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Detroit, The Car and Rock n’ Roll

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Mustang Sally, think you better slow your mustang down.
You been running all over the town now.
Oh! I guess I’ll have to put your flat feet on the ground.

– Mack Rice

Now you get off your Mustang Sally.
You ain’t goin’ nowhere.
You ain’t goin’ nowhere.

-Patti Smith

by Laura Barton
The Guardian
20 February 2009

If there’s one thing that unites the car and rock’n’roll, it is that dream of escape, that desire to be free of place and time and restraint.

There is something strangely harmonious in the way the death rattle of Detroit’s motor industry has dovetailed with the 50th anniversary of Motown records. Just as Hitsville USA embarks on a year of festivities, box-sets and all-star performances, General Motors and Chrysler are beseeching the US government to again rescue them from bankruptcy.

Since the beginning of the 20th century, Detroit has been fired by cars and music. As well as the Ford Mustang, the Chevrolet Camaro, the Pontiac Firebird, this city gave us Motown and revelled in garage rock, hip-hop, techno, blues, jazz, gospel. It gave us Hank Ballard and the Midnighters, Bill Haley, the MC5, Smokey Robinson, the Stooges, George Clinton, Madonna, Martha Reeves, Brendan Benson, the Supremes, Stevie Wonder, the White Stripes, Touch and Go records, J Dilla, Eminem, and Creem magazine.

The history of rock’n’roll is entwined with that of the automobile – from the very beginning, to paraphrase Mr Springsteen, it strapped its hands ‘cross the car’s engines. In the 1950s and 60s, in Detroit’s automotive heyday, many popular songs celebrated the cars rolling off the production lines, sometimes with comical effect – Hopped-Up Mustang, from 1964, for instance, was a Bill Romberger and Arlen Sanders composition that waxed lyrical about the Mustang’s “289 motor with a special Cobra kit”, the transistor ignition, power-pipe exhaust, eight carburettors and four-speed stick. And it was Mack Rice, a Michigan native, who wrote Mustang Sally, a song that gathered together all the delights of cars, speed, sex and youth, and conveyed the giddiness of that period in the city’s history.

Right now, in musical terms, the city is poised somewhere between Sufjan Stevens‘ Detroit Lift Up Your Weary Head (Restore! Rebuild! Reconsider!) and the White Stripes‘ The Big Three Killed My Baby. Stevens’ track appeared on his 2003 album, Greetings From Michigan, and is a tentative portrayal of the city, listing all that is good and bad about Detroit – industry, Pontiacs and Henry Ford, gun control, burning buildings and unemployment. The Stripes song hails from the band’s first album in 1999, and concerns itself with the fall of the labour unions of the 1960s; “the big three” refers to Ford, Chrysler and GM and there’s a nod, too, to Preston Tucker, architect of the Tucker Torpedo.

In 1959, Berry Gordy followed Henry Ford’s lead and founded Motown, adopting a conveyor belt approach to music production, and gave a voice to young black Americans, many of whom had arrived in the city looking for work in its factories. The Motown producers’ approach to composition is often described as “Keep it simple, stupid”, echoing Ford’s approach to cars: “Any colour, so long as it’s black.”

Iggy Pop once told me about the lingering effects of growing up there: “The Michigan stuff stays. Yeah. It’s way down in there. The auto industry was at its most optimistic when I was a kid, and the cars were beautiful, all aggressively optimistic, wildly voluptuous Corvettes … When I was eight, we were taken through the plants where they would press the body parts. There was just a whole vibe there, an atmosphere where mechanised things were good. Henry Ford had a dream, he wanted to create his own world.”

It made me think of a song by Patti Smith, another of Michigan’s adopted children, who wrote Piss Factory to record the monotony of working on a production line: “Now you get off your Mustang Sally/ You ain’t goin’ nowhere, you ain’t goin’ nowhere,” she drawled.

Because if there is one thing that truly unites the car and rock’n’roll, it is surely that dream of escape, that desire to be free of place and time and restraint. So what is Detroit, if not the city of dreams? As Joe Hunter of the Funk Brothers put it last month at the opening ceremony of the Motown celebrations: “God bless the dream,” he said. “God bless the dreamer. God bless the result.”

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February 25, 2009 Posted by | Iggy Pop, Patti Smith, _ARTICLE, _BABE, _MUSIC | Leave a comment

Iggy Pop – Zombie Birdhouse (1982)

Nice piece from thefatvat about a somewhat neglected Iggy LP Zombie Birdhouse.

