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DUKE ELLINGTON & JOHN COLTRANE

A wonderful document of the summit meeting of two giants of jazz, recorded by Rudy Van Gelder at The Van Gelder Studio, Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey, September 26, 1962.

This great collection begins with a remarkable performance of “In A Sentimental Mood.” Ellington’s chattering, bell-like accompaniment sets off Coltrane’s fulsome, rhapsodic interpretation in sharp relief. For Johnny Hodges–one of Duke’s main men, and an early employer of Coltrane–“In A Sentimental Mood” was a showpiece.
The Rabbit practically owned the tune, and yet Hodges considered Coltrane’s to be the finest version of the song he’d ever heard.Which indicates how deeply rooted in the jazz and blues tradition Coltrane always was.

DUKE ELLINGTON & JOHN COLTRANE represented an opportunity for Trane to step back and reflect upon the elemental lyricism and swing that were at the heart of even his most adventurous flights–and to silence those nay-sayers who were carping about how his band with Eric Dolphy was “anti-jazz.”

“Take The Coltrane” offers up one of Duke’s great vamp tunes, and illustrates just how well the master knew how to accommodate Coltrane and play to his strengths, gently prodding him into fresh melodic directions. with its insistent bluesy hosannas and tart, off-center harmonies, “Take The Coltrane” is an improviser’s delight, as the pianist offers elegant harmonic contrasts to Trane’s backwoods preacher.

“Big Nick” is Trane’s tip of the hat to tenor man and raconteur Nick Nicholas, a tipsying, elusive little melody with a hint of Sidney Bechet (and Hodges) that allows the saxophonist to range up and down his soprano.

The remainder of the repertoire is from the Ellington/Strayhorn songbook, beginning with Duke’s infectious minor blues, “Stevie.” Ellington treats his keyboard as a mini-orchestra, and Coltrane rides Sam Woodyard’s backbeat into the sun. Strayhorn’s “My Little Brown Book” opens with a bell-like fantasia between piano and Elvin Jones’ cymbals, as Coltrane demonstrates a variety of refined ballad inflections.

“Angelica” offers an infectious Afro-Cuban dialogue between Ellington and Woodyard, and an earnest, fervent Coltrane who doesn’t rise to the tune’s humor the way a Sonny Rollins would, but when Aaron Bell seats that 4/4 in the bass…look out. “The Feeling Of Jazz” is just that, closing things out with a classic blues that shuffles happily between swing and a hard rock.

Tracklisting

1. In a Sentimental Mood 4:12
2. Take the Coltrane 4:40
3. Big Nick 4:25
4. Stevie 4:20
5. My Little Brown Book 5:20
6. Angelica 5:56
7. The Feeling of Jazz 5:30

Details:

Duke Ellington (piano);
John Coltrane (tenor & soprano saxophones);
Jimmy Garrison, Aaron Bell (bass);
Elvin Jones, Sam Woodyard (drums)

Here she be


http://www.zshare.net/download/103366052494f63d/

Big thanks to rockcitygentlemen



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September 30, 2008 Posted by | Duke Ellington, John Coltrane, Music_Jazz, _MUSIC | Leave a comment

John Coltrane – Standard Coltrane (1958)

John Coltrane – Standard Coltrane (1958)
MP3 | 320kbps | Covers + Scans | RS.com | 85mb | 5% File Recovery

Personnel:
John Coltrane (tenor sax)
Wilbur Harden (flugelhorn, trumpet)
Red Garland (piano)
Paul Chambers (bass)
Jimmy Cobb (drums)


Some classic Trane ballads on this wonderful album recorded at the Van Gelder Studio, Hackensack, New Jersey on July 11, 1958 and originally released on Prestige (7243).

An indispensable recording for admirers of Coltrane’s ballad playing, STANDARD COLTRANE emphasizes this moving, stirring aspect of Coltrane’s career.

The four long tracks serve as a reminder that the tenor saxophonist’s skill does not lie exclusively in his faster, more energetic work, but that he is capable of great tenderness and romanticism. “Invitation” and “Don’t Take Your Love From Me” are replete with the kind of singing solos Coltrane excels in, with his sax assuming all the tones and pitches of a human voice.


Tracklisting

1. Don’t Take Your Love From Me
2. I’ll Get By (As Long As I Have You)
3. Spring Is Here
4. Invitation


Here’s Johnny!

