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A Collection Of 46 Hallelujahs !





A Collection Of 46 Hallelujahs !


This is a song about the broken.

- L.Cohen

On the subject of the sublime and the slew of versions proliferating lately, here’s a collection of some of the versions proliferating lately, which we see on this blog!

Capt. Kurtz said “I’ve seen horrors… horrors that you’ve seen…..” when he heard some of these!

Some of em are OK though! They’d be mostly the Cohen, Cale and Dylan versions!

Image



Tracks

01 – Alexandra Burke

02 – Leonard Cohen

03 – John Cale

04 – Jeff Buckley

05 – Bob Dylan

06 – Leonard Cohen (Live)

07 – Katherine Jenkins

08 – Leonard Cohen (Live)

09 – John Cale (Live)

10 – Kathryn Williams

11 – Rufus Wainwright

12 – Allison Crowe

13 – Sheryl Crow

14 – Damien Rice

15 – K.D. Lang

16 – Regina Spektor

17 – Aroof Aftab

18 – David Bazan

19 – Eric Beverly

20 – Erik Flaa

21 – Gordon Downie

22 – I Am Lost At Sea

23 – Imogen Heap

24 – John Jerome

25 – Late Tuesday

26 – Susanna And The Magical Orchestra

27 – The Junebugs

28 – Tony Lucca

29 – Gavin Degraw

30 – Chris Botti

31 – Kate Noson

32 – Lucky Jim

33 – Euan Morton & Denise Summerford

34 – Keren Ann

35 – Jack Lukeman

36 – Clare Bowditch

37 – Ari Hest

38 – Beirut

39 – Elisa

40 – K’s Choice

41 – Dresden Dolls

42 – Street To Nowhere

43 – Naomi Hates Humans

44 – Noam Pelled

45 – Macbrolan

46 – Damien Rice

NOTE:



We do not host any files here. If this post contains a link to content hosted elsewhere, this is content found by a simple search on the worldwide freedom web. However, if for some valid reason, you object to a said content, or any content here, please let us know and we will remove the content in question.

Any content linked to here is only meant as a taster for the original work itself and is posted on the strict understanding that anyone who downloads the taster, deletes said content within 24 hours. We would assume that these fans will then buy the original work and we greatly encourage them to do so.

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December 29, 2008 Posted by | Beirut, Hallelujah, Jeff Buckley, John Cale, Leonard Cohen, _BOB DYLAN, _MUSIC | 1 Comment

When Genius Collides – Leonard Cohen’s majestic "Hallelujah" and Bob Dylan


This is a song about the broken.

- L.Cohen



I wanted to push the Hallelujah deep into the secular world, into the ordinary world.

- L.Cohen

A sublime moment this! Two of the giants of modern culture collide when his Bobness performs a fine cover of Leonard Cohen’s sublime “Hallelujah“, one of the finest songs of recent times! See vid below at the end of this post.

Lenny and Dylan are probably the greatest two artists of the modern music era, in terms of the quality of their work and their artistic longevity. A propos nothing, both, too, are coincidentally, yet interestingly, Jewish.

The work of these two masters will live on forever.

Lenny talks in a French interview in 85 about meeting Bob in Paris and introducing him to the song;

“It’s a rather joyous song . I like very much the last verse. I remember singin’ it to Bob Dylan after his last concert in Paris. The morning after, I was having coffee with him and we traded lyrics. Dylan especially liked this last verse “And even though it all went wrong , I stand before the Lord of song With nothing on my lips but Hallelujah”

- Leonard Cohen (from an interview in Paroles et Musiques, 1985)

We don’t know any details about where and when this Dylan boot comes from though. We think it could be from Bob’s 1988 tour.

by endraum

“Hallelujah” is an expertly crafted, beautiful and complex song where Cohen’s sculpted poetry juxtaposes secular and religious desire and ecstasy.

The sublime lyric sits astride a sumptuous melody regarding which, Rufus Wainwright – who often includes the song in his live repertoire and who did a decent version of the song on the Leonard Cohen I’m Your Man movie from 2006 – has commented that;

“It’s an easy song to sing. The music never pummels the words. The melody is almost liturgical and conjures up religious feelings. It’s purifying.”

Interestingly regarding the melody, in the section where the lyrics go “the fourth, the fifth, the minor fall, the major lift“, the chords move as described in the lyrics as follows: F (“the fourth”), G (“the fifth”), Am (“the minor fall”), F (“the major lift”).

“Hallelujah” was originally written and composed over the course of a year, and is said to have been a frustrating and difficult process for Lenny.

Cohen says he wrote at least eighty verses, discarding most of them in the process of crafting the song. Cohen is quoted as saying:

“ I filled two notebooks and I remember being in the Royalton Hotel, on the carpet in my underwear, banging my head on the floor and saying, ‘I can’t finish this song.’ ”

Cohen first recorded the song at Quadrasonic Sound, New York in June 1984, working with producer John Lissauer. The next recording of this song by Leonard Cohen was captured live in Austin, Texas on October 31, 1988 with production by Leanne Ungar and Bob Metzger.

The original incarnation of Hallelujah was as track 5 on Lenny’s Various Positions LP in 1984, which clocked in at 4:34. Here the lyric is much less secular than what it would later become.

The original recording is noted for containing a substantial amount of biblical references in the lyrics, alluding to David’s harp-playing used to soothe King Saul (I Sam 16:23), and his later affair with Bathsheba after watching her bathe from his roof (2 Sam 11:2).

The line “she broke your throne and she cut your hair” is obviously a reference to the source of Samson’s strength from the Book of Judges chapter 16 and to how his hair was cut by Delilah. The third verse refers to “the name” (Tetragrammaton).

An extended and significantly different version of “Hallelujah” was recorded for the Cohen Live LP in 1994, the performance being from an Austin gig in October 1988. This clocked in at a substantially longer 6:54.

The lyrics are very different in this version and in fact only the final verse from the original recording is retained.

In this version, the lyrics have become far more sexual and ambiguous, while the song’s structure has also been slightly reworked.

On stage in Antwerp in April 1988, Cohen describes this version as the the “secular” Hallelujah and speaks about the background to the song’s metamorphosis;

You know, I wrote this song …. it seems like yesterday but I guess it was five or six years ago and it had a chorus called Hallelujah. And it was a song that had references to the Bible in it, although these references became more and more remote as the song went from beginning to the end. And finally I understood that it was not necessary to refer to the Bible anymore.

And I rewrote this song; this is the “secular” Hallelujah.

by tulzdavampslayer

In the years after his original studio album version, live performances by Cohen were almost invariably of the second version of the song.

Between Lenny’s two released versions of “Hallelujah”, former Velvet, John Cale recorded a very notable cover version, which appeared on the great 1991 Leonard Cohen tribute album I’m Your Fan and, again, on Cale’s beautiful 1992 live album Fragments of a Rainy Season.

See a great “Hallelujah” performance from John Cale below from BBC TV back in ’92.

Cale’s version featured vocals with simple piano accompaniment. Importantly the lyrics are quite different from those on Lenny’s Various Positions. In a 2001 interview with The Observer, John Cale said:

After I saw [Cohen] perform at the Beacon I asked if I could have the lyrics to “Hallelujah”. When I got home one night there were fax paper rolls everywhere because Leonard had insisted on supplying all 15 verses.”

John says he “went through and just picked out the cheeky verses”!

John Cale’s version was far closer to the secular version of “Hallelujah” Lenny had been performing on his tours, the version Cale had heard him perform.

John Cale’s fine version would later feature in the 1996 film, Basquiat, as well as, rather surreally, in the 2001 animated film, Shrek. Strangely, for the latter movie, Rufus Wainwright covered the song as well, and his version appears on the Shrek soundtrack album rather than Cale’s – whose version is far better in our view!

Single released from the “I’m Your Fan” tribute album

Cale’s version would prove very influential since Lenny would not for some time release his updated version of of “Hallelujah”.

Although Cale’s version did not reach a mass audience, it became well known among music cognoscenti. Jeff Buckley would, soon after, begin performing “Hallelujah” at his live shows, in a version heavily influenced by Cale’s. We were lucky enough to catch a couple of his shows from around this time in small clubs such as Whelan’s in Dublin

Buckley later recorded “Hallelujah” for his only completed studio album, 1994 ‘s Grace in a version that would reach a much wider audience than the original Cohen song or Cale’s cover, particularly so after Jeff’s horribly early demise in 1997.

Buckley’s version relied quite heavily on studio technology. Not wholly satisfied with any one take, Buckley recorded the song more than twenty times. Studio engineer Andy Wallace then took three of these recordings to create a single track. The result was a quite commercial sounding version which was more accessible to the music masses than Lenny’s.

Buckley’s is the version that inspired a thousand insipid cover versions by muzak merchants the likes of Bon Jovi (oh, the horror!) et al!! In fact there are countless morons out there who believe Buckley actually wrote the song!

Bizarrely, in March, 2008, Buckley’s version of “Hallelujah”, went to No. 1 on the iTunes chart, selling 178,000 downloads for the week, after being performed by some joker named Jason Castro on the seventh season of the vile television series American Idol. The song debuted at #1 that week on Billboard’s Hot Digital Songs chart, giving Buckley his first #1 on any Billboard chart!

As alluded to above, a slew of other cover versions of “Hallelujah” have been attempted, very variable in quality, to say the least, and most not very good!

Many such cover artists mix lyrics from both Lenny versions, and occasionally make direct lyric changes such as Rufus Wainwright singing “holy dark” and Allison Crowe singing “Holy Ghost” rather than “holy dove”.

“Hallelujah” is a very difficult song to cover well. Bob Dylan, typically, does a great job in the boot recording here though.

It’s up there with John Cale’s fine version.

No, we’re not big fans of the rather saccharine Jeff Buckley version. Nor, surprisingly, the version that cnut did on America Idol this year!!

There’s a nice piece about this majestic song on pagesperso-orange, with some great quotes from Lenny – in interviews or on stage – regarding the song, and also some changed lyrics live, as follows:

Warsaw 22/03/1985

Thank you very much friends. You know, since I’ve been here, many people have asked me what I have thought just about everything there is in this veil of tears. I don’t know the answers to anything. I just come here to sing you these songs that have been inspired by something that I hope is deeper and bigger than myself. I have nothing to say about the way that Poland is governed. I have nothing to say about the resistance to the government. The relationship between a people and its government is an intimate thing. It is not for a stranger to comment. I know that there is an eye that watches all of us. There is a judgment that weighs everything we do. And before this great force which is greater than any government, I stand in awe and I kneel in respect. And it is to this great judgment, that I dedicate this next song: “Hallelujah”.

Interview (magazine “Guitare et Claviers” 1985)

Hallelujah is a Hebrew word which means “Glory to the Lord.” The song explains that many kinds of Hallelujahs do exist. I say : “All the perfect and broken Hallelujahs have an equal value.” It’s, as I say, a desire to affirm my faith in life, not in some formal religious way but with enthusiasm, with emotion.

Interview (Magazine “Paroles et Musiques” 1985)

Here there is an ironic and warm “feeling.” I wanted to get into this tradition of the composers who said “Hallelujah,” but with no precisely religious point of view. And then I realize there is a “Hallelujah” more general that we speak to the world, to life… It’s a rather joyous song. I like very much the last verse. I remember singin’ it to Bob Dylan after his last concert in Paris. The morning after, I was having coffee with him and we traded lyrics. Dylan especially liked this last verse, “And even though it all went wrong, I stand before the Lord of song with nothing on my lips but Hallelujah.”

About the second verse, “Your faith was strong but you needed proof”:

According to the Judaic tradition, David asked for ordeal. But the Rabbies said we should be reluctant to do so because ordeal there will sure be!

“David playing psalterion”, Reichenau Movement, Tenth century

Interview (Magazine “Actuel” January 1985)

LC – I intended to say “Hallelujah”. There is a religious Hallelujah, but there are many other ones. When one looks at the world and his proper life, there’s only one thing to say, it’s Hallelujah. That’s the way it is….
Mag – It means “Thank You” ?

LC – The literal translation is “Pray God”. It’s not exactly some gratitude but the affirmation there is a will that we can’t control. What can we do in front of it ?

Mag – A good will or a bad one ?

LC – An impenetrable one.

Mag – Mysterious ?

LC – Saying “Mysterious” is again making a description. This will is obvious from time to time, hidden at other times

Montreux 09/07/1985

This is a song about the broken.

München 12/04/1988

Verse Variation

Forgive me Lord if you’re up there above, but all I ever learned from love …

Antwerp 17/04/1988

You know, I wrote this song a couple of … it seems like yesterday but I guess it was five or six years ago and it had a chorus called Hallelujah. And it was a song that had references to the Bible in it, although these references became more and more remote as the song went from beginning to the end. And finally I understood that it was not necessary to refer to the Bible anymore.

And I rewrote this song; this is the “secular” Hallelujah.

Nürnberg 10/05/1988 and Roskilde July 2, 1988

Modified verses

But it’s not a cry that you hear tonight And it’s not some gleeful laughter from somebody who says he has seen the light …

alternate version (Roskilde July 2nd, 1988)

It’s not some gleeful christian who has seen the light, it’s a cold and it’s a broken Hallelujah …

Interview, Reijkavik, Iceland June 1988

Yeah another song came on top of that. So I’d already recorded that one. And I wanted to push the Hallelujah deep into the secular world, into the ordinary world. The Hallelujah, the David’s Hallelujah was still a religious song. So I wanted to indicate that Hallelujah can come out of things that have nothing to do with religion.

Gothenburg 02/05/93

In solemn testimony of that unbroken faith, which binds a generation one to another, I hereby bestow upon you the ancient priestly benediction “May the Lord bless you and keep you, May the Lord shine His Light upon you, May the Lord be gracious unto you, and grant you the blessings of Peace”.