This one was recently released in a bumper 2 CD volume .. we’ll try to dig that version out too and post it soon!

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Iggy Pop –
Zombie Birdhouse

Animal Records
1982
6.0 / 10

myspace/iggyandthestooges

Of course, we’d love to simply gush over The Ig’s Zombie Birdhouse. He’d likely love it, too. After burning down the house The Stooges built with two miraculous solo albums (yes, yes, we mean 1977’s The Idiot and Lust for Life), Pop put together this album to finally communicate his own voice. The problem is that, as always, his big ideas got in the way. Sorry, Ig.

As is typical, The Stooges collapsed under the weight of ego. Pop felt stifled, as the story goes, by the band members and by the limitations of the band’s genre. Somewhere in mid-rail he’d dreamed himself a genius, and punk unfit. He then emerged from a brief spell of writing in 1977 with twin albums. No small feat, even for bad albums. But both albums were almost impeccable. The Idiot explored Pop’s take on Bowie’s Low influences, turning long sonic indulgences into terrifying noise. Lust for Life, however, better mirrored what would soon be Bowie’s Heroes, trussed up in glittered bows and hip shaking like only a tough guy can.

We hardly need to point out the irony, but we just can’t help ourselves: Pop destroyed his band in the name of pioneering his own sound, then released two Bowie albums. Go figure.

What came after was a series of records that saw Pop being, for the first time in his life, predictable. New Values, Soldier, and Party all sound like Pop trying to prove he can sell a record without Bowie writing the music, each release presenting Pop as an almost likable guy.

Zombie Birdhouse, however, sounds more like a middle finger than a handshake. There’s hardly a song on here that seems built for radio. Every track rolls on, with Pop singing – or we might say quote-unquote singing – the sort of ethereal, pseudo-voodoo lyrics we’d expect of Jim Morrison. He doesn’t rock as hard as he could, nor pander to the masses. Zombie Birdhouse stands now as a reactionary gesture to Pop’s previous releases, a final attempt to establish the genius he was so sure he had. For the first half of the album, he succeeds. Things fall apart in the final half, where the songs begin to emulate far superior work from earlier in his career: “Platonic” steals the dreamy guitar from “China Girl”; “Pain and Suffering” tries to recapture the sulking horror of “Nightclubbing”. That four years passed after Zombie Birdhouse before Pop would be inspired to write again is telling. The album fades out slowly, not with triumph, but exhaustion, the procession indicating that maybe, just maybe, The Ig’s badass brand of art had finally been tapped.

Don’t believe us? Download it first.

Tracklisting

1. Run Like a Villain
2. Villagers
3. Angry Hills
4. Life of Work
5. Ballad of Cookie Mcbride
6. Ordinary Bummer
7. Eat or Be Eaten
8. Bulldozer
9. Platonic
10. Horse Song
11. Watching the News
12. Street Crazies

Big thanks to thefatvat



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September 12, 2008 Posted by | Iggy Pop, Music_Punk, _MUSIC | Leave a comment

Iggy Pop – Discography (Solo and Stooges)

Iggy Pop – Discography

There’s a reason why many consider Iggy Pop the godfather of punk — every single punk band of the past and present has either knowingly or unknowingly borrowed a thing or two from Pop and his late-’60s/early-’70s band, the Stooges.

Born on April 21, 1947, in Muskegon, MI, James Newell Osterberg was raised by his parents (his father was an English teacher) in a trailer park close to Ann Arbor, in nearby Ypsilanti. Intrigued by rock & roll (as well as such non-musical, monotonous, and mechanical sounds as his father’s electric razor and the local automobile assembly plants in Detroit), Osterberg began playing drums and formed his first band, the Iguanas, in the early ’60s. Via the Rolling Stones, Osterberg discovered the blues, forming a similarly styled outfit, called the Prime Movers, upon graduating from high school in 1965. When a brief stint at the University of Michigan didn’t work out, Osterberg moved to Chicago, playing drums alongside bluesmen.
But his true love was still rock & roll and shortly after returning to Ann Arbor, Osterberg decided to form a rock band, but this time, he would leave the drums behind and be the frontman (inspired by the Velvet Underground’s Lou Reed and the Doors’ Jim Morrison). He tried to find the right musicians who shared his same musical vision: to create a band whose music would be primordial, sexually charged, aggressive, and repetitive (using his early electric razor/car plant memories for reference).

