STUPID and Contagious

Our holiday home from stupidd.blogspot.com !

Bo Diddley – His Best (1955-66)

Bo Diddley – His Best (1955-66)
FLAC (cue+log+covers) | 335 Mb | RS
Released: 1997 | Label:MCA / Chess (MCD 09373) | Genre:Blues

Wonderful collection from the late great bluesman!

The Chess Records’ “His Best” compilations are generally outstanding, and the Bo Diddley installation is no exception.

Outside of purchasing Bo’s key studio albums, or shelling out for the comprehensive box set, HIS BEST is the Bo Diddley disc to have, since it covers all of his essential hits, from “Roadrunner” to “I’m a Man” to “Hey! Bo Diddley” to “Who Do You Love?”

But the real surprise here is the quality of the remastering, which brings out a real crispness and edge to the recordings, and the “longer cuts” that result from re-edits to the original masters. Also here, of course, are the infectious, hugely influential Bo Didley beat, the rumbling, ch-chinking guitar, Bo’s neo-blues wails and self-mythologizing lyrics, and everything else that makes this music some of the absolute best and most important in the chapters of early rock & roll.

Tracklisting

01. Bo Diddley [2:46]
02. I’m A Man [3:01]
03. You Don’t Love Me (You Don’t Care) [2:52]
04. Diddley Daddy [2:27]
05. Pretty Thing [2:50]
06. Bring It To Jerome [2:29]
07. I’m Looking For A Woman [2:33]
08. Who Do You Love? [2:29]
09. Hey Bo Diddley [2:12]
10. Mona (aka I Need You Baby) [2:21]
11. Before You Accuse Me [3:05]
12. Say Man [3:14]
13. Dearest Darling [2:52]
14. Crackin’ Up [2:06]
15. The Story Of Bo Diddley [2:52]
16. Road Runner [2:47]
17. Pills [2:50]
18. I Can Tell [4:34]
19. You Can’t Judge A Book By It’s Cover [3:15]
20. Ooh Baby [3:49]


Personnel:

Bo Diddley (vocals, guitar, violin)
Jerome Green (vocals, maracas)
Peggy Jones (guitar, background vocals)
Jody Williams, Ricky Jolivet (guitar)
Edward Drennon (electric violin)
Billy Boy Arnold, Little Walter, Lester Davenport (harmonica)
Otis Spann, Lafayette Leake (piano)
Frank Kirkland, Clifton James, Billy Downing, Edell Robertson (drums)
Willie Dixon, James Bradford, Jesse James Johnson, Chester Lindsey (bass)
Cornelia Redmond (tambourine)
The Bo-ettes (aka The Cookies), Bobby Baskerville, The Moonglows, The Flamingos, The Carnations (background vocals)

Here she be:

FLAC1 99,66 Mb
FLAC2 99,66 Mb
FLAC3 99,66 Mb
FLAC4 36,34 Mb

Artwork 18,86 Mb

5% recovery

Pass: drucen

Big thanks to drucen



We do not host any files here. If this post contains a link to content hosted elsewhere, this is content found by a simple search on the worldwide freedom web. However, if for some valid reason, you object to a said content, or any content here, please let us know and we will remove the content in question.

Any content linked to here is only meant as a taster for the original work itself and is posted on the strict understanding that anyone who downloads the taster, deletes said content within 24 hours. We would assume that these fans will then buy the original work and we greatly encourage them to do so.

Mail us: stupidand@gmail.com

Home Art Babes Cartoons Dylan Editorial Music Videos Other

October 11, 2008 Posted by | Bo Diddley, Music_Blues, _MUSIC | Leave a comment

Bo Diddley – The London Bo Diddley Sessions (1973)

Bo Diddley – The London Bo Diddley Sessions (1973)
Rip-Vinyl @320

After Howlin’ Wolf made the Billboard album charts in 1970 with his London Howlin’ Wolf Sessions release, Chess duly began preparing similarly titled albums by its remaining roster of stars — Muddy Waters and Chuck Berry followed the Wolf — and in 1973 this Bo Diddley release came along.