Paris 13/05/93

verse variation

….Well I’ve seen your walls on the marble arch, but Love is not a victory march

Helsinki 1993

verse variation

….Well I’ve seen your fortress on the marble arch, but Love is not a victory march

by hakanphotography

Leonard Cohen – Hallelujah

Now I’ve heard there was a secret chord
That David played, and it pleased the Lord
But you don’t really care for music, do you?
It goes like this
The fourth, the fifth
The minor fall, the major lift
The baffled king composing Hallelujah

Hallelujah
Hallelujah
Hallelujah
Hallelujah

Your faith was strong but you needed proof
You saw her bathing on the roof
Her beauty and the moonlight overthrew you
She tied you
To a kitchen chair
She broke your throne, and she cut your hair
And from your lips she drew the Hallelujah

Hallelujah, Hallelujah
Hallelujah, Hallelujah

You say I took the name in vain
I don’t even know the name
But if I did, well really, what’s it to you?
There’s a blaze of light
In every word
It doesn’t matter which you heard
The holy or the broken Hallelujah

Hallelujah, Hallelujah
Hallelujah, Hallelujah

I did my best, it wasn’t much
I couldn’t feel, so I tried to touch
I’ve told the truth, I didn’t come to fool you
And even though
It all went wrong
I’ll stand before the Lord of Song
With nothing on my tongue but Hallelujah

Hallelujah, Hallelujah
Hallelujah, Hallelujah
Hallelujah, Hallelujah
Hallelujah, Hallelujah
Hallelujah, Hallelujah
Hallelujah, Hallelujah
Hallelujah, Hallelujah
Hallelujah, Hallelujah
Hallelujah


(Original version from the Various Positions LP)


painting by L Cohen

Leonard Cohen – Hallelujah


Baby, I’ve been here before.
I know this room, I’ve walked this floor.
I used to live alone before I knew you.

Yeah I’ve seen your flag on the marble arch,
But listen, love is not some kind of victory march,
No it’s a cold and it’s a very broken Hallelujah.

Hallelujah, Hallelujah, Hallelujah, Hallelujah, (Hallelujah…)

There was a time you let me know
What’s really going on below,
Ah but now you never show it to me, do you?

Yeah but I remember, yeah when I moved in you,
And the holy dove, she was moving too,
Yes every single breath that we drew was Hallelujah.

Hallelujah, Hallelujah, Hallelujah, Hallelujah.

Maybe there’s a God above,
As for me, all I’ve ever seemed to learn from love
Is how to shoot at someone who outdrew you.

Yeah but it’s not a complaint that you hear tonight,
It’s not the laughter of someone who claims to have seen the light
No it’s a cold and it’s a very lonely Hallelujah.

Hallelujah, Hallelujah, Hallelujah, Hallelujah.

I did my best, it wasn’t much.
I couldn’t feel, so I learned to touch.
I’ve told the truth, I didn’t come all this way to fool you.

Yeah even tough it all went wrong
I’ll stand right here before the Lord of Song
With nothing on my lips but Hallelujah.

Hallelujah, Hallelujah, Hallelujah, Hallelujah.
Hallelujah, Hallelujah, Hallelujah, Hallelujah.

(Extended version from the Cohen Live LP)



Bob Dylan performs Leonard Cohen’s majestic “Hallelujah”

From: thcarmine

John Cale performs Leonard Cohen’s majestic “Hallelujah”

From the BBC TV show Later, back in 1992.

From: thecatkeaton

The maestro performs his own majestic “Hallelujah”!
(original Various Positions
version)

From German TV? A very, let’s say, interesting set! Very eighties! Lenny looks quite bemused by it anyway!!


from Duncster

NOTE:

We do not host any files here. If this post contains a link to content hosted elsewhere, this is content found by a simple search on the worldwide freedom web. However, if for some valid reason, you object to a said content, or any content here, please let us know and we will remove the content in question.

Any content linked to here is only meant as a taster for the original work itself and is posted on the strict understanding that anyone who downloads the taster, deletes said content within 24 hours. We would assume that these fans will then buy the original work and we greatly encourage them to do so.

November 25, 2008 Posted by | Canon, John Cale, Leonard Cohen, _BOB DYLAN, _MUSIC, _PHOTOGRAPHY, _VIDEO | Leave a comment

John Cale with Chrissy Hynde and Nick Cave – Ship of Fools

Nick Cave, John Cale & Chrissie Hynde
Recorded on 9th July 1999
Songwriters Circle
BBC Live
Subterania Club, London

TV Broadcast

Three great artists (well, at least two! But some of Chrissie’s stuff is tops too, so let’s categorise her thusly also!) illustrate their songwriting craft in this special TV show broadcast by BBC TV in UK back in 1999.

John Cale with Chrissy Hynde and Nick Cave perform Cale’s Ship of Fools

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October 21, 2008 Posted by | Chrissie Hynde, John Cale, Music_Alternative, Nick Cave, _MUSIC, _VIDEO | Leave a comment

Lou Reed & John Cale – Waiting for the Man – Paris 1972

Feel sick and dirty, more dead than alive, I’m waiting for my man

An amazing video this!

The great John Cale performs with Lou Reed at Bataclan in Paris in 1972!

After Cale was essentially kicked out of the Velvet underground in 1969 by Reed, not long after their wonderful second LP “White Light White Heat”, I’d thought that Cale in ’72 would be more likely to punch Reed’s lights out than perform with him!

Of course, they would work together again much later on the “Songs for Drella” LP and perform in the Velvets reunion tour.

Here, they perform a slowed down re-interpretation of the amazing track Waiting for the Man from the Velvet’s seminal 1967 debut, The Velvet Underground & Nico, better known as the “Banana” album!

Am I crazy or is Lou actually happy and smiling here??!

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/e/e4/Velvet_underground_album_cover_2.png http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/0/0c/Velvet_Underground_and_Nico.jpg/200px-Velvet_Underground_and_Nico.jpg

I’m waiting for my man
Twenty-six dollars in my hand
Up to Lexington, 125
Feel sick and dirty, more dead than alive
I’m waiting for my man

Hey, white boy, what you doin’ uptown?
Hey, white boy, you chasin’ our women around?
Oh pardon me sir, it’s the furthest from my mind
I’m just lookin’ for a dear, dear friend of mine
I’m waiting for my man

Here he comes, he’s all dressed in black
PR shoes and a big straw hat
He’s never early, he’s always late
First thing you learn is you always gotta wait
I’m waiting for my man

Up to a Brownstone, up three flights of stairs
Everybody’s pinned you, but nobody cares
He’s got the works, gives you sweet taste
Ah then you gotta split because you got no time to waste
I’m waiting for my man

Baby don’t you holler, darlin’ don’t you bawl and shout
I’m feeling good, you know I’m gonna work it on out
I’m feeling good, I’m feeling oh so fine
Until tomorrow, but that’s just some other time
I’m waiting for my man

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October 21, 2008 Posted by | Canon, John Cale, Lou Reed, Music_ClassicRock, The Velvet Underground, _MUSIC, _VIDEO | Leave a comment

How the dramatic Nico became a music iconoclast – by John Cale et al

A wonderful piece about the great Christa Paffgen, better known as

The piece comes from The Times UK

We do love ‘s work, not only her contribution to the greatest group of all time but also her innovative solo work, which was decades ahead of its time!
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Here, a group of people who knew her well – including a pivotal figure in the “original” and best Velvets line up – speak about their late great friend.

Cale is also of course a wonderful pioneering solo artist and magnificent producer (who has produced seminal and ground breaking albums -including Nico’s best work The Marble Index (1968) and 2 later Nico albums – but also an array of great LPs from acts we love ranging from;

http://www.gonzai.com/wp-content/photos/Nico.jpg
Nico’s life was beset by extreme tragedy and horror throughout.

The extent of this tragedy is surreal, crazy. It ranges from being an illegitimate child, to being born in a war ravaged Hungary in 1938, to having her father killed by the Nazis when she was 5 years old, to being raped at 15 by a US soldier, to testifying about that rape resulting in capital punishment for the perpetrator, to getting involved in damaging relationships with a series of abusive men, to bearing an illegitimate child, to becoming a chronic heroin addict, to being penniless, to ending up dead aged only 49 from a freak situation, a death which could perhaps have been prevented.

For over fifteen years, Nico was a heroin addict. Biographer Richard Witts speculated that the habit was caused by her traumatic experiences of war and of being an illegitimate child.

In his book Songs They Never Play on the Radio, James Young, a member of her band in the 1980s, recalls many examples of Nico’s fiendish behaviour due to the addiction.

But just before her death, she had managed to kick the habit and had embarked on a regimen of exercise and healthy eating.

On July 18, 1988, while on holiday with her son in Ibiza, Spain, Nico had a minor heart attack while riding a bicycle, and hit her head as she fell. A passing taxi driver found her unconscious, and had difficulty getting her admitted to local hospitals. She was incorrectly diagnosed as suffering from exposure, and she died the next day. X-rays later revealed a severe cerebral hemorrhage as the cause of her death.

Nico was buried in her mother’s plot in Grunewald Forest Cemetery in Berlin. A few friends played a tape of “Mütterlein”, a song from Desertshore, at her funeral.

http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a118/ImInDaBand/04nico01.jpg

beefheart.com published a wonderful biographical piece on Nico, from which we quote below;

According to popular folklore, she was born in 1938 in Budapest, named Christa Paffgen, and lived under Nazi Germany in Cologne while Churchill rained bombs all around her.

Her father was conscripted into the German army and, after suffering brain damage resulting from a head wound, was killed in a concentration camp by the Nazis in 1943.

At the ago of 15 Nico was raped by a US Air Force sergeant who was tried and shot for his crime. Her tour manager in the later period of her career commented:

“Not only does she have to carry the horror of the rape but the secret guilt of somehow being complicit, by her testimony, in his execution. Sex, for Nico is irrevocably associated with punishment.”

(Young, 1992, p150)

At a similar time she started modelling, with great success, which eventually took her to New York via Rome and Ibiza, changing her name along the way.

Once in New York she met Brian Jones and, later, Bob Dylan, and involved herself in the music scene, releasing a single, “I’m Not Saying” before ending up at the Factory. Warhol was so taken with her that he wanted her to front his in-house band, the Velvet Underground.

This was to the absolute horror of the misogynistic band themselves, for whom women were simply not welcome. Moe Tucker had faced similar hostility from the band when she first joined – a move which was only agreed to by John Cale when he was assured that it would only be a temporary measure.

Cale wrote in his autobiography:

Nico intended to sing all the songs and, at first, looked upon us as a hired back-up band. We had a different idea. However, remarkably quickly, and as a sign of Warhol’s amazing ability to overcome objections and get things done his way, we agreed to let Nico sing a few songs and otherwise stand on the stage looking unenthusiastic and play the tambourine. She was tone deaf and had an abrasive voice, but it turned out to be a great casting.

(Cale, 1999, p82)

http://www.aquariumdrunkard.com/wp-content/uploads/2007/10/velvet-underground-and-nico.jpg

It seems from this quote that Cale at first valued Nico for her image rather than any musical contribution that she offered. Her coolly detached vocal phrasings were extremely distinctive, but she had another asset which made her stand out from the rest of the band during their performance: she had a poise which commandeered the attention of the audience. Notice the subtle differences between the following description of Nico’s stage presence and the one quoted above from Cale:

Onstage in her white pantsuit, she was the centre of attention. She was an inch taller than Cale, and despite the fact that Reed sang most of the songs, everything was geared so that she just had to stand there to command attention. Every drug-induced movement she made became significant. It was a talent she had developed in her years as a model with which Lou Reed could not compete.”

(Bockris, 1995, 120)

It is this poise which also helps to make her voice so striking. A model learns to make every movement as precise, captivating and assured as possible, and Nico employed a similar technique in the movement of her vocal chords. Every syllable, every note was perfectly and precisely formed with such grace, in a way that mirrors a performance on a catwalk.

Nico’s time with the Velvets was somewhat fraught. She continued to insist that she should be singing all the Velvets songs, regardless of the appropriateness of her voice for tunes such as “I’m Waiting For The Man” and “Heroin”, and her tempestuous love-affair with Lou Reed increased the tension even further. It was a love affair which Cale referred to as being “both consummated and constipated” and Lou savoured his bitchy revenge on her by verbally attacking her at every opportunity, criticising her ability to sing, to keep time, etc etc.

By the time White Light White Heat was being written and recorded there were no more songs written for Nico to perform with the Velvet Underground. Her fall from grace from the Factory crowd, and Warhol in particular, is described by Victor Bokris in his Warhol biography thus:

Andy never developed the kind of rapport with Nico that he has with Edie. For all his talk of beauty and glamour, Andy had always admitted that he liked good talkers best. Nico had a wonderful presence. She was mysterious, intuitive and fascinating to be with, but she was no Brigid Polk in the rap department. She was on different drugs. Edie and Andy had been able to communicate on the speed that made them so alike. Nico’s use of LSD and heroin tended to distance her from Andy’s mentality. Worse, Nico was a star in her own right and was not completely dependent on Andy, although she was somewhat identified with him.

(Bokris, 1989, 327)

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1969 saw the release of her second solo album, The Marble Index which is her most commonly critically acclaimed work. Recorded in New York at the end of 1968, all eight songs are written by Nico, primarily composed on her harmonium.

The harmonium is a nineteenth century reed organ powered by foot pedals which force air over the reeds, producing a distinctively mournful drone. Nico made this instrument her own, teaching herself to play it, with its tones making the perfect accompaniment for her icebound vocals and lyrics of forbidden fruit and folly which seldom follow any specific narrative. Her words are a collection of abstract images, which waft in and out of the sound of her harmonium’s drone, with images of the unusual setting of her childhood.

The next two albums, Desertshore and The End, are very similar both musically and in atmosphere. Ever-so-slightly lighter and more accessible that The Marble Index, like a picture which has fully come into focus, these for me are the real delight.

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The years after The End saw Nico’s heroin abuse worsen and consume her talents. There was no recorded output for some years due to her narcotised incapacitation. Cale wrote of his attempts to resuscitate her career in this period:

“I tried to persuade him [Lou Reed] to write songs for Nico. He could have done it so easily and it would have changed her life. He said he would but unfortunately, all Lou seemed able to do when Nico was around him was torture her.”

(Cale, 1999, p162)

She would have left an unblemished recorded legacy behind, but Nico returned in the 1980s to half-heartedly attempt to resurrect a career long since sidelined by the more pressing concerns of heroin addiction. These albums, while occasionally offering glimpses of something once special, merely detract from what was recently described in The Wire as:

“…the most uncompromising and original body of work to emerge from any of the five participants in the founding document, 1967′s The Velvet Underground And Nico.”

