STUPID and Contagious

Our holiday home from stupidd.blogspot.com !

Jody Reynolds – Fire Of Love (1958)


The sun beats down, with its fiery glow, knows I won’t see my love no more.

From the late great , another classic track, Fire Of Love, from 1958.

This was his follow up to the big selling Endless Sleep, a track that sold over a million copies and reached number 5 in the Billboard Charts.

Fire Of Love, although another classic cut, was a much lesser hit than Endless Sleep and, sadly, would be the last time Jody made a dint on the charts.

We love this wonderful timeless track!

A great rock n’roll ballad more than tinged with the spirit of the Blues!

A lyric full of desire, regret, hope, love and sadness! Beautifully sung by Jody, all above a delicious rock’n roll riff.

We also notice there’s a great riff in here that seems to have been ripped off by the Doors years later in “People are Strange”!


https://i1.wp.com/fc88.deviantart.com/fs11/i/2006/192/f/8/too_Broken_to_be_Bitter_by_kedralynn.jpg

The fire of love is burning deep
The fire of love won’t let me see

Oh my love, here this my plea
because of you, it’s burning me

The sun beats down, with its fiery glow
knows I won’t see my love no more

I’m sorry for the things I’ve done
forgive me dear, my only one.

My baby’s back, once more she’s mine,
to have and hold till the end of time.

The moon shines down from up above
it’s light to cool the fire of love

The fire of love

The fire of love




Jody Reynolds – Fire Of Love (1958)



From: RoverTCB



November 19, 2008 Posted by | Jody Reynolds, Music_ClassicRock, _MUSIC, _VIDEO | Leave a comment

Jody Reynolds – Fire Of Love (1958)


The sun beats down, with its fiery glow, knows I won’t see my love no more.

From the late great , another classic track, Fire Of Love, from 1958.

This was his follow up to the big selling Endless Sleep, a track that sold over a million copies and reached number 5 in the Billboard Charts.

Fire Of Love, although another classic cut, was a much lesser hit than Endless Sleep and, sadly, would be the last time Jody made a dint on the charts.

We love this wonderful timeless track!

A great rock n’roll ballad more than tinged with the spirit of the Blues!

A lyric full of desire, regret, hope, love and sadness! Beautifully sung by Jody, all above a delicious rock’n roll riff.

We also notice there’s a great riff in here that seems to have been ripped off by the Doors years later in “People are Strange”!


https://i1.wp.com/fc88.deviantart.com/fs11/i/2006/192/f/8/too_Broken_to_be_Bitter_by_kedralynn.jpg

The fire of love is burning deep
The fire of love won’t let me see

Oh my love, here this my plea
because of you, it’s burning me

The sun beats down, with its fiery glow
knows I won’t see my love no more

I’m sorry for the things I’ve done
forgive me dear, my only one.

My baby’s back, once more she’s mine,
to have and hold till the end of time.

The moon shines down from up above
it’s light to cool the fire of love

The fire of love

The fire of love




Jody Reynolds – Fire Of Love (1958)



From: RoverTCB



November 19, 2008 Posted by | Jody Reynolds, Music_ClassicRock, _MUSIC, _VIDEO | Leave a comment

Jody Reynolds – Endless Sleep (1958)

I heard a voice cryin’ in the deep, “Come join me, baby, in my endless sleep”


From the late great , the classic rock n’ Roll hit Endless Sleep from 1958, a track that sold over a million copies and reached number 5 in the Billboard Charts.

This is a wonderful song, a powerful ballad sung above a wonderful rock n roll riff.

The lyrics here are heavy with bleak imagery, portents and all shades of darkness – but ultimately redemptive.

It’s a dark stormy night. Nigh apocalyptic. Panicking for the safety of his beloved, having left her alone after some incendiary argument, the protagonist rushes to the sea shore fearing that she – like Shakespeare’s troubled Ophelia – may have committed suicide and is himself being destroyed by guilt, sorrow and self-hate … “Why did I leave her alone tonight? That’s why her footsteps ran into the sea …”

In powerful imagery, the protagonist’s self-hate is manifested in his being taunted by the sea … “I looked at the sea and it seemed to say “I took your baby from you away.”