Actually, a lot of it was done in Chicago, with the London portion of the sessions added, seemingly to justify the title. And it did sell better than Bo’s other original albums of this era.

It remains in print on compact disc, one of a only handful of his albums so released. As with Muddy Waters’ London Muddy Waters Sessions album, Bo’s presence was somewhat overwhelmed by the massive number of session musicians involved (well-meaning though they may have been) and more so, because Bo was still looking for a new sound, whereas Muddy knew what he was about.

The songs are pretty fair — a mix of soul and funk — with elements of his old sound, and this is probably the best compromise he achieved during this phase of his career, between the old and the new.

Tracklisting

01. Don’t Want No Lying Woman
02. Bo Diddley
03. Going Down
04. Make a Hit Record
05. Bo-Jam
06. Husband-In-Law
07. Do the Robot
08. Sneakers Ona Rooster
09.Get out of my Life

Personnel

Gene Barge: Saxophone
Crystal Brake: Vocals
Bo Diddley: Guitar, Vocals
Ray Fenwick: Guitar
Nigel Grainge: Percussion
Eddie Hardin: Organ
Marilyn Haywood: Vocals
Willie Henderson: Saxophone
Arthur Hoyle: Trumpet
Derf Reklaw-Raheem: Conductor
Angela Smith: Vocals
Tennyson Stephens: Piano
Mary Ann Stewart: Vocals
Greg “Fingers” Taylor: Vocals
Cookie Vee: Vocals
Murray Watson: Trumpet

Here be Bo
http://www.shareonall.com/LBDS_tzkb.rar

PW : vVv

Big thanks to the original poster

Mail us: stupidand@gmail.com

Home Art Babes Cartoons Dylan Editorial Music Videos Other

June 5, 2008 Posted by | Bo Diddley, Music_Blues, _MUSIC | Leave a comment

Bo Diddley – Have Guitar, Will Travel (1959)

Bo Diddley – Have Guitar, Will Travel (1959)
@VBR

Amazingly, Bo Diddley’s third album — containing classics such as “Cops and Robbers,” “Run Diddley Daddy,” and “Mona (I Need You Baby)” — has only been reissued on vinyl, and even that’s out of print.

More than one British Invasion band learned what they needed to know about American rock & roll from the songs on this record (the Stones cut “Cops and Robbers” at their earliest recording session, and later released a killer version of “Mona,” though the most interesting British version of the latter was done by an all-girl band with an attitude called the Liverbirds).

This record is every bit as raunchy as Diddley’s first two albums (the guitars may even be crunchier, and the singing shows more range), and has more than enough to recommend it to collectors and fans.

This is the album that began the funny cover photos on Diddley’s records.

Tracklisting

01.She’s Alright: McDaniel
02.Cops and Robbers: Harris
03.Run Diddley Daddy: McDaniel
04.Mumblin’ Guitar: Diddley
05.I Need You Baby (Mona): McDaniel
06.Say Man: Diddley, McDaniel
07.Nursery Rhyme: McDaniel
08.I Love You So: Diddley
09.Spanish Guitar
10.Dancing Girl
11.Come on Baby

Here be Bo

http://www.shareonall.com/BDHGWT_jtxt.rar

PW : vVv

Big thanks to the original poster

Mail us: stupidand@gmail.com

Home Art Babes Cartoons Dylan Editorial Music Videos Other

June 5, 2008 Posted by | Bo Diddley, Music_Blues, _MUSIC | Leave a comment

Bo Diddley – Got My Own Bag of Tricks (1971)

Bo Diddley – Got My Own Bag of Tricks (1971)
mp3 @320

For a lot of years, this double-album compilation — sort of the Bo Diddley equivalent to Chuck Berry’s The Great 28 or the first two Chuck Berry Golden Decade sets — was the best collection of Diddley’s stuff on the market, containing all of his best known songs and some of the best of his album tracks up through the mid-’60s.

After it was deleted in America, it was available as an import from Canada and then Europe for a long time. On vinyl it is one place to start, although the double-CD Chess Box has supplanted it in many respects.