(Biba Kopf, The Wire, June 2000).

In Young’s wry yet affectionate account of Nico in the 80s, we are presented with a life gone very dreary indeed; a festering universe far removed from the grimy glamour which Nico possessed during her Factory days. It is also a chilling portrait of what happens when one’s career disappears from under one’s feet, though Nico appeared not to realise that her underground superstar status had very rapidly faded. Surrounded by unsympathetic musicians, she was left completely without an audience, save for the few handfuls of Velvet Underground enthusiasts dragged along and eventually let down by their own curiosity.

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Sometimes, the best a person can do is to retire, which Nico did do towards the end of her life (from touring, at least). Cleaned up and relatively rejuvenated post-heroin, she was preparing to write her biography when a minor heart attack prompted her to fall badly from her bicycle, causing the brain haemorrhage which killed her at the age of only 49.

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Nico’s amazing works have for a few years now been critically reassessed, and slowly she is beginning to get the levels of credit she so well merits.

It’s all too later for her now though, sadly.

Two great Nico Tributes are about to take place this month;

  • Life Along the Borderline — a Nico Tribute, curated by John Cale, Southbank Centre, London SE1 (0871-663 2500), Oct 11 2008.
  • Nico tribute concert curated by Lutz Ulrich, Volksbühne, Berlin (0049 30 24 065 5), Oct 17 2008

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How the dramatic Nico became a music iconoclast

Nico was the supermodel who hated being beautiful, a junkie muse, musical pioneer and femme fatale whose only regret was being a woman.

Two decades after her death John Cale and other friends recall a true iconoclast

Nico wanted to be an enfant terrible, a problem child, and maybe even thought that was the way you became an artist. And there are plenty of previous examples to prove that she was right.

The first time I met her was at Andy Warhol’s Factory in New York. It was 1966. It was impossible not to be struck by her. She was so statuesque and serious. Certainly, we were stunned by Andy’s suggestion to include her in the Velvet Underground. No one knew what to make of her but we were far too self-concerned to either argue or refuse.

Here was this formidable woman, the world’s first supermodel. We were awed by her style – something that we were just beginning to taste the fruits of ourselves, with Kenneth J. Lane jewellery and Betsey Johnson designs. Of course we’d seen her in Fellini’s La Dolce Vita – the first time you see her on screen she is introduced as “that German cow”. She was quintessentially the person that Andy used to make us aware of another dimension to music: publicity and image-making.

She was unbelievably dramatic. Along with an already imposing physical presence she had worked at the Actors Studio, where Elia Kazan had helped her to hone her timing to a sharp blade. The silences that threw people off their stride were the result of Kazan’s advice that she “use time to carve a space for herself in everything she did”, as she described it to me later. This style of social conduct had hilarious as well as caustic results. She was a sucker for creating the “perfect storm”.

Being in New York in the Sixties with that kind of sonorous German accent had specific connotations no matter how beautiful you were. And she played on that. She wanted to explode the air around her.

On the one hand she was a threat, but it was such a startling threat that everybody decided to make it work – and, as it turned out, the blonde and statuesque Nico was exactly what Lou Reed was looking for. I was always suspicious of blondes, Lou was not. The band had no idea how to deal with her — the timing, the accent — but Lou rose to the occasion. His songs for her such as Femme Fatale are some of the most beautiful ballads he has written.

Being in the late Sixties with Nico was great. From the band’s point of view, we were all entranced by being on the Exploding Plastic Inevitable tour and all the kerfuffle and pizzazz that went along with it. Touring the US was surreal. Nico loved driving the Winnebago and one time we were stopped by the state police who thought that we had kidnapped the chief of police’s daughter. They eventually let us go, having spent most of the time in awe of Nico’s stunning looks.

We were all for her being a songwriter and heaved a sigh of relief when she left. Although her leaving was not untinged by disappointment, we felt we had failed her in some way. She had that ability — to make you feel you had failed her but no matter: she would survive all the stronger for it.

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Her leaving New York was typical. One night she was having drinks in a bar with two women, one of whom was rumoured to have been Jimi Hendrix’s groupie/girlfriend. This woman was complaining about what a tough life she had, she was relentlessly going on about it, Nico kept telling her to stop and eventually she cracked. “You don’t know what a tough life is,” she said and threw a glass in the girl’s face. It wasn’t pretty. She had to leave town that night; went to San Francisco and then Europe. That temper had its cost.

All the revisionist speculation about her being a racist is ridiculous. I do know she’d try to zone in on the vulnerability of others, so I wouldn’t be surprised if she “used” the topic to force a confrontation and discomfort. Really, though, this is someone who grew up in a war zone, hiding from British bombing raids, whose father had died on the Russian front and who, if she hadn’t been plucked out of nowhere to be a model, would have stayed in a German town being preyed on by sleazy managers of the supermarket she worked in as a teenager.

All Nico had of her childhood was a blurry, tattered black-and-white photo of her mother leaning against a tank. Nico had made her own way and she couldn’t take this person going on about what a tough life she’d had. That, and the liquor and whatever else was going on, that was her perfect storm.

Another story that has been twisted came from when she was dating Lou. She came into the Factory one time without him and Andy said: “So where’s Lou?” And she replied, after a silence: “I cannot zleep with Jews any more.” People chuckled and got on with their chores.

These were explosive remarks done for dramatic purposes. And there was so much drama of that kind going on. Things like that went on all day long and no one paid attention. It was outrageous. Life in the Factory went through the gamut and people don’t ever really want to be put through the gamut.

Most importantly for Nico, she learnt from Lou and Andy how to access a more freewheeling creativity — independence was Andy’s gift to Nico. She also met Jim Morrison in New York. He drew her into his poetic circle, from which she emerged with English as her poetic language. Being deaf in one ear didn’t prevent her writing songs on a harmonium she picked up in India. She read Steppenwolf and Siddartha. After meeting Jim and quitting the Velvet Underground her blonde life was changed. She died her hair red with henna and then to raven black.

She really related to Jim on an artistic level, if you like, her “soul-brother”, as she had done with Lou at one point. But despite all of her lovers, all that the men really did, I think, was remind her of her imperfections. She felt that they were a danger to her and that she would never get any respect from them. Really, she never thought of herself as a woman. It’s what made her relationship with her son, Ari, so difficult. His father [the actor], Alain Delon, never accepted paternity and Nico didn’t know how to be a mother. Ari was brought up by Delon’s mother, but ran away to live with Nico when he was a teenager. She was heavily addicted to heroin by then and would say, so despondently: “I can’t deal with him, he thinks he’s me.”

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And he did, he went through all of that and hit rock bottom. I believe those days are well behind him now.

Her first album Chelsea Girls (1967) had featured the Velvet Underground. Dylan gave her a song for it (I’ll Keep it With Mine), as did Jackson Browne and Tim Hardin, yet everyone agreed it was too MOR. She was totally indifferent to it, later saying: “I cried because of the flute . . . There should be a button on record players, a ‘No Flute’ button.”

Marble Index (1969) was what four days of entrenched self-interest created. Her view was pre-punk. The sense of impending nihilism was goth before goth. Most reactions were of shock. In among the murk there was real drama. I played the LP for the composer Aaron Copland, proud of its Neo-Classical European style. Copland’s only comment was about her “gravelly voice”.

I always felt somewhat protective towards her music. I felt it needed presentation that elevated her to the status of a serious female songwriter, very different from those celebrated at the time. I think she understood this — felt that I appreciated and “understood” her — although the “understanding” was focused exclusively in musical terms. Her life made me depressed. Every recording session I came away from thinking I had seen her inner self and that it was a little girl trying to reach the daylight. Eventually I was left to consider that the drugs in her life were stronger than my attempts to use music to delineate a pathway ahead.

The few times I’d witness her childlike laughter and utter amazement at her finished work — those were the moments a collaborator clings to. The payoff, the reward! Those times were so rare, but they kept me on the string that was Nico’s to dangle — the belief in her, even when she didn’t believe.

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ANDREW LOOG OLDHAM, the manager of the Rolling Stones and producer of Nico’s first single

My Nico story is a short one but, like her life, it’s reasonably star-studded. Brian Jones brought Nico over from Paris, where she was modelling, in 1965 and said: “How about recording my friend too?” I’d already been through it with Marianne Faithfull, and I thought that I could tell who could sing just by hearing their speaking voice — and what a voice Nico had.

I sent her to John Paul Jones and Jimmy Page to audition; they thought she was quite something, totally scrumptious. We weren’t used to this European allure. She was no doormat. She was a lethal woman. She was one of a new breed of woman, like Anita Pallenberg and Yoko Ono, who could have been a man. Like Carla Bruni is today. Far better that than the silly little English teacups around at that time.

We got it all wrong on the record, though, I’m Not Sayin’. I made the mistake of recording her with a big orchestra. It was a Gordon Lightfoot song and it just didn’t swing. Decca rejected it and I hated it. It was in the wrong key, her voice sounded like a horse on steroids. But the B-side, The Last Mile, written by Jimmy Page, was good. [My label] Immediate Records put it out and we did a tour of the all the recording factories around the country. She was a trouper, a real laugh. They all loved her on the factory floor.

We were a stepping stone for her but happy to be one. All the drugs and darkness came later. When I worked with her she was pure Harvey Nichols, and wonderful for it. Well done, Brian, he certainly knew how to pick ’em.

JAMES YOUNG, member of Nico’s band from 1981-88 and the author of Nico — Songs They Never Play on the Radio

A favourite Nico anecdote comes from spring 1982. I was in the tour van, at the back. The air was thick with Marlboro smoke, patchouli and something else. I pushed open the rear side window. A pocket of air whooshed around the interior and slapped Nico in the back of the neck. She turned round. “What are you?” she said. “Some kind of fresh-air freak?”

I’d first heard Nico’s voice as a 14-year-old back in Oldham. A friend had brought round a copy of Chelsea Girl. What was this? A voice deeper than the foghorn on the Bismarck but with a strange inwardness; the music folky but with lyrics that were urban and startling.

I got to hear her voice again, on my doorstep 14 years later. I was living in Oxford by then. I had a place at the university to begin a masters in romantic literature. Nico was with an old schoolfriend, Alan Wise, who had become her manager. She was performing at a local disco, Scamps, above Sainsbury’s in the Westgate shopping centre. I hadn’t planned to go to the concert, and I certainly hadn’t planned to abandon the academic life. But things change. I ended up playing piano for her until her death six years later.

With a Nico performance, whether you were on stage or at the back of the hall, you had to be there all the way with her. You had to remember the world she was born into, without seeing her as a tragic beauty and sentimentalising it. Nico was a beautiful, dreaming, gifted monster.


ALAN WISE, New Order promoter and Nico’s manager

Twenty years on, it seems as if her little funeral in Berlin, with the help of the Rev Michael Gartland, an old friend of mine and hers, a weedy tape player and a few non-famous people, preceded, not followed, the seven years I had known her.

I’d met her on the stairs at the Rafters club in Manchester in 1981, when she was 42. I liked her at first, and after a couple of years I loved her. I made little money with her, just got to travel. The Smiths were just happening, I promoted the first show, but I ignored them for Nico. I had no head for business, only for romance. I loved the travel, and the taste of a faded bohemia.

Looking back I think we undervalued her. Her real stuff was the Germanic lullaby music, not the rock. She had something, a gravitas, even if she was not a “musician”. She could speak five languages and was ashamed of her lack of formal education. But she usually read good books and watched good black-and-white films.

She was the real thing. Fascinated by drugs, she feared whatever her real self was; was scared that she might be mad and changed her mood every minute. She was ashamed of being a German and she was ashamed of being a woman. She was never an anti-Semite. That was crap. She chose to live among Ashkenazim Jews when she lived in Manchester and those of a Jewish cultural background for most of her life, ie, 80 per cent of the music industry here and in New York. She was no snob. She liked playing pool with bums in the pub.

She was a pretty unusual person — a disaster, but also some kind of angel. I wanted her to love me and she never could, though she said once: “Of course I do.” But she loved only one person, her son, Ari. The rest of us vaguely amused her.

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Nico: life of an icon

1938 Born Christa Pfaffgen in Cologne
1954 Is spotted at 16, becomes a model
1959 Appears in Fellini’s La Dolce Vita
1962 Gives birth to son Ari
1965 Records first single in London
1967 Dylan introduces her to Warhol who makes her a Factory superstar and member of the Velvet Underground. Releases solo album, Chelsea Girl.
1969-85 Records series of remarkable albums with John Cale
1988 Dies of a brain hemorrhage


Life Along the Borderline — a Nico Tribute, curated by John Cale, Southbank Centre, London SE1 (0871-663 2500), Oct 11 2008.


Nico tribute concert curated by Lutz Ulrich, Volksbühne, Berlin (0049 30 24 065 5), Oct 17 2008


October 3, 2008 Posted by | John Cale, Music_Alternative, Nico, OTHER_ARTICLE, _MUSIC | 2 Comments

Lou Reed Discography

Anyone for a Lou Reed overdose?

I’m not sure where this comes from but kudos to the posters!

Transformer (1972)

01 – Vicious
02 – Andy’s Chest
03 – Perfect Day
04 – Hangin’ Round
05 – Walk On The Wild Side
06 – Make Up
07 – Satellite Of Love
08 – Wagon Wheel
09 – New York Telephone Conversation
10 – I’m So Free
11 – Goodnight Ladies
12 – Hangin’ Round (Acoustic Demo)
13 – Perfect Day (Acoustic Demo)

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David Bowie has never been shy about acknowledging his influences, and since the boho decadence and sexual ambiguity of the Velvet Underground’s music had a major impact on Bowie’s work, it was only fitting that as Ziggy Stardust mania was reaching its peak, Bowie would offer Lou Reed some much needed help with his career, which was stuck in neutral after his first solo album came and went.