In 1967, he hooked up with an old acquaintance from his high school days, guitarist Ron Asheton, who also brought along his drummer brother Scott and bassist Dave Alexander, forming the Psychedelic Stooges. Although it would take a while for their sound to gel — they experimented with such non-traditional instruments as empty oil drums, vacuums, and other objects before retuning to their respective instruments — the group fit in perfectly with such other high-energy Detroit bands as the MC5, becoming a local attraction.

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It was around this time that the group shortened their name to the Stooges, and Osterberg changed his stage name to Iggy Pop. With the name change, Pop became a man possessed on-stage — going into the crowd nightly to confront members of the audience and working himself into such a frenzy that he would be bleeding by the end of the night from various nicks and scratches. Elektra Records signed the quartet in 1968, issuing their self-titled debut a year later and a follow-up, Fun House, in 1970.

Although both records sold poorly upon release, both have become rock classics and can be pointed to as the official beginning of what would become known as punk rock. The group was dropped from their record company in 1971 due to the public’s disinterest and the group’s growing addictions to hard drugs (and additionally in Pop’s case, continuous death-defying acts), leading to the group’s breakup the same year.

But Stooges fan David Bowie tracked down Pop and convinced the newly clean and sober singer to restart his career. Pop enlisted guitarist James Williamson (who was briefly a second guitarist for the Stooges before their breakup) and, after the pair signed to Bowie’s Mainman management company and relocated to England, eventually reunited with the Asheton brothers (with Ron moving from the six-string to the bass).

Signed by Columbia Records and hoping to follow in Bowie’s footsteps toward a major commercial breakthrough, the Stooges penned another punk classic, the brutally explosive Raw Power. Pop’s plan for the Stooges’ third release overall would be to create a record that would be so over the top sonically that it would actually hurt you when it poured out of the speakers. Although it may not have been that extreme, it came pretty close (with Bowie signed on as the producer), but yet again, the album sank without a trace.

By 1974, Pop and most of the Stooges were strung out again on drugs, and with their star fading, the band called it quits for a second (and final) time. After spending a brief spell homeless on the streets of Hollywood (during which time there was an unsuccessful attempt to form a band with Pop and former Doors keyboardist Ray Manzarek), Pop checked himself into the Neuropsychiatric Institute in Los Angeles. During his stay at the hospital, Pop made an attempt at writing and recording some new tunes with Williamson, but when no labels expressed interest, Pop and Williamson went their separate ways as well. (Completed demos of the sessions would surface on the Kill City release in 1977; they would also appear on the 2005 compilation Penetration, which also featured a number of widely circulated demos, outtakes, and alternate mixes from the Raw Power sessions.)

During his hospital stay, another old friend came to visit him: David Bowie. Bowie (whose career was still in high gear) offered to take Pop on the road with him during his tour in support of Station to Station. The pair got along so well that they both moved to Berlin in late 1976, during which time Bowie helped Pop secure a solo record deal with RCA.

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Bowie was interested in European electronic rock (Kraftwerk, Can, etc.) and admitted later that he used Pop as a musical guinea pig on such releases as The Idiot and Lust for Life (both issued in 1977 and produced/co-written by Bowie). Both albums sold better than his previous efforts with the Stooges (especially in the U.K., where Pop was looked upon as an icon by the burgeoning punk rock movement) as Bowie joined Pop on his world tour as a keyboardist. Shortly thereafter, a surprisingly muddy sounding live album was culled from Pop’s most recent tour, titled TV Eye (1977 Live). It was also around this time that Pop severed his ties with Bowie, striking out on his own.

Signing on with another new label (Arista), Pop reunited once more with James Williamson for 1979’s New Values, an album that touched off a string of releases that were for the most part inconsistent and musically confused (it appeared as though Pop was trying to reinvent himself as a new waver): 1980’s Soldier, 1981’s Party, and 1982’s Zombie Birdhouse. Also in 1982, Pop penned his autobiography, I Need More, a fascinating book of rock & roll excess that chronicled his early years straight up to the then-present day. But around this time, Pop began succumbing to his vices once again and he soon stepped out of the spotlight for a long stretch to sort his life out, during which time Bowie scored a massive hit with a remake of the Pop/Bowie nugget “China Girl” (recorded earlier on Pop’s The Idiot).