Tracklisting

01.Bo Diddley
02.I’m A Man
03.Bring It To Jerome
04.Diddley Daddy
05.Before You Accuse Me
06.Pretty Thing
07.Who Do You Love
08.Dearest Darling
09.You can’t Judge A Book By It’s Cover
10.Hey’ Bo Diddley
11.Say Man
12.I’m Looking For A Woman
13.Road Runner
14.Mona (I Need You Baby)
15.Cops And Robbers
16.Story Of Bo Diddley
17.Hey, Boss Man
18.Hush Your Mouth
19.500% More Man
20.Bo’s Blues
21.Nursery Rhyme
22.Whoa, Mule
23.Live My Life
24.Bo Diddley Is Loose

Bo is loose here;

http://www.shareonall.com/BDGMOBO_jhcf.rar

PW : vVv


Big thanks to the original poster

Mail us: stupidand@gmail.com

Home Art Babes Cartoons Dylan Editorial Music Videos Other

June 5, 2008 Posted by | Bo Diddley, Music_Blues, _MUSIC | Leave a comment

Bo Diddley – Bo Diddley 1958

A real early outing by the man who gave us true rock ‘n’ roll.

The boogie’s running high in the sky tonight!

We miss him.

Tracklisting

01 Bo Diddley
02 I’m A Man
03 Bring It To Jerome
04 Before You Accuse Me
05 Hey Bo Diddley
06 Dearest Darling
07 Hush Your Mouth
08 Say Boss Man
09 Diddley Daddy
10 Diddy Wah Diddy
11 Who Do You Love
12 Pretty Thing

Here be Bo

Bo Diddley – Self-Titled 1958

Big thanks to the original poster

Mail us: stupidand@gmail.com

Home Art Babes Cartoons Dylan Editorial Music Videos Other

June 5, 2008 Posted by | Bo Diddley, Music_Blues, _MUSIC | Leave a comment

Ten Reasons Bo Diddley Is the Forgotten Heavyweight Champion of Rock

http://www.popmatters.com/pm/features


Ten Reasons Bo Diddley Is the Forgotten Heavyweight Champion of Rock

Here are 10 reasons why the recently departed Diddley is a bona fide rock legend and hugely important in the history of popular music for his vital role in the creation of rock ‘n’ roll in the 1950s.

by Matt Cibula

1. Bo Diddley got his very name from fighting.
Eight-year-old Ellas McDaniel moved to Chicago from McComb, Mississippi, with his mother’s cousin. This wasn’t unusual—the South Side was full of kids from Mississippi. But Ellas was as Country as Country could be, and he learned that that don’t play in Chi. Littler kids were whippin’ up on him, so he learned to fight back. One day, while proving something to some kid with his fists, a neighborhood girl said, “Man, you’re a bo diddley!” No one knew what she meant, but the name stuck.

2. Bo did the boxing thing, and quit for the right reason.
He actually used the name “Bo Diddley” when he started boxing, and it gained him some notoriety—his big ol’ country fists gained him even more notoriety. Don’t be fooled by the glasses and the plaid suits, people: this was a bad man in the ring. But he quit when he got married—Mrs. Diddley didn’t like it, and that’s the only respectable reason for a man to give up the game. But that’s where he met Roosevelt Jackson, his first bass player and they formed the Hipsters together in 1945.

3. He had the greatest corner man in early rock history.
When Bo taught Jerome Green to play maracas, he did more than just add a band member—he invented Flavor Flav and Keith Richards and all the other great second bananas in modern music. Jerome was there when Bo needed him, and knew when to fade into the background or step up. The constant rhythmic rattle is crucial to Bo’s sound, whether it’s the rudimentary triplets on “I’m a Man” or the relatively complex shaking of more uptempo stuff. And Jerome knew when to speak up, too. Witness the great vocal turn on “Bring it to Jerome”, and is it any surprise that Bo’s only Top 20 hit was “Say Man”, which consists solely of Bo and Jerome insulting each other in a way that white America had never heard before?

