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Leonard Cohen and Hank Williams


art from chodrawings

Nice piece from ahankwilliamsjournal.wordpress looking at the genius Cohen, his amazing track ‘Tower of Song’ and the homage therein to the great Hank Williams!

Leonard Cohen and Hank Williams: Part 1

Leonard Cohen is one of the most celebrated singer songwriters in popular music.

His music career began in the sixties and along with Bob Dylan, John Lennon, and many others he led the wave which brought the songwriter especially the songwriter with a message to the forefront of popular music. The singer songwriter revolution, which as we all know had a long tradition in country and blues, brought to pop a renewed empahsis on language and poetic techniques.

Before his first album, Leonard Cohen had a successful career as a legitimate academic style poet and novelist. Before the albums, and songs, and music there were award winning books of poetry and the friendship, mentorship, and acceptance by the University community and other poets.

Since the sixties, Cohen has become a legendary figure in pop music, playing around the world with sell out shows before adoring fans, especially women, with songs such as ‘Bird on a Wire’, ‘MaryAnne’, ‘That’s no way to say Goodbye’,and ’Suzanne’,

He has been the subject of many cover versions of his songs including the acclaimed ‘Famous Blue Raincoat’ by Jennifer Warnes in 1988.

As all Hank Williams fans know, Leonard Cohen famously paid tribute to Hank in a song called ‘Tower of Song’ released in 1988 on the Album ‘I’m Your Man’.

Here are the first three verses of that song.

Well my friends are gone and my hair is grey
I ache in the places where I used to play
And I’m crazy for love but I’m not coming on
I’m just paying my rent every day
Oh in the Tower of Song

I said to Hank Williams: how lonely does it get?
Hank Williams hasn’t answered yet
But I hear him coughing all night long
A hundred floors above me
In the Tower of Song

I was born like this, I had no choice
I was born with the gift of a golden voice
And twenty-seven angels from the Great Beyond
They tied me to this table right here
In the Tower of Song

There are five more verses.

Its significant to note that in this song about songwriters and singers, Cohen only mentions one actual real person who is a modern singer/songwriter and that person is Hank Williams.

During a visit to the UK, Cohen was asked about the ‘Tower of Song’ and Hank Williams.

I will take some time looking at this response which I quote here in full.

“If you’re going to think of yourself in this game, or in this tradition, and you start getting a swelled head about it, then you’ve really got to think about who you’re talking about. You’re not just talking about Randy Newman, who’s fine, or Bob Dylan, who’s sublime, you’re talking about King David, Homer, Dante, Milton, Wordsworth, you’re talking about the embodiment of our highest possibility. So I don’t think it’s particularly modest or virtuous to think of oneself as a minor poet. I really do feel the enormous luck I’ve had in being able to make a living, and to never have had to have written one word that I didn’t want to write.”

“But I don’t fool myself, I know the game I’m in. When I wrote about Hank Williams ‘A hundred floors above me in the tower of song’, it’s not some kind of inverse modesty. I know where Hank Williams stands in the history of popular song. Your Cheatin’ Heart, songs like that, are sublime, in his own tradition, and I feel myself a very minor writer. I’ve taken a certain territory, and I’ve tried to maintain it and administrate it with the very best of my capacities. And I will continue to administrate this tiny territory until I’m too weak to do it. But I understand where this territory is.”

I want to talk about the curious phrase “inverse modesty” and other aspects of Cohen’s tribute to Hank which I will save until Part 2.

Leonard Cohen and Hank Williams: Part 2

As mentioned earlier famed singer/songwriter Leonard Cohen paid tribute to Hank Williams in his 1988 song called ‘Tower of Song’. Then later in 1994, Cohen expanded on his reference to Hank, to talk what he was trying to say in the song and what he saw as Hank Williams’ place in history as well as his own.

Perhaps the most interesting part of the quotation is when he says he was not employing “inverse modesty” when he said Hank was “a hundred floors above me in the tower of song.” We would normally call that “false modesty”. He means, of course, he was sincere and was not trying to reflect attention back to himself from people who would say “wink wink, nudge nudge” we know you’re trying to get us to think you are really just kidding and know you are far more important than Hank Williams.

Earlier in the quote, Cohen had placed himself and by implication Hank Williams as well, in the long tradition of songwriters, and lyric poets such as Homer, Dante, and Wordsworth. In that respect he calls himself a very minor writer compared to Hank Williams.

He doesn’t force people to compare Hank or for that matter himself to the greats of literature. He says, ” I know where Hank Williams stands in the history of popular song,” but notes that the songs must be understood in, “his own tradition”. As for his own contribution, he says he understands, “I’ve taken a certain territory, and I’ve tried to maintain it and administrate it with the very best of my capacities. And I will continue to administrate this tiny territory until I’m too weak to do it. But I understand where this territory is.” And so it goes back to, “a hundred floors above me.”

I think this is one of the most profoundly deep, and moving tributes to Hank Williams I’ve ever read. It’s complex and sincere. It recognizes that poets from the ancients, to Country Music, to the folk/rock singer songwriters of the 60’s are part of the same tradition.

Now, I know there have been many famous singer songwriters who have talked glowingly about the work of Hank Williams and his standing in the world of songwriting. But what Cohen has done is to lift that praise to a new level bringing Hank into a new place as a part of the legitimate literary world. I’ve always thought the Leonard Cohen song and quotation were special because of his standing as both a songwriter, musician and in the literary world of poetry, novels, and serious literary discussion.

I hope you haven’t been too bored!

Big thanks to ahankwilliamsjournal.wordpress

NOTE:

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Any content linked to here is only meant as a taster for the original work itself and is posted on the strict understanding that anyone who downloads the taster, deletes said content within 24 hours. We would assume that these fans will then buy the original work and we greatly encourage them to do so.

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December 7, 2008 Posted by | Hank Williams, Leonard Cohen, _ART, _ARTICLE, _MUSIC, _PHOTOGRAPHY, _POETRY | Leave a comment

TTRH3.8 Bob Dylan TTRH Season 3 Ep 8 ‘STREET MAP’

Bob Dylan’s Theme Time Radio Hour

Season 3

Episode 8

Street Map

Original Airdate December 3, 2008

(Streaming Country Pie Vers.)