Musically, Reed’s work didn’t have too much in common with the sonic bombast of the glam scene, but at least it was a place where his eccentricities could find a comfortable home, and on Transformer Bowie and his right-hand man, Mick Ronson, crafted a new sound for Reed that was better fitting (and more commercially astute) than the ambivalent tone of his first solo album. Ronson adds some guitar raunch to “Vicious” and “Hangin’ Round” that’s a lot flashier than what Reed cranked out with the Velvets, but still honors Lou’s strengths in guitar-driven hard rock, while the imaginative arrangements Ronson cooked up for “Perfect Day,” “Walk on the Wild Side,” and “Goodnight Ladies” blend pop polish with musical thinking just as distinctive as Reed’s lyrical conceits.

And while Reed occasionally overplays his hand in writing stuff he figured the glam kids wanted (“Make Up” and “I’m So Free” being the most obvious examples), “Perfect Day,” “Walk on the Wild Side,” and “New York Telephone Conversation” proved he could still write about the demimonde with both perception and respect. The sound and style of Transformer would in many ways define Reed’s career in the 1970s, and while it led him into a style that proved to be a dead end, you can’t deny that Bowie and Ronson gave their hero a new lease on life — and a solid album in the bargain. (allmusic.com)

Berlin (1973)

01 – Berlin
02 – Lady Day
03- Men Of Good Fortune
04 – Caroline Says
05 – How Do You Think It Feels
06 – Oh Jim
07 – Caroline Says II
08 – The Kids
09 – The Bed
10 – Sad Song

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Transformer and “Walk on the Wild Side” were both major hits in 1972, to the surprise of both Lou Reed and the music industry, and with Reed suddenly a hot commodity, he used his newly won clout to make the most ambitious album of his career, Berlin. Berlin was the musical equivalent of a drug-addled kid set loose in a candy store; the album’s songs, which form a loose story line about a doomed romance between two chemically fueled bohemians, were fleshed out with a huge, boomy production (Bob Ezrin at his most grandiose) and arrangements overloaded with guitars, keyboards, horns, strings, and any other kitchen sink that was handy (the session band included Jack Bruce, Steve Winwood, Aynsley Dunbar, and Tony Levin).

And while Reed had often been accused of focusing on the dark side of life, he and Ezrin approached Berlin as their opportunity to make The Most Depressing Album of All Time, and they hardly missed a trick.

This all seemed a bit much for an artist who made such superb use of the two-guitars/bass/drums lineup with the Velvet Underground, especially since Reed doesn’t even play electric guitar on the album; the sheer size of Berlin ultimately overpowers both Reed and his material. But if Berlin is largely a failure of ambition, that sets it apart from the vast majority of Reed’s lesser works; Lou’s vocals are both precise and impassioned, and though a few of the songs are little more than sketches, the best — “How Do You Think It Feels,” “Oh, Jim,” “The Kids,” and “Sad Song” — are powerful, bitter stuff. It’s hard not to be impressed by Berlin, given the sheer scope of the project, but while it earns an A for effort, the actual execution merits more of a B-. (allmusic.com)

Rock N Roll Animal (1974)

01 – Intro – Sweet Jane
02 – Heroin
03 – White Light – White Heat
04 – Lady Day
05 – Rock ‘N’ Roll

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In 1974, after the commercial disaster of his album Berlin, Lou Reed needed a hit, and Rock N Roll Animal was a rare display of commercial acumen on his part, just the right album at just the right time. Recorded in concert with Reed’s crack road band at the peak of their form, Rock N Roll Animal offered a set of his most anthemic songs (most dating from his days with the Velvet Underground) in arrangements that presented his lean, effective melodies and street-level lyrics in their most user-friendly form (or at least as user friendly as an album with a song called “Heroin” can get).

Early-’70s arena rock bombast is often the order of the day, but guitarists Dick Wagner and Steve Hunter use their six-string muscle to lift these songs up, not weigh them down, and with Reed’s passionate but controlled vocals riding over the top, “Sweet Jane,” “White Light/White Heat,” and “Rock ‘n’ Roll” finally sound like the radio hits they always should have been. Reed would rarely sound this commercial again, but Rock N Roll Animal proves he could please a crowd when he had to.

The revised CD reissue of Rock N Roll Animal released in 2000 offers markedly better sound than the album’s initial release, along with two bonus cuts that give a better idea of how this band approached the material from Berlin on-stage, as well as an amusing moment of Reed verbally sparring with a heckler. (allmusic.com)

Sally Can’t Dance (1974)

01 – Ride Sally Ride
02 – Animal Language
03 – Baby Face
04 – N. Y. Stars
05 – Kill Your Sons
06 – Ennui
07 – Sally Can’t Dance
08 – Billy
09 – Good Taste

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On the live album Rock N Roll Animal, Lou Reed showed he’d learned how to give his audience what they wanted, and do it well. Sally Can’t Dance, on the other hand, was the polar opposite, a remarkably cynical album that pandered to the lowest common denominator of the market that had bought Transformer and Rock N Roll Animal, and didn’t even do it with much flair. Reed’s performances here are limited to vocals, except for some sloppy acoustic guitar on one track (this from the man who helped reinvent electric guitar with the Velvet Underground), and the sodden, overblown arrangements sink most of these tunes before they get past the first chorus; much of the time, Reed sounds like an afterthought on his own album.

And while Reed’s best songwriting ranks with the best rock of his generation, Sally Can’t Dance is cluttered with throwaways that reach for the boho decadence of Transformer and come up empty (with special recognition going to the bizarre and truly puzzling “Animal Language”).

Side two does offer two worthwhile songs: “Kill Your Sons,” a powerful and deeply personal remembrance of Reed’s bouts with shock treatment and brutal psychotherapy, which he would revisit in a much stronger performance on 1984′s Live in Italy, and “Billy,” a witty and surprisingly poignant remembrance of an old friend and how their paths in life diverged. But otherwise, Sally Can’t Dance has the distinction of being the worst studio album of Reed’s career; Metal Machine Music may have been a lot more annoying, but at least he was trying on that one. (allmusic.com)

Coney Island Baby (1976)

01 – Crazy Feeling
02 – Charley’s Girl
03 – She’s My Best Friend
04 – Kicks
05 – A Gift
06 – Ooohhh Baby
07 – Nonody’s Business
08 – Coney Island Baby
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From 1972′s Transformer onward, Lou Reed spent most of the ’70s playing the druggy decadence card for all it was worth, with increasingly mixed results. But on 1976′s Coney Island Baby, Reed’s songwriting began to move into warmer, more compassionate territory, and the result was his most approachable album since Loaded.

On most of the tracks, Reed stripped his band back down to guitar, bass, and drums, and the results were both leaner and a lot more comfortable than the leaden over-production of Sally Can’t Dance or Berlin. “Crazy Feeling,” “She’s My Best Friend,” and “Coney Island Baby” found Reed actually writing recognizable love songs for a change, and while Reed pursued his traditional interest in the underside of the hipster’s life on “Charlie’s Girl” and “Nobody’s Business,” he did so with a breezy, freewheeling air that was truly a relief after the lethargic tone of Sally Can’t Dance. “Kicks” used an audio-tape collage to generate atmospheric tension that gave its tale of drugs and death a chilling quality that was far more effective than his usual blasé take on the subject, and “Coney Island Baby” was the polar opposite, a song about love and regret that was as sincere and heart-tugging as anything the man has ever recorded. Coney Island Baby sounds casual on the surface, but emotionally it’s as compelling as anything Lou Reed released in the 1970s, and proved he could write about real people with recognizable emotions as well as anyone in rock music — something you might not have guessed from most of the solo albums that preceded it. (allmusic.com)

Rock and Roll Heart (1976)

01 – I Belive In Love
02 – Banging On My Drum
03 – Follow The Leader
04 – You Wear It So Well
05 – Ladies Pay
06 – Rock And Roll Heart
07 – Chooser And The Chosen One
08 – Senselessly Cruel
09 – Chain To Fame
10 – Vicious Circle
11 – A Sheltered Life
12 – Temporary Thing

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Rock and Roll Heart was Lou Reed’s first album for Arista Records, and one senses that he wanted to come up with something saleable for his new sponsors. Uptempo numbers with pop hooks dominate the set, the 12 songs zip by in an efficient 38 minutes, and instead of Reed’s trademark meditations on the dark side of life, the lyrics are (for the most part) lean bursts of verse and chorus, in which the artist sings the praises of good times in general and rock & roll in particular (then again, on “I Believe in Love,” Reed pledges his allegiance to both “good time music” and “the iron cross,” a bit of perversity to remind us whose album this is).

But if Rock and Roll Heart sounds like “Lou Reed Lite,” there are more than a few flashes of Reed’s inarguable talent. His band is in fine form (especially Marty Fogel on sax and Michael Fonfara on keyboards). “Banging on My Drum” is a crunchy rocker that recalls his work with the Velvet Underground; “A Sheltered Life” is an amusing bit of VU archeology (the Velvets demoed the song, but this marked its first appearance on record); and the closer, “Temporary Thing,” is a bitter, haunting narrative that foreshadows Reed’s next album, the harrowing masterpiece Street Hassle. (allmusic.com)

Street Hassle (1978)

01 – Gimmie Some Good Times
02 – Dirt
03 – Street Hassle
04 – I Wanna Be Black
05 – Real Good Time Together
06 – Shooting Star
07 – Leave Me Alone
08 – Wait

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The rise of the punk/new wave movement in the late ’70s proved just how pervasive Lou Reed’s influence had been through the past decade, but it also gave him some stiff competition, as suddenly Reed was no longer the only poet of the New York streets. 1978′s Street Hassle was Reed’s first album after punk had gained public currency, and Reed appeared to have taken the minimal approach of punk to heart.

With the exception of Metal Machine Music, Street Hassle was Reed’s rawest set of the 1970s; partly recorded live, with arrangements stripped to the bone, Street Hassle was dark, deep, and ominous, a 180-degree turn from the polished neo-glam of Transformer. Lyrically, Street Hassle found Reed looking deep into himself, and not liking what he saw. Opening with an uncharitable parody of “Sweet Jane,” Street Hassle found Reed acknowledging just how much a self-parody he’d become in the 1970s, and just how much he hated himself for it, on songs like “Dirt” and “Shooting Star.”

Street Hassle was Reed’s most creatively ambitious album since Berlin, and it sounded revelatory on first release in 1978. Sadly, time has magnified its flaws; the Lenny Bruce-inspired “I Wanna Be Black” sounds like a bad idea today, and the murk of the album’s binaural mix isn’t especially flattering to anyone.

But the album’s best moments are genuinely exciting, and the title cut, a three-movement poetic tone poem about life on the New York streets, is one of the most audacious and deeply moving moments of Reed’s solo career. Raw, wounded, and unapologetically difficult, Street Hassle isn’t the masterpiece Reed was shooting for, but it’s still among the most powerful and compelling albums he released during the 1970s, and too personal and affecting to ignore. (allmusic.com)

The Blue Mask (1982)

01 – My House
02 – Women
03 – Underneath the Bottle
04 – Gun
05 – The Blue Mask
06 – Average Guy
07 – Heroine
08 – Waves of Fear
09 – Day John Kennedy Died
10 – Heavenly Arms
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In 1982, 12 years after he left the Velvet Underground, Lou Reed released The Blue Mask, the first album where he lived up to the potential he displayed in the most groundbreaking of all American rock bands. The Blue Mask was Reed’s first album after he overcame a long-standing addiction to alcohol and drugs, and it reveals a renewed focus and dedication to craft — for the first time in years, Reed had written an entire album’s worth of moving, compelling songs, and was performing them with keen skill and genuine emotional commitment. Reed was also playing electric guitar again, and with the edgy genius he summoned up on White Light/White Heat.

Just as importantly, he brought Robert Quine on board as his second guitarist, giving Reed a worthy foil who at once brought great musical ideas to the table, and encouraged the bandleader to make the most of his own guitar work. (Reed also got superb support from his rhythm section, bassist extraordinaire Fernando Saunders and ace drummer Doane Perry).

As Reed stripped his band back to a muscular two-guitars/bass/drums format, he also shed the faux-decadent “Rock N Roll Animal” persona that had dominated his solo work and wrote clearly and fearlessly of his life, his thoughts, and his fears, performing the songs with supreme authority whether he was playing with quiet subtlety (such as the lovely “My House” or the unnerving “The Gun”) or cranked-to-ten fury (the paranoid “Waves of Fear” and the emotionally devastating title cut). Intelligent, passionate, literate, mature, and thoroughly heartfelt, The Blue Mask was everything Reed’s fans had been looking for in his work for years, and it’s vivid proof that for some rockers, life can begin on the far side of 35. (allmusic.com)

Legendary Hearts (1983)

01 – Legendary Hearts
02 – Don’t Talk to Me About Work
03 – Make Up Mind
04 – Martial Law
05 – The Last Shot
06 – Turn Out the Light
07 – Pow Wow
08 – Betrayed
09 – Bottoming Out
10 – Home of the Brave
11 – Rooftop Garden
link

If Legendary Hearts seemed like a disappointment in 1983, that was largely because the year before Lou Reed had released The Blue Mask, one of the finest albums of his career, and Legendary Hearts just wasn’t quite as good. But pull it off the shelf today, give it a listen, and Legendary Hearts easily shuts down nearly anything Reed released in the 1970s; if it’s a less obvious masterpiece than The Blue Mask, it makes clear that Reed was once again in firm command of his strengths, and making the most of them in the studio. Guitarist Robert Quine and bassist Fernando Saunders were both back on board from The Blue Mask, and they reaffirmed their status as the linchpins of the strongest band of Reed’s solo career, and drummer Fred Maher rocked harder (and with fewer frills) than Doane Perry.