4. No one had a harder first punch.
No one. He just came out swinging with his first single, undeniably the greatest two sides ever released together: “Bo Diddley” backed with “I’m a Man.” They’re hard as hell, dude, and no mistake. Check the combo of the African drum sound with that echoey guitar sound on “Bo Diddley”—what the hell is that, an e-bow? Damn. Unapologetic apple-cart upsetting, with his very first song. And “I’m a Man” is so ballsy that I’m surprised our nation survived it at all. Check the opening: guitar/harmonica/maracas/drums doing that “da DA da da” Muddy Waters beat, and then arguably the best opening lines ever written by anyone, including Shakespeare and Emily Dickinson and Gabriel García fuckin’ Márquez: “Now when I was a little boy / At the age of five / I had something in my pocket / Keep a lot of folks alive.” This song became the immediate blueprint for heavy metal: that guitar is fuzzy and stingy and wobbly and it’s just all about power. “I’m a Man” is the uppercut to the jab of “Bo Diddley” and neither one has ever been beaten.

5. He created Muhammad Ali… and Mike Tyson.
Bo Diddley didn’t need to scream to make America’s blood run cold. He just stood there and declared himself the toughest mother alive: “I walk 47 miles of barbed wire / I use a cobra snake for a necktie / I got a brand-new house on the roadside / And it’s made out of rattlesnake hide / I got a brand-new chimney made on top / Made out of a human skull” is just some sick-ass punch-drunk signifying, especially when you realize that this was recorded in 1956. (It’s much better than that “I wanna eat his children” shite that Iron Mike was trying to run on Lennox a couple of months ago.) This kind of writin’-is-fightin’ approach has a long gloried history in black culture, but Bo put it out there first, and he turned it out pretty damn nice. So a few years later when a brash young loudmouth named Cassius Clay came out of Louisville spouting some brash braggart street poetry, people shouldn’t have been gasping in shock—they’d already heard it on their radios. This isn’t far-fetched, people: Ali is known to have appeared on the BBC with Bo in the early 1960s, talking about how he loved the music of his friend Bo. So there.

6. Who invented rope-a-dope?
You know who. Everyone always puts Bo Diddley in that “everything he did sounded the same” box… but that just proves that they never actually listened to anything he recorded. The man was a chameleon, a Proteus of pop. We’ve already established that he’s a rocker and a bluesman, but he was also a crooner along the lines of Jackie Wilson and Elvis Presley on “Mona”, a doo-wop guy on “Crackin’ Up”, and a specialist of the talkin’ blues on “The Story of Bo Diddley” (from 1959, when Bob Dylan was just graduating from high school). He might have invented surf guitar with “Mumblin’ Guitar” and “Aztec”, both recorded before 1960. He launched the Rolling Stones; a cover of “Mona” was their first big hit, but they called it “I Need You Baby”, which is probably the first reason I ever had for why I hate on the Stones. Both Buddy Holly and the Animals covered “Bo Diddley”, which is weird, because you wouldn’t think two different guys would have a hit with a song named for its songwriter. (Holly is actually double-guilty on this one, because “Not Fade Away” is basically an uncredited cover of “Bo Diddley” anyway, what with its blatant beatjacking.) Speaking of which…

7. That beat is straight out of Africa… and the gym.
Okay, okay, the “Bo Diddley beat.” Whether you believe musicologists who say that the three-beat/two-beat “bomp bomp bomp, bomp bomp” thing arises directly out of Afro-Cuban tradition, or Bo himself, who claims variously that he heard the beat in a movie about Indians or that he invented it accidentally while trying to play “The Green Green Grass of Home” on guitar, you must realize that that thing is one of the basic building blocks of modern music. It became his signature style due to his use of it in “Bo Diddley”, “Who Do You Love”, “Cadillac”, “Back Home”, and other songs, but it seems to come from a deeper place, a more fundamental part of the heart. But think about it—doesn’t it sound kinda like a boxing cadence? It always sounds to me like Bo’s working the speedbag on these numbers: bam bam bam is the set-up, and then wham wham is the payoff.

8-10. Bo Diddley is more important than the Stones, more crucial than the Beatles, more fundamental to rock as a lyricist and an instrumentalist and a conceptualist than Elvis Presley or Buddy Holly or Brian Wilson.

So where’s the love for the champ?