Mp3 @ 256 kbps/ 136 MB/ RS + ES

Absolute Sound Recorder > Sound Forge 6.0 > FLAC Frontend

[highway+61+logo+song.bmp]

We’ll just put some bleachers out in the sun and have it on Highway 61

-R. Zimmerman


“The road to ruin is always in good repair, and the travellers pay the expense of it.”

– Josh Billings


Today, we’re gonna walk down that weary road.

– Bob Dylan

“As life runs on, the road grows strange With faces new,-and near the end The milestones into headstones change, ‘Neath every one a friend.”

– James Russel Lowell


Theme Time Radio Hour, your home for Highway Dreams, Avenue Themes and Street Schemes



Back in the 60s I used to hear the word “groovy” all the time. I had no idea what people were talking about.

– Bob Dylan

At the dark end of the street
That is where we always meet
Hiding in shadows where we don’t belong
Living in darkness, to hide alone
You and me, at the dark end of the street
You and me
I know a time has gonna take it’s toll
We have to pay for the love we stole
It’s a sin and we know it’s wrong
Oh, our love keeps going on strong
Steal away to the dark end of the street
You and me
They gonna find us, they gonna find us
They gonna find us love someday
You and me, at the dark end of the street
You and me
When the daylight all goes around
And by chance we’re both down the town
Please meet, just walk, walk on by
Oh, darling, please don’t you cry
You and me, at the dark end of the street
You and me





I may not be a Rhodes Scholar but I got my share of street smarts.

– Bob Dylan



Here’s a really interesting 90 seconds of music.

– Bob Dylan



Trailers for sale or rent
Rooms to let…fifty cents.
No phone, no pool, no pets
I ain’t got no cigarettes
Ah, but..two hours of pushin’ broom
Buys an eight by twelve four-bit room
I’m a man of means by no means
King of the road.

Third boxcar, midnight train
Destination…Bangor, Maine.
Old worn out clothes and shoes,
I don’t pay no union dues,
I smoke old stogies I have found
Short, but not too big around
I’m a man of means by no means
King of the road.

I know every engineer on every train
All of their children, and all of their names
And every handout in every town
And every lock that ain’t locked
When no one’s around.

I sing,
Trailers for sale or rent
Rooms to let, fifty cents
No phone, no pool, no pets
I ain’t got no cigarettes
Ah, but, two hours of pushin’ broom
Buys an eight by twelve four-bit room
I’m a man of means by no means
King of the road.

– Roger Miller


You are HERE.

– Bob Dylan




Coming in a number One is Second Street.

– Bob Dylan



I’m a rollin stone all alone and lost
For a life of sin I have paid the cost
When I pass by all the people say
Just another guy on the lost highway

Just a deck of cards and a jug of wine
And a womans lies makes a life like mine
O the day we met, I went astray
I started rolling down that lost highway

I was just a lad, nearly 22
Neither good nor bad, just a kid like you
And now Im lost, too late to pray
Lord I take a cost, o the lost highway

Now boys dont start to ramblin round
On this road of sin are you sorrow bound
Take my advice or youll curse the day
You started rollin down that lost highway

Hank Williams




I’ve got friends who are taller than that street.

– Bob Dylan


Dylan’s magnificent and seminal Theme Time Radio Hour series continues into Season 3 with this wonderful show on the expansive theme of Road Maps!

I am talking to a couple of car companies about possibly being the voice of their GPS system …

– Bob Dylan


Another fabulous show! There was really nothing much to dislike about this episode (with the exception of Green Day)!

Eclectic range of topics discussed. Some fascinating stuff. Find out about some celebrity deaths!

A nice tribute to sometime Dylan collaborator Jim Dickinson.

Shitloads of witticisms and corny jokes too!

Surreally, a snippet from supreme innovators – but not remotely in what would be considered Dylan’s mileau! – Kraftwerk! Aus dem Lautsprecher klingt es dann, Wir fah’rn auf der Autobahn ! The first German music played on TTRH?

Lots of literary references including Dylan hero and author of the classic “On the Road“, Jack Kerouac! Also others such as Tennesse Williams and great poet Carl Sandburg, etc.

Bob also advises those of us who didn’t already know about Percy Mayfield to go and download some of Bob’s previous shows – illegally!! Nice!

I just want to take a moment to talk about some of the Streets I’m particularly fond of. The first one is Diller Street. She was Perry Mason’s assistant.

– Bob Dylan


Take a left at the next street! No, a right! You know what, just go straight.

– Bob Dylan GPS system!

Wonderful music this week, as usual.

Pop to ska to jazz to country to gospel to emo to blues to soul … and everything in between!

Lots of truly classic acts – none moreso than the supremely influential (on Dylan and countless others) Woody Guthrie, Hank Williams and Roger Miller! The great Ray Charles too – twice represented (once indirectly).

Lots of truly classic tracks also and a few amazing rarities.

We really really liked the fantastic early acapella demo version of the Ray Charles smash, Hit The Road, Jack by the song’s writer Percy Mayfield! Stupendous stuff!

And Mississippi Fred McDowell’s great track about Dylan’s beloved Highway 61 !

Most of the rest too!

We won’t mention Green Day though! Oops we did!

And perhaps too, things would’ve been better without the mawkish Little Feat track.

All in all a wonderfully enjoyable show! That’s why we played it about 100 times consecutively!

Next week’s show is on the topic of Famous People! Maybe a full show about His Bobness – surely the greatest person of all time in this or any other Universe! Even moreso than say Darwin (who’s real but not really famous relative to his impact on the world – thanks creationist morons!) or God (not real but kinda famous!)!

Since there is a distinct correlation between fame and dumbness, expect a show chock full of magnificent muzak from the likes of Britney, Paris, Christina … and any number of other amoeba-brained skanks!!


