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Classic Music Images – John Lennon and Sean at the Hit Factory by Bob Gruen

It looks like he’s turning Sean on to the world of music

– Bob Gruen

Beautiful and powerful image of John Lennon, with his young son Sean, showing off the new automated mixing board at New York’s Hit-Factory back in 1980.

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March 18, 2009 Posted by | John Lennon, _MUSIC, _PHOTOGRAPHY | Leave a comment

Best Bob Dylan Impressions/ Parodies by Other Musicians/Celebrities


Aside from the Seuss thing, a few good Dylan impressions/ parodies here!

10. Joan Baez in “Mary Hamilton (Bob Dylan version)”

As well as this one, Baez has another hilarious parody in a version of “A Hard Rain’s A-Gonna Fall,” in which she sings all the questions (“Where have you been, my blue-eyed boy?” etc.) in her beautiful voice and all the answers in great nasally Dylan twang! Very strange and funny.

9. Benny Hill sketch

A Dylan parody by the late Benny Hill.

8. Paul Simon in “A Simple Desultory Philippic” by Simon and Garfunkel


[no embedding on this one, sorry]

6. Frank Skinner sketch

During an episode of The Frank Skinner Show, UK comedian Skinner does a parody of a Bob Dylan song bizarrely involving the news story of a man from Scotland beating HIV.

6. Weird Al Yankovic in “Bob” by Weird Al Yankovic



5. Hugh Laurie in A Bit of Fry and Laurie


[no embedding on this one either]

4. Ed Mann in “Flakes” by Frank Zappa



(At 1:19 in the video)

Note: the studio version of this one was done by Adrian Belew, an impression probably better than Mann’s. This one’s great too, though.

3. John C. Reilly in Walk Hard




2. John Lennon in an unreleased solo track






1. Mark Knopfler – his entire career!!



thanks to peterandrobmakelistsofthings

NOTE:

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Any content linked to here is only meant as a taster for the original work itself and is posted on the strict understanding that anyone who downloads the taster, deletes said content within 24 hours. We would assume that these fans will then buy the original work and we greatly encourage them to do so.

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March 3, 2009 Posted by | Benny Hill., Frank Zappa, Joan Baez, John C. Reilly, John Lennon, Mark Knopfler, Paul Simon, Weird Al Yankovic, _BOB DYLAN, _COMEDY, _MUSIC, _VIDEO | Leave a comment

John Lennon Interview: Larry Kane, Baltimore September 1964

“I once received a bra with ‘I Love John’ embroidered on it. I thought it was pretty original. I didn’t keep it, mind you – It didn’t fit.”

Fascinating interview with Jack Lennon – sorry John Lennon – during the Beats’ seminal 1964 North American tour – from the excellent Beatles Ultimate Experience

Some wonderful, typically Lennon, ripostes and banter! You can see the genesis of John’s love affair with the States.

ABOUT THIS INTERVIEW:

On this date, the Beatles arrived in Maryland for their performance at Baltimore’s Civic Center. John Lennon was interviewed by Larry Kane as part of an on-going series of interviews with the group. Kane was the only American reporter allowed to travel with the Beatles during their 1964 North American tour, and also accompanied them on their 1965 tour.

Larry Kane has authored the insightful books, “Lennon Revealed” (2005) and “Ticket To Ride” (2003) documenting his conversations with the group and also his first-hand accounts of behind-the-scenes events as they happened.

– Jay Spangler, Beatles Ultimate Experience

Q: “John, occasionally we see magazine articles, like last night, one that had your name as ‘Jack Lennon’ and all these irregularities. What do you think of this when you look at them?”

JOHN: “Well, I just think the people are stupid, you know, if they’re not gonna bother to take enough time to do a job and find out what our names are… and try and get the facts right, you know. They must be a bit soft.”

Q: “There are alot of people who have albums out with your music on it, like this ‘Chipmunk’ album, and the ‘Boston Pops.’ Do you find this a credit to you, or an abortion of your songs.”

JOHN: “No, we enjoy it! We always try to get a copy of these people that do our songs. The thing about the ‘Chipmunks’ and the ‘Boston…’ they do it so differently from us and from each other– it’s very interesting. And also we, Paul and I, get alot of money when they make these so it’s very good for us, you know.”

Q: “There is a cut in it for you when they do record these songs.”

JOHN: “Yeah, ‘cuz we compose them, you know, so we get the… a good lot of money.”

Q: “John, when you were in New York, what did you like best about it?”

JOHN: “I just like cities, you see, and preferably big ones. That’s why I liked it. And we met some good people like Bob Dylan and Joan Baez, you know, and I enjoy meeting people I admire.”

Q: “Do you like to play better indoors or outdoors?”

JOHN: “Indoors. I don’t like playing outdoors. You can’t hear and you get blown to pieces.”

Q: “Like last night.”

JOHN: “Oh! That was dreadful!”

Q: “John, any particular reason that you chose the songs that you did for the current concerts?”

JOHN: “We took a sort of aggregate of the most popular ones in the States over the last couple of months.”

Q: “Your early songs and your latest songs.”

JOHN: “Yeah. We missed-out alot of the earlier ones, like uhh… I can’t think of any, but I’m sure we missed some out.”

Q: “There’s so many rumors going around and one of the jobs I like to do is either to confirm them or dispel them. There’s a big rumor in alot of magazines and papers that you’re coming back (to America) in January.”

JOHN: “Well, I don’t know… might be true. I haven’t a clue. Nobody’s told me if we are, you know.”