June 5, 2008 Posted by | Bo Diddley, OTHER_ARTICLE, _MUSIC, _OTHER | Leave a comment

Ten Reasons Bo Diddley Is the Forgotten Heavyweight Champion of Rock

http://www.popmatters.com/pm/features


Ten Reasons Bo Diddley Is the Forgotten Heavyweight Champion of Rock

Here are 10 reasons why the recently departed Diddley is a bona fide rock legend and hugely important in the history of popular music for his vital role in the creation of rock ‘n’ roll in the 1950s.

by Matt Cibula

1. Bo Diddley got his very name from fighting.
Eight-year-old Ellas McDaniel moved to Chicago from McComb, Mississippi, with his mother’s cousin. This wasn’t unusual—the South Side was full of kids from Mississippi. But Ellas was as Country as Country could be, and he learned that that don’t play in Chi. Littler kids were whippin’ up on him, so he learned to fight back. One day, while proving something to some kid with his fists, a neighborhood girl said, “Man, you’re a bo diddley!” No one knew what she meant, but the name stuck.

2. Bo did the boxing thing, and quit for the right reason.
He actually used the name “Bo Diddley” when he started boxing, and it gained him some notoriety—his big ol’ country fists gained him even more notoriety. Don’t be fooled by the glasses and the plaid suits, people: this was a bad man in the ring. But he quit when he got married—Mrs. Diddley didn’t like it, and that’s the only respectable reason for a man to give up the game. But that’s where he met Roosevelt Jackson, his first bass player and they formed the Hipsters together in 1945.

3. He had the greatest corner man in early rock history.
When Bo taught Jerome Green to play maracas, he did more than just add a band member—he invented Flavor Flav and Keith Richards and all the other great second bananas in modern music. Jerome was there when Bo needed him, and knew when to fade into the background or step up. The constant rhythmic rattle is crucial to Bo’s sound, whether it’s the rudimentary triplets on “I’m a Man” or the relatively complex shaking of more uptempo stuff. And Jerome knew when to speak up, too. Witness the great vocal turn on “Bring it to Jerome”, and is it any surprise that Bo’s only Top 20 hit was “Say Man”, which consists solely of Bo and Jerome insulting each other in a way that white America had never heard before?

4. No one had a harder first punch.
No one. He just came out swinging with his first single, undeniably the greatest two sides ever released together: “Bo Diddley” backed with “I’m a Man.” They’re hard as hell, dude, and no mistake. Check the combo of the African drum sound with that echoey guitar sound on “Bo Diddley”—what the hell is that, an e-bow? Damn. Unapologetic apple-cart upsetting, with his very first song. And “I’m a Man” is so ballsy that I’m surprised our nation survived it at all. Check the opening: guitar/harmonica/maracas/drums doing that “da DA da da” Muddy Waters beat, and then arguably the best opening lines ever written by anyone, including Shakespeare and Emily Dickinson and Gabriel García fuckin’ Márquez: “Now when I was a little boy / At the age of five / I had something in my pocket / Keep a lot of folks alive.” This song became the immediate blueprint for heavy metal: that guitar is fuzzy and stingy and wobbly and it’s just all about power. “I’m a Man” is the uppercut to the jab of “Bo Diddley” and neither one has ever been beaten.

5. He created Muhammad Ali… and Mike Tyson.
Bo Diddley didn’t need to scream to make America’s blood run cold. He just stood there and declared himself the toughest mother alive: “I walk 47 miles of barbed wire / I use a cobra snake for a necktie / I got a brand-new house on the roadside / And it’s made out of rattlesnake hide / I got a brand-new chimney made on top / Made out of a human skull” is just some sick-ass punch-drunk signifying, especially when you realize that this was recorded in 1956. (It’s much better than that “I wanna eat his children” shite that Iron Mike was trying to run on Lennox a couple of months ago.) This kind of writin’-is-fightin’ approach has a long gloried history in black culture, but Bo put it out there first, and he turned it out pretty damn nice. So a few years later when a brash young loudmouth named Cassius Clay came out of Louisville spouting some brash braggart street poetry, people shouldn’t have been gasping in shock—they’d already heard it on their radios. This isn’t far-fetched, people: Ali is known to have appeared on the BBC with Bo in the early 1960s, talking about how he loved the music of his friend Bo. So there.