Tracklisting

01 Opening
02 14th Street – Laura Cantrell
03 “Fourteenth St and The Pilgrim Travelers”
04 Straight Street – The Pilgrim Travelers
05 “Straight, Long, Tall & Gold Streets”
06 King Of The Road – Roger Miller
07 “Hobos, Tramps & Bums”
08 Lonely Avenue – Ray Charles
09 “Skid Row & Easy Street”
10 Hit The Road, Jack – Percy Mayfield
11 “Human Streets”
12 Boulevard Of Broken Dreams – Green Day
13 “Failure on Broadway”
14 Highway 61 – Mississippi Fred McDowell
15 “Famous Addresses”
16 Lost Highway – Hank Williams
17 “Last Highway”
18 Willin’ – Little Feat
19 “Gettin’ Weighed”
20 (Get Your Kicks On) Route 66 – Nat King Cole
21 “Routes 66 and 90”
22 Route 90 – Clarence “Bon Ton” Garlow
23 “Most Traveled Streets with Jack Kerouac”
24 “Jim Dickinson”
25 The Dark End Of The Street – Mud Boy & The Neutrons
26 Going Down The Road Feeling Bad – Woody Guthrie
27 Closing/End Credits


Next week: Famous People …. a show not only about His Bobness!

Here she be Dylanite dogs !


The full show on one mp3;

http://www.sendspace.com/file/zlqaki

Various individual show components recorded as individual mp3s;

http://rapidshare.com/files/170081472/3 … 2-2008.zip



Big thanks to blindwilly / charlespoet!




December 5, 2008 Posted by | Hank Williams, Kraftwerk, Laura Cantrell, Percy Mayfield, Woody Guthrie, _BOB DYLAN, _Bob Dylan's Theme Time Radio Hour, _MUSIC | Leave a comment

I’m So Lonesome I Could Cry – Hank Williams Live Performance

A rare recording of Hank Williams, with the Drifting Cowboys, on live radio – on the Mothers Best Flour Show – from 1951!


A great rendition of this classic!

The greatest country song ever written? Yap!


Hear the lonesome whiperwill

He sounds too blue to fly

The midnight train is whining low

I’m so lonesome I could cry

I’ve never seen a night so long

When time goes crawling by

The moon just went behind a cloud

To hide its face and cry

Did you ever see a robin weep

When leaves begin to die

That means he’s lost the will to live

I’m so lonesome I could cry

The silence of a falling star

Lights up a purple sky

And as I wonder where you are

I’m so lonesome I could cry

April 1, 2008 Posted by | Hank Williams, Music_Country, _MUSIC, _VIDEO | Leave a comment

I’m So Lonesome I Could Cry – Hank Williams Live Performance


A rare recording of Hank Williams, with the Drifting Cowboys, on live radio – on the Mothers Best Flour Show – from 1951!


A great rendition of this classic!

The greatest country song ever written? Yap!


Hear the lonesome whiperwill

He sounds too blue to fly

The midnight train is whining low

I’m so lonesome I could cry

I’ve never seen a night so long

When time goes crawling by

The moon just went behind a cloud

To hide its face and cry

Did you ever see a robin weep

When leaves begin to die

That means he’s lost the will to live

I’m so lonesome I could cry

The silence of a falling star

Lights up a purple sky

And as I wonder where you are

I’m so lonesome I could cry

April 1, 2008 Posted by | Hank Williams, Music_Country, _MUSIC, _VIDEO | Leave a comment

Bob Dylan and Johnny Cash- I’m so Lonesome I Could Cry

A great snippet where Bob Dylan and Johnny Cash duet on the Hank Williams classic I’m so Lonesome I Could Cry, from “No Direction Home”.



April 1, 2008 Posted by | Bob Dylan, Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, _MUSIC, _VIDEO | Leave a comment

Hank Williams Keeps Coming Back

The darkness is falling, the sky has turned grey
A hound in the distance is starting to bey
I wonder, I wonder – what she’s thinking of
Forsaken, forgotten – without any love.

https://i1.wp.com/images.usatoday.com/weather/_photos/2006/06/29/dhank_prime_23.jpg

Hank Williams Keeps Coming Back? Don’t worry, Hank hasn’t become a mad bloodthirsty zombie or something! It’s just a metaphor. Metaphors aren’t usually that dangerous!

Here’s an interesting piece about the Dylan Thomas of the Traintracks, of the Ezra Pound of the Prairie, the Sam Beckett of the Badlands!

from http://www.cmt.com

NASHVILLE SKYLINE:

Hank Williams Keeps Coming Back – A New Interest Revives the Country Pioneer

https://i0.wp.com/www.cmt.com/sitewide/assets/img/news/skyline.logo.280x210.jpg(NASHVILLE SKYLINE is a column by CMT/CMT.com Editorial Director Chet Flippo.)

I sense a bit of a Hank Williams resurgence ahead. He’s never really gone out of style since he died 55 years ago from a fatal highball of drugs and alcohol. What Roy Acuff termed as Hank’s “timely death” at age 29 has made him country music’s forever tragically-doomed poet, the Baudelaire of rural Alabama. A romantic legend from the land of piney woods and red dirt.

Even when his records quit selling and his record label was messing up his recordings by layering strings and other glop all over them, the beauty of the songs remained undimmed. And he’s still a shining beacon for country songwriters. For the ones who really want to be good and not just successful, that is.

One of the best tributes I’ve read about Hank is in a current magazine. You should check out the April issue of Road & Track. Peter Egan, one of the best writers laboring for magazines these days, is a musician himself and decided to take on the odyssey of recreating Hank’s last and fatal drive. Egan was not a lifelong Hank or country fan. Like me and many other country music devotees, he grew up loving rock ‘n’ roll and hating country. It wasn’t until maturity brought him some perspective and sense that he began listening to the music of his heritage and grew to love Hank Williams.

For his pilgrimage, he bought and restored over two years, at considerable effort and expense, a 1953 Cadillac Fleetwood and had it painted the same powder egg blue as Hank’s 1952 Caddy convertible. For his journey, he packed it with supplies, including a large supply of Jim Beam, because, as Egan wrote, “This was not a Pat Boone memorial tour.”

Then he and a friend set out from Egan’s Wisconsin home to begin the attempt to retrace Hank’s 800-mile drive from Montgomery, Ala., to Oak Hill, W.Va. Hank was trying to make it to a New Year’s show in Canton, Ohio, but expired in his Cadillac’s backseat well short of his destination.

Egan does a good job of recreating the Hank era on the road. A lovely picture accompanying this article shows the restored Caddy next to Hank’s gravesite in Montgomery. In researching this article, part one of two, one of the things Egan learned, that I hadn’t known, was that Hank had bought his Cadillac used and paid $5,202 — which was more than the original buyer had paid new, only $5083.95. Some things don’t change. Never trust a used-car salesman.