Q: “Everyone asks what you like… What’s your pet peeve? What is the thing that you dislike the most in the world?”

JOHN: “Having things thrown at us on-stage. Jellybeans and rubbish and that.”

Q: “This is your pet peeve in your whole life.”

JOHN: “Yeah, ‘cuz it hurts.”

Q: (laughs)

JOHN: (giggles) “You can’t carry on singing and laughing with things hitting you.”

Q: “How many other instruments do you play if you play any?”

JOHN: “A bit of piano, and a bit of mouth organ.”

Q: “Have you played the organ… umm… mouth organ on any of your songs?”

JOHN: “Well, all the… yeah. There’s quite a few we did with mouth organ. I played it on the early hits– ‘Please Please Me,’ ‘From Me To You,’ ‘Love Me Do,’ ‘Little Child’ from the LP, ‘I Should Have Known Better’ on the film– I stuck mouth organ on that.”

Q: “When you’re over here, do you miss England? Do you ever get a little homesick even though you’re achieving great success over here, and you’re having some good times?”

JOHN: “Oh yeah. You get homesick, alright. Every other day (laughs) only!”

Q: “What about the gifts? I notice more and more you’ve been getting more and more gifts from fans. What was the most unusual gift you’ve ever received? I know there’s so many– Is there one that sticks out in your mind?”

JOHN: (laughs) “I once received a bra…”

Q: (laughs) “You did?”

JOHN: “…with ‘I Love John’ embroidered on it. I thought it was pretty original. I didn’t keep it, mind you– It didn’t fit.”

Q: “How did you like Key West?”

JOHN: (jokingly) “It was alright for a swamp. (laughs) No, it wasn’t bad, you know.”

Q: “When you’re out there, you do alot of lead (vocal) on most of the songs. Have you ever had a point during your concerts where you ever had a loss, a mental-block in your head as to what to do next?”

JOHN: “Yeah. I’m the one that often gets it– suddenly go blank and I don’t know what I’m singing or playing or anything, you know. I just forget, and all the rest sort of tell me what’s happening.”

Q: “You mentioned these jellybeans and everything. Does it hamper your work… besides making you frightened of the fact that it might hit your eye or something… does it hamper your work?”

JOHN: “Yeah. You can’t play if they keep hitting you, you know. You keep stopping ‘cuz it’s natural– you sort of duck, you know, and you stop playing. But it’s been quite good– it’s stopped now. So I suppose we should stop talking about it.”

Q: “Here’s a question alot of people will think it kind of ridiculous to ask entertainers this, but I’m going to because alot of people are interested in your opinion. So much of these world conflicts going on– everybody’s fighting each other. What would be your personal solution to stopping war? What way or method?”

JOHN: “I don’t think there is one, you know. Not if everybody was all rich and happy, and each country had all they wanted, they’d still want the next bit. I don’t think there’ll ever be any solution… only, just, you know, a sort of power block where everybody’s got the same weapons.”

Q: “There was a big rumor out around the country– as you know there’s so many rumors– about Ringo having a throat operation. And this was cleared up last night with this ‘tonsil’ bit.”

JOHN: “Yeah, he’s having his tonsils out when we get back to Britain, then go after the British tour.”

Q: “Has there ever been one rumor that’s particularly peeved you?”

JOHN: “Umm, me leaving the group… and my wife being pregnant.”

Q: “You mean, having a baby next month?”

JOHN: “Yeah.”

Q: “There’s been alot of criticism by Americans of the fact that there’s so many groups that are coming out that have no originality, from England, that are all trying to copy you. Now we know there’s a handful that are really doing very well over here, as well as you…”

JOHN: “Yeah.”

Q: “…Does it ever bother you that certain groups will copy you completely whatever you do?”

JOHN: “No, because everybody knows, you know. Only the dumbest people don’t know that they’re copying us, you know. So it’s just a laugh when you see a big imitation of you going ’round. They never really make it. They might have a hit, but nobody’s fooled for long.”

Q: “Does anybody ever ask you for advice– another group, let’s say?”

JOHN: “Younger groups, you know, that are just sort of forming. But there’s no advice you can give really. Just keep playing and hope for the best.”

Q: “I notice that you have this guitar with you, and I notice you strum it quite a bit. Where do you get your ideas for songs? Do you ever get them sitting in a dressing room, or in a hotel room? Is it a planned session, or do you just come across an idea?”

JOHN: “No, I just come across one. I could happen any minute… (strums wildly and yells) Noww-yyo-oumpfff!!! You see… like that!”

Q: (laughs) “Have you written any on this current tour?”

JOHN: “Two.”

Q: “You don’t have the names or anything like that?”

JOHN: “I know the names, but we don’t give them ‘cuz people turn out songs with the same name, you know.”

Q: “I’m not that familiar with the music business, myself.”

JOHN: “Well that’s what happens. You think of a name that’s original, and you broadcast it, and somebody will make a record with the same name and a different song. And it gets confusing, you know.”

Q: “When you first came over to this country in February and I met you briefly in Miami, were you shocked by the reaction? Were you worried about your reaction over here, personally– the crowds and everything else?”

JOHN: “Well, we never expected to… didn’t expect to sell records or anything over here. So we were just amazed. (giggles) And we still are, you know.”

Q: “Was the American market your main goal after conquering England”

JOHN: “Yeah, well, every British artist used to imagine trying to get… you get the odd hit from Britain, or you get the odd hit from Germany– there’s alot of freak records. But nobody ever sort of made it in America, and we were dying to be the first.”