6. Who invented rope-a-dope?
You know who. Everyone always puts Bo Diddley in that “everything he did sounded the same” box… but that just proves that they never actually listened to anything he recorded. The man was a chameleon, a Proteus of pop. We’ve already established that he’s a rocker and a bluesman, but he was also a crooner along the lines of Jackie Wilson and Elvis Presley on “Mona”, a doo-wop guy on “Crackin’ Up”, and a specialist of the talkin’ blues on “The Story of Bo Diddley” (from 1959, when Bob Dylan was just graduating from high school). He might have invented surf guitar with “Mumblin’ Guitar” and “Aztec”, both recorded before 1960. He launched the Rolling Stones; a cover of “Mona” was their first big hit, but they called it “I Need You Baby”, which is probably the first reason I ever had for why I hate on the Stones. Both Buddy Holly and the Animals covered “Bo Diddley”, which is weird, because you wouldn’t think two different guys would have a hit with a song named for its songwriter. (Holly is actually double-guilty on this one, because “Not Fade Away” is basically an uncredited cover of “Bo Diddley” anyway, what with its blatant beatjacking.) Speaking of which…

7. That beat is straight out of Africa… and the gym.
Okay, okay, the “Bo Diddley beat.” Whether you believe musicologists who say that the three-beat/two-beat “bomp bomp bomp, bomp bomp” thing arises directly out of Afro-Cuban tradition, or Bo himself, who claims variously that he heard the beat in a movie about Indians or that he invented it accidentally while trying to play “The Green Green Grass of Home” on guitar, you must realize that that thing is one of the basic building blocks of modern music. It became his signature style due to his use of it in “Bo Diddley”, “Who Do You Love”, “Cadillac”, “Back Home”, and other songs, but it seems to come from a deeper place, a more fundamental part of the heart. But think about it—doesn’t it sound kinda like a boxing cadence? It always sounds to me like Bo’s working the speedbag on these numbers: bam bam bam is the set-up, and then wham wham is the payoff.

8-10. Bo Diddley is more important than the Stones, more crucial than the Beatles, more fundamental to rock as a lyricist and an instrumentalist and a conceptualist than Elvis Presley or Buddy Holly or Brian Wilson.

So where’s the love for the champ?

June 5, 2008 Posted by | Bo Diddley, OTHER_ARTICLE, _MUSIC, _OTHER | Leave a comment

Jagger pays tribute to Bo Diddley

function syncRoadBlock(src) { BBC.adverts.empCompanionResponse(src); };

Singer Mick Jagger has paid tribute to singer-guitarist Bo Diddley as an “enormous force in music” and “a big influence on the Rolling Stones”.

Jagger said the US rock ‘n’ roll pioneer, who has died at the age of 79, was “a wonderful, original musician”.

US blues legend BB King was among other stars to honour Diddley. King said his legacy would “live on forever”.

Diddley, who was known for his homemade square guitar, dark glasses and black hat, died of heart failure in Florida.

This royal shape shifter continues to influence four generations of musicians on a daily basis

Robert Plant

He had a heart attack in August 2007, three months after suffering a stroke which affected his ability to speak.

Jagger, whose band recorded cover versions of Mona and Crackin’ Up, said: “He was very generous to us in our early years and we learned a lot from him.

“We will never see his like again.”

King, 82, said his Grammy-winning contemporary was “a music pioneer and legend with a unique style”.

“We always had a good time when we played together,” he added.

Led Zeppelin singer Robert Plant said Diddley’s “voice and relentless, glorious anthems echo down through my years”.

Without him, the history of music would not have developed as it has

Singer Richard Hawley

“This royal shape shifter continues to influence four generations of musicians on a daily basis,” he added.

And Neil Portnow, chief of Grammy organisers the Recording Academy, praised “one of rock ‘n’ roll’s true pioneers”.

In 1997, his 1955 song Bo Diddley was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame while, a year later, he was awarded the Grammy lifetime achievement award.