I hear that part two of Egan’s odyssey will include some new revelations about Hank’s last days. Stay posted. Oh. One more thing. A 1953 Caddy Fleetwood V-8? Gets 13.7 miles per gallon on the highway.

Other signs of renewed Hank interest include a new Country Music Hall of Fame exhibit, a major release of previously unreleased Hank radio broadcasts and a revived interest in Hank tours.

The Country Music Hall of Fame is opening a new exhibit devoted to the extended Hank Williams family on March 28. I just got a long preview tour, and it is an extraordinary presentation indeed. Look for more coverage on that soon at CMT.com.

A new series of two- and three-day Hank Williams tours visit his birthplace, his childhood home, his church, the gravesite, museums, his Montgomery and his Nashville.

One of Hank Williams’ almost-hidden legacies over the years has been the lost radio shows he did known as the “Mother’s Best” programs, named after the sponsoring flour company. The broadcasts, on Nashville’s WSM in the early morning hours in 1951, were recorded only on flimsy discs, and those were later thrown out as garbage by the radio station. Fortunately, they were retrieved from the trash cans and have languished in Nashville for a number of years. One attempt was made to release them with added instrumental tracks — now recognized as heresy, then regarded as “sweetening.” Fortunately, that effort failed. One record label tried to release them and lost a legal challenge.

Now a deal has been struck to issue a series of “Mother’s Best” CDs, with a total of 143 songs. I have heard a number of those early recordings, and they are remarkable, indeed. It’s just Hank and his road band gathered around the early morning microphone on 15-minute radio shows, with an occasional appearance from Audrey Williams, and Hank breaking to read commercials for cornbread and the like. Those were humdrum in their day, but to hear them now is electrifying in the sense that they give you the significance of real everyday life as conveyed by homegrown music and food, as opposed to MP3s and YouTube and fast food. You pick what you want.

March 25, 2008 Posted by | Hank Williams, Music_Country, _EDITORIAL, _MUSIC | Leave a comment

Hank Williams Keeps Coming Back

The darkness is falling, the sky has turned grey
A hound in the distance is starting to bey
I wonder, I wonder – what she’s thinking of
Forsaken, forgotten – without any love.

https://i1.wp.com/images.usatoday.com/weather/_photos/2006/06/29/dhank_prime_23.jpg

Hank Williams Keeps Coming Back? Don’t worry, Hank hasn’t become a mad bloodthirsty zombie or something! It’s just a metaphor. Metaphors aren’t usually that dangerous!

Here’s an interesting piece about the Dylan Thomas of the Traintracks, of the Ezra Pound of the Prairie, the Sam Beckett of the Badlands!

from http://www.cmt.com

NASHVILLE SKYLINE:

Hank Williams Keeps Coming Back – A New Interest Revives the Country Pioneer

https://i0.wp.com/www.cmt.com/sitewide/assets/img/news/skyline.logo.280x210.jpg(NASHVILLE SKYLINE is a column by CMT/CMT.com Editorial Director Chet Flippo.)

I sense a bit of a Hank Williams resurgence ahead. He’s never really gone out of style since he died 55 years ago from a fatal highball of drugs and alcohol. What Roy Acuff termed as Hank’s “timely death” at age 29 has made him country music’s forever tragically-doomed poet, the Baudelaire of rural Alabama. A romantic legend from the land of piney woods and red dirt.

Even when his records quit selling and his record label was messing up his recordings by layering strings and other glop all over them, the beauty of the songs remained undimmed. And he’s still a shining beacon for country songwriters. For the ones who really want to be good and not just successful, that is.

One of the best tributes I’ve read about Hank is in a current magazine. You should check out the April issue of Road & Track. Peter Egan, one of the best writers laboring for magazines these days, is a musician himself and decided to take on the odyssey of recreating Hank’s last and fatal drive. Egan was not a lifelong Hank or country fan. Like me and many other country music devotees, he grew up loving rock ‘n’ roll and hating country. It wasn’t until maturity brought him some perspective and sense that he began listening to the music of his heritage and grew to love Hank Williams.

For his pilgrimage, he bought and restored over two years, at considerable effort and expense, a 1953 Cadillac Fleetwood and had it painted the same powder egg blue as Hank’s 1952 Caddy convertible. For his journey, he packed it with supplies, including a large supply of Jim Beam, because, as Egan wrote, “This was not a Pat Boone memorial tour.”

Then he and a friend set out from Egan’s Wisconsin home to begin the attempt to retrace Hank’s 800-mile drive from Montgomery, Ala., to Oak Hill, W.Va. Hank was trying to make it to a New Year’s show in Canton, Ohio, but expired in his Cadillac’s backseat well short of his destination.

Egan does a good job of recreating the Hank era on the road. A lovely picture accompanying this article shows the restored Caddy next to Hank’s gravesite in Montgomery. In researching this article, part one of two, one of the things Egan learned, that I hadn’t known, was that Hank had bought his Cadillac used and paid $5,202 — which was more than the original buyer had paid new, only $5083.95. Some things don’t change. Never trust a used-car salesman.

I hear that part two of Egan’s odyssey will include some new revelations about Hank’s last days. Stay posted. Oh. One more thing. A 1953 Caddy Fleetwood V-8? Gets 13.7 miles per gallon on the highway.

Other signs of renewed Hank interest include a new Country Music Hall of Fame exhibit, a major release of previously unreleased Hank radio broadcasts and a revived interest in Hank tours.

The Country Music Hall of Fame is opening a new exhibit devoted to the extended Hank Williams family on March 28. I just got a long preview tour, and it is an extraordinary presentation indeed. Look for more coverage on that soon at CMT.com.

A new series of two- and three-day Hank Williams tours visit his birthplace, his childhood home, his church, the gravesite, museums, his Montgomery and his Nashville.

One of Hank Williams’ almost-hidden legacies over the years has been the lost radio shows he did known as the “Mother’s Best” programs, named after the sponsoring flour company. The broadcasts, on Nashville’s WSM in the early morning hours in 1951, were recorded only on flimsy discs, and those were later thrown out as garbage by the radio station. Fortunately, they were retrieved from the trash cans and have languished in Nashville for a number of years. One attempt was made to release them with added instrumental tracks — now recognized as heresy, then regarded as “sweetening.” Fortunately, that effort failed. One record label tried to release them and lost a legal challenge.