Q: “I know there’s a record over here of ‘I Want To Hold Your Hand’ in German, or ‘She Loves you,’ one or the other.”

JOHN: “Both of them.”

Q: “Have you done them any other languages”

JOHN: “No, the Germans are the only ones that won’t buy you in English. You have to kow-tow to the Germans. But after you’ve made a couple of records they’ll buy anything.”

Q: “I know the police have generally done a great job on this current tour, but what do you think personally about some of them trying to get autographs and going out of the line of duty? You know, you’ve seen so many of them come back in the plane– and to me, this may be a little strong, but it’s sort of a bribe. What do you think of this?”

JOHN: “Well, some of the police do sort of– ‘You sign this or we won’t help you’ but most of them are just normal fellas, and you get sort of lousy people in any organization. You get a couple of lousy cops who sort of threaten you or… not threaten you with violence, but sort of ‘Unless you sign me eighty of these I’m not gonna look after you.’ But they’re no worse than any people in any organization. You get bums everywhere.”

Q: “This is your first tour that you’ve actually seen all of America, and up to now you’ve seen about every section. Off your role as a performer, what do you think of America as a country– the cities and the land and the people?”

JOHN: “I think it’s marvelous, you know. I like it, and especially places like New York and Hollywood, you know. I like the big places. And it’s amazing to see a place like Los Vegas. Who ever thought of building a place in the middle of a desert, (giggles) you know. Things like that are marvelous.”

Q: “Do you ever have any differences on-stage or off-stage?”

JOHN: “Off-stage are the same differences that normal people have or friends have, you know, but they’re never violent or they never last long. We always settle our argument, you know.”

Q: “Everybody says you’re gonna break up. This is another rumor. It’s all over.”

JOHN: “That’s alot of rubbish, you know. It’s just rubbish. We’ve never even thought of it.”

Q: “We were reading those fan magazines, and I plan to show you a few more because some of them are unbelievable.”

JOHN: “Yeah.”

Q: “I don’t know who prints them. I know you laughed when you saw the name Jack Lennon on the page the other night, and I laughed too. Has it ever really bugged you that they get your name wrong?”

JOHN: “No. It’s always made me laugh when people get my name wrong. Like, there was one DJ today who said, ‘This is so-and-so from so-and-so station, talking to John Harrison here,’ and I just creased up but I never told him, you know. He found out by himself at the end. But it’s just funny, you know. If they can’t get your name right, well, (comical voice) God help ’em, that’s what I say!”

Q: “You talked about playing in-doors and outdoors. I noticed the other night, even though you had a forty mile an hour, or thirty mile an hour wind in Jacksonville– I don’t know if you knew it was that high…”

JOHN: (giggles) “It felt like a hundred mile an hour one to me.”

Q: “…you still didn’t have any trouble getting out the song. Do you try to acclimate yourself to this, or did it really bother you the other night?”

JOHN: “Yeah, you know. We’d never been through a thing like that. We were most sort of awkward with… all our hair was blowing up– we all looked like four Elvis Presleys or something. (giggles) We just felt uncomfortable with all that wind.”

Q: “John, thank you very much. It’s been nice working with you.”

JOHN: “Great working with you, Larry.”

Source: Transcribed by the Beatles Ultimate Experience website from audio copy of the interview

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February 24, 2009 Posted by | John Lennon, The Beatles, _ARTICLE, _BOB DYLAN, _MUSIC | Leave a comment

10 songs the ‘Mad Men’ shouldn’t touch

10 songs the ‘Mad Men’ shouldn’t touch

By JIM FARBER
DAILY NEWS MUSIC CRITIC
January 29th 2009
http://www.nydailynews.com

There’s nothing more tired at this point than bitching about stars selling out their songs to Madison Avenue.

That battle is so last century.

Still, every so often a star’s shill retains the rare ability to bring up the bile.

For many, that moment will surely come when they hear about Bob Dylan selling his seminal ode “Blowin’ In The Wind” to a British company that pushes food stores, funeral homes, and financial services.

Of course, the company in question issued a lot of blather about their ethical concerns and progressive views. But, face it, it’s still a business and it’s still “Blowin’ In The Wind,” fer’chrissakes.

With that in mind, I’ve come up with ten songs most likely to make the public apoplectic should they be reduced to ads for adult diapers or sex-enhancement pills:

1) “Mother” John Lennon: The ultimate protest against hypocrisy from the angriest ex-Beatle just won’t do as a plug.

2) “Mercedes Benz” Janis Joplin: Actually, this satire of car-lust and rampant materialism already has been used in an ad – to sell Mercedes, no less.

3) “Volunteers of America” Jefferson Airplane:A song calling for the overthrow of the American government wouldn’t exactly sit right on Madison Avenue would it?

4) “Revolution” The Beatles: Another anti-conformity anthem that, again, has already been subverted in a Nike ad. Blame Michael Jackson, who held the rights to the catalogue at the time.

5) “Born to Run” Bruce Springsteen: Let’s just hope it never turns up as a car spot.

6) “God Save The Queen” Sex Pistols: One of the most deliciously nasty hits in history needs to keep its fangs unsullied and sharp.

7) “Smells like Teen Spirit” Nirvana: Can you imagine just how many somersaults Kurt Cobain’s body would do in his grave should this happen?

8) “People Get Ready” Curtis Mayfield and The Impressions: One of the most stirring civil rights anthems in history needs to stay pure.