The bracing cross-talk of Reed’s and Quine’s guitars had lost nothing in the year separating the two albums, and if Reed didn’t seem to be aiming quite as high as a songwriter this time out, most of the tracks were every bit as intelligent and soul-searching as The Blue Mask‘s lineup; if there were a few moments of comic relief, like “Don’t Talk to Me About Work” and “Pow Wow,” no one could argue that Reed hadn’t earned a few laughs after songs like “Make Up Mind,” “The Last Shot,” and “Betrayed.” On Legendary Hearts, Reed was writing great songs, playing them with enthusiasm and imagination, and singing them with all his heart and soul, and if it wasn’t his best album, it was more than good enough to confirm that the brilliance of The Blue Mask was no fluke, and that Reed had reestablished himself as one of the most important artists in American rock. (allmusic.com)

New York (1989)

01 – Romeo Had Juliette
02 – Halloween Parade (Aids)
03 – Dirty Blvd.
04 – Endless Cycle
05 – There Is No Time
06 – Last Great American Whale
07 – Beginning of a Great Adventure
08 – Busload of Faith
09 – Sick of You
10 – Hold On
11 – Good Evening Mr. Waldheim
12 – Xmas in February
13 – Strawman
14 – Dime Story Mystery [To Andy - Honey]

link

New York City figured so prominently in Lou Reed’s music for so long that it’s surprising it took him until 1989 to make an album simply called New York, a set of 14 scenes and sketches that represents the strongest, best-realized set of songs of Reed’s solo career. While Reed’s 1982 comeback, The Blue Mask, sometimes found him reaching for effects, New York‘s accumulated details and deft caricatures hit bull’s-eye after bull’s-eye for 57 minutes, and do so with an easy stride and striking lyrical facility.

New York also found Reed writing about the larger world rather than personal concerns for a change, and in the beautiful, decaying heart of New York City, he found plenty to talk about — the devastating impact of AIDS in “Halloween Parade,” the vicious circle of child abuse “Endless Cycle,” the plight of the homeless in “Xmas in February” — and even on the songs where he pointedly mounts a soapbox, Reed does so with an intelligence and smart-assed wit that makes him sound opinionated rather than preachy — like a New Yorker. And when Reed does look into his own life, it’s with humor and perception; “Beginning of a Great Adventure” is a hilarious meditation on the possibilities of parenthood, and “Dime Store Mystery” is a moving elegy to his former patron Andy Warhol.

Reed also unveiled a new band on this set, and while guitarist Mike Rathke didn’t challenge Reed the way Robert Quine did, Reed wasn’t needing much prodding to play at the peak of his form, and Ron Wasserman proved Reed’s superb taste in bass players had not failed him. Produced with subtle intelligence and a minimum of flash, New York is a masterpiece of literate, adult rock & roll, and the finest album of Reed’s solo career. (allmusic.com)

Songs for Drella (1990)

01 – Smalltown
02 – Open House
03 – Style It Takes
04 – Work
05 – Trouble With Classicists
06 – Starlight
07 – Faces and Names
08 – Images
09 – Slip Away (A Warning)
10 – It Wasn’t Me
11 – I Believe
12 – Nobody But You
13 – A Dream
14 – Forever Changed
15 – Hello It’s Me
link

John Cale, the co-founder of The Velvet Underground, left the group in 1968 after tensions between himself and Lou Reed became intolerable; neither had much charitable to say about one other after that, and they seemed to share only one significant area of agreement — they both maintained a great respect and admiration for Andy Warhol, the artist whose patronage of the group helped them reach their first significant audience.

So it was fitting that after Warhol’s death in 1987, Reed and Cale began working together for the first time since White Light/White Heat on a cycle of songs about the artist’s life and times. Starkly constructed around Cale’s keyboards, Reed’s guitar, and their voices, Songs for Drella is a performance piece about Andy Warhol, his rise to fame, and his troubled years in the limelight. Reed and Cale take turns on vocals, sometimes singing as the character of Andy and elsewhere offering their observations on the man they knew.

On a roll after New York, Reed’s songs are strong and pithy, and display a great feel for the character of Andy, and while Cale brought fewer tunes to the table, they’re all superb, especially “Style It Takes” and “A Dream,” a spoken word piece inspired by Warhol’s posthumously published diaries. If Songs for Drella seems modest from a musical standpoint, it’s likely neither Reed nor Cale wanted the music to distract from their story, and here they paint a portrait of Warhol that has far more depth and poignancy than his public image Identity-Issues would have led one to expect.

It’s a moving and deeply felt tribute to a misunderstood man, and it’s a pleasure to hear these two comrades-in-arms working together again, even if their renewed collaboration was destined to be short-lived. (allmusic.com)

Magic and Loss (1992)

01 – Dorita
02 – What’s Good
03 – Power and Glory
04 – Magician
05 – Sword of Damocles
06 – Goodby Mass
07 – Cremation
08 – Dreamin’
09 – No Chance
10 – Warrior King
11 – Harry’s Circumcision
12 – Gassed and Stoked
13 – Power and Glory, Pt. 2
14 – Magic and Loss

link

With 1982′s The Blue Mask, Lou Reed began approaching more mature and challenging themes in his music, and in 1992, Reed decided it was time to tackle the Most Serious Theme of All — Death. Reed lost two close friends to cancer within the space of a year, and the experience informed Magic and Loss, a set of 14 songs about loss, illness, and mortality.

It would have been easy for a project like this to sound morbid, but Reed avoids that; the emotions that dominate these songs are fear and helplessness in the face of a disease (and a fate) not fully understood, and Reed’s songs struggle to balance these anxieties with bravery, humor, and an understanding of the notion that death is an inevitable part of life — that you can’t have the magic without the loss.

It’s obvious that Reed worked on this material with great care, and Magic and Loss contains some of his most intelligent and emotionally intense work as a lyricist. However, Reed hits many of the same themes over and over again, and while Reed and his accompanists — guitarist Mike Rathke, bassist Rob Wasserman, and percussionist Michael Blair — approach the music with skill and impeccable chops, many of these songs are a bit samey; the album’s most memorable tunes are the ones that pull it out of its mid-tempo rut, like the grooving “What’s Good” and the guitar workout “Gassed and Stoked.”

Magic and Loss is an intensely heartfelt piece of music, possessing a taste and subtlety one might never have expected from Reed, but its good taste almost works against it; it’s a sincere bit of public mourning, but perhaps a more rousing wake might have been a more meaningful tribute to the departed. (allmusic.com)

Set the Twilight Reeling (1996)

01 – Egg Cream
02 – NYC Man
03 – Finish Line
04 – Trade In
05 – Hang on to Your Emotions
06 – Sex With Your Parents (Motherfucker), Pt. II [Live]
07 – Hookywooky
08 – The Proposition
09 – Adventurer
10 – Riptide
11 – Set the Twilight Reeling

link

After contemplating the decline of New York City, the passing of his mentor Andy Warhol Noteworthy-Art-Basel-Buys Mar-08 , his place in (perhaps) the greatest American rock band Harmonix-Profile of all time, and the very nature of life and death, in 1996 Lou Reed finally began to consider a really important subject — where to get a good chocolate egg cream.

“Egg Cream” kicked off Set the Twilight Reeling, and for many fans it was a kick to hear Reed cranking up his amps and having some fun again, but much of the rest of the album turned out not to be as lightweight as the opener would have led you to expect. On Set the Twilight Reeling, Reed is preoccupied with relationships, as he tries to figure if he wants a long-term commitment (“Trade In”), if he’s better off as a lone wolf (“NYC Man”), if he’s in love (“The Proposition”), or if he just wants to fool around (“Hookywooky”).

Reed rocks a lot harder here than on the two albums that preceded it (and plays plenty of great crunchy guitar), but much of the album is set in a mellow mid-tempo groove that’s casual and comfortable but not especially compelling. And while “Sex With Your Parents (Motherfucker), Pt. II” is an amusing attack on conservative politicians, his logic isn’t exactly clear.

Longtime fans are no doubt grateful that Reed’s relatively unfocused and unsubstantial albums these days are such a vast improvement over his fallow period in the 1970s, but for the most part Set the Twilight Reeling sounds like a standard issue 1990s Lou Reed album — smart, well-crafted, with plenty of guitar, but nothing terribly special, either. (allmusic.com)

Ecstasy (2000)

01 – Paranoia Key of E
02 – Mystic Child
03 – Mad
04 – Ecstasy
05 – Modern Dance
06 – Tatters
07 – Future Farmers of America
08 – Turning Time Around
09 – White Prism
10 – Rock Minuet
11 – Baton Rouge
12 – Like a Possum
13 – Rouge
14 – Big Sky

link

Never let it be said that Lou Reed has lost the ability to surprise his audience; who would have thought that at the age of 58, on his first album of the new millennium, Reed would offer us an 18-minute guitar distortion workout with lyrics abut kinky sex, dangerous drugs, and (here’s the surprise) imagining what it would be like to be a possum? For the most part, Ecstasy finds Reed obsessed with love and sex, though (as you might expect) his take on romance is hardly rosy (“Paranoia Key of E,” “Mad,” and “Tatters” all document a relationship at the point of collapse, while “Baton Rouge” is an eccentric but moving elegy for a love that didn’t last) and Eros is usually messy (“White Prism”), obsessive (“Ecstasy”), or unhealthy and perverse (“Rock Minuet”).

Reed genuinely seems to be stretching towards new lyrical and musical ground here, but while some of his experiments work, several pointedly do not, with the epic “Like a Possum” only the album’s most spectacular miscalculation. Still, Reed and producer Hal Wilner take some chances with the arrangements that pay off, particularly the subtle horn charts that dot several songs, and Reed’s superb rhythm section (Fernando Saunders on bass and Tony “Thunder” Smith on drums) gives these songs a rock-solid foundation for the leader’s guitar workouts.

As Reed and his band hit fifth gear on the album’s rousing closer, “Big Sky,” he once again proves that even his uneven works include a few songs you’ll certainly want to have in your collection — as long as they’re not about possums. (allmusic.com)

The Raven (2003)

01 – Overture
02 – Edgar Allan Poe
03 – Call On Me
04 – The Valley of Unrest
05 – A Thousand Departed Friends
06 – Change
07 – The Bed
08 – Perfect Day
09 – The Raven
10 – Balloon
11 – Broadway Song
12 – Blind Rage
13 – Burning Embers
14 – Vanishing Act
15 – Guilty
16 – I Wanna Know (The Pit and the Pendulum)
17 – Science of the Mind
18 – Hop Frog
19 – Tripitena’s Speech
20 – Who Am I (Tripitena’s Song)
21 – Guardian Angel

>download part1
>download part2

Edgar Allan Poe was a man who usually looked on the dark side of life, had more than a few less-than-healthy romantic and sexual obsessions, was known to dabble in dangerous drugs, and was fascinated with the possibilities of the English language, so it’s no wonder why Lou Reed regards Poe as a kindred spirit.

In his liner notes to the album The Raven, Reed touches on the parallels between their work when he writes, “I have reread and rewritten Poe to ask the same questions again. Who am I? Why am I drawn to do what I should not?…Why do we love what we cannot have? Why do we have a passion for exactly the wrong thing?” Reed’s obsession with Poe’s work found a creative outlet when visionary theatrical director Robert Wilson commissioned Reed to adapt Poe’s works to music for a production called POE-Try, and The Raven collects the material Reed wrote for this project, as well as a number of dramatic interpretations of Poe’s work, featuring performances by Willem Dafoe, Steve Buscemi, Elizabeth Ashley, Amanda Plummer, and others.

The limited-edition two-disc version of The Raven gives a nearly equal balance to words and music; while the single-disc edition is dominated by Reed’s songs, the double-disc set features a much greater number of spoken-word pieces, most of which have been filtered through Reed’s imagination, with a more intense focus on sex, drugs, and conflict as a result.

While the condensed version of The Raven sounds like one of the oddest and most audacious rock albums of recent memory, the complete edition feels more like a lengthy performance piece (albeit a rather unusual one), and while it lacks something in the way of a central narrative, the focus on the letter as well as the spirit of Poe’s work seems a great deal clearer here. The pitch of the acting is sometimes a bit sharp (especially Dafoe, who seems to be projecting to the last row of the balcony), but the con brio performances certainly suit the tenor of the material and Poe’s writing style. Musically, The Raven is all over the map, leaping from low-key acoustic pieces to full-bore, window-rattling rock & roll, with a number of stops along the way.

Reed also touches more than casually on his own past as well, with new recordings of “The Bed” and “Perfect Day” added to the sequence, and for a man not known for his ability to collaborate well, The Raven is jam-packed with guest artists, including David Bowie , the Five Blind Boys of Alabama, Kate and Anna McGarrigle, Ornette Coleman, and Laurie Anderson, all of whom are used to their best advantage.

The mix of ingredients on The Raven is heady, and the result is more than a little bizarre, but there’s no mistaking the fact that Reed’s heart and soul are in this music; even the most oddball moments bleed with passion and commitment, whether he’s handing the vocal mic over to Buscemi for a faux-lounge number, conjuring up brutal guitar distortion while his band wails behind him, or confronting his fears and desires with just a piano to guide him.

Truth to tell, Reed hasn’t sounded this committed and engaged on record since Magic and Loss over a decade before; The Raven reaches for more than it can grasp, especially in its two-hours-plus expanded edition, and is dotted with experiments that don’t work and ideas that don’t connect with their surroundings.

But the good stuff is strong enough that anyone who cares about Lou Reed’s body of work, or Edgar Allan Poe’s literary legacy, ought to give it a careful listen.

The edition contained herein, ladies and gentlemen, is the double disc version!

Big thanks to the original posters



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September 16, 2008 Posted by | David Bowie, John Cale, Lou Reed, Music_Alternative, Music_ClassicRock, Music_Punk, _MUSIC | 1 Comment

John Cale – Music For a New Society (Rhino 1982)

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John Cale – Music For a New Society
Rhino, 1982
Released August 1982
Recorded Sky Line Studios, New York
Genre Art rock
Length 44:12
Label Rhino Records
Producer John Cale
Music for a New Society is a magnificent solo album by our favourite Velvet, Mr John Cale. It was released in August 1982 on Island Records.

New Society is packed full of amazing songs, wonderful musical moments!

New Society was in stark contrast with Cale’s previous few albums, which were packed with as much avant-garde noise as could be afforded, as it contained very minimalist instrumentation and a great deal of sonic space.

Allmusic has called it “Spare, understated, and perhaps a masterpiece.”

“(I Keep A) Close Watch” is a re-recording of the song originally released on Helen of Troy.

The original “Mama’s Song”, featured a telephone call between John Cale and his mother. She had sung “Arlan y Mor” (On The Sea Shore). When she was taken ill, Cale decided not to include it on the album.