Thanks to the original poster

http://stupidd.blogspot.com/

Mail us: stupidand@gmail.com

May 26, 2008 Posted by | John Coltrane, Music_Jazz, _MUSIC | Leave a comment

John Coltrane – Standard Coltrane (1958)

John Coltrane – Standard Coltrane (1958)
MP3 | 320kbps | Covers + Scans | RS.com | 85mb | 5% File Recovery

Personnel:
John Coltrane (tenor sax)
Wilbur Harden (flugelhorn, trumpet)
Red Garland (piano)
Paul Chambers (bass)
Jimmy Cobb (drums)


Some classic Trane ballads on this wonderful album recorded at the Van Gelder Studio, Hackensack, New Jersey on July 11, 1958 and originally released on Prestige (7243).

An indispensable recording for admirers of Coltrane’s ballad playing, STANDARD COLTRANE emphasizes this moving, stirring aspect of Coltrane’s career.

The four long tracks serve as a reminder that the tenor saxophonist’s skill does not lie exclusively in his faster, more energetic work, but that he is capable of great tenderness and romanticism. “Invitation” and “Don’t Take Your Love From Me” are replete with the kind of singing solos Coltrane excels in, with his sax assuming all the tones and pitches of a human voice.


Tracklisting

1. Don’t Take Your Love From Me
2. I’ll Get By (As Long As I Have You)
3. Spring Is Here
4. Invitation


Here’s Johnny!

Thanks to the original poster

http://stupidd.blogspot.com/

Mail us: stupidand@gmail.com

May 26, 2008 Posted by | John Coltrane, Music_Jazz, _MUSIC | Leave a comment

John Coltrane – Giant Steps (MFSL)

John Coltrane – Giant Steps (MFSL)

Genre: Jazz/Audiophile | Format: FLAC – Lossless with Cue and Log | 5 files 431 MB | 5% Recovery | Complete Scans – 300 dpi | RS

“Coltrane’s most important album”

It’s understandable that many listeners may prefer to “Giant Steps” the more accessible earlier or later Trane. The former offers up his explorations within more familiar song forms; the latter makes the song secondary to the soloist’s quest for a rapture beyond musical form altogether. “Giant Steps,” on the other hand, is a musican’s album.

It set a new standard not only for saxophonists but all musicians, requiring a combination of harmonic knowledge and technical facility that sent numerous musicians back to the woodshed for countless hours of practice.

Without this album, and especially the title song and “The Countdown,” Coltrane’s early work would have seemed short of realizing its potential, and his later work would have been open to increasing suspicion about his actual credentials. Like Armstrong’s cadenza on “West End Blues” and Bird’s break on “Night in Tunisia,” “Giant Steps” turned heads and gave a generation of musicians a whole new understanding of what jazz improvisation was capable of producing.

For the more technically minded, Trane’s revision of dominant-tonic harmony is more impressive than his later embracing of modes as the sole platform for his scales and upper register probings. Suggested by the challenging bridge of Rodgers and Hart’s “Have You Met Miss Jones,” the sequence moves through a cycle of descending major thirds which, in the hands of most musicians, feels awkward and unnatural.

Coltrane not only mastered the sequence but learned how to use it as a substitution in conventional harmonic settings. More impressively, he learned to execute it with an agility and naturalness that makes it possible for the listener to ignore the harmonic underpinning entirely and be swept up by the wave of emotion and melodic inventiveness.

“Giant Steps” is apparently the main reason Sonny Rollins temporarily stopped playing in public. To his credit he came up with his own solution to the tyrannous sameness of much pop song harmony, but he was never able to come to terms with the harmonic complexity and technical innovations introduced by Coltrane. On the other hand, few have. ”

Tracklisting

1. Giant Steps (4:47)
2. Cousin Mary (5:49)
3. Countdown (2:25)
4. Spiral (6:00)
5. Syeeda’s Song Flute (7:03)
6. Naima (4:25)
7. Mr. P.C. (7:02)
8. Giant Steps (Alternate Take) (3:45)
9. Naima (Alternate Take) (4:31)
10. Cousin Mary (Alternate Take) (5:48)
11. Countdown (Alternate Take) (4:35)
12. Syeeda’s Song Flute (Alternate Take) (7:05)

DOWNLOAD

Thanks to chronograph

February 12, 2008 Posted by | John Coltrane, Music_Jazz, _MUSIC | Leave a comment

John Coltrane – Giant Steps (MFSL)

John Coltrane – Giant Steps (MFSL)

Genre: Jazz/Audiophile | Format: FLAC – Lossless with Cue and Log | 5 files 431 MB | 5% Recovery | Complete Scans – 300 dpi | RS

“Coltrane’s most important album”

It’s understandable that many listeners may prefer to “Giant Steps” the more accessible earlier or later Trane. The former offers up his explorations within more familiar song forms; the latter makes the song secondary to the soloist’s quest for a rapture beyond musical form altogether. “Giant Steps,” on the other hand, is a musican’s album.