9) “Won’t Get Fooled Again” The Who: It’s bad enough that it turned up as a theme song in a nighttime drama. We couldn’t take any deeper desecration.

10) “The Times They Are a Changin'” Bob Dylan: The irony would cut too deep.

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January 30, 2009 Posted by | Bruce Springsteen, John Lennon, Nirvana, The Beatles, _ARTICLE, _BOB DYLAN, _MUSIC | Leave a comment

Paul McCartney on ‘The Howard Stern Show’ — the dirty details!

Paul McCartney on ‘The Howard Stern Show’ — the dirty details!

by Steve Marinucci,
Beatles Examiner
January 14, 2009

On Wednesday’s “The Howard Stern Show,” Paul McCartney gave Howard Stern a signed Hofner bass as a present for Stern’s 55th birthday, which was Monday. Here’s a very rough account of the show (since I didn’t hear it) on what happened on the show compiled from notes by HwyCDRev. My transitions here aren’t really smooth and some of the information is sketchy, but you get a basic idea of what went on.

We’ll revise this as we get more information. (And if you heard it, feel free to add your comments.)

Here we go:

Paul McCartney gave Stern a signed Hofner bass guitar for a birthday gift. Stern said, “Is it yours?” McCartney replied, “No, it’s yours.”

Stern reminded Paul that he told him to get a pre-nuptial agreement. Paul says he doesn’t remember. Denies everything and winks. Stern said it was good McCartney took the high road.

Paul mentioned the East Hamptons concerts and says he didn’t date the women he was photographed with. He just said hello and gave them a kiss as the pictures were taken. The names Christie Brinkley, Renée Zelleweger and Rosanne Arquette were mentioned.

Stern said, “Are you happy with this ‘broad’? Paul asked, “Who?” Stern said, “The rich one.” Artie Lang followed with, “Everyone knew her as Nancy.”

Stern asked Paul about the rumor of John Lennon having sex with Brian Epstein that’s discussed in Philip Norman’s biography, “John Lennon: The Life.” Paul says it’s an old rumor. “One hint and they write a book.”

About the Fireman album, Stern said he liked it, saying, “And when you do a good job, I’ll tell you.”

Robin Quivers said, “i’m throwing my hat into the ring. I’m a vegan, too. Take me to the inauguration. Kids love me.” Stern tells Robin, “Show Paul your breasts.” Paul said no. Robin said, “I’ve been rejected by Paul McCartney.” (Paul is apparently in the U.S. to attend the inauguration.)

Stern asked if it was OK to ask about the Beatles. Paul McCartney: “I like the Beatles. They were a good band.” Paul then tells the story that the “Abbey Road” album was originally called ‘Everest.’ He says, “It was a cheap approach.” He explained that walking outside (for the “Abbey Road” cover) was cheaper than going to Mount Everest and shooting an album cover.

The subject came around to the Ringo “no autographs by mail” video. Paul said, “Ringo would always say ‘p— off'” in the old days because he had kids.” Stern replied he’s not that busy. (p.s. Howard, he’s working on an album.) On Ringo’s “no autographs” video, Paul said, “Ringo can do what he wants” and called Ringo “brave” for doing that video.

Paul replied, “I just signed something outside.” Stern said, “Pete Best will sign anything.”

About the unreleased song “Carnival of Light,” Paul confirmed it was George Harrison, not Yoko Ono, who didn’t like it and that he (Paul) wanted it to go on the “Anthology.”

Stern: “Did you ever write Pete Best a check?” Paul said, “He got pride!” Paul said Pete was kicked out not because he was good looking, but because Ringo sat in and sounded amazing. Stern said, “Don’t miss a day of work!”

Paul said after George Harrison died, “You just remember the good stuff. “Like losing anyone, I don’t think of him every day, but you tell a Beatles story and it’s tinged with sadness.”

And about Dhani Harrison, George’s son, McCartney said, “He’s really good.” Paul also said he and his son James were doing an album together.

Paul McCartney: “I’m an optimist. I’ve seen Vietnam, Nixon, 9/11. I’m excited about Obama. I’m reading his book.”

It’s noted that Christie Brinkley got dolled up for Paul McCartney. Paul: “Who can blame her?” Stern said he heard Brinkley was after Paul.

Paul said he loves having a young child. He makes breakfast, drives her to school and talks to mothers of other students. “Very hands on. It’s a thrill.”

Paul plays the promo single (probably “Sing the Changes”). Paul says, “I like it already.” Stern: “You’re excited?” Paul: “Why not?” and starts to dance a bit.

On the Fireman album, Paul made up the lyrics as he went along, like “improv.” Stern says “Highway” is one of his favorite tracks and says he should have had sex with Renee to that song.

Stern asked if Paul played Guitar Hero. Paul said he didn’t, but then added the Beatles were going to have a Guitar Hero game. “I may learn how to be a Beatle,” Paul said. Stern also mentions his daughter took a Beatles college course.

The subject turned to drugs. Stern says to Paul, “Cocaine .. everyone knows you were addicted.” Paul replied he was not addicted, it was a peer group thing. He says he never took heroin and says he got fed up with cocaine and got out before it was hip. He says he no longer does pot, either.

Paul says he’s still a vegetarian, but he doesn’t like cruelty to animals. Paul said that some eggs are abandoned by the hens, so it’s OK. Stern asked, “Isn’t an egg a chicken abortion?” Paul replied it wasn’t. “We don’t like to think of it like that.”