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It wouldn’t be until 1986 that Pop would resurface again, signing with A&M and issuing the Bowie-produced Blah Blah Blah, which featured his first U.S. hit single (albeit a moderate one), a cover of “Real Wild Child.” 1988’s Instinct saw Pop try his hand at hard rock/heavy metal, joined by ex-Sex Pistols guitarist Steve Jones, but it wasn’t until 1990’s Brick by Brick (his first album for Virgin) that Pop fully regained his musical strength and focus, resulting in his first U.S. gold-certified album and Top 20 hit single, “Candy,” a surprisingly tuneful duet with the B-52’s’ Kate Pierson.

Just as in the mid-’70s when Pop was looked up to by a slew of up-and-coming punk bands, history repeated itself in the early ’90s with the emergence of such Stooges disciples from Seattle (Nirvana, Mudhoney, Soundgarden, etc.). Around the same time, a wide variety of bands covered Pop and/or Stooges tracks — Slayer, Duran Duran, Guns N’ Roses, R.E.M., and Tom Jones — while Pop issued another fine solo set, 1993’s American Caesar. Although Pop attempted to re-create the Stooges’ sound and approach on his 1996 solo album Naughty Little Doggie, it wasn’t as critically or commercially successful as his previous couple of releases. But the same year, Pop enjoyed another hit when the nearly 20-year-old title track from Lust for Life was used prominently on the hit movie soundtrack Trainspotting.

Throughout the decade, Pop also tried his hand at acting in movies, scoring bit parts in such flicks as Cry-Baby, Dead Man, and The Crow II: City of Angels, plus a recurring role on the TV show The Adventures of Pete & Pete. Although he wasn’t involved in it, the 1998 movie Velvet Goldmine was allegedly based on Bowie and Pop’s relationship in the early ’70s (Ewan McGregor’s character, Curt Wild, was obviously patterned after Stooges-era Pop).

With just about every new rock band listing the Stooges as a major influence by the late ’90s, Iggy began tentatively looking back to the band’s legacy. He personally remixed a newly remastered version of Raw Power in 1997, after the long-lost original master tapes were rediscovered and Pop moved the album closer to his original vision of a total sonic onslaught. Also released around this time was another Pop/Stooges-related book, the must-read Please Kill Me: The Oral History of Punk, which recounted the Stooges’ career in great detail (featuring interviews with all the band’s surviving members). 1999 was a busy year for Pop as he was the subject of a VH1 Behind the Music episode, and a new solo album was issued, the laid-back Avenue B. But his more “refined” musical approach was strictly a detour, as proven by his next release, 2001’s in-your-face rock fest Beat Em Up.

And after abandoning a promised Stooges reunion in the late ’90s, Iggy finally made good on his pledge in 2003, bringing Ron Asheton and Scott Asheton aboard to write and record four songs with him for his album Skull Ring, and taking the reconstituted Stooges on the road for a short but riotously received tour (with Mike Watt standing in for the late Dave Alexander on bass, and with the set dominated by tunes from The Stooges and Fun House). In 2004 Iggy appeared in Jim Jarmusch’s Coffee and Cigarettes. In addition to the January 2005 Penetration set, that July saw the issue of A Million in Prizes: The Anthology. It spanned his entire career and included a 37-track CD, a previously unreleased live DVD, and a round of essays from notables like Bowie and Lou Reed discussing Iggy’s legacy. Pop released a collection of new songs, Where the Faces Shine, the following year.

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Iggy Pop Solo Discography


1977 – The Idiot

1977 – Kill City (With James Williamson)


1977 – Lust for Life


1978 – TV Eye (Live)


1979 – New Values


1980 – Soldier


1981 – Party


1982 – Zombie Birdhouse


1986 – Blah Blah Blah


1988 – Instinct


1990 – Brick by Brick


1993 – American Caesar


1996 – Naughty Little Doggie


1999 – Avenue B


2001 – Beat ‘Em Up


2003 – Skull Ring


Iggy Pop With The Stooges – Discography

1969 – The Stooges


1970 – Fun House I / II


1973 – Raw Power


2007 – The Weirdness

Big thanks to the original poster

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July 23, 2008 Posted by | Iggy Pop, Music_Alternative, Music_ClassicRock, Music_DISCOGRAPHY, Music_Pop, Music_PostPunk, The Stooges | Leave a comment

Iggy Pop – Lust For Life ( 1977 )

Iggy Pop – Lust For Life (1977)
MP3

Hey man, where’d ya get that lotion?

This is a classic album by the Igster. One of his greatest works.

Lust for Life was his second solo release and his second collaboration with David Bowie, following The Idiot a few months earlier.