The engineer misread Cale’s handwritten title of “Sanctus” and thus the track was named “Santies” on the LP. The CD reissue calls it “Sanities.”

The song “Sanitites” is the inspiration for the title and closing quote of the twelfth chapter of the comic book “Watchmen” entitled “A Stronger Loving World”.

The cover photography is by Betsey Johnson, Cale’s former wife.

This an album for days when you just feel unable to get out of bed and life has yanked your hair as a prelude to kneeing you in the balls. Music For a New Society is John Cale’s last great album before a parade of underwhelming efforts. Although his live album, Fragments of a Rainy Season, is one of his best, everything after this paled in comparison to the brilliance and creativity of his 70s works. Of all the members of the Velvet Underground, John Cale is the one who is responsible for the most challenging and interesting work after their slow, pathetic dissolution. To hell with Metal Machine Music, Cale’s Paris 1919, Vintage Violence, Church of Anthrax, Fear, Slow Dazzle, Academy in Peril, Helen of Troy and Music For a New Society are sometimes nasty and claustrophobic and sometimes lush and sentimental, but always worth your full attention. There is no excusing such dreck as Artificial Intelligence and Caribbean Sunset, but Cale’s decade of genius is enough to last me for an eternity.

Enough proselytising, let’s get back to the matter at hand. Music For a new Society is Cale’s most sparse and single-minded record as it is just Cale’s voice, piano, minimal percussion, eerie electronics and the occasional bagpipe solo. “I Keep a Close Watch on this Heart of Mine” is one of the most heartwrenching portraits of a man who has been burned too many times. He captures the essence of betrayal and its subsequent damning effects on the one who has been betrayed. It is a dark look at love and how it can harden the heart.

Never win and never lose
There’s nothing much to choose
Between the right and wrong
Nothing lost and nothing gained
Still things aren’t quite the same
Between you and me

I keep a close watch on this heart of mine
I keep a close watch on this heart of mine

I still hear your voice at night
When I turn out the light
And try to settle down
But there’s nothing much I can do
Because I can’t live without you
Any way at all

I don’t know why this song haunts me so. I have a healthy, optimistic view of love and its potential to cast life in a new light, but we’ve all been to that desperate place described in this song.

An even more disturbing view of love, obsession and hard feeling is “If You Were Still Around.” It is a bit of a hateful ditty about what he would do to those who have done him wrong. There is a lot of violence in his intentions and probably much more lurking in the subtext of this one. Actually, it’s pretty much in plain view as Cale openly lobbies for some sort of psychic or emotional cannibalism.

If you were still around
I’d hold you
I’d hold you
I’d shake you by the knees
Blow hard in both ears
If you were still around

You could write like a panther
Whatever got into your veins
What kind of green blood
Swung you to your doom
To your doom

If you were still around
I’d tear unto your fear
Leave it hanging off you
In long streamers

Shreds of dread
If you were still around
I’d turn you facing the wind
Bend your spine on my knee
Chew the back of your head
Chew the back of your head
‘Til you opened your mouth
To this life

It starts off as a tender song about longing and regret, but builds into something ugly. In fact, it’s a pretty primal song and reveals a man who wants to punish a lover who revealed herself to be a traitor to his love and friendship. The rest of the album isn’t quite so morbid and grisly, but it is still pretty damn depressing. Music For a New Society may be one of my favorite albums, but it isn’t one that I dust off often because it’s so full of bad juju.

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Tracklisting

1. “Taking Your Life in Your Hands”
2. “Thoughtless Kind”
3. “Sanities”
4. “If You Were Still Around” (Cale, Sam Shepherd)
5. “(I Keep A) Close Watch”
6. “Broken Bird”
7. “Chinese Envoy”
8. “Changes Made”
9. “Damn Life” (Cale, Risé Cale)
10. “Rise, Sam and Rimsky-Korsakov” (Cale, Sam Shepherd)

All tracks composed by John Cale; except where indicated


Musicians:

* John Cale: vocals, guitars, keyboards
* Allen Lanier: guitar
* David J. Young: guitar, assistant engineer
* David Lichtenstein: accompanyment, engineer
* John Wonderling: accompanyment
* Mike McLintock: accompanyment
* Robert Elk: accompanyment
* Pipe Major Tom Fitzgibbon: accompanyment
* Chris Spedding: acoustic guitar
* Risé Cale: vocal on “Risé, Sam And Rimsky-Korsakov”

Here’s Johnny!

http://www.mediafire.com/?emqvixmwyby

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September 5, 2008 Posted by | John Cale, Music_Alternative, _MUSIC | Leave a comment

The Velvet Underground – Another View [1986]

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41OQtLc1WzL._SL500_AA240_.jpg

The Velvet Underground – Another View [1986]
Mp3@192
Released September, 1986
Recorded 1967–1969, New York City, United States
Genre Rock and roll
Length 36:21
Label Verve Records
Producer The Velvet Underground
This is basically VU, take 2! Nevertheless, cos it’s the Velvets, it’s a great comp!

This one is a must have for fans as it includes rarities and obscure tracks. Especially some unreleased stuff when the great John Cale was on board before being kicked out by Reed.

When The Velvet Underground moved from Verve Records (who had released their first two albums) to parent company MGM Records, they signed a two-album deal, releasing their third and eponymous album The Velvet Underground in March 1969.

Later that same year, however, there was a management change and MGM Records’ new CEO, Mike Curb, wanted to purge the record company of all acts he considered offensive to his moral standards. The Velvet Underground quickly became one of the groups blacklisted and were released from their contract.

The band had, however, in the meantime recorded fourteen tracks for possible release as their second MGM album. Shockingly, all of these were shelved and forgotten by their record company until the early Eighties.

As Verve (by then an imprint of Polygram) prepared to re-release the band’s three Verve/MGM albums on vinyl and, for the first time, on CD, they found nineteen previously unreleased tracks: five Cale-era tracks and the fourteen “lost album” tracks, some of them in two-track mixdown format, some of them even on multitracks.

The cream of the nineteen tracks was released in February of 1985 on VU; the rest remained for the time being in the vaults.

In 1986, Polydor decided to prepare a vinyl box set for European release. Simply titled The Velvet Underground, this box, which was released in June, consisted of the bands first three albums, VU, and an untitled bonus album containing the remaining nine tracks from Polygram’s vaults. That untitled album was later separately released on vinyl and CD as Another View.

Lou Reed, Sterling Morrison, John Cale,Nico, Maureen Tuckerphoto by David Horvitz and Adam Dower

Certain critics concluded that since the best ten tracks had gone on VU, Another View suffered somewhat in both quality and coherence – as well as suffering from the same lack of coherence as VU, in that the albums contain both Cale-era and Yule-era tracks.

Nevertheless, lighter and simpler as Another View may be, it contains some fine songs that show the transition from the subdued less-is-more The Velvet Underground style to the more mainstream-oriented rock of 1970′s Loaded.

An acetate-sourced alternate mix of this album’s version of “Ride Into The Sun”, featuring vocals by Lou Reed, has appeared on bootlegs and on the Australian boxed set What Goes On.

As The Velvet Underground moved from MGM to Atlantic, they re-recorded two of the songs on Another View, “Ride into the Sun” and “Rock and Roll”, for possible inclusion on Loaded. Only “Rock and Roll” made the grade, but two of the Another View songs would be recycled by Lou Reed during his early solo career: “Ride into the Sun” (on Lou Reed, 1972) and “We’re Gonna Have a Real Good Time Together” (on Street Hassle, 1978).

Drummer Maureen Tucker believes there is still one “lost” song recorded during these sessions that was not included on either VU or Another View, titled “Lonesome Cowboys”, which was based on an Andy Warhol film. (not to be confused with “Lonesome Cowboy Bill”, which was released on the Loaded album)

Tracklisting

Side A

1. “We’re Gonna Have a Real Good Time Together” – 2:56 (Reed)
* Recorded September 30, 1969
2. “I’m Gonna Move Right In” – 6:30
* Recorded September 27, 1969
3. “Hey Mr. Rain” (version 1) – 4:56
* Recorded May 29, 1968
4. “Ride into the Sun” – 3:20
* Recorded September 5, 1969
5. “Coney Island Steeplechase” – 2:20
* Recorded May 6, 1969

Side B

1. “Guess I’m Falling in Love” (instrumental version) – 3:35
* Recorded December 5, 1967
2. “Hey Mr. Rain” (version 2) – 5:16
* Recorded May 29, 1968
3. “Ferryboat Bill” – 2:10 (Reed, Morrison, Yule, Tucker)
* Recorded June 19, 1969
4. “Rock and Roll” (1969 version) – 5:18 (Reed)
* Recorded June 19, 1969

The band

* Lou Reed – vocals, guitar, piano
* Sterling Morrison – guitar, backing vocals, bass guitar on “Hey Mr. Rain”
* Maureen Tucker – percussion
* John Cale – viola, bass guitar (A3, B1-2)
* Doug Yule – bass guitar, keyboards, backing vocals (A1-2, A4-5, B3-4)

Here she be;

VelvetUndAnoView.rar

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September 4, 2008 Posted by | John Cale, Lou Reed, Mo Tucker, Music_Alternative, Music_ClassicRock, Sterling Morrison, The Velvet Underground, _MUSIC | 1 Comment

Nico – The Marble Index (1968)

Nico – The Marble Index

Avant Garde | Pop | mp3 | 320 kbps | 63 mb | covers included

Here’s where Nico, in one fell swoop, became the Godmother of Goth!

The Marble Index was Nico’s second album, a complex and challenging work which could be described as a mixture of gothic-folk, neo-classical and avant-garde, recorded and released in 1968.
Where the statue stood,
Of Newton, with his prism and silent face,
The marble index of a mind forever
Voyaging through strange seas of thought alone

- William Wordsworth

The album featured long-term associate John Cale, who had worked briefly with Nico during her stint in The Velvet Underground. They would work together again many times in subsequent years.

Cale had an extensive background in the world of the avant-garde, having worked with minimalist composer LaMonte Young, among others.

Cale and Nico here created an album that radically deviated from traditional rock music song structures. Cale said it was the first rock album to do so. He also said that The Marble Index had “made a seminal contribution to the body of modern classical music“.

Nico wrote all her own songs on this album and accompanied herself on the harmonium, which has also been referred to as an “Indian pump organ”.

The lyrics are typically dark and the subject matter far different to the cliched themes of most songs written at that time – and indeed since.

The arrangements are abstract and, musically speaking, “cold”. The effect is akin to the psychological sound experimentation of famous electronic and serial composer, Karlheinz Stockhausen.

The Marble Index has been described as a “nightmare in sound”. It has influenced a wide array of genres in contemporary independent music. Artists such as Coil, Jocelyn Pook and Dead Can Dance, as well as numerous contemporary goth bands have all cited Nico as a seminal influence.

Sail away, sail away my little boy
Let the wind fill your heart with light and joy
Sail away my little boy
Let the rain wash away your cloudy days
Sail away into a dream
Let the wind send you a fantasy
Of the ancient silver sea
Now you see that only dreams

This was the second solo album from the late, one-time, Velvet Underground chanteuse, and it’s several galaxies removed from the conservative, pleasingly orchestrated songs of her debut album from merely one year before, Chelsea Girls.

Here Nico’s Gregorian chant melodies, cryptic lyrics, and wavering harmonium combine with always sparse, consistently absorbing arrangements (courtesy of fellow Velvets exile John Cale) to create a singular work fresh from the mausoleum.

While Marble Index is occasionally tedious, give a listen particularly to “Lawns of Dawns,” “Frozen Warnings,” and “Evening of Light,” and you will feel like you are peering into Hades itself.

This is one truly creepy and morbid-sounding album, but never over-the-top to the point of silliness like, say, Diamanda Galas’ Plague Mass.

You and your friends definitely won’t be bringing this along to the Halloween party at that abandoned, decaying mansion on the dead-end road.

A radical statement, highly recommended for those who dig chamber prog (e.g. Art Zoyd and Univers Zero), and maybe also fans of the more straightforward R.I.O. Those prog fans against a lot of avantness should most likely steer clear of this one.


Tracklisting

1. Prelude
2. Lawns Of Dawns
3. No One Is There
4. Ari’s Song
5. Facing The Wind
6. Julius Caesar (Memento Hodie)
7. Frozen Warnings
8. Evening Of Light
9. Roses In The Snow
10. Nibelungen

Here’s Nico;

Nico_Marble_Index.rar

Big thanks to the original poster

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August 28, 2008 Posted by | John Cale, Music_Alternative, Nico, The Velvet Underground, _MUSIC | 2 Comments

Nico – Chelsea Girl [1967]


http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41OQtLc1WzL._SL500_AA240_.jpg

Nico – Chelsea Girl [1967]
mp3 – 192kbs – 62mb
Shes turned another trick. Her treats and times revolves, she’s got problems.


Here’s Nico’s first post-Velvets solo album. A fine LP it is too.

Chelsea Girl is the debut solo album by Nico, released in October 1967 by Verve Records, also home to The Velvet Underground.

After collaborating as a singer with The Velvet Underground on their debut The Velvet Underground and Nico (recorded during 1966, released in March 1967), Warhol superstar Nico toured with the band in Andy Warhol’s Exploding Plastic Inevitable multimedia roadshow.

Before the EPI came to an end in 1967, Nico took up residence in a New York City coffeehouse as solo folk chanteuse, accompanied in turn by acquainted guitarists, such as Tim Hardin, Jackson Browne and Leonard Cohen, but also her Velvet Underground colleagues Lou Reed, Sterling Morrison and John Cale.

Some of her accompanists wrote songs for her to sing, and these form the backbone of Chelsea Girl. Browne and Hardin contributed some songs, Lou Reed gave her one of his early Velvet Underground songs, “Wrap Your Troubles in Dreams” (which did not surface as a Velvet Underground recording until it was included in the 1995 box set Peel Slowly and See), and Reed, Cale and Morrison in various combinations contributed four more songs. Additionally, Bob Dylan gave her one of his songs to record: “I’ll Keep It with Mine”.

