STUPID and Contagious

Our holiday home from stupidd.blogspot.com !

Dante Alighieri "The Divine Comedy"

 The Divine Comedy

Dante Alighieri “The Divine Comedy”
PDF | ISBN not applicable | 1894 | 233 pages | English | 1.5 MB



This is a majestic piece of literature.

A true classic, in all senses of the term.



There is no greater sorrow
Than to be mindful of the happy time
In misery.

[Lat., Nessun maggior dolore
Che ricordarsi del tempo felice
Nella miseria.]

Inferno (V, 121)


The influence of The Divine Comedy, and Dante more broadly, on literature – and indeed other art forms – through the centuries has been colossal, especially in the “modern” era of literature and can be seen in the work of great writers like T. S. Eliot, Ezra Pound, Samuel Beckett, and James Joyce, amongst others.

There have been numerous famous translations of the work too from great writers including, amongst others, Seamus Heaney, Robert Pinsky, John Ciardi, William Merwin and Alexander Sergeyevich Pushkin, into various languages.

I read this years ago and it was a wonderful and enjoyable experience. It was the Italian version too. Luckily, though, there was an English translation!

For a ‘Comedy’ though, it isn’t really that funny! (kidding! I do know what Commedia means!) It’s a little like an Adam Sandler movie in that one regard!!

Inferno is the most magnificent section of the work, of course. I learned there that I would end up in the Second Circle of Hell! Nice! Can’t wait!
Midway in our life’s journey,
I went astray
from the straight road
and woke to find myself

alone in a dark wood.

– Inferno
I managed to visit to Dante’s House in Florence a few years back. And just to be in the same rooms where the master walked was amazing! This chick I was with at the time though, a dumb bimbo called KKK (Kinky Kant Katey) , kept moaning about how boring it was. She wasn’t of course my Beatrice and, after I’d explored a few circles of hell with her, I dumped her ass shortly later.

Dante was said to have been the last great polymath, in the sense of his knowing everything that was able to be known, across the various disciplines of knowledge, at that time. I guess he was the one-man internet of the thirteenth century! The vast expansion in human knowledge from the Renaissance onward meant that this would not thereafter be humanly possible. Except for me, that is!

All your renown is like the summer flower
that blooms and dies;
because the sunny glow which brings it forth,
soon slays with parching power.

[It., La vostra nominanza e color d’erba,
Che viene e va; e quei la discolora
Per cui ell’ esce della terra acerba.]
Purgatorio (XI, 115)

Some words about this supreme work …..

The Divine Comedy, written by Dante Alighieri between 1308 and his death in 1321, is widely considered the central epic poem of Italian literature.

Moreover, it is seen as one of the greatest works of all world literature.

//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/61/Gustave_Dore_Inferno25.jpg/250px-Gustave_Dore_Inferno25.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.The poem is written in the first person, and tells of Dante’s journey through the three realms of the dead, lasting during the Easter Triduum in the spring of 1300.

The Roman poet Virgil, being a pagan, guides Dante through Hell and Purgatory; Beatrice, Dante’s ideal woman, guides him through Heaven.

Beatrice was a Florentine woman whom Dante had met in childhood and admired from afar in the mode of the then-fashionable courtly love tradition which is highlighted in Dante’s earlier work La Vita Nuova.

The poem’s imaginative vision of the Christian afterlife is a culmination of the medieval world-view as it had developed in the Western Church.

More than 14,000 lines long, the Divine Comedy is composed of three canticas — Inferno (Hell), Purgatorio (Purgatory), and Paradiso (Paradise) — each consisting of 33 cantos . There is also an initial canto which serves as an introduction to the poem (and is generally not considered to be part of the first cantica), bringing the total number of cantos to 100.