Now a deal has been struck to issue a series of “Mother’s Best” CDs, with a total of 143 songs. I have heard a number of those early recordings, and they are remarkable, indeed. It’s just Hank and his road band gathered around the early morning microphone on 15-minute radio shows, with an occasional appearance from Audrey Williams, and Hank breaking to read commercials for cornbread and the like. Those were humdrum in their day, but to hear them now is electrifying in the sense that they give you the significance of real everyday life as conveyed by homegrown music and food, as opposed to MP3s and YouTube and fast food. You pick what you want.

March 25, 2008 Posted by | Hank Williams, Music_Country, _ARTICLE, _MUSIC, _OTHER | Leave a comment

Hank Williams – Rare Demos First To Last

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Hank Williams – Rare Demos First To Last

Hank Williams scattered just 66 songs along the Lost Highway of his very brief life. Therefore, it’s natural that even his basic demos might be resurrected and preserved- especially when most of them thrill with a blend of genius (“There’s Nothing as Sweet as My Baby”) and madness (a spooky version of “A House of Gold”).

This compilation of two memorable LPs, Just Me and My Guitar and The First Recordings, sounds brighter than the vinyl incarnations and gives new life to old favorites (“Jambalaya,” “Honky Tonk Blues”).

Furthermore, this collection offers many of Hank’s lesser-known songs, almost all of them haunting (“Lost on the River”), grim (“Neath a Cold Gray Tomb of Stone”), and set to the tempo of tears.

Yes – these 24 rare publisher’s demos present some of Williams’s earliest work exactly as he wrote it, just Hank and his guitar. Buried away and forgotten for almost 30 years, these priceless recordings have been skillfully restored and preserved using the most advanced restoration technologies available.

All hail Hank – Dylan Thomas of the traintracks, of the Ezra Pound of the Prairie, the Sam Beckett of the Badlands!


Tracklisting

01 – Won’t You Sometimes Think Of Me
02 – Why Should I Cry
03 – Calling You
04 – You Broke Your Own Heart
05 – Pan American
06 – Mother Is Gone
07 – I Watched My Dream World Crumble Like Clay
08 – In My Dreams You Still Belong To Me
09 – Wealth Won’t Save Your Soul
10 – I Told A Lie To My Heart
11 – Singing Waterfall
12 – I’m Goin’ Home
13 – Jambalaya
14 – Heaven Holds All My Treasures
15 – You Better Keep It On Your Mind
16 – Lost On The River
17 – Your Cheatin’ Heart
18 – A House Of Gold
19 – Honky Tonk Blues
20 – Help Me Understand
21 – ‘Neath A Cold Gray Tomb Of Stone
22 – There’s Nothing As Sweet As My Baby
23 – Fool About You
24 – The Log Train

Here’s Hank:

http://www.mediafire.com/?tj55miganbi

Thanks to the original poster

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March 25, 2008 Posted by | Hank Williams, Music_Country, _MUSIC | Leave a comment

Hank Williams – Rare Demos First To Last

The image “https://i2.wp.com/store.countrymusichalloffame.com/site/files/cm/products/hankwilliamsraredemos_main.jpeg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

Hank Williams – Rare Demos First To Last

Hank Williams scattered just 66 songs along the Lost Highway of his very brief life. Therefore, it’s natural that even his basic demos might be resurrected and preserved- especially when most of them thrill with a blend of genius (“There’s Nothing as Sweet as My Baby”) and madness (a spooky version of “A House of Gold”).

This compilation of two memorable LPs, Just Me and My Guitar and The First Recordings, sounds brighter than the vinyl incarnations and gives new life to old favorites (“Jambalaya,” “Honky Tonk Blues”).

Furthermore, this collection offers many of Hank’s lesser-known songs, almost all of them haunting (“Lost on the River”), grim (“Neath a Cold Gray Tomb of Stone”), and set to the tempo of tears.

Yes – these 24 rare publisher’s demos present some of Williams’s earliest work exactly as he wrote it, just Hank and his guitar. Buried away and forgotten for almost 30 years, these priceless recordings have been skillfully restored and preserved using the most advanced restoration technologies available.

All hail Hank – Dylan Thomas of the traintracks, of the Ezra Pound of the Prairie, the Sam Beckett of the Badlands!


Tracklisting

01 – Won’t You Sometimes Think Of Me
02 – Why Should I Cry
03 – Calling You
04 – You Broke Your Own Heart
05 – Pan American
06 – Mother Is Gone
07 – I Watched My Dream World Crumble Like Clay
08 – In My Dreams You Still Belong To Me
09 – Wealth Won’t Save Your Soul
10 – I Told A Lie To My Heart
11 – Singing Waterfall
12 – I’m Goin’ Home
13 – Jambalaya
14 – Heaven Holds All My Treasures
15 – You Better Keep It On Your Mind
16 – Lost On The River
17 – Your Cheatin’ Heart
18 – A House Of Gold
19 – Honky Tonk Blues
20 – Help Me Understand
21 – ‘Neath A Cold Gray Tomb Of Stone
22 – There’s Nothing As Sweet As My Baby
23 – Fool About You
24 – The Log Train

Here’s Hank

Link removed at Record Company’s behest

NOTE:


We do not host any files here. If this post contains a link to content hosted elsewhere, this is content found by a simple search on the worldwide freedom web. However, if for some valid reason, you object to a said content, or any content here, please let us know and we will remove the content in question.

Any content linked to here is only meant as a taster for the original work itself and is posted on the strict understanding that anyone who downloads the taster, deletes said content within 24 hours. We would assume that these fans will then buy the original work and we greatly encourage them to do so.

March 25, 2008 Posted by | Hank Williams, Music_Country, _MUSIC | Leave a comment

Hank Williams – Rare Demos First To Last

The image “https://i2.wp.com/store.countrymusichalloffame.com/site/files/cm/products/hankwilliamsraredemos_main.jpeg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

Hank Williams – Rare Demos First To Last

Hank Williams scattered just 66 songs along the Lost Highway of his very brief life. Therefore, it’s natural that even his basic demos might be resurrected and preserved- especially when most of them thrill with a blend of genius (“There’s Nothing as Sweet as My Baby”) and madness (a spooky version of “A House of Gold”).