Musically, Chelsea Girl is best described as a cross between chamber folk and Sixties pop. The musical backing is relatively simple, consisting of one or two guitars or, alternatively, a keyboard instrument, played by either Browne or (a combination of) her Velvet Underground colleagues. There are no drums or bass instruments. Adding to the chamber folk feel of the music is the strings and flute arrangement superimposed over the initial recordings by producer Tom Wilson and arranger Larry Fallon without involving or consulting Nico.

Nico was dissatisfied with the finished product. Looking back in 1981, she stated:

“ I still cannot listen to it, because everything I wanted for that record, they took it away. I asked for drums, they said no. I asked for more guitars, they said no. And I asked for simplicity, and they covered it in flutes! [...] They added strings and – I didn’t like them, but I could live with them. But the flute! The first time I heard the album, I cried and it was all because of the flute. ”

Because of the Velvet Underground band members involvement and the similarities with the softer The Velvet Underground and Nico tracks, Chelsea Girl is sometimes seen by fans as a companion record to that album. “Little Sister” and “Wrap Your Troubles in Dreams,” and perhaps others included here, had also been played live by The Velvet Underground during Nico’s time with the band. Polydor (the record label that oversees The Velvet Underground’s Universal Music Group back catalogue) tends to agree, adding Chelsea Girl tracks to Peel Slowly and See, the 2002 Deluxe edition of The Velvet Underground and Nico and the 2005 Velvet Underground compilation album Gold.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chelsea_Girl_(album)

Tracklisting

Side A

The Fairest of the Seasons (Jackson Browne, Gregory Copeland) – 4:06
These Days (Jackson Browne) – 3:30
Little Sister (John Cale, Lou Reed) – 4:22
Winter Song (Cale) – 3:17
It Was a Pleasure Then (Nico, Reed, Cale) – 8:02

Side B

Chelsea Girls (Reed, Sterling Morrison) – 7:22
I’ll Keep It With Mine (Bob Dylan) – 3:17
Somewhere There’s a Feather (Browne) – 2:16
Wrap Your Troubles in Dreams (Reed) – 5:07
Eulogy to Lenny Bruce (Tim Hardin) – 3:45

Personnel
* Nico – vocals
* Jackson Browne – acoustic guitar (A1-2, B2-3, B5)
* Lou Reed – electric guitar (A3, A5, B1, B4)
* John Cale – viola, organ, guitar (A3-5)
* Sterling Morrison – electric guitar (B1, B4)
* Tom Wilson – producer
* Larry Fallon – strings and flute arrangements

Here she be;

http://lix.in/-2a3872

all thanks to joe le taxi

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August 28, 2008 Posted by | John Cale, Music_Alternative, Nico, Sterling Morrison, The Velvet UndergroundLou Reed, _BABE, _BOB DYLAN, _MUSIC | Leave a comment

Mercury Rev – Back To Mine (2006) @320

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Mercury Rev – Back To Mine
Released in 2006
Mp3 @320kbps / 142 Mb / 2 RARs
A wonderfully eclectic and excellent compilation via the boys from Rev!

Yap, this 2006 compilation was handpicked by Alternative heroes Mercury Rev and features many songs that have influenced them as well as a few current favorites.

Amongst the array of great talent here are Suicide, David Bowie, Nico, Alex Chilton, Galaxie 500, Billie Holliday and John Cale. There are also some more obscure music – including an amazing Nicolai Dunger track.

I could live without the awful Terry Jacks track though! Thank fuck for delete buttons!

And, if that’s not enough, there’s a brand new Mercury Rev track, ‘Cecilia’s Lunar Expose’, recorded specifically for this collection!

Get downloading now mofos!!

As one might expect from a band as eclectic as Mercury Rev, their late-night mixtape compilation offers a selection of style and genres, incorporating legends (Billie Holiday, George Jones, Nico, Pharoah Sanders and Randy Newman) alongside more outré talents. What’s also no surprise, given the layered approach of their early albums, is the elegant congruence of many of the segues: the opening link from Bowie’s “A New Career in a New Town” to Johan Johannsson’s “Hotel Borg”, for instance, is all about shared intent and melodic echoes, while the move from John Cale’s “Days of Steam” to Andrew Bird’s “Opposite Day” involves the subtlest of shifts from viola to violin.

The most sustained progress, however, is from the band’s “Cecilia’s Lunar Exposé”, a slice of Saucerful Of Secrets-era Floydism, through the Neu!-style groove of Spacemen 3′s “Big City”, to the erotic trance-scape of Suicide’s “Dream Baby Dream”, a beautifully modulated arc for the more ambitious musical explorers, with childlike comforts furnished by “Seasons In the Sun” and “When You Wish Upon A Star”.

Highlights :’Days Of Steam’, ‘Big City’, ‘Dream Baby Dream’, ‘Cecilia’s Lunar Exposé’

-jazzmusikeditor

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Tracklisting

1. A New Career In A New Town – David Bowie
2. Hotel-Borg – Johan Johannsson
3. Seasons In The Sun – Terry Jacks
4. When Will You Come Home – Galaxie 500
5. I’m A Fool To Want You – Billie Holliday
6. Days Of Steam – John Cale
7. Opposite Day (Reprise) – Andrew Bird
8. The Grand Tour (Clean Version) – George Jones
9. If I Were A Little Star – Nicolai Dunger
10. Wrap Your Troubles In Dreams – Nico
11. Cecilia’s Lunar Expose – Mercury Rev
12. Big City – Spacemen 3
13. Dream Baby Dream – Suicide
14. Let Me Get Close To You – Alex Chilton
15. Astral Traveling – Pharoah Sanders
16. Cast Anchor – Hanne Hukkleberg
17. Uncle Bob’s Midnight Blues – Randy Newman
18. When You Wish Upon A Star – Cliff Edwards

Here she be:

Part1:
RevBACKTOMINE.part1.rar

Part2:

RevBACKTOMINE.part2.rar

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August 19, 2008 Posted by | Alex Chilton, Billie Holiday, David Bowie, Galaxie 500, Hanne Hukkelberg, John Cale, Mercury Rev, Music_Alternative, Music_Electronica, Nicolai Dunger, Suicide, Various Artists, _MUSIC | Leave a comment

Lou Reed & John Cale – Waiting for the Man – Bataclan ’72

I’m just lookin for a dear, dear friend of mine.
I’m waiting for my man.

A rare and fascinating video of Lou Reed and John Cale performing the VU classic, Waiting for My Man at the Bataclan in Paris in 1972.

An interesting version of this great track too. Much different emphasis and slower tempo than the original.

I always assumed that at that point, Cale was more likely to slit Reed’s throat than play live with him!

I’m waiting for my man
Twenty-six dollars in my hand
Up to Lexington, 125
Feel sick and dirty, more dead than alive
I’m waiting for my man

Hey, white boy, what you doin uptown?
Hey, white boy, you chasin our women around?
Oh pardon me sir, its the furthest from my mind
I’m just lookin for a dear, dear friend of mine
I’m waiting for my man

Here he comes, he’s all dressed in black
PR shoes and a big straw hat
He’s never early, he’s always late
First thing you learn is you always gotta wait
I’m waiting for my man

Up to a brownstone, up three flights of stairs
Everybody’s pinned you, but nobody cares
He’s got the works, gives you sweet taste
Ah then you gotta split because you got no time to waste
I’m waiting for my man

Baby don’t you holler, darlin don’t you bawl and shout
I’m feeling good, you know I’m gonna work it on out
I’m feeling good, I’m feeling oh so fine
Until tomorrow, but thats just some other time
I’m waiting for my man

Big thanks to the original poster

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June 15, 2008 Posted by | John Cale, Lou Reed, Music_Alternative, The Velvet Underground, _ART, _MUSIC, _POETRY, _VIDEO | Leave a comment

Brian Eno & John Cale – Wrong Way Up

Brian Eno & John Cale – Wrong Way Up
Mp3 @ 256 kbps

Wrong Way Up was the 1990 album by music greats Brian Eno and John Cale.

The album features Electronic and Prog-Rock/Art Rock sound and features some of Eno’s most mainstream work.

The single “Been There, Done That” remains the only Eno single to ever reach an American chart. The cover picture is by Brian Eno.

Read more about Eno here; http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brian_Eno

Tracklisting

1. “Lay My Love” (4:44)
2. “One Word” (4:34)
3. “In the Backroom” (4:02)
4. “Empty Frame” (4:26)
5. “Cordoba” (4:22)
6. “Spinning Away” (5:27)
7. “Footsteps” (3:13)
8. “Been There, Done That” (2:52)
9. “Crime in the Desert” (3:42)
10. “The River” (4:23)



All tracks written by John Cale & Brian Eno


Personnel

* John Cale: vocals, pianos, keyboards, bass, harp, horn, dumbek, viola, strings, omnichord
* Brian Eno: vocals, keyboards, rhythm bed, Indian drum, guitars, Shinto bell, bass, little Nigerian organ
* Robert Ahwai: rhythm guitar
* Nell Catchpole: violins
* Rhett Davies: backing vocals
* Daryl Johnson: bass
* Ronald Jones: tabla, drums
* Bruce Lampcov: backing vocals
* Dave Young: guitars, bass

Here she be:

http://rapidshare.com/files/11…..Way_Up.zip
Big thanks to the original poster

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June 15, 2008 Posted by | Brian Eno, John Cale, Music_Ambient, _MUSIC | Leave a comment

Brian Eno & John Cale – One Word

Two greats of modern music combine here on this rare video.

This was a single from their collaborative album “Wrong Way Up”.

“Wrong Way Up” from 1990 featured an Electronic /Prog-Rock/Art Rock sound and features some of Eno’s most mainstream work.

The single “Been There, Done That” remains the only Eno single to ever reach an American chart.

Big thanks to the original poster

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June 15, 2008 Posted by | Brian Eno, John Cale, Music_Alternative, Music_Ambient, _MUSIC, _VIDEO | Leave a comment

Nick Cave, John Cale & Chrissie Hynde "Songwriters Circle " – from BBC TV 1999

Nick Cave, John Cale & Chrissie Hynde
Recorded on 9th July 1999
Songwriters Circle
BBC Live
Subterania Club, London

TV Broadcast

Three great artists (well, at least two! But some of Chrissie’s stuff is tops too, so let’s categorise her thusly also!) illustrate their songwriting craft in this special TV show broadcast by BBC TV in UK back in 1999.

They each rattle off four classics.

I remember taping this on video when it was first broadcast! I couldn’t even play the fucking tape now even if I could find it!

John Cale with Chrissy Hynde and Nick Cave perform Cale’s Ship of Fools

Tracklisting

01 – Intro (Nick Cave, John Cale & Chrissie Hynde) (01:22)
02 – Dying On The Vine (John Cale) (03:44)
03 – Talk Of The Town (Chrissie Hynde) (03:59)
04 – West Country Girl (Nick Cave) (02:01)
05 – Thoughtless Kind (John Cale) (02:24)
06 – Kid (Chrissie Hynde) (03:45)
07 – Henry Lee (Nick Cave) (03:29)
08 – Fear Is A Man’s Best Friend (John Cale) (04:20)
09 – I’ll Stand By You (Chrissie Hynde) (04:33)
10 – Into My Arms (Nick Cave) (04:44)
11 – Ship Of Fools (John Cale) (05:06)
12 – Back On The Chain Gang (Chrissie Hynde) (04:00)
13 – The Ship Song (Nick Cave) (03:46)

Here be Songsters;

Songwriters_Circle_BBC_Live_Subterania_Club__London Part 1

Songwriters_Circle_BBC_Live_Subterania_Club__LondonPart 2


Big thanks to taringa.net

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June 2, 2008 Posted by | Chrissie Hynde, John Cale, Music_Alternative, Music_Bootleg, Nick Cave, _MUSIC, _VIDEO | 2 Comments

The Velvet Underground – First Album Test Acetate (1966 ) – RARE!

The Velvet Underground – 1st Album Test Acetate ( 1966 )

The Mystery Of The Velvet Underground’s “Real First Record”
(And How The Only Existing Copy Was Bought For 75 Cents!!)

Any VU fan would already know the score, but if you don’t the whole story of this record is set out below.

The acetate was so pricey because it’s thought to be the only surviving copy of the early version of The Velvet Undergrounds’ classic eponymous album.

The 1966 recording features nine alternative versions of Velvet Underground tracks and is thought to be part of the much reported lost Scepter Studio Recordings.

Arguably the rarest and most important rock’n’roll /art artefact in the world”. They claim that this is, in fact, the original version of the Velvets’ legendary first album The Velvet Underground and Nico, their proof being that producer Andy Warhol apparently sent it as the finished article to Columbia records – who responded to the depravity within with the words to the effect of “do you think we’re out of our fucking minds?”

Norman Dolph’s original acetate pressing of the Scepter Studios material contains several recordings that would make it onto the final album, though many are different mixes of those recordings and three are different takes entirely.

The acetate was pressed on April 25, 1966, shortly after the recording sessions. It would resurface decades later when it was bought by collector Warren Hill of Montreal, Canada in September 2002 at a flea market in the Chelsea neighborhood of New York City for $0.75.

Hill put the album up for auction on eBay in November 2006.

On December 8, 2006, a winning bid for $155,401 was placed, but not honoured. The album was again placed for auction on eBay and was successfully sold on December 16, 2006 for $25,200.

It is important to note that ten songs were recorded during the Scepter sessions and only nine appear on the acetate cut. Dolph recalls “There She Goes Again” being the missing song (and, indeed, the version of “There She Goes Again” that appears on the final LP is attributed to the Scepter Studios session).

Though rumours have circulated concerning an eventual official release of this version of the album, this has yet to be confirmed or announced by any major record label. However, a ripped version of the acetate began circulating the internet in January 2007. Bootleg versions of the acetate tracks have also become available on vinyl and CD.