Stern asked why called the album the Fireman? Paul said it’s like Sgt. Pepper. Then, referring to the Ruttles, he said, “You are Dirk, you are Barry. “I make trails in the woods with a chainsaw for wood (to get wood for a fire).” And says his dad was a fireman.

Stern played another of his favorite songs from the album “Light From Your Lighthouse.” (The other is “Highway.”) He says this is like the Frost/Nixon interview. “We need 18 hours.”

The interview lasted approximately 40 minutes. Paul was having a great time. He was dancing to his CD when it was played.

After the commercial, Stern said there was lots of pressure over the visit. Paul came in with his entourage and there was a lot of things to do. But Stern said it was fun. Paul was relaxed and had his feet up on the couch.

At the end, Fred Norris added, “Before anyone has a heart attack,” the guitar came from Guitar Center.

Photo by Steve Gullick, courtesy MPL Communications Ltd.

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January 21, 2009 Posted by | George Harrison, Howard Stern, John Lennon, Paul McCartney, Ringo Starr, The Beatles | Leave a comment

Mexican Beauty Queen wants to Save the Drugs World !!

I’ve had enough of watching scenes
Of schizophrenic, egocentric, paranoiac, prima-donnas
All I want is the truth now
Just gimme some truth

We love this one!

As John Lennon said “All I want is the truth, just gimme some truth”.

And, after years of listening to dumb Beauty Queen bimbos rabbiting on about how their ambition is to Save the World and invent a cure for cancer, and an array of other ridiculous bullshit, here we get what’s closer to the truth.

This 23 year old hotty Beauty Queen senorita’s ambition is more like “I want to Save the Drugs World”!

Ten out of Eleven for your honesty mamasita! Twelve out of Eleven for those hot bikini shots!

This genius hotty told police that she was planning on travelling to Bolivia and Colombia with some drug cartel gang members to go shopping! No, she knew nothing about the armed convoy of trucks carrying a barrage of heavy weapons, as well as amounts of cash and probably more than a few ‘medicinal samples’!!

Don’t worry baby. It ain’t so bad. We’ve got two pieces of good news for you!

First, you’ll be very popular very fast amongst, let’s say, the more sexually open female inhabitants of Guadalajara State Prison (they’ll be the ones that look like Sly Stallone. But with stubble!)

Second, and even better, you’re a shoo in next year for the annual Guadalajara State Prison Beauty Queen Award!

You can start writing your speech now!!







Mexican Beauty Queen Arrested in Gun-Filled Truck


GUADALAJARA, Mexico — A reigning Mexican beauty queen from the drug-plagued state of Sinaloa was arrested with suspected gang members in a truck filled guns and ammunition, police said Tuesday.

Miss Sinaloa 2008 Laura Zuniga stared at the ground, with her flowing dark hair concealing her face, as she stood squeezed between seven alleged gunmen lined up before journalists. Soldiers wearing ski masks guarded the 23-year-old model and the suspects.

Zuniga was arrested shortly before midnight on Monday at a military checkpoint in Zapopan, just outside the colonial city of Guadalajara, said Jalisco state police director, Francisco Alejandro Solorio.

Zuniga was riding in one of two trucks, where soldiers found a large stash of weapons, including two AR-15 assault rifles, .38 specials, 9mm handguns, nine magazines, 633 cartridges and $53,300 in U.S. currency, Solorio said.

State police identified one of the men caught with her as the brother of an alleged drug trafficker from Ciudad Juarez, a city on the U.S. border, and said the man appeared to have been her boyfriend.

Zuniga told police that she was planning on traveling to Bolivia and Colombia with the men to go shopping, Solorio said.

When the former preschool teacher won Miss Sinaloa in July she gave an impassioned speech about how society should value women more, especially mothers. In October, she won the Hispanoamerican Queen beauty contest in October against competitors from across Latin America.

She placed third in the Nuestra Belleza Mexico pageant in Monterrey in September. That pageant sends its winner to the Miss Universe contest. For placing third, she was expected to represent Mexico in the 2009 Miss International contest.

Zuniga is from the Pacific coast state of Sinaloa, the home of the powerful cartel of the same name. It was not immediately known whether Zuniga and the men were being investigated for drug ties.

Lupita Jones, the national director of Nuestra Belleza Mexico, released a statement distancing the organization from Zuniga. Jones also said Nuestra Belleza knew nothing about “any illicit activity in which she could be involved.”

The organization also says it will await the results of the investigation before making any decision about whether to strip Zuniga of her crown.

“Since 1994, Nuestra Belleza has been a serious, honest and transparent organization dedicated exclusively to preparing Mexican women to successfully represent our country en various contests and whose object is to show the beauty, value and intelligence of each one of them,” Jones said.

Tatiana Limpias of Gloria promotions, which organizes the Hispanoamerican contest in Bolivia, told The Associated Press that their lawyers were also looking into the matter before making a decision about her crown.

About 90 percent of the cocaine entering the United States passes through Mexico, earning its powerful and vicious cartels billions of dollars a year and allowing them to corrupt the segments of society ranging from the police and army to musical groups.

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December 27, 2008 Posted by | John Lennon, Laura Zuniga, Mexico, _ARTICLE, _BABE | Leave a comment

The Sunday Times Music books of the year

The Sunday Times books of the year: Music

Reviewed by Robert Sandall

John Lennon: The Life by Philip Norman
HarperCollins £25

Written with the co-operation of Yoko Ono, who subsequently disowned it for being ‘disrespectful’, Norman’s life of Lennon is the most complete account yet of an incendiary talent and troubled soul. Fame has seldom alighted on a man who was, from first to last, such an unhappy misfit.

