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Big Joe Williams: Nine String Guitar Blues (1990) @320


Big Joe Williams: Nine String Guitar Blues (1990) @320

Big Joe Williams (October 16, 1903 – December 17, 1982) was an American Delta blues musician and songwriter, known for his characteristic style of guitar-playing and his nine-string guitar.

We love Big Joe …. Here’s more Big Joe on Last Bastion HERE!!

Most famous of his many great works is the wonderful Baby Please Don’t Go – which is described here, together with some Big Joe performances; Baby Please Don’t Go


Big Joe Williams
(1903-1982)

by Barry Lee Pearson

Big Joe Williams may have been the most cantankerous human being who ever walked the earth with guitar in hand. At the same time, he was an incredible blues musician: a gifted songwriter, a powerhouse vocalist, and an exceptional idiosyncratic guitarist. Despite his deserved reputation as a fighter (documented in Michael Bloomfield’s bizarre booklet Me and Big Joe), artists who knew him well treated him as a respected elder statesman. Even so, they may not have chosen to play with him, because — as with other older Delta artists — if you played with him you played by his rules.

As protégé David “Honeyboy” Edwards described him, Williams in his early Delta days was a walking musician who played work camps, jukes, store porches, streets, and alleys from New Orleans to Chicago.

He recorded through five decades for Vocalion, Okeh, Paramount, Bluebird, Prestige, Delmark, and many others. As a youngster, I met him in Delmark owner Bob Koester’s store, the Jazz Record Mart. At the time, Big Joe was living there when not on his constant travels. According to Charlie Musselwhite, he and Big Joe kicked off the blues revival in Chicago in the ’60s.

When I saw him playing at Mike Bloomfield’s “blues night” at the Fickle Pickle, Williams was playing an electric nine-string guitar through a small ramshackle amp with a pie plate nailed to it and a beer can dangling against that. When he played, everything rattled but Big Joe himself. The total effect of this incredible apparatus produced the most buzzing, sizzling, African-sounding music I have ever heard.

Anyone who wants to learn Delta blues must one day come to grips with the idea that the guitar is a drum as well as a melody-producing instrument. A continuous, African-derived musical tradition emphasizing percussive techniques on stringed instruments from the banjo to the guitar can be heard in the music of Delta stalwarts Charley Patton, Fred McDowell, and Bukka White.

Each employed decidedly percussive techniques, beating on his box, knocking on the neck, snapping the strings, or adding buzzing or sizzling effects to augment the instrument’s percussive potential.

However, Big Joe Williams, more than any other major recording artist, embodied the concept of guitar-as-drum, bashing out an incredible series of riffs on his G-tuned nine-string for over 60 years.

Tracklisting

01. I Got the Best King Biscuit
02. Haunted House Blues
03. I Done Stop Hollering
04. I Got a Bad Mind
05. Long Tall Woman, Skinny Mama Too
06. Stack of Dollars
07. Indiana Woman Blues
08. My Baby Keeps Hanging Around
09. Jiving the Blues
10. Jump, Baby Jump!



Here’s Big Joe

http://www.shareonall.com/BJW90_mbbi_rar.htm

PW : vVv

Thanks to the original poster

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May 6, 2008 Posted by | Big Joe Williams, Music_Blues, _MUSIC | Leave a comment

Big Joe Williams – Baby Please Don’t Go


I b’lieve I’ll leaves you here
‘Cause you got me way up here
An you don’t feel my care
Now, baby please don’t go


Big Joe Williams (October 16, 1903 – December 17, 1982) was an American Delta blues musician and songwriter, known for his characteristic style of guitar-playing and his nine-string guitar.

We love Big Joe …. Here’s more Big Joe on Last Bastion HERE!!

Here we give you two great versions by Big Joe Williams of the peerless blues classic Baby Please Don’t Go!
  • The wonderful original recording from 1935;
  • Big Joe Williams performing the song live much later, in 1963 from a rare TV clip.