This compilation of two memorable LPs, Just Me and My Guitar and The First Recordings, sounds brighter than the vinyl incarnations and gives new life to old favorites (“Jambalaya,” “Honky Tonk Blues”).

Furthermore, this collection offers many of Hank’s lesser-known songs, almost all of them haunting (“Lost on the River”), grim (“Neath a Cold Gray Tomb of Stone”), and set to the tempo of tears.

Yes – these 24 rare publisher’s demos present some of Williams’s earliest work exactly as he wrote it, just Hank and his guitar. Buried away and forgotten for almost 30 years, these priceless recordings have been skillfully restored and preserved using the most advanced restoration technologies available.

All hail Hank – Dylan Thomas of the traintracks, of the Ezra Pound of the Prairie, the Sam Beckett of the Badlands!


Tracklisting

01 – Won’t You Sometimes Think Of Me
02 – Why Should I Cry
03 – Calling You
04 – You Broke Your Own Heart
05 – Pan American
06 – Mother Is Gone
07 – I Watched My Dream World Crumble Like Clay
08 – In My Dreams You Still Belong To Me
09 – Wealth Won’t Save Your Soul
10 – I Told A Lie To My Heart
11 – Singing Waterfall
12 – I’m Goin’ Home
13 – Jambalaya
14 – Heaven Holds All My Treasures
15 – You Better Keep It On Your Mind
16 – Lost On The River
17 – Your Cheatin’ Heart
18 – A House Of Gold
19 – Honky Tonk Blues
20 – Help Me Understand
21 – ‘Neath A Cold Gray Tomb Of Stone
22 – There’s Nothing As Sweet As My Baby
23 – Fool About You
24 – The Log Train

Here’s Hank

Link removed at Record Company’s behest

NOTE:


We do not host any files here. If this post contains a link to content hosted elsewhere, this is content found by a simple search on the worldwide freedom web. However, if for some valid reason, you object to a said content, or any content here, please let us know and we will remove the content in question.

Any content linked to here is only meant as a taster for the original work itself and is posted on the strict understanding that anyone who downloads the taster, deletes said content within 24 hours. We would assume that these fans will then buy the original work and we greatly encourage them to do so.

March 25, 2008 Posted by | Hank Williams, Music_Country, _MUSIC | Leave a comment

Jack White speaks about Bob Dylan collaboration

Interesting piece from the bastion of Britrock and music hype, NME!

The White Stripes star sheds light on Hank Williams project

//static.nme.com/images/0759_153320_WhiteStripes1_L090507.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

Jack White has spoken about his work on a project organised by Bob Dylan.

Dylan asked a series of musicians to write music for a set of unfinished lyrics by country singer Hank Williams.

White, who has now recorded his version of the Williams lyrics ‘You Know That I Know’ in Nashville, explained: “[Bob] came upon, somehow, 20-25 unfinished songs by Hank Williams, just the lyrics, no music, and he started to ask people if they would finish these songs.

“He did one, asked Willie Nelson to do one, asked me to do one, and I think Lucinda Williams and Alan Jackson are on it too. I think it might come out this year. It’s a cool record.”

Speaking to MTV News, White also hinted that he has yet another musical project on the go, in addition to his work with The White Stripes and The Raconteurs.

He said: “There’s some other stuff I have coming out, but I can’t tell you about it all just yet. You’ll have to be patient!”

http://www.nme.com/news/the-white-stripes/34649

February 27, 2008 Posted by | Hank Williams, Jack White, White Stripes, _BOB DYLAN | Leave a comment

Jack White speaks about Bob Dylan collaboration

Interesting piece from the bastion of Britrock and music hype, NME!

The White Stripes star sheds light on Hank Williams project

The image “https://i0.wp.com/static.nme.com/images/0759_153320_WhiteStripes1_L090507.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

Jack White has spoken about his work on a project organised by Bob Dylan.

Dylan asked a series of musicians to write music for a set of unfinished lyrics by country singer Hank Williams.

White, who has now recorded his version of the Williams lyrics ‘You Know That I Know’ in Nashville, explained: “[Bob] came upon, somehow, 20-25 unfinished songs by Hank Williams, just the lyrics, no music, and he started to ask people if they would finish these songs.

“He did one, asked Willie Nelson to do one, asked me to do one, and I think Lucinda Williams and Alan Jackson are on it too. I think it might come out this year. It’s a cool record.”

Speaking to MTV News, White also hinted that he has yet another musical project on the go, in addition to his work with The White Stripes and The Raconteurs.

He said: “There’s some other stuff I have coming out, but I can’t tell you about it all just yet. You’ll have to be patient!”

http://www.nme.com/news/the-white-stripes/34649

February 27, 2008 Posted by | Hank Williams, Jack White, The White Stripes, _BOB DYLAN | Leave a comment

Jack White speaks about Bob Dylan collaboration

Interesting piece from the bastion of Britrock and music hype, NME!

The White Stripes star sheds light on Hank Williams project

The image “https://i0.wp.com/static.nme.com/images/0759_153320_WhiteStripes1_L090507.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

Jack White has spoken about his work on a project organised by Bob Dylan.

Dylan asked a series of musicians to write music for a set of unfinished lyrics by country singer Hank Williams.

White, who has now recorded his version of the Williams lyrics ‘You Know That I Know’ in Nashville, explained: “[Bob] came upon, somehow, 20-25 unfinished songs by Hank Williams, just the lyrics, no music, and he started to ask people if they would finish these songs.

“He did one, asked Willie Nelson to do one, asked me to do one, and I think Lucinda Williams and Alan Jackson are on it too. I think it might come out this year. It’s a cool record.”

Speaking to MTV News, White also hinted that he has yet another musical project on the go, in addition to his work with The White Stripes and The Raconteurs.

He said: “There’s some other stuff I have coming out, but I can’t tell you about it all just yet. You’ll have to be patient!”

http://www.nme.com/news/the-white-stripes/34649

February 27, 2008 Posted by | Hank Williams, Jack White, White Stripes, _BOB DYLAN | Leave a comment

Hank Williams – The Unreleased

https://i0.wp.com/i20.servimg.com/u/f20/11/21/11/62/hankvi10.jpgHank Williams The Unreleased

Some unreleased beauties here from the Shakespeare of the Hony Tonk!