It set a new standard not only for saxophonists but all musicians, requiring a combination of harmonic knowledge and technical facility that sent numerous musicians back to the woodshed for countless hours of practice.

Without this album, and especially the title song and “The Countdown,” Coltrane’s early work would have seemed short of realizing its potential, and his later work would have been open to increasing suspicion about his actual credentials. Like Armstrong’s cadenza on “West End Blues” and Bird’s break on “Night in Tunisia,” “Giant Steps” turned heads and gave a generation of musicians a whole new understanding of what jazz improvisation was capable of producing.

For the more technically minded, Trane’s revision of dominant-tonic harmony is more impressive than his later embracing of modes as the sole platform for his scales and upper register probings. Suggested by the challenging bridge of Rodgers and Hart’s “Have You Met Miss Jones,” the sequence moves through a cycle of descending major thirds which, in the hands of most musicians, feels awkward and unnatural.

Coltrane not only mastered the sequence but learned how to use it as a substitution in conventional harmonic settings. More impressively, he learned to execute it with an agility and naturalness that makes it possible for the listener to ignore the harmonic underpinning entirely and be swept up by the wave of emotion and melodic inventiveness.

“Giant Steps” is apparently the main reason Sonny Rollins temporarily stopped playing in public. To his credit he came up with his own solution to the tyrannous sameness of much pop song harmony, but he was never able to come to terms with the harmonic complexity and technical innovations introduced by Coltrane. On the other hand, few have. ”

Tracklisting

1. Giant Steps (4:47)
2. Cousin Mary (5:49)
3. Countdown (2:25)
4. Spiral (6:00)
5. Syeeda’s Song Flute (7:03)
6. Naima (4:25)
7. Mr. P.C. (7:02)
8. Giant Steps (Alternate Take) (3:45)
9. Naima (Alternate Take) (4:31)
10. Cousin Mary (Alternate Take) (5:48)
11. Countdown (Alternate Take) (4:35)
12. Syeeda’s Song Flute (Alternate Take) (7:05)

DOWNLOAD

Thanks to chronograph

February 12, 2008 Posted by | John Coltrane, Music_Jazz, _MUSIC | 1 Comment

Miles Davis Quintet – Steamin’ With The Miles Davis Quintet (FLAC – DCC Gold)

Miles Davis Quintet – Steamin’ With The Miles Davis Quintet (DCC Gold)

Genre: Jazz/Audiophile | FLAC – Lossless with Cue and Log | 3 files 247 MB | 5% Recovery | Complete Scans – 300 dpi | RS

Audio CD (August 29, 1994)

Original Release Date: May 11, 1956
Number of Discs: 1
Format: Limited Edition, Gold CD, Original recording reissued, Original recording remastered
Label: Dcc Compact Classics
ASIN: B00000017N

“A Truly Special Moment in American Music”
This was the last of four albums recorded by the Miles Davis Quintet for Prestige records in 1956 (Cookin’, Relaxin’, and Workin’ are the others.)

The highlight, and without a doubt one of the best recordings from the 1956 Prestige sessions, is The Surrey with the Fringe on Top”. The rhythm section sets up their perfect light swinging groove, over which Miles’s weaves a witty, melodic trumpet solo. Coltrane follows, barrelling ahead and providing the perfect constrast. “Diane” mines a similar groove though not quite reaching the same heights. The two ballads (“Something I Dreamed Last Night” and “When I Fall in Love”) are typical for Miles during this time, with Coltrane sitting out.

Tracklisting

1. Surrey With The Fringe On Top (9:08)
2. Salt Peanuts (6:10)
3. Something I Dreamed Last Night (6:17)
4. Diane (7:53)
5. Well, You Needn’t (6:22)
6. When I Fall In Love (4:26)


Here be miles and
miles of Miles!