“He leaves an indelible mark on American music and culture and our deepest sympathies go out to his family, friends and fans,” Mr Portnow said.

“The Bo Diddley beat surely will continue on.”

‘Myth created’

Other stars to pay tribute to Diddley include Guns N’ Roses guitarist Slash, The Strokes guitarist Albert Hammond Jr and UK singer Richard Hawley.

The Rolling Stones

Hawley told BBC 6 Music: “Without him there wouldn’t be any music, the kind of history of music would not have developed as it has.”

And Slash told nme.com: “He’s a huge hero of mine and the fact that he knew who I was was a huge compliment.

“Bo Diddley created a myth that was uniquely his own.

“An entire rhythm is owed to just one guy and that’s pretty rare.”

Diddley rose to fame in 1955 when he topped the R&B charts with Bo Diddley.

His other hits include Who Do You Love, Before You Accuse Me, and Mona.

His so-called “Bo Diddley beat” influenced rockers from Buddy Holly, to Bruce Springsteen and U2.

June 5, 2008 Posted by | Bo Diddley, Mick Jagger, Music_Blues, _ARTICLE, _MUSIC, _OTHER | Leave a comment

Bo Diddley : The EP Collection (1991) @VBR



Bo Diddley : The EP Collection (1991) @VBR



On this sad day for music, let’s remember some of the greatness of Bo Diddley.

Here’s a great collection from “The Originator”.

Bo Diddley will never be forgotten.

This magnificent 22-track album collects material originally released on Bo Diddley’s British EPs.

Apart from functioning handily as a better-than-average greatest-hits collection, this album includes several rarely-heard tracks such as “Bo Meets the Monster,” “Rooster Stew,” “Bo’s a Lumberjack,” “Hong Kong, Mississippi,” and “Put the Shoes on Willie.”



Tracklisting

01.Little Girl: McDaniel 2:33

02.Put the Shoes on Willie: Hooker 2:32

03.Run Diddley Daddy: McDaniel 2:28

04.Bo Diddley: McDaniel 2:45

05.I’m a Man: Diddley 2:59

06.Bring It to Jerome: McDaniel 2:29

07.Pretty Thing: Diddley 2:50

08.The Greatest Lover in the World: McAlister 2:43

09.She’s Fine, She’s Mine: McDaniel 2:44

10.Hey Good Looking: Berry 2:52

11.Deed and Deed I Do: McDaniel 2:22

12.I’m Sorry: Freed, Fuqua, McDaniel 2:26

13.Dearest Darling: Diddley 2:05

14.Bo Meets the Monster: McDaniel 3:07

15.Rooster Stew: McDaniel 2:25

16.Bo’s a Lumberjack: McDaniel 2:41

17.Let Me In: McDaniel 1:55

18.Hong Kong, Mississippi: McDaniel 2:59

19.Hey! Bo Diddley: McDaniel 2:12

20.Before You Accuse Me: McDaniel 3:05

21.The Story of Bo Diddley: McDaniel 2:50

22.You’re Looking Good: Buckner 2:21

23.Hush Your Mouth: McDaniel 3:05

24.I’m Looking for a Woman: McDaniel 2:32


Here be Bo

http://www.shareonall.com/BDEPC_lqwo.rar

PW : vVv

Big thanks to to the original poster

June 3, 2008 Posted by | Bo Diddley, Music_Blues, _MUSIC | Leave a comment

Blues King Bo Diddley dead at 79

http://www.reuters.com/resources/r/?m=02&d=20080603&t=2&i=4620168&w=&r=2008-06-03T063105Z_01_N02285006_RTRUKOP_0_PICTURE0

More terrible news for the world of music, the passing away of Blues King Bo Diddley at 79.

All commiserations to his family and loved ones.

His music will live forever and Bo Diddley will never be forgotten.

We will always remember him for perfect music moments like this.

We miss you Bo! Thanks for all the wonderful music!

Bo Diddley – Hey Mona

Bo Diddley – Road Runner

MIAMI (Reuters) – Rock ‘n’ roll pioneer Bo Diddley, who banged out hit songs powered by the relentless “Bo Diddley beat” that influenced rockers from Buddy Holly to U2, died on Monday at the age of 79.