From the upheavals of his early life, as an unwanted child raised by his strict and starchy aunt Mimi, to his last days as a homesick, housebound exile in New York, Lennon never really settled. Not even leading the most famous pop group in history could bring the peace he hymned in his celebrated song Imagine. The reasons why are superbly marshalled in this meticulously researched, compulsively readable book.

ROCK ON by DAN KENNEDY
Harvill Secker £12.99

A rock’n’roll version of The Office, this account of Kennedy’s spell as an employee of the Warner label in New York is a droll antidote to the standard musicbiz memoir. When he arrives in 2002, the budgets for debauchery have been slashed, and nervous marketing types rule.

Desperate avarice is everybody’s default position – from the new proprietors who loot the company for their $20m bonuses to the artists eager to flog their integrity to the first corporate sponsor. Kennedy views this shambles with the eye of a larky obituarist.
Background

WHEN GIANTS WALKED THE EARTH: A Biography of Led Zeppelin by MICK WALL
Orion £20

Led Zeppelin summed up the best and the worst of rock culture in the 1970s, and Wall is one of few biographers to have got the measure of both sides of the band. If he is steadfastly nonjudgmental in the face of all the drinking and drugging, the misogynist abuse of groupies and the psychotic thuggishness of drummer John Bonham and manager Peter Grant, that’s because he appreciates how their callous disregard for normal constraints also allowed Led Zeppelin to make toweringly original music – for a while. Theirs was a Faustian tale that veteran metal-journo Wall tells with authority.

ON SOME FARAWAY BEACH:The Life and Times of Brian Eno by DAVID SHEPPARD
Orion £20

Encapsulating the life of a prolific character such as Eno is, as Sheppard points out, “like folding down a skyscraper into a suitcase”. His preference is for the younger man, the art-school maverick turned boa-wearing synthesizer whiz who lit up the early 1970s with Roxy Music and went on to produce U2. Although Sheppard skimps the last 25 years and doesn’t delve far into Eno’s art projects or complicated marriage, he is strong on the bitter 1970s battle with Bryan Ferry and the working friendship with Bowie. He sheds interesting light, too, on Eno’s fondness for women with large bottoms.

GIG: The Life and Times of a Rock-Star Fantasist by SIMON ARMITAGE
Viking £16.99

Armitage is a writer and poet for whom the template of performance is supplied by the rock gig. In this lively memoir he takes us through his youthful obsession with punk and the “new romantics”, right up to his current interest in Arctic Monkeys and their “engaging narratives and subtle half-rhymes (sung) in a republic of south Yorkshire accent”. Armitage’s taste in music (indie guitar bands such as the Smiths and the Fall) is stuck firmly north of Watford, and the way he weaves it into the story of his life with his wife, formerly the singer with Sue and the Speedy Bears, makes this a must-read for fortysomething teenagers everywhere.

A FREEWHEELIN’ TIME by SUZE ROTOLO
Aurum £16.99

Rotolo was Bob Dylan’s first proper girlfriend, and was with him, on and off, for four formative years in New York from 1961 to 1965. Apart from hugging his arm on the front cover of his second album, Rotolo kept a low profile before publishing a book that has curried her no favour with Dylan anoraks. Her portrait of an unsophisticated and unscrupulous young hick from Minnesota may not burnish the myth, but she tells it with a keen eye for Manhattan’s bohemian folky ethos and, given Dylan’s relentless womanising, a complete lack of vengeful bitterness.

THE REST IS NOISE:Listening to the 20th Century by ALEX ROSS
Fourth Estate £25

Much modern classical composition is a no-go area for many music lovers, and a pointless racket to the general public – hardly a promising subject therefore for a non-academic book. The New Yorker’s music critic Ross, however, has turned it into a gripping account of the last century in which troubled, shady characters such as Richard Strauss and Dmitri Shostakovitch seek refuge in the patronage of Hitler and Stalin, and outlandish avant-garde ideas find shelter in the work of cool jazzers such as Miles Davis and Thelonius Monk. A definitive work of reference dressed as unputdown-able social history.

THE OLIVETTI CHRONICLES by JOHN PEEL
Bantam Press £20

Although he never got feted as a journalist the way he did as a DJ and broadcaster, Peel contributed columns and reviews to a number of publications throughout his career. This selection of his articles (chosen by his children and named after the make of typewriter he always used) reminds you of his wonderfully surreal humour; as in “Aerosmith thundered away with all the careless spontaneity of a telephone booth.” It also contains some surprisingly indiscreet, possibly fictitious personal details, such as “somebody called Anne has written to me from Preston offering to fellate me till I faint…”.

THE FALLEN: Searching for the Missing Members of The Fall by DAVE SIMPSON
Canongate £18.99

MarkE Smith, the prime mover of the Fall, the longest-running punk group on the planet, is a notoriously autocratic band-leader who has fired around 40 backing musicians during his 30-year career. Simpson’s idea – to interview as many of these discarded sidemen (and women) as he can track down – is a good one, given that Smith himself is as enigmatic in interviews as he is on record. The results of Simpson’s picaresque endeavours are a hoot and reveal a surprising amount of goodwill for a capricious and sometimes violent employer. Most believable is the lady vocalist who observes, “Mark’s the sort of person who likes pulling wings off flies.”