Read more about this great work, any purchase it, here;

http://hankunreleased.blogspot.com/

Hank Williams – Dear John (from The Unreleased Recordings)

http://www.podbean.com/podcast-audio-video-blog-player/mp3playerdarksmallv3.swf?audioPath=http://www.saguaroroad.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2008/10/12-dear-john.mp3&autoStart=no

from NPR

Jett Williams 200

Jett Williams, Hank’s only daughter, obtained the salvaged acetates in the early 1980s.

Weekend Edition Saturday, October 25, 2008 – At the pinnacle of country music, you’ll find names that include Dolly Parton, Patsy Cline and Johnny Cash. On another level, somewhere above all the rest, you’ll find Hank Williams.

A new box-set collection of Williams’ music captures a treasure trove of intimate and rare performances that few fans have heard. The Unreleased Recordings of Hank Williams includes performances from the Mother’s Best Flour radio program, a show that Williams himself hosted in 1951. No matter how much the legend’s songs have been played, studied, cried over and admired, unless you happened to be listening to the Nashville radio station WSM in the early ’50s, it’s likely that you haven’t heard this Hank Williams before.

Jett Williams, Hank’s only daughter, was born after her father died in 1953 at the age of 29. Now a musician in her own right, Williams helped bring these songs to the public. She recently joined Weekend Edition Saturday host Scott Simon from Nashville to talk about the origins of the long-lost music and the legacy her father left behind.

The image “https://i0.wp.com/media.npr.org/programs/wesat/features/2008/oct/hankwilliams_300.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

“Back in 1951,” Williams says, “my dad was getting at a zenith, and he was traveling, so therefore he could not do a live radio show every morning. So what they did was he would go in, say, Monday and Tuesday, but then they’d put what they call ‘in the can’ [shows for] Wednesday, Thursday and Friday.”

Back then, Williams says, radio stations would record the shows on acetate discs, intended for one-time play and then stored away in boxes. When WSM moved, the recordings were discarded and then luckily rescued by a man named Les Leverate. Williams says that he held on to the recordings until he met her in the 1980s and gave them to her.

“The other thing that’s fascinating about the Mother’s Best,” Williams says, “is that, back when my dad was recording under MGM, what they did was apply compressors and limiters and filters, and that kind of robbed some of that presence we’re hearing in these recordings. These were made direct to the disc, so it didn’t have that middle man or anything in there. I know a lot of people would say, ‘Those are rare or old recordings; they’re gonna sound like that.’ Well, you can hear these are better than the MGM masters. If you listen, it’s as close to you being in that studio with my dad when he recorded these things.”

“When I hear my dad sing,” Williams adds, “to me it sounds like his life depends on it. I mean, you stop and catch your breath, and you feel as if he’s singing that song just to you.”

function iTunesCallback96107842(resultsObj) { iTunesCallback(resultsObj, “Hank Williams”,”Unreleased Recordings”); }

function iTunesCallback96108051(resultsObj) { iTunesCallback(resultsObj, “Hank Williams”,”Unreleased Recordings”); }

Tracklisting

01 – The Old Country Church.mp3
02 – I’m Bound For That Promised Land.mp3
03 – Farther Along.mp3
04 – When The Fire Comes Down From Heaven.mp3
05 – One Way Ticket To The Sky.mp3
06 – The Great Judgement Morning.mp3
07 – Drifting Too Far From The Shore.mp3
08 – At The Cross.mp3
09 – Beautiful Home.mp3
10 – Prodigal Son.mp3
11 – I Heard My Savior Call.mp3
12 – When God Dips His Love Into My Heart.mp3
13 – Softly and Tenderly.mp3
14 – Take My Hand Precious Lord.mp3
15 – Build Me A Cabin In The Corner Of Gloryland.mp3
16 – Where He Leads Me.mp3
17 – Lonely Tombs.mp3
18 – From Jerusalem To Jerico.mp3
19 – Gathering Flowers For The Master’s Bouquet.mp3
20 – Thirty Pieces Of Silver.mp3

A01 – Cherokee Boogie.mp3
A02 – If I Didn’t Love You.mp3
A03 – Next Sunday, Darling, Is My Birthday.mp3
A04 – Blue Eyes Crying In The Rain.mp3
A05 – Where The Old Red River Flows.mp3
A06 – The Alabama Waltz.mp3
A07 – Just When I Needed You.mp3
A08 – Deck Of Cards.mp3
A09 – I’ll Sail My Ship Alone.mp3
A10 – There’s Nothing As Sweet As My Baby.mp3
A11 – Tennessee Border.mp3
A12 – Low And Lonely.mp3
A13 – Searching for A Soldier’s Grave.mp3
A14 – On Top Of Old Smokey.mp3
A15 – Seaman’s Blues.mp3
A16 – California Zephyr.mp3
A17 – The Blind Child’s Prayer.mp3
A18 – I Can’t Tell My Heart That.mp3
A19 – Pins And Needles.mp3
A20 – Hang My Head And Cry.mp3

Links removed at behest of Record Company!

Read more about this great work, any purchase it, here;
http://hankunreleased.blogspot.com/


February 6, 2008 Posted by | Hank Williams, Music_Country, _MUSIC | Leave a comment

Hank Williams – The Unreleased

https://i0.wp.com/i20.servimg.com/u/f20/11/21/11/62/hankvi10.jpgHank Williams The Unreleased

Some unreleased beauties here from the Shakespeare of the Hony Tonk!

Read more about this great work, any purchase it, here;

http://hankunreleased.blogspot.com/

Hank Williams – Dear John (from The Unreleased Recordings)

from NPR

Jett Williams 200

Jett Williams, Hank’s only daughter, obtained the salvaged acetates in the early 1980s.

Weekend Edition Saturday, October 25, 2008 – At the pinnacle of country music, you’ll find names that include Dolly Parton, Patsy Cline and Johnny Cash. On another level, somewhere above all the rest, you’ll find Hank Williams.

A new box-set collection of Williams’ music captures a treasure trove of intimate and rare performances that few fans have heard. The Unreleased Recordings of Hank Williams includes performances from the Mother’s Best Flour radio program, a show that Williams himself hosted in 1951. No matter how much the legend’s songs have been played, studied, cried over and admired, unless you happened to be listening to the Nashville radio station WSM in the early ’50s, it’s likely that you haven’t heard this Hank Williams before.