As well as achieving critical success, it was Pop’s most commercially popular album to date, and remains his highest-charting release in the UK. The title track gained further exposure two decades later when it was featured on the soundtrack of the film Trainspotting (1996).

The Lust for Life sessions took place soon after the completion of a concert tour in support of the The Idiot album, the tour ending on 16 April 1977. Pop has stated, “David and I had determined that we would record that album very quickly, which we wrote, recorded, and mixed in eight days, and because we had done it so quickly, we had a lot of money left over from the advance, which we split.” The singer slept little during its making, commenting “See, Bowie’s a hell of a fast guy… I realized I had to be quicker than him, otherwise whose album was it gonna be?” Pop’s spontaneous lyrical method inspired Bowie to improvise his own words on his next project, “Heroes”.

Bowie, Pop and engineer Colin Thurston produced Lust for Life under the pseudonym “Bewlay Bros.” (name via the final track on Bowie’s Hunky Dory).

The recording was made at Hansa Studio by the wall in Berlin and featured Ricky Gardiner and Carlos Alomar on guitars with Hunt and Tony Sales on drums and bass, respectively. With Bowie on keyboards and backing vocals, the team included three-quarters of the future Tin Machine line-up; the Sales brothers’ “gale-force” contribution to this album led Bowie to invite them to join his new band twelve years later (“Check out Lust For Life,” he told guitarist Reeves Gabrels, “I’ve found the rhythm section!”).

https://i2.wp.com/scienceblogs.com/insolence/upload/2007/05/Iggy_pop_davis_b&w_1.jpgA few months earlier, on The Idiot, Iggy Pop had looked deep inside himself, trying to figure out how his life and his art had gone wrong in the past. But on Lust for Life, released less than a year later, Iggy decided it was time to kick up his heels, as he traded in the mid-tempo introspection of his first album and began rocking hard again.

Musically, Lust for Life is a more aggressive set than The Idiot, largely thanks to drummer Hunt Sales and his bassist brother Tony Sales. The Sales’ proved they were a world class rhythm section, laying out power and spirit on the rollicking title cut, the tough groove of “Tonight,” and the lean neo-punk assault of “Neighborhood Threat”.

With guitarists Ricky Gardner and Carlos Alomar at their side, they made for a tough, wiry rock & roll band — a far cry from the primal stomp of the Stooges, but capable of kicking Iggy back into high gear. (David Bowie played piano and produced, as he had on The Idiot, but his presence is less clearly felt on this album.)

As a lyricist and vocalist, Iggy Pop rose to the challenge of the material; if he was still obsessed with drugs (“Tonight”, decadence (“The Passenger”, and bad decisions (“Some Weird Sin”, the title cut suggested he could avoid a few of the temptations that crossed his path, and songs like “Success” displayed a cocky joy that confirmed Iggy was back at full strength.

On Lust for Life, Iggy Pop managed to channel the aggressive power of his work with the Stooges with the intelligence and perception of The Idiot, and the result was the best of both worlds; smart, funny, edgy, and hard-rocking, Lust for Life is the best album of Iggy Pop’s solo career.

Lust for Life reached #28 in the UK Albums Chart and is still his highest-performing release in that country. Initially the album sold well in the US but the death of Elvis Presley caused RCA to quickly reissue Presley’s catalogue and any promotional focus for Pop’s album was lost.

It eventually performed well in America, but only peaked at #120 on the Billboard charts at the time of release. Rolling Stone’s contemporary review considered that “purely on its own terms, Lust for Life is a successful album” but complained that Pop’s “new stance is so utterly unchallenging and cautious”. “Success”, backed with “The Passenger”, was released as a single on 30 September 1977.

The sleeve photo was taken by Andy Kent, who also shot the cover for The Idiot.

Here comes Johnny in again

With the liquor and drugs

And a flesh machine

He’s gonna do another strip tease.

Hey man, where’d ya get that lotion?

I’ve been hurting since I’m up again

About something called love

Yeah, something called love.

Well, that’s like hypnotizing chickens.

Well, I’m just a modern guy

Of course, I’ve had it in the ear before.

I have a lust for life

‘Cause of a lust for life.

I’m worth a million in prizes

With my torture film

Drive a GTO

Wear a uniform

All on a government loan.

I’m worth a million in prizes

Yeah, I’m through with sleeping on the sidewalk

No more beating my brains

No more beating my brains

With liquor and drugs

With liquor and drugs.