THE CLASH by STRUMMER, JONES, SIMONON, HEADON
Atlantic £30

The trend for bands to publish books the size of paving slabs with lots of previously unpublished posters and accompanying “in their own words” blah has gone beyond the point of dullness. The Clash bucks it, thanks partly to the fact that the band’s career was so hectic and short – a little over eight years – and mainly to the individual members’ refreshing candour. Headon apologises for his heroin addiction; Jones forgives Strummer for kicking him out of the band; and Simonon says he wishes that the triple album Sandinista! had been released as a single one.

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December 15, 2008 Posted by | John Lennon, Suze Rotolo, _ARTICLE, _BOB DYLAN, _LITERATURE, _MUSIC | Leave a comment

John Lennon – Oh My Love

An truly under-rated classic this, one of our favourite Lennon tracks.

It’s a beautiful, simple yet deeply resonant and powerful love song.

There is a zen-like feel to the deceptive simplicity in the lyric. All above a gorgeous pared down melody.

This comes from the Imagine album, recorded and released in 1971, and is credited to John Lennon and Yoko Ono.

However, the song was originally written and demoed years earlier in 1968 after The Beatles “White Album” sessions.

“Oh My Love” is said to have been influenced by John’s experience with Primal Therapy and communicates the joy and growth Lennon was experiencing as a result of the therapy.

George Harrison contributed guitar on this track and several other songs on Imagine.

In the vid below, John, George and Yoko are filmed at Ascott studio in June 1971 recording this great song.

Their German friend Klaus Voormann plays bass and the late Nicky Hopkins is on second piano.

Oh my love for the first time in my life

my eyes are wide open

Oh my lover for the first time in my life

my eyes can see

I see the wind, oh I see the trees

everything is clear in my heart

I see the clouds, oh I see the sky

everything is clear in our world

Oh my love for the first time in my life

my mind is wide open

Oh my lover for the first time in my life

my mind can feel
I feel sorrow, oh I feel dreams

everything is clear in my heart

everything is clear in our world

I feel life, oh I feel love

John Lennon – Oh My Love

Good visuals but poor sound!

John Lennon – Oh My Love

Better sound!

John Lennon and George Harrison in 1971 recording Oh My Love


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December 11, 2008 Posted by | George Harrison, John Lennon, Music_ClassicRock, Roykeanz, Yoko Ono, _ART, _MUSIC, _PHOTOGRAPHY, _POETRY, _VIDEO | Leave a comment

John Lennon – Rock N Roll (1975)

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John Lennon – Rock N Roll1975
Remastered & Bonus Tracks – 2004

When the night has come
And the land is dark
And the moon is the only light we’ll see
No I won’t be afraid, no I won’t be afraid
Just as long as you stand, stand by me

-Jerry Leiber/Mike Stoller/Ben E. King
I’m a freakin’ artist, man, not a fuckin’ racehorse!

-John Lennon (Rolling Stone 5/6/1975)

We saw a post with this fine release posted over at scarydaydreams

Rock ‘n’ Roll is a 1975 album of late 1950s and early 1960s-era rock songs covered by John Lennon. The recording of the album spanned a year and its dramatic and infamous sessions have since entered into rock music folklore. The title was actually a last-minute choice, coming from a neon sign crafted for the album cover.

In this new improved version of the album from 2004, all the tracks have been remixed and remastered, and while true to the original release, sound better than they ever have before. A few extra touches, such as a count-in on “Be Bop A Lula”, are good and the bonus tracks ain’t half bad either – particularly the fun arrangement and backing vocals on “My Baby Left Me”, and the extra spoken words on the previously unreleased outro to “Just Because”.

It may not be a perfect album, but it’s pretty damn good indeed and a must-have for fans of great music. It’ an uplifting album and the interpretations sound fresh and strong. The songs of course are stone-cold classics and the album itself is a great and warm Lennon tribute to the rock n’ roll roots that influenced him, seeped into his soul and stayed with him throughout his life.

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The context and background for this album were very complex indeed and rather surreal!

John was in the midst of his so called, “Lost Weekend” when he started recording golden oldies for a new album.

After splitting with Yoko Ono in the fall of 1973, and arriving in Los Angeles with May Pang, Lennon teamed up with Phil Spector to record the album, working at both A&M Records Studios and Gold Star Recording Studios. Due to the boys-club nature of the sessions, the atmosphere quickly fell into disarray with alcohol, with Lennon in very aggressive form.

Paul McCartney had decided to go to court to dissolve the Beatles partnership, which froze their assets. All of the Ex-Beatles were given allowances, and this meant that none of them could make any money on their own until the Beatles had officially broken up on paper. All of the money that the Beatles were making on solo projects was being poured into one giant Apple pot.

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Lawyers had begun to slice up the Apple pie, and each of the Beatles had their own lawsuits to fight. John Lennon started making the album “ROCK ‘N ROLL,” due to a lawsuit that was filed against him by Morris Levy, a renowned shyster, who owned the publishing to “You Can’t Catch Me” by Chuck Berry.

Levy claimed that John had ripped off Chuck Berry when he recorded, “Come Together.” The lawsuit was filed in 1973. John’s lawyer, “Harry Seider” was ready to fight, but Yoko didn’t want John to come back to New York, she wanted him to settle this out of court.

An agreement was reached that, in summary, Lennon would record three Chuck Berry numbers and thereby fill Levy’s coffers!