DOWNLOAD

Thanks to chronograph

February 12, 2008 Posted by | John Coltrane, Miles Davis, Music_Jazz, _MUSIC | Leave a comment

John Coltrane – Soultrane (FLAC – DCC Gold)

John Coltrane – Soultrane (DCC Gold)

Genre: Jazz/Audiophile | Format: FLAC – Lossless with Cue and Log | 4 files 311 MB | 5% Recovery | Complete Scans – 300 dpi | RS

Audio CD (October 22, 1993)

Original Release Date: February 7, 1958
Number of Discs: 1
Format: Gold CD
Label: Dcc Compact Classics
ASIN: B000000177

“Unrivaled and Peerless”

What made John Coltrane such a great musician is that he used the saxaphone not as an instrument but rather as a voice. He could scream loudly, whisper softly, or emote convincingly through all his tracks.

“Soultrane” provides ample evidence of his mastery of expression through his remarkable playing. The 12-minute rendition of “Good Bait” has Coltrane in smooth form, and is well supported by Paul Chambers on bass and Arthur Taylor on drums. “I Want to Talk About You” is a slow number that Coltrane brings to life with his soft touches, making it all the more romantic and tender.

Then, there’s “Russian Lullaby,” which is a fast and furious rush of jazzed-up energy; it’s amazing to see Coltrane keep up with the hurried tempo of this track. He seems to master it without ever breaking a sweat. Immeasurably talented and cool beyond measure, Coltrane’s mark on music is tremendous, and this album is another stellar entry in his extensive line of work.

Tracklisting

1. Good Bait (12:10)
2. I Want To Talk About You (10:57)
3. You Say You Care (6:18)
4. Theme For Ernie (4:58)
5. Russian Lullaby (5:33)

Here’s Johnny!!

DOWNLOAD

Thanks to chronograph

February 12, 2008 Posted by | John Coltrane, Music_Jazz, _MUSIC | Leave a comment

Miles Davis Quintet – Steamin’ With The Miles Davis Quintet (FLAC – DCC Gold)

Miles Davis Quintet – Steamin’ With The Miles Davis Quintet (DCC Gold)

Genre: Jazz/Audiophile | FLAC – Lossless with Cue and Log | 3 files 247 MB | 5% Recovery | Complete Scans – 300 dpi | RS

Audio CD (August 29, 1994)

Original Release Date: May 11, 1956
Number of Discs: 1
Format: Limited Edition, Gold CD, Original recording reissued, Original recording remastered
Label: Dcc Compact Classics
ASIN: B00000017N

“A Truly Special Moment in American Music”
This was the last of four albums recorded by the Miles Davis Quintet for Prestige records in 1956 (Cookin’, Relaxin’, and Workin’ are the others.)

The highlight, and without a doubt one of the best recordings from the 1956 Prestige sessions, is The Surrey with the Fringe on Top”. The rhythm section sets up their perfect light swinging groove, over which Miles’s weaves a witty, melodic trumpet solo. Coltrane follows, barrelling ahead and providing the perfect constrast. “Diane” mines a similar groove though not quite reaching the same heights. The two ballads (“Something I Dreamed Last Night” and “When I Fall in Love”) are typical for Miles during this time, with Coltrane sitting out.

Tracklisting

1. Surrey With The Fringe On Top (9:08)
2. Salt Peanuts (6:10)
3. Something I Dreamed Last Night (6:17)
4. Diane (7:53)
5. Well, You Needn’t (6:22)
6. When I Fall In Love (4:26)


Here be miles and
miles of Miles!

DOWNLOAD

Thanks to chronograph

February 12, 2008 Posted by | John Coltrane, Miles Davis, Music_Jazz, _MUSIC | Leave a comment

John Coltrane – Soultrane (FLAC – DCC Gold)

John Coltrane – Soultrane (DCC Gold)

Genre: Jazz/Audiophile | Format: FLAC – Lossless with Cue and Log | 4 files 311 MB | 5% Recovery | Complete Scans – 300 dpi | RS

Audio CD (October 22, 1993)

Original Release Date: February 7, 1958
Number of Discs: 1
Format: Gold CD
Label: Dcc Compact Classics
ASIN: B000000177

“Unrivaled and Peerless”

What made John Coltrane such a great musician is that he used the saxaphone not as an instrument but rather as a voice. He could scream loudly, whisper softly, or emote convincingly through all his tracks.

“Soultrane” provides ample evidence of his mastery of expression through his remarkable playing. The 12-minute rendition of “Good Bait” has Coltrane in smooth form, and is well supported by Paul Chambers on bass and Arthur Taylor on drums. “I Want to Talk About You” is a slow number that Coltrane brings to life with his soft touches, making it all the more romantic and tender.