Jett Williams, Hank’s only daughter, was born after her father died in 1953 at the age of 29. Now a musician in her own right, Williams helped bring these songs to the public. She recently joined Weekend Edition Saturday host Scott Simon from Nashville to talk about the origins of the long-lost music and the legacy her father left behind.

The image “https://i0.wp.com/media.npr.org/programs/wesat/features/2008/oct/hankwilliams_300.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

“Back in 1951,” Williams says, “my dad was getting at a zenith, and he was traveling, so therefore he could not do a live radio show every morning. So what they did was he would go in, say, Monday and Tuesday, but then they’d put what they call ‘in the can’ [shows for] Wednesday, Thursday and Friday.”

Back then, Williams says, radio stations would record the shows on acetate discs, intended for one-time play and then stored away in boxes. When WSM moved, the recordings were discarded and then luckily rescued by a man named Les Leverate. Williams says that he held on to the recordings until he met her in the 1980s and gave them to her.

“The other thing that’s fascinating about the Mother’s Best,” Williams says, “is that, back when my dad was recording under MGM, what they did was apply compressors and limiters and filters, and that kind of robbed some of that presence we’re hearing in these recordings. These were made direct to the disc, so it didn’t have that middle man or anything in there. I know a lot of people would say, ‘Those are rare or old recordings; they’re gonna sound like that.’ Well, you can hear these are better than the MGM masters. If you listen, it’s as close to you being in that studio with my dad when he recorded these things.”

“When I hear my dad sing,” Williams adds, “to me it sounds like his life depends on it. I mean, you stop and catch your breath, and you feel as if he’s singing that song just to you.”

function iTunesCallback96107842(resultsObj) { iTunesCallback(resultsObj, “Hank Williams”,”Unreleased Recordings”); }

function iTunesCallback96108051(resultsObj) { iTunesCallback(resultsObj, “Hank Williams”,”Unreleased Recordings”); }

Tracklisting

01 – The Old Country Church.mp3
02 – I’m Bound For That Promised Land.mp3
03 – Farther Along.mp3
04 – When The Fire Comes Down From Heaven.mp3
05 – One Way Ticket To The Sky.mp3
06 – The Great Judgement Morning.mp3
07 – Drifting Too Far From The Shore.mp3
08 – At The Cross.mp3
09 – Beautiful Home.mp3
10 – Prodigal Son.mp3
11 – I Heard My Savior Call.mp3
12 – When God Dips His Love Into My Heart.mp3
13 – Softly and Tenderly.mp3
14 – Take My Hand Precious Lord.mp3
15 – Build Me A Cabin In The Corner Of Gloryland.mp3
16 – Where He Leads Me.mp3
17 – Lonely Tombs.mp3
18 – From Jerusalem To Jerico.mp3
19 – Gathering Flowers For The Master’s Bouquet.mp3
20 – Thirty Pieces Of Silver.mp3

A01 – Cherokee Boogie.mp3
A02 – If I Didn’t Love You.mp3
A03 – Next Sunday, Darling, Is My Birthday.mp3
A04 – Blue Eyes Crying In The Rain.mp3
A05 – Where The Old Red River Flows.mp3
A06 – The Alabama Waltz.mp3
A07 – Just When I Needed You.mp3
A08 – Deck Of Cards.mp3
A09 – I’ll Sail My Ship Alone.mp3
A10 – There’s Nothing As Sweet As My Baby.mp3
A11 – Tennessee Border.mp3
A12 – Low And Lonely.mp3
A13 – Searching for A Soldier’s Grave.mp3
A14 – On Top Of Old Smokey.mp3
A15 – Seaman’s Blues.mp3
A16 – California Zephyr.mp3
A17 – The Blind Child’s Prayer.mp3
A18 – I Can’t Tell My Heart That.mp3
A19 – Pins And Needles.mp3
A20 – Hang My Head And Cry.mp3

Links removed at behest of Record Company!

Read more about this great work, any purchase it, here;
http://hankunreleased.blogspot.com/


February 6, 2008 Posted by | Hank Williams, Music_Country, _MUSIC | Leave a comment

Hank Williams – The Unreleased

https://i0.wp.com/i20.servimg.com/u/f20/11/21/11/62/hankvi10.jpgHank Williams The Unreleased

Some unreleased beauties here from the Shakespeare of the Hony Tonk!

Tracklisting

01 – The Old Country Church.mp3
02 – I’m Bound For That Promised Land.mp3
03 – Farther Along.mp3
04 – When The Fire Comes Down From Heaven.mp3
05 – One Way Ticket To The Sky.mp3
06 – The Great Judgement Morning.mp3
07 – Drifting Too Far From The Shore.mp3
08 – At The Cross.mp3
09 – Beautiful Home.mp3
10 – Prodigal Son.mp3
11 – I Heard My Savior Call.mp3
12 – When God Dips His Love Into My Heart.mp3
13 – Softly and Tenderly.mp3
14 – Take My Hand Precious Lord.mp3
15 – Build Me A Cabin In The Corner Of Gloryland.mp3
16 – Where He Leads Me.mp3
17 – Lonely Tombs.mp3
18 – From Jerusalem To Jerico.mp3
19 – Gathering Flowers For The Master’s Bouquet.mp3
20 – Thirty Pieces Of Silver.mp3

A01 – Cherokee Boogie.mp3
A02 – If I Didn’t Love You.mp3
A03 – Next Sunday, Darling, Is My Birthday.mp3
A04 – Blue Eyes Crying In The Rain.mp3
A05 – Where The Old Red River Flows.mp3
A06 – The Alabama Waltz.mp3
A07 – Just When I Needed You.mp3
A08 – Deck Of Cards.mp3
A09 – I’ll Sail My Ship Alone.mp3
A10 – There’s Nothing As Sweet As My Baby.mp3
A11 – Tennessee Border.mp3
A12 – Low And Lonely.mp3
A13 – Searching for A Soldier’s Grave.mp3
A14 – On Top Of Old Smokey.mp3
A15 – Seaman’s Blues.mp3
A16 – California Zephyr.mp3
A17 – The Blind Child’s Prayer.mp3
A18 – I Can’t Tell My Heart That.mp3
A19 – Pins And Needles.mp3
A20 – Hang My Head And Cry.mp3

February 6, 2008 Posted by | Hank Williams, Music_Country, _MUSIC | Leave a comment