Tracklisting

  1. “European Son” – 8:49†
  2. “The Black Angel’s Death Song” – 3:13†
  3. “All Tomorrow’s Parties” – 5:51†
  4. “I’ll Be Your Mirror” – 2:07†
  5. “Heroin” – 6:12‡
  6. “Femme Fatale” – 2:36†
  7. “Venus In Furs” – 4:35‡
  8. “I’m Waiting For The Man” – 4:11‡
  9. “Run Run Run” – 4:23†
† – denotes track as same take, but different mix from album version
‡ – denotes track as different take from album version
Here she be:

velvet_underground_acetate.rar.html

thanks thewickedthing

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stupidand@gmail.com


May 21, 2008 Posted by | John Cale, Lou Reed, Music_Alternative, The Velvet Underground, _MUSIC | 1 Comment

Nico – The Marble Index (1968)

Nico – The Marble Index

Avant Garde | Pop | mp3 | 320 kbps | 63 mb | covers included

Here’s where Nico, in one fell swoop, became the Godmother of Goth!

The Marble Index was Nico’s second album, a complex and challenging work which could be described as a mixture of gothic-folk, neo-classical and avant-garde, recorded and released in 1968.
Where the statue stood,
Of Newton, with his prism and silent face,
The marble index of a mind forever
Voyaging through strange seas of thought alone

- William Wordsworth

The album featured long-term associate John Cale, who had worked briefly with Nico during her stint in The Velvet Underground. They would work together again many times in subsequent years.

Cale had an extensive background in the world of the avant-garde, having worked with minimalist composer LaMonte Young, among others.

Cale and Nico here created an album that radically deviated from traditional rock music song structures. Cale said it was the first rock album to do so. He also said that The Marble Index had “made a seminal contribution to the body of modern classical music“.

Nico wrote all her own songs on this album and accompanied herself on the harmonium, which has also been referred to as an “Indian pump organ”.

The lyrics are typically dark and the subject matter far different to the cliched themes of most songs written at that time – and indeed since.

The arrangements are abstract and, musically speaking, “cold”. The effect is akin to the psychological sound experimentation of famous electronic and serial composer, Karlheinz Stockhausen.

The Marble Index has been described as a “nightmare in sound”. It has influenced a wide array of genres in contemporary independent music. Artists such as Coil, Jocelyn Pook and Dead Can Dance, as well as numerous contemporary goth bands have all cited Nico as a seminal influence.

Sail away, sail away my little boy
Let the wind fill your heart with light and joy
Sail away my little boy
Let the rain wash away your cloudy days
Sail away into a dream
Let the wind send you a fantasy
Of the ancient silver sea
Now you see that only dreams

This was the second solo album from the late, one-time, Velvet Underground chanteuse, and it’s several galaxies removed from the conservative, pleasingly orchestrated songs of her debut album from merely one year before, Chelsea Girls.

Here Nico’s Gregorian chant melodies, cryptic lyrics, and wavering harmonium combine with always sparse, consistently absorbing arrangements (courtesy of fellow Velvets exile John Cale) to create a singular work fresh from the mausoleum.

While Marble Index is occasionally tedious, give a listen particularly to “Lawns of Dawns,” “Frozen Warnings,” and “Evening of Light,” and you will feel like you are peering into Hades itself.

This is one truly creepy and morbid-sounding album, but never over-the-top to the point of silliness like, say, Diamanda Galas’ Plague Mass.

You and your friends definitely won’t be bringing this along to the Halloween party at that abandoned, decaying mansion on the dead-end road.

A radical statement, highly recommended for those who dig chamber prog (e.g. Art Zoyd and Univers Zero), and maybe also fans of the more straightforward R.I.O. Those prog fans against a lot of avantness should most likely steer clear of this one.


Tracklisting

1. Prelude
2. Lawns Of Dawns
3. No One Is There
4. Ari’s Song
5. Facing The Wind
6. Julius Caesar (Memento Hodie)
7. Frozen Warnings
8. Evening Of Light
9. Roses In The Snow
10. Nibelungen

Here’s Nico;

Nico_Marble_Index.rar

April 13, 2008 Posted by | John Cale, Music_Alternative, Nico, The Velvet Underground, _MUSIC | 1 Comment

The Velvet Underground – The Very Best of the Velvet Underground


The Very Best of the Velvet Underground
(2006)

A great collection of 18 great Velevets tracks.

It’s always difficult to compile a Best Of VU, aside from subjectivity on individual tracks, the work is so consistently magnificent that you really need to listen to all their albums.

I personally much prefer the avant-garde edginess of the first two albums – The Velvet Underground & Nico and White Light/White Heat – when John Cale’s post-modern music sensibilities perfectly meshed with Reed’s poetry of the real.

This was sold as the definitive collection from one of the most influential bands of all time. Contains all their singles & album highlights. Featuring six tracks from their classic, seminal debut album, ‘The Velvet Underground & Nico’ (1967). 18 tracks in all packaged in a slipcase.


Thought of you as my mountain top,
Thought of you as my peak.
Thought of you as everything,
I’ve had but couldn’t keep.
I’ve had but couldn’t keep.
Linger on, your pale blue eyes.
Linger on, your pale blue eyes.
If I could make the world as pure
and strange as what I see,

I’d put you in the mirror,
I put in front of me.




Most fans of the VU are very dedicated and over-familiar with this legendary band’s classic albums. That means they may not like this non-chronological sequence of tracks. I find it a refreshing listening experience because it highlights the individual songs instead of the overall feel of those album masterpieces.

It’s great to hear Pale Blue Eyes after All Tomorrow’s Parties and to have it followed by Femme Fatale, it somehow seems right. Another refreshing sequence is the wistful Sunday Morning being followed by Rock `n Roll, which concludes the album.

Of course this collection excludes some familiar tracks like The Gift but it does include most of their most accessible numbers like Sweet Jane, Waiting For The Man Venus In Furs and the aforementioned Pale Blue Eyes. Plus the controversial and experimental White Light White Heat and the overwhelming Heroin. A good selection, in my book, that’s why I don’t hesitate to give it five stars.

- Amazon Reviewer

Tracklisting

01. Sweet Jane
02. I’m Sticking with You (1969 version)
03. I’m Waiting for the Man
04. What Goes On
05. White Light/White Heat
06. All Tomorrow’s Parties
07. Pale Blue Eyes
08. Femme Fatale
09. Heroin
10. Here She Comes Now
11. Stephanie Says
12. Venus in Furs
13. Beginning to See the Light
14. I Heard Her Call My Name
15. Some Kinda Love (alternate take)
16. I Can’t Stand It
17. Sunday Morning
18. Rock and Roll

Here be greatness;

http://lix.in/44d598

http://lix.in/e13d88

Thanks to the original poster

//myimg.info/thumbs/opt0447042001205737261x.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

stupidand@gmail.com

April 12, 2008 Posted by | John Cale, Lou Reed, Moe Tucker, Music_Alternative, Sterling Morrison, The Velvet Underground, _MUSIC | Leave a comment

Velvet Underground & Nico – Deluxe Edition

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Velvet Underground & Nico – Velvet Underground & Nico – Deluxe Edition


Extra Tracks
Original Recording Remastered

I’m not prone to hyperbole, but the Velvet Underground & Nico is surely one of the greatest albums ever made, or ever will be made, in the history of the universe!

I fucking love it to death, anyway!

This album has been hugely influential on countless great groups that came after.

What’s amazing is how fresh the album sounds. It seems to exist somewhere out of time.

This album was hugely innovative in terms of its musicality and edginess, primarily thanks to the avant-garde sensibilities of the great John Cale combined with Lou Reed’s wonderful, poetry of the streets, which called to mind great writers such as Huber Selby Jr (who I fucking love), Burroughs, Celine etc. Sterling Morrison and Moe tucker also contributed immensely to the power of the music.

Each song on this classic album is a masterpiece in its own right.

This is true art. Timeless art.

Up to a Brownstone, up three flights of stairs
Everybody’s pinned you, but nobody cares
He’s got the works, gives you sweet taste
Ah then you gotta split because you got no time to waste
I’m waiting for my man
Baby don’t you holler, darlin’ don’t you bawl and shout
I’m feeling good, you know I’m gonna work it on out
I’m feeling good, I’m feeling oh so fine
Until tomorrow, but that’s just some other time

The Velvet Underground and Nico was the debut album by The Velvets and vocal collaborator Nico, and was originally released in March 1967 by Verve Records.

//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/7/74/VU%26N_CD_comparison.JPG/150px-VU%26N_CD_comparison.JPG” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.In 2002, Universal released this two-disc “Deluxe Edition” set containing both stereo and mono mixes of the entire album, along with five songs taken from Nico’s Chelsea Girl (“Little Sister”, “Winter Song”, “It Was a Pleasure Then”, “Chelsea Girls”, and “Wrap Your Troubles in Dreams”) and single versions of “All Tomorrow’s Parties”, “I’ll Be Your Mirror”, “Sunday Morning”, and “Femme Fatale”. A limited edition release of the set featured a reproduction of the original cover’s peelable banana sticker.

Recorded in 1966 during Andy Warhol’s Exploding Plastic Inevitable multimedia event tour, The Velvet Underground and Nico would gain notoriety for its experimentalist performance sensibilites, as well as its focus on controversial subject matter in songs such as “Heroin”.

Though largely ignored upon its release, it has since become one of the most influential and critically lauded rock albums in history, appearing as #13 on Rolling Stone magazine’s list of the 500 greatest albums of all time as well as being added to the 2006 National Recording Registry by the Librarian of Congress.

I am tired, I am weary
I could sleep for a thousand years
A thousand dreams that would awake me
Different colors made of tears
Kiss the boot of shiny, shiny leather
Shiny leather in the dark
Tongue of thongs, the belt that does await you
Strike, dear mistress, and cure his heart
Severin, Severin, speak so slightly
Severin, down on your bended knee
Taste the whip, in love not given lightly
Taste the whip, now plead for me

The Velvet Underground and Nico was recorded with the first professional line up of The Velvet Underground, including Lou Reed, John Cale, Sterling Morrison and Maureen “Moe” Tucker; with Nico, who would occasionally sing lead with the band at the instigation of their mentor and manager, Andy Warhol.

//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/4/41/The_Velvet_Underground_and_Nico_back_cover.JPG” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.Nico sings lead on three of the album’s tracks (“Femme Fatale”, “All Tomorrow’s Parties” and “I’ll Be Your Mirror”) and back up on “Sunday Morning”.

In 1966, as the album was being recorded, this was also the line up that would perform live as a part of Warhol’s Exploding Plastic Inevitable.

The bulk of the songs that would become The Velvet Underground and Nico were recorded in mid-April, 1966, during a four-day stint at Scepter Studios, a decrepit recording studio in New York City. This recording session was financed by Warhol and Columbia Records’ sales executive Norman Dolph, who also acted as an engineer with John Licata. Though exact total cost of the project is unknown, estimates vary from $1500 to $3000.

There is some confusion as to who actually produced The Velvet Underground and Nico. Although Andy Warhol was the only formally credited producer, he had very little direct influence or authority over the album beyond paying for the recording sessions. In fact, several other individuals who worked on the album are often mentioned as the album’s technical producer.

Lou Reed discussed the matter in an interview:

He just made it possible for us to be ourselves and go right ahead with it because he was Andy Warhol. In a sense, he really did produce it, because he was this umbrella that absorbed all the attacks when we weren’t large enough to be attacked… and as a consequence of him being the producer, we’d just walk in and set up and do what we always did and no one would stop it because Andy was the producer.
Of course he didn’t know anything about record production—but he didn’t have to. He just sat there and said “Oooh, that’s fantastic,” and the engineer would say, “Oh yeah! Right! It is fantastic, isn’t it?
I’ll be your mirror
Reflect what you are, in case you don’t know
I’ll be the wind, the rain and the sunset
The light on your door to show that you’re home
When you think the night has seen your mind
That inside you’re twisted and unkind
Let me stand to show that you are blind
Please put down your hands
‘Cause I see you
I find it hard to believe you don’t know
the beauty you are


The Velvet Underground and Nico is sometimes referred to as the “banana album” as it features a Warhol print of a banana on the cover. Early copies of the album invited the owner to “Peel slowly and see”; peeling back the banana skin revealed a flesh-colored banana underneath.

A special machine was needed to manufacture these covers (one of the causes of the album’s delayed release), but MGM paid for costs figuring that any ties to Warhol would boost sales of the album.

When the Velvets recorded this debut, they were best known as the protégés of Andy Warhol (who of course designed the sleeve), and as a grating, combustive live band.

Fuelled by drummer Moe Tucker’s no-nonsense wham and John Cale’s howling viola, some of the straight-up rock & roll and arty noise extravaganzas here bear that out.

But before Lou Reed was singing about sadomasochism and drug deals and writing lyrics inspired by his favorite poets, he was a pop songwriter, and this album has some of his prettiest tunes, mostly sung by Nico, the German dark angel who appeared with the band only this disc.

Even the sordid rockers are underscored by graceful pop tricks, like the two-chord flutter at the center of the classic “Heroin.”

- Amazon

Reviews

Tracklisting

Disc: 1

1. Sunday Morning
2. I’m Waiting For The Man
3. Femme Fatale
4. Venus In Furs
5. Run Run Run
6. All Tomorrow’s Parties
7. Heroin
8. There She Goes Again
9. I’ll Be Your Mirror
10. The Black Angel’s Death Song
11. European Son
12. Little Sister
13. Winter Song
14. It Was A Pleasure Then
15. Chelsea Girls
16. Wrap Your Troubles In Dreams

Disc: 2

1. Sunday Morning
2. I’m Waiting For The Man
3. Femme Fatale
4. Venus In Furs
5. Run Run Run
6. All Tomorrow’s Parties
7. Heroin
8. There She Goes Again
9. I’ll Be Your Mirror
10. The Black Angel’s Death Song
11. European Son
12. All Tomorrow’s Parties
13. I’ll Be Your Mirror (Mono)
14. Sunday Morning
15. Femme Fatale (Mono)

//ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/31ZNZFP3GNL._SL500_AA240_.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.Here be beauty;

no pass

You have to dl the 2 separate files

Mirror
VU1_.rar
VU2_.rar

pw for MIRROR= posted_first_at_chocoreve

//myimg.info/thumbs/opt0447042001205737261x.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

stupidand@gmail.com


April 12, 2008 Posted by | John Cale, Lou Reed, Moe Tucker, Music_Alternative, Nicolas Hodge, Sterling Morrison, The Velvet Underground, _MUSIC | 4 Comments

   

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