Then, there’s “Russian Lullaby,” which is a fast and furious rush of jazzed-up energy; it’s amazing to see Coltrane keep up with the hurried tempo of this track. He seems to master it without ever breaking a sweat. Immeasurably talented and cool beyond measure, Coltrane’s mark on music is tremendous, and this album is another stellar entry in his extensive line of work.

Tracklisting

1. Good Bait (12:10)
2. I Want To Talk About You (10:57)
3. You Say You Care (6:18)
4. Theme For Ernie (4:58)
5. Russian Lullaby (5:33)

Here’s Johnny!!

DOWNLOAD

Thanks to chronograph

February 12, 2008 Posted by | John Coltrane, Music_Jazz, _MUSIC | Leave a comment

John Coltrane – My Favorite Things @320kbps

John Coltrane – My Favorite Things
1961| Jazz | mp3 @320kbps | Total time:40:26 | 86 MB

With the forming of his own group in 1960, which you hear here (excepting the substitution of drummer Elvin Jones), Coltrane became more flexible.

If variety had been lacking, he determined to become more varied. He chose his material carefully to ensure this.

And he chose his companions as carefully. Pianist McCoy Tyner is a highly intuitive musician in accompaniment, a soloist with rare ability to reach into a heart of melody. Bassist Steve Davis, a most underrated musician, is the soul of strength and taste. Drummer Elvin Jones inventive and rhythmically powerful.

Together, they take the Coltrane track – direct , uncluttered, sometimes arhythmic, always rolling in pulsation, never sentimental. And varied: contrast the title tune, and John’s almost middle-Eastern soprano flvor in strict waltz time, with Cole Porter’s “Everytime We Say Goodbye”, John obviously is a much concerned with the lyric as he is with the melody; or contrast those with either of the bright tempo tracks on the other side of this record.

Add to those, Tyner’s solos of the first two tunes, Davis’ special strength on the second, and his solo on “Summertime”, and Elvin Jones throughout. The harvest, you see, is a many-splendoured thing. And you will find it glowing within My Favorite Things.


Tracklist
:

1. My Favorite Things
2. Everytime We Say Goodbye
3. Summertime
4. But Not For Me

John Coltrane – tenor & soprano saxes
McCoy Tyner – piano
Steve Davis – bass
Elvin Jones – drums

Recorded at Atlantic Studios, New York, New York on October 21, 24 & 26, 1960.

tx devil666r
Enjoy!

January 2, 2008 Posted by | John Coltrane, Music_Jazz, _MUSIC | Leave a comment

John Coltrane – My Favorite Things @320kbps

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John Coltrane – My Favorite Things
1961| Jazz | mp3 @320kbps | Total time:40:26 | 86 MB

With the forming of his own group in 1960, which you hear here (excepting the substitution of drummer Elvin Jones), Coltrane became more flexible.

If variety had been lacking, he determined to become more varied. He chose his material carefully to ensure this.

And he chose his companions as carefully. Pianist McCoy Tyner is a highly intuitive musician in accompaniment, a soloist with rare ability to reach into a heart of melody. Bassist Steve Davis, a most underrated musician, is the soul of strength and taste. Drummer Elvin Jones inventive and rhythmically powerful.

Together, they take the Coltrane track – direct , uncluttered, sometimes arhythmic, always rolling in pulsation, never sentimental. And varied: contrast the title tune, and John’s almost middle-Eastern soprano flvor in strict waltz time, with Cole Porter’s “Everytime We Say Goodbye”, John obviously is a much concerned with the lyric as he is with the melody; or contrast those with either of the bright tempo tracks on the other side of this record.

Add to those, Tyner’s solos of the first two tunes, Davis’ special strength on the second, and his solo on “Summertime”, and Elvin Jones throughout. The harvest, you see, is a many-splendoured thing. And you will find it glowing within My Favorite Things.


Tracklist
:

1. My Favorite Things
2. Everytime We Say Goodbye
3. Summertime
4. But Not For Me

John Coltrane – tenor & soprano saxes
McCoy Tyner – piano
Steve Davis – bass
Elvin Jones – drums

Recorded at Atlantic Studios, New York, New York on October 21, 24 & 26, 1960.

tx devil666r
Enjoy!

January 2, 2008 Posted by | John Coltrane, Music_Jazz, _MUSIC | Leave a comment