Now, baby please don’t go
Now, baby please don’t go home
Baby, please don’t go
Back to New Orleans
And get your cold ice cream

I b’lieve that a man done gone
I b’lieve that a man done gone
I b’lieve that a man done gone
To the county farm
Now, with his long chain on

Turn your lamp down low
You turn your lamp down low
Turn your lamp down low
I cried all night long
Now, baby please don’t go

I begged you night befo’
I begged you night befo’
Begged you night befo’
Turn your lamp down low
Now, baby please don’t go

I b’lieve my baby done lied
I b’lieve my baby done lied
I b’lieve my baby she lied
Says she didn’t have a man
Now, while I had my time

‘Fore I’d be yo’ dog
I swore I’d leave your do’
‘Fore I’d be yo’ dog
I’d pack my trunk this mo’nin, baby
Go back to Rolling Fork, umm

I b’lieve I’ll leave, here
I b’lieve I’ll leave you here
I b’lieve I’ll leaves you here
‘Cause you got me way up here
An you don’t feel my care

Now, baby please don’t go
Oh baby, please don’t go, umm
Now, baby please don’t go
Back to New Orleans
Even though I love you so

I b’lieve you tryin’ just leave me here
Why leave yo’ daddy, here?
Why leave yo’ daddy, here?
You got me way down here
An you don’t feel my care.

Baby Please Don’t Go is one of the most famous of all blues songs and was first recorded by Big Joe Williams in 1935.

The song is related to, and influenced by, a group of early 20th century blues and work songs that include “Alabama Bound”, “Another Man Done Gone”, “Don’t Leave Me Here”, and “Turn Your Lamp Down Low”.

The song explains why a man begs his girl to come back, and what might happen should his girl leave him.

Baby Please Don’t Go has become a blues and rock standard, and has been recorded by countless artists.

This classic track has been covered by artists, not just in the Blues sphere – where practically everyone’s covered it – but also in the more mainstream music world, by artists ranging from the truly sublime (Bob Dylan, Them, Taste etc) to the truly ridiculous (e.g. Aerosmith, some cnut from American Idol, etc)!


I first heard this song years ago via the amazing version cut by Van Morrison and Them back in 1964. It totally fucking blew me away!


Selective list of recorded versions

1935 Big Joe Williams (Bluebird records), also re-recorded in 1941

1936 Tampa Kid (Decca records)

1936 Sam Montgomery (ARC records)

1939 Leonard ‘Baby Doo’ Caston

1960 Mance Lipscomb (Arhoolie)

1962 Bob Dylan, officially released 2005 as a download only

1964 Them (Decca UK)

1967 Amboy Dukes

1975 AC/DC (Alberts/EMI)

2004 Aerosmith

Budgie

Zakk Wylde’s Pride & Glory

Paul Butterfield

The Doors

Beausoleil

Lightnin’ Hopkins

Al Kooper

John Mellencamp

Van Morrison

Ted Nugent

Tom Petty & The Heartbreakers

Paul Revere & the Raiders

Taste

Muddy Waters

Bill Wyman

The Damn Fine Band


Big Joe Williams – Baby Please Don’t Go (1935)


On the first piece – an audio clip – we get Joe’s amazing original recording.

In 1934, Joe was in St. Louis, where he met record producer Lester Melrose who later signed him to a contract with Bluebird Records in 1935.

Joe stayed with Bluebird for ten years, recording such blues hits as this one, “Baby, Please Don’t Go” (1935), and “Crawlin’ King Snake” (1941). Both songs were later covered by many other performers.

With Bluebird, Joe also recorded with other blues singers, including John Lee “Sonny Boy” Williamson, Robert Nighthawk and Peetie Wheatstraw.

On this famous cut, Big Joe is accompanied by Old Tracy on the one-string-fiddle, and Chasey Collins on washboard!


The instrumentation is great here. The melancholy one-string fiddle sounds fantastic!

The recording date was Thursday, 31 October 1935 at RCA Studios in Chicago.



Baby Please Don’t Go 3:21 Trk 2
(Joe Williams)
Big Joe Williams & William’s Washboard Blues Singers
Joe Williams – vocal & guitar
‘Dad’ Trace – 1 string fiddle
And Chasey ‘Kokomo’ Collins – washboard.
Recorded RCA Studio C, Chicago, IL., Oct. 31, 1935
Original issue Bluebird 6200/BS-96244-1.
Album: Vol. 1 ‘Walk Right In’
Bluebird Records ‘When The Sun Goes Down’


Big Joe Williams – Baby Please Don’t Go (1963)


Big Joe Williams here performing the song live and unaccompanied, much later, in 1963 from a rare TV clip.

May 2, 2008 Posted by | Big Joe Williams, Music_Blues, _MUSIC, _VIDEO | Leave a comment