Well, I’m just a modern guy

Of course, I’ve had it in my ear before

Well, I’ve a lust for life

‘Cause of a lust for life

I got a lust for life

Well, I’m just a modern guy

Of course, I’ve had it in my ear before

Well, I’ve a lust for life

‘Cause I’ve a lust for life.

Here comes Johnny in again

With the liquor and drugs

And a flesh machine

I know he’s gonna do another strip tease.

Hey man, where’d ya get that lotion?

Your skin starts itching once you buy the gimmick

about something called love

Love, love, love

Well, that’s like hypnotizing chickens.

Well, I’m just a modern guy

Of course, I’ve had it in the ear before

And I’ve a lust for life

‘Cause I’ve a lust for life

Got a lust for life

Yeah, a lust for life

Iggy Pop – Lust For Life (1977) – promo-video

Iggy Pop’s promo-video for ‘Lust For Life’ in 1977. This was used as a promo-video in Australia.


Tx RagePlays

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The Igster meets a giant lady on a red road

Tracklisting

1. “Lust for Life” – 5:13 (lyrics: Iggy Pop, music: David Bowie)
2. “Sixteen” – 2:26 (Pop)
3. “Some Weird Sin” – 3:42 (lyrics: Pop, music: Bowie)
4. “The Passenger” – 4:44 (lyrics: Pop, music: Ricky Gardiner)
5. “Tonight” – 3:39 (lyrics: Pop, music: Bowie)
6. “Success” – 4:25 (lyrics: Pop, music: Bowie, Gardiner)
7. “Turn Blue” – 6:56 (lyrics: Pop, Walter Lacey, music: Bowie, Warren Peace)
8. “Neighborhood Threat” – 3:25 (lyrics: Pop, music: Bowie, Gardiner)
9. “Fall in Love with Me” – 6:30 (lyrics: Pop, music: Bowie, Hunt Sales, Tony Sales)

Personnel

* Iggy Pop – vocals
* David Bowie – keyboards, piano, backing vocals
* Carlos Alomar – guitar, backing vocals
* Ricky Gardiner – guitar, backing vocals
* Tony Sales – bass, backing vocals
* Hunt Sales – drums, backing vocals

Here’s Iggy;


Luuuusssssstttt

Big thanks to the original poster

Mail us: stupidand@gmail.com

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July 23, 2008 Posted by | David Bowie, Iggy Pop, Music_ClassicRock, Music_Punk, _MUSIC | Leave a comment

Iggy Pop & James Williamson: Kill City (1977)


Iggy Pop & James Williamson: Kill City (1977)
MP3 / 44mb / Length 32:00
Released 1977 / Recorded 1975
Genre Proto-punk, Glam Rock, Detroit Rock
Label Bomp Records/ Radar Records
Producer James Williamson

Kill City is a 1977 release by the Iggster and Stooges guitarist James Williamson.

Kill City coverBy 1974, Pop and most of the Stooges were strung out on drugs, and with their star fading, the band called it quits for a second (and final) time.

After spending a brief spell homeless on the streets of Hollywood (during which time there was an unsuccessful attempt to form a band with Pop and former Doors keyboardist Ray Manzarek), Pop checked himself into the Neuropsychiatric Institute in Los Angeles. During his stay at the hospital, Pop made an attempt at writing and recording some new tunes with Williamson.

They made a series of studio demos to shop to labels in hopes of getting a contract. However, when no labels expressed interest, Pop and Williamson went their separate ways as well.

These are the completed demos of the sessions released as Kill City in 1977. The demos would also appear on the 2005 compilation Penetration, which also featured a number of widely circulated demos, outtakes, and alternate mixes from the Stooges’ Raw Power sessions.

Notable is the fact that “Johanna” and “I Got Nothin'” were both recorded previously by the James Williamson-era Stooges.

Iggy’s vocals were recorded on weekends when he got permission to leave a mental hospital for treatment of heroin addiction. There would be no takes until James Williamson got an advance from Bomp to release the album; some of which was used to remix the original recordings.

Pop later appeared as himself on the infamous Tales from the Crypt TV series and preformed the title track.