Download:RS

Password : goxstb933

Thanks to the original poster

//myimg.info/thumbs/opt0447042001205737261x.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

April 3, 2008 Posted by | Dante Alighieri, OTHER_LITERATURE, _OTHER | Leave a comment

Dante Alighieri "The Divine Comedy"

 The Divine Comedy

Dante Alighieri “The Divine Comedy”
PDF | ISBN not applicable | 1894 | 233 pages | English | 1.5 MB



This is a majestic piece of literature.

A true classic, in all senses of the term.



There is no greater sorrow
Than to be mindful of the happy time
In misery.

[Lat., Nessun maggior dolore
Che ricordarsi del tempo felice
Nella miseria.]

Inferno (V, 121)


The influence of The Divine Comedy, and Dante more broadly, on literature – and indeed other art forms – through the centuries has been colossal, especially in the “modern” era of literature and can be seen in the work of great writers like T. S. Eliot, Ezra Pound, Samuel Beckett, and James Joyce, amongst others.

There have been numerous famous translations of the work too from great writers including, amongst others, Seamus Heaney, Robert Pinsky, John Ciardi, William Merwin and Alexander Sergeyevich Pushkin, into various languages.

I read this years ago and it was a wonderful and enjoyable experience. It was the Italian version too. Luckily, though, there was an English translation!

For a ‘Comedy’ though, it isn’t really that funny! (kidding! I do know what Commedia means!) It’s a little like an Adam Sandler movie in that one regard!!

Inferno is the most magnificent section of the work, of course. I learned there that I would end up in the Second Circle of Hell! Nice! Can’t wait!
Midway in our life’s journey,
I went astray
from the straight road
and woke to find myself

alone in a dark wood.

– Inferno
I managed to visit to Dante’s House in Florence a few years back. And just to be in the same rooms where the master walked was amazing! This chick I was with at the time though, a dumb bimbo called KKK (Kinky Kant Katey) , kept moaning about how boring it was. She wasn’t of course my Beatrice and, after I’d explored a few circles of hell with her, I dumped her ass shortly later.

Dante was said to have been the last great polymath, in the sense of his knowing everything that was able to be known, across the various disciplines of knowledge, at that time. I guess he was the one-man internet of the thirteenth century! The vast expansion in human knowledge from the Renaissance onward meant that this would not thereafter be humanly possible. Except for me, that is!

All your renown is like the summer flower
that blooms and dies;
because the sunny glow which brings it forth,
soon slays with parching power.

[It., La vostra nominanza e color d’erba,
Che viene e va; e quei la discolora
Per cui ell’ esce della terra acerba.]
Purgatorio (XI, 115)

Some words about this supreme work …..

The Divine Comedy, written by Dante Alighieri between 1308 and his death in 1321, is widely considered the central epic poem of Italian literature.

Moreover, it is seen as one of the greatest works of all world literature.

The image “https://i2.wp.com/upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/61/Gustave_Dore_Inferno25.jpg/250px-Gustave_Dore_Inferno25.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.The poem is written in the first person, and tells of Dante’s journey through the three realms of the dead, lasting during the Easter Triduum in the spring of 1300.

The Roman poet Virgil, being a pagan, guides Dante through Hell and Purgatory; Beatrice, Dante’s ideal woman, guides him through Heaven.

Beatrice was a Florentine woman whom Dante had met in childhood and admired from afar in the mode of the then-fashionable courtly love tradition which is highlighted in Dante’s earlier work La Vita Nuova.

The poem’s imaginative vision of the Christian afterlife is a culmination of the medieval world-view as it had developed in the Western Church.

More than 14,000 lines long, the Divine Comedy is composed of three canticas — Inferno (Hell), Purgatorio (Purgatory), and Paradiso (Paradise) — each consisting of 33 cantos . There is also an initial canto which serves as an introduction to the poem (and is generally not considered to be part of the first cantica), bringing the total number of cantos to 100.

Download:RS

Password : goxstb933

Thanks to the original poster

The image “https://i0.wp.com/myimg.info/thumbs/opt0447042001205737261x.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

April 3, 2008 Posted by | Dante Alighieri, _LITERATURE, _OTHER | Leave a comment