Diddley died of heart failure at his home in Archer, Florida, his management agency, Talent Consultants International, said in a statement.

“One of the founding fathers of rock ‘n’ roll has left the building he helped construct,” the statement said.

Diddley suffered a stroke during a concert in Iowa in May 2007 and was hospitalized in Omaha, Nebraska. In August 2007 he had a heart attack in Florida.

Garry Mitchell, a grandson of Diddley and one of more than 35 family members at the musician’s home when he died at about 1:45 a.m. EDT (0545 GMT), said his death was not unexpected.

“There was a gospel song that was sang and he said ‘wow’ with a thumbs up,” Mitchell told Reuters, when asked to describe the scene at Diddley’s deathbed.

“The song was ‘Walk Around Heaven’ and in his last words he stated that he was going to heaven.”

In a career spanning more than five decades, Diddley composed a substantial body of rock classics, including “Who Do You Love,” “Bo Diddley,” “Bo Diddley’s a Gunslinger,” “Before You Accuse Me,” “Mona,” “I’m a Man” and “Pretty Thing.”e cranked them out on a signature rectangular guitar, setting many of them to rumba-like rhythm of his “Bo Diddley beat” that gave rock ‘n’ roll a powerful rhythmic foundation.

Along with such contemporaries as Chuck Berry and Little Richard, he was among a pioneering group of black recording artists who crossed the American racial divide with music that appealed to white audiences and was emulated by white performers.

Although Diddley recorded relatively few chart-topping hits, his seminal role in the formative years of rock music was recognized by his induction into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1987 and with a Grammy lifetime achievement award in 1998.

Born Ellas Bates in 1928 in McComb, Mississippi, he took the last name McDaniel from his adoptive mother, and played classical violin as a boy.

‘FIRST DUDE OUT THERE’

He was given the nickname Bo Diddley as a teenager after moving to Chicago, where he started playing music on street corners in the 1940s.

Inspired by blues musician John Lee Hooker’s classic “Boogie Chillen,” Diddley used his violin skills to craft a guitar sound that laid the basis for the funk music of the 1960s.

He found fame in the mid-1950s with his signature song “Bo Diddley.” Even among the first wave of rock music, the song stood out with its tremolo guitar, maracas and trademark beat.

Diddley’s unique guitar playing and rhythm influenced generations of rockers from Elvis Presley to Bon Jovi. Keith Richards and Ron Wood of the Rolling Stones and Richie Sambora of Bon Jovi made guest appearances on his records and Diddley played with the likes of The Clash and The Grateful Dead.

Arguably the greatest mainstream success of a song with the Bo Diddley beat was Buddy Holly’s “Not Fade Away,” recorded in the 1950s and which saw renewed success when it was covered by the Rolling Stones in the 1960s.

In an interview with The Sydney Morning Herald in March 2007, Diddley insisted he was the real father of rock, saying: “Little Richard came two or three years later, along with Elvis Presley. In other words, I was the first dude out there.”

Diddley frequently complained about not being paid royalties during his peak years, telling The New York Times, “Have I been ripped off? … You bet I’ve been ripped off.”

In 1955 Diddley appeared on “The Ed Sullivan Show” and was promptly banned from further appearances because he defied Sullivan’s instructions to sing a cover song and instead performed his own hit “Bo Diddley.”

Diddley had harsh words for the direction black music had taken in recent years, telling Reuters that “gangsta” rap made his blood boil.

“I hate it. I call it rap-crap,” Diddley said in a 1996 interview. “I can’t seem to get my records played but they’ll play all this garbage.”

Diddley liked to help out in his local community in Florida. A father of five, he said he was deeply concerned about the direction of children in American society.

He worked with his local police department to warn teenagers about the dangers of drugs and gang violence.

Diddley was still touring and making records in recent years, not least because he said he needed the money.

His agency said public and private services are planned for this weekend.

June 3, 2008 Posted by | Bo Diddley, OTHER_ARTICLE, _MUSIC, _OTHER, _VIDEO | Leave a comment