It doesn’t end there! The protagonist also hears his loved one beseech him to kill himself like she has done … “I heard a voice cryin’ in the deep, “Come join me, baby, in my endless sleep.”

However, miraculously he has arrived in the nick of time and is able to save his beloved from a dark tragic fate …. “Reached for my darlin’, held her to me, stole her away from the angry sea ….. I saved my baby from an endless sleep”.

It’s all very Old testament in nature! A tale laden with raw religious guilt and hope! But after suffering and repentance, there is redemption at the end! Like Dante Algheiri descending into Hell before ultimately making his way to Heaven!

And beautifully crooned by Reynolds.

All very dark and portentous! You don’t get many tracks of this nature hitting the top five in the charts these days!

However, the word “dysfunctional” does not even come close to describing the relationship that must exist between these two lovers! Endless hours of couples therapy are in store for these whackos to even have a faint hope of a weak hope of making their fucked up relationship last!!

Reynolds became a star in 58 on the back of this single, and made appearances in some of the Alan Freed shows in New York as well as those of Dick Clark.

Endless Sleep was on the leading (bleeding?!) edge of what came to be known as the teenage disaster songs, a wave that included Mark Dinning’s Teen Angel, Ray Peterson’s Tell Laura I Love Her, and Dickey Lee’s Patches.

However though, there actually is a happy ending to Endless Sleep, where the protagonist saves his loved one from drowning!

Reached for my darlin’, held her to me, stole her away from the angry sea ….. I saved my baby from an endless sleep.




Reynolds followed this track up later in 1958 with another classic cut, although a lesser hit, Fire Of Love.


Sadly though, these two excellent tracks were to be his only two hits in the United States, although Marty Wilde would sell many copies of his own recording of Endless Sleep in England a short time later.

In the years to come, Endless Sleep would be recorded by a number of other artists, including Hank Willams, Jr. and John Fogerty.

Jody Reynolds had a million-seller in 1958 with “Endless Sleep.” The single became a forerunner of death rock classics such as “Tell Laura I Love Her” from Ray Peterson and “Teen Angel” by Mark Dinning. Reynolds charted for the last time that same year with a number titled “Fire of Love.”

Despite the lack of a string of chart successes, his one big seller was enough to ensure Reynolds’ membership in the Rockabilly Hall of Fame, which inducted him in 1999. In conjunction with the honor, Tru Gems Records issued a double-CD set of Reynolds’ recordings, featuring guest performances by Bobbie Gentry, Jimmy Bryant, and others.

Reynolds was born in Colorado in 1932, but he was raised in Oklahoma. He learned how to play guitar during his early teen years, when he gravitated to the Western swing sounds of Hank Thompson, Bob Wills, and Eddy Arnold. In 1952, he founded a group called the Storms. Within three years, he was in Texas, where he played rockabilly, caught Roy Orbison’s live act, and enjoyed the music of such performers as Carl Perkins and Elvis Presley.

Herb Montei, a Hollywood music publisher, turned down Reynolds when he heard his first demo submissions. After hearing “Endless Sleep,” however, Montei agreed to manage the young rockabilly singer and he arranged for Reynolds to record the song for Demon Records. Reynolds had written the song in a single afternoon in 1956 in Yuma, AZ. Some of Reynolds’ songs, including “Endless Sleep,” give a writing credit to Dolores Nance, but the name is a pseudonym that Reynolds used.

Reynolds and the Storms later recorded a honky tonk sounding instrumental, “Thunder,” for Indigo. The flip side was “Tarantula.” Reynolds also released “Stormy” on Smash Records, which was backed by “Don’t Jump.” For Brent, he recorded “Raggedy Ann,” which was produced by Alan Freed. “Fire of Love” has been featured in a few films, including Doctor Chance in France.

Reynolds remained with the Storms throughout the 1960s. He left the limelight during the 1970s. He settled in Palm Springs, CA, where he sold real estate.