Some reviews here;

Tracklisting

1. “Kill City” – 2:20
2. “Sell Your Love” – 3:36
3. “Night Theme” – 3:00
4. “I Got Nothin'” – 3:23
5. “Johanna” – 3:03
6. “Night Theme” – 1:20
7. “Night Theme (Reprise)” – 1:04
8. “Consolation Prizes” – 3:17
9. “No Sense Of Crime” – 3:42
10. “Lucky Monkeys” – 3:37
11. “Master Charge” – 4:33


All tracks written by Pop/Williamson; except “Master Charge” by Scott Thurston

Personnel

* Iggy Pop – Vocals
* James Williamson – Guitar, Vocals, Producer, Mixing
* Scott Thurston – Bass, Guitar, Harmonica, Keyboards, Sound Effects, Special Effects, Vocals, Vocals (bckgr) on “Kill City”, “Night Theme”, “Johanna” & “Night Theme”
* Brian Glascock – Percussion, Conga, Drums, Vocals, Vocals (bckgr), Guiro
* John Harden – Saxophone
* Hunt Sales – Drums, Vocals (bckgr) on “Lucky Monkeys” & ” Master Charge”
* Tony Sales – Bass, Drums, Vocals (bckgr) on “Lucky Monkeys” & ” Master Charge”
* Steve Tranio – Bass on “Sell Your Love”, “I Got Nothin'” & “Lucky Monkeys”
* Ganya – Background vocals on “Night Theme” & “Night Theme (Reprise)”

Here she be:

Kill City

Big thanks to the original poster

Mail us: stupidand@gmail.com

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July 23, 2008 Posted by | ames Williamson, Iggy Pop, Music_Alternative, Music_Punk, _MUSIC | Leave a comment

Iggy Pop/Ryuichi Sakamoto – Risky (1987)

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As you lie in the dark

With your pink dress on

You look risky. lovely. risky.



Interesting late-eighties collaboration here between two greats in different musical genres, Messrs. Iggy Pop and Ryuichi Sakamoto.

Bill Laswell was also involved in the songwriting, I believe.

Some background and words about the great innovative video.

In 1987, Pop appeared on the mostly instrumental album, Neo Geo by Japanese composer Ryuichi Sakamoto.

The music video for “Risky”, written and directed by Meiert Avis, won the first ever MTV “Breakthrough Video Award”.

The ground breaking video explores (Persian: فریدون اسفندیاری)’s, transhumanist philosopher FM-2030’s ideas of “Nostalgia for the Future”, in the form of an imagined love affair between a robot and one of Man Ray’s models in Paris in the late 1930’s!

Additional inspiration was drawn from Jean Baudrillard, Edvard Munch’s 1894 painting “Puberty”, and Roland Barthes ” Death of the Author”.

The surrealist black and white video uses stop motion, light painting, and other retro in-camera effects techniques.

Meiert Avis shot Sakamoto while at work on the score for “The Last Emperor” in London. Sakamoto also also appears in the video painting words and messages to an open shutter camera.

Iggy Pop, who performs the vocals on “Risky”, chose not appear to in the video, allowing his performance space to be occupied by the surrealist era robot! Who can tell the difference?

Born in a corporate dungeon

Where people are cheated of life

I knew I could never stay home no

As you lie in the dark

With your pink dress on

You look risky lovely risky lovely

Child of the whispering skies

Risky that’s your name

Risky unashamed

Risky show your style

Risky love’s on trial

You make me feel that this heart is real

When you hold me love me hold me love me

Girl with the scream in her eyes

Risky that’s your name

Risky unashamed

Risky show your style

Risky love’s on trial

People fall apart all the time

I’ve been hit enough to know why

Climb to this point move on

Climb to this point move on

Career, career acquire, acquire

But what is life without a heart

There’s standing room only

Somebody better tell the truth

Proceed at your own risk

Risky that’s your name

Risky unashamed

Risky show your style

Risky love’s on trial

Why feel so sad

Let your heart be glad

Love is risky lovely risky lovely

Child of the whispering skies

Born in a corporate dungeon

Where people are cheated of life

I knew I could never stay home

Risky love, risky love, risky love, sweet love

Risky love, risky love, give me love, sweet love, risky love, risky love

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June 13, 2008 Posted by | Bill Laswell, Iggy Pop, Music_Alternative, Music_Ambient, Ryuichi Sakamoto, _ART, _MUSIC, _POETRY, _VIDEO | Leave a comment

Iggy Pop – Kiss My Blood – Live in Paris (1995)


Iggy Pop – Kiss
My Blood – Live in Paris (1995)

DivX / Artwork included
running time : 1 hour 50 min approx
DVD Release Date: May 25, 2004

More than just a concert, this movie captures for the first time on film the raw energy of the legendary Detroit iguana!