~ Linda Seida, All Music Guide


//fc04.deviantart.com/fs17/i/2007/218/e/0/Drowning_by_madelaines.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

by madelaines

The night was black, rain fallin’ down
Looked for my baby, she’s nowhere around.
Traced her footsteps down to the shore
‘fraid she’s gone forever more.
I looked at the sea and it seemed to say
“I took your baby from you away”
I heard a voice cryin’ in the deep
“Come join me, baby, in my endless sleep”

Why did we quarrel, why did we fight?
Why did I leave her alone tonight?
That’s why her footsteps ran into the sea
That’s why my baby has gone from me.
I looked at the sea and it seemed to say
“I took your baby from you away”
I heard a voice cryin’ in the deep
“Come join me, baby, in my endless sleep”

Ran in the water, heart full of fear
There in the breakers I saw her near
Reached for my darlin’, held her to me
Stole her away from the angry sea
I looked at the sea and it seemed to say
“You took your baby from me away”
My heart cried out “she’s mine to keep”
I saved my baby from an endless sleep.

Endless sleep, endless sleep

– by Jody Reynolds and Dolores Nance




Jody Reynolds – Endless Sleep (1958)

Tx JBauder1948

November 19, 2008 Posted by | Jody Reynolds, Music_ClassicRock, _MUSIC, _VIDEO | Leave a comment

Jody Reynolds dies November 7th in Palm Desert, California.

Very sadly, passed away on November 7, 2008 in Palm Desert, California, aged 75.

Jody was a great American singer and guitarist whose biggest hit single was 1958’s Endless Sleep which reached #5 in the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 chart on July 7, 1958.

He followed this great song up with another classic cut, Fire Of Love, in 1958.

After a period of stardom, sadly Jody disappeared from the charts, but kept on playing music for many years.

He had entered the world in 1932, born in Denver, and been named Ralph Joseph Reynolds.

“Jody” had later moved to Oklahoma with his family as a child and had grown up in Shady Grove.

After his flirtation with the charts in 58, Reynolds continued writing songs and performing with the Storms throughout the 60’s.

He moved to Palm Springs, California and pursued a variety of interests, including real estate sales!

His old friend Alan Freed later moved to Palm Springs and the two travelled to Phoenix where Freed produced Reynolds’ record Raggedy Ann.

Reynolds retained his interest in songwriting and recording and set up a small recording studio in his home in Palm Springs.

Jody had for some time suffered from cancer of the liver and a malignant brain tumour.

Jody passed away on November 7, 2008 in Palm Desert, California.

All commiserations to Jody’s family and loved ones.

An interesting interview with Jody can be had here

Some more info about Jody can be found at;

There’s a nice tribute piece below from Rockrap@aol.com

A man who took his membership in the 50’s one-hit wonder club in stride, Jody was a musician’s musician and could shred (old-school style) with the best of ’em – whether he was onstage with Roy Orbison or runnin’ around Hollywood with cats like Duane Eddy and Al Casey.

In the course of one of my attempts to satiate my obsessive desire for firsthand information on the early history of rock ‘n’ roll, I contacted Jody to bug him about the old days.

I found him to be open and generous, sharp and funny. Whether he was reminiscing about recording alongside Eddie Cochran and Ritchie Valens at Gold Star in ’58, or talking about his experiences working with Alan Freed* in the 60’s – he was a treasure trove of great stories. The guy made and lived rock ‘n’ roll history.

Jody was aware of and embraced his legacy, had a genuine passion for rock ‘n’ roll and was accessible to his fans. For people like me, deeply interested in the early days of rock ‘n’ roll, he was a National Treasure.

His coolness cannot be overstated. Thanks Jody, and rest in peace.

* Freed left Jody his personal stash of 45s – ones that (I gather) he was spinning during his last couple of stints on the air (KDAY, WQAM). Jody gave me a few – they will always be among my most prized possessions.

Mail us: stupidand@gmail.com

Home Art Babes Cartoons Dylan Editorial Music Videos Other

November 19, 2008 Posted by | Jody Reynolds, _MUSIC, _OTHER | Leave a comment