Until the arrival of “Avenue B”, this was arguably the best video document of Iggy Pop in my collection.

Recorded during the “Brick By Brick” tour, this show features one of Iggy’s best bands in recent memory. Primarily because of the killer lead guitar of Whitey Kurst.

Whitey rips through ever lead from Ron Asheton’s to Williamson’s effortlessly.

This is a great ProShot show with 10 out of 10 soundboard quality audio. If you are an Iggy Pop fan you owe yourself this dvd and I gurantee you will not be disappointed. But….until you can find it, definitely drop some cash on the new “Live At The Avenue B”. You can pick it up for around 10 bucks on zShops. “Avenue B” has a slight edge “video” wise over “Kiss My Blood” (due to technology). But from a performance standpoint, the two are dead even. Long live Mr. Pop.

*****By the way, there is a import dvd release available titled, “Iggy In Paris “, which is the same video as “Kiss My Blood”. Don’t let the mistaken date of 1977 fool you. It is the exact same show. Quality is almost as good at a much more reasonable cost. Recommended! *****

-Amazon reviewer

Tracklisting

1. Raw Power
2. 5 Foot 1
3. Dirt
4. Loose
5. Lust For Life
6. China Girl
7. I Got A Right
8. Butt Town
9. Real Wild Child
10. My Baby Wants To R n’ R
11. Neon Forest
12. Home
13. Brick By Brick
14. 1969
15. Candy
16. I Wanna Be Your Dog
17. No Fun
18. Search And Destroy
19. Down On The Street
20. The Passenger
21. Louie Louie
22. Foxy Lady

pass: purgatory

http://stupidd.blogspot.com/

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Mail us : stupidand@gmail.com

April 23, 2008 Posted by | Iggy Pop, Music_Alternative, Music_Punk, _MUSIC, _VIDEO | Leave a comment

Iggy & The Stooges – Live In Chicago (2007)

Iggy & The Stooges – Live In Chicago (04/15/2007)

Ig and the (old boys) rattling off the classics, and a few newer tracks, as hard as ever, on their lucrative world tour last year!

This is rock n’ roll, motherfuckers!

Our friend Claudius from clearwaterahead.blogspot, who also took the great pic, speaks about this gig thusly;

Without a doubt, the best show I’ve ever been to in my life. I was there, I took those photos, and I’ve never seen a live band blow me away like The Stooges did on that night just one short year ago. I wrote a review of the show for my college’s newspaper, so I don’t terribly feel like going into details here, but this show was an experience that you won’t get any where else or with any other band. It’s definitely a lot different just hearing it through a bootleg, but I was front and center for this orgasm of rock ‘n roll.

Tracklisting

1. Loose
2. Down On The Street
3. I Wanna Be Your Dog
4. TV Eye
5. My Idea Of Fun
6. Dirt
7. Real Cool Time
8. No Fun
9. 1970
10. Fun House
11. Skull Ring
12. Trollin’
13. audience
14. 1969
15. She Took My Money
16. Not Right
17. I’m Fried
18. audience
19. Little Electric Chair

Here’s the Igster;

HERE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


pic by clearwaterahead.blogspot


http://stupidd.blogspot.com/

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April 23, 2008 Posted by | Iggy Pop, Music_ClassicRock, Music_Punk, The Stooges, _MUSIC | Leave a comment

Iggy & The Stooges – Live In Detroit 2003

Iggy & The Stooges – Live In Detroit 2003

Ig and the (old boys) soon after reforming rattling off the classics as hard as ever!

This is rock n’ roll, motherfuckers!

Tracklisting

01 Loose.mp3

02 Down on the Street.mp3

03 1969.mp3

04 Wanna Be Your Dog.mp3

05 TV Eye.mp3

06 Dirt.mp3

07 Real Cool Time.mp3

08 No Fun.mp3

09 1970.mp3

10 Funhouse.mp3

11 Skull Ring.mp3

12 Not Right.mp3

13 Little Doll.mp3

14 Wanna Be Your Dog (Reprise).mp3

Here’s the Ig;

http://sharebee.com/94104441

pass: HAVEDAT


pic by clearwaterahead.blogspot

Thanks to HAVEDAT

http://stupidd.blogspot.com/

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Mail us : stupidand@gmail.com

April 23, 2008 Posted by | Iggy Pop, Music_ClassicRock, Music_Punk, The Stooges, _MUSIC | Leave a comment