Furthermore, Lennon’s recent outings had not sold well so he felt he would return to his roots with classic Rock n Roll numbers with a view to increasing sales.

These two scenarios were the main factors leading to the recording of what became this album.

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The LA sessions for the album are infamous and filled with so many strange and fucked-up details, it would take a novel to do them justice. Therefore, let’s just cover the main salient points.

John went to work on the album in LA with ‘wall of sound’ uber-producer, whack-job (and now potential murder felon!) Phil Spector. The sessions at various points ranged between chaotic to insane, entailing throughout, the consumption (allegedly!) of copious amounts of cocaine, alcohol, pot etc. and entailing, at various points, Spector gunshots in the studio, fierce arguments, Lennon fights, monster celebrity parties, etc. etc.

Furthermore, Lennon was so fucked-up that not only was his voice shot but he was changing his singing style, as well as the lyrics, so much between takes that continuity and cutting together of takes was impossible. Also Spector’s style of very slowly designing the arrangements in the studio, and technically his means of recording every take with all 24 tracks wide open, meant that very little from the sessions could be salvaged.

In the end, the sessions had cost a hell of a lot of money and had yielded very little. A further surreal complication was that, for a time, Spector absconded with the masters and claimed they had been destroyed in a motorcycle crash!

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Eventually, the masters were returned to Lennon, but were in the most part unusable. Lennon basically re-recorded the entire thing in NYC over 9 days and the record company shipped it out pronto due to an impending similar release being made by the aforementioned Morris Levy of similar Lennon material called Roots. This was an unauthorised album recorded by Lennon and his band in Levy’s farmhouse and released on Levy’s Adam VIII label. Though it didn’t sell very well, original copies of Roots are now valuable collector’s items.

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The album cover for Rock n Roll is of course the famous photo of John Lennon standing in a doorway while the other Beatles walk in front of him, and are blurred as they’re walking by. Photographer Jurgen Volimer took the great shot in 1961.

The photo was a favorite of John’s, and was one of the few Beatles photos that he had hanging in his Dakota pad. He actually kept the picture hanging over his jukebox there.

The album’s working title had been Oldies but Mouldies; no official title had been chosen until Lennon saw the neon sign prepared as cover art by John Uotomo, with Lennon’s name and the words “ROCK ‘N’ ROLL” beneath. This struck Lennon in a positive way, and it became the album title.

Some interesting links:

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Tracklisting:

All tracks produced by John Lennon, except where noted.

1. “Be-Bop-A-Lula” (Tex Davis/Gene Vincent) – 2:39

* Lennon opened with a song he’d played the only time his mother Julia got to see him perform. This was the song he was playing when he met Paul McCartney in 1957.

2. “Stand by Me” (Jerry Leiber/Mike Stoller/Ben E. King) – 3:26

* The single’s B-side, “Move Over Ms. L”, was a non-album song written by Lennon, originally intended for Walls and Bridges.

3. “Medley: Rip It Up/Ready Teddy” (Blackwell/John Marascalco) – 1:33

* Two songs famously recorded by Little Richard, who had toured with the Beatles.

4. “You Can’t Catch Me” (Chuck Berry) – 4:51

* Produced by Phil Spector was the song that, according to Morris Levy, sounded very much like Come Together.

5. “Ain’t That a Shame” (Fats Domino/Dave Bartholomew) – 2:38

* Lennon met Fats Domino during a Las Vegas visit late in 1973; this was the first song Lennon’s mother taught him to play.

6. “Do You Wanna Dance?” (Bobby Freeman) – 3:15

* A reggae-flavoured remake.

7. “Sweet Little Sixteen” (Chuck Berry) – 3:01

* Produced by Phil Spector.

8. “Slippin’ and Slidin'” (Eddie Bocage/Albert Collins/Richard Wayne Penniman/James H. Smith) – 2:16

* Planned as the second single from the album (with “Ain’t That A Shame” as the B-side), but cancelled before its release. In the video, he sends a sweet message to son Julian.

9. “Peggy Sue” (Jerry Allison/Norman Petty/Buddy Holly) – 2:06

* Lennon, Paul McCartney and George Harrison were Buddy Holly fans; McCartney purchased Holly’s song copyrights in the late 1970s.

10. “Medley: Bring It On Home to Me/Send Me Some Lovin'” (Sam Cooke)/(John Marascalco/Lloyd Price) – 3:41

11. “Bony Moronie” (Larry Williams) – 3:47

* Produced by Phil Spector

12. “Ya Ya” (Lee Dorsey/Clarence Lewis/Morgan Robinson) – 2:17

* A brief version appeared on Walls and Bridges, featuring eleven-year-old Julian Lennon on drums.

13. “Just Because” (Lloyd Price) – 4:25

* Produced by Phil Spector

* Lennon speaks before the fadeout, in the style of a 50’s D.J. closing out a radio programme, joking, “There’s two basses in this, and I hope you appreciate it!” adding “Good night from the Record Plant East, New York… Goodbye.” He said in a later interview that he was subconsciously bidding farewell to the music business.

* On the ‘Reprise’ version found on the 2005 re-issue, Lennon says “it’s all down to Goodnight Vienna, I’d like to say hi to Ringo, Paul and, George… how are you?” “All wounds are healed” said Lennon in 1974, and he was feeling sentimental toward his fellow bandmates. As he could not leave the U.S. because of immigration problems, he sent this message to them.

14. “Angel Baby” (Rosie Hamlin) – 3:44

* appears on 2004 reissue

15. “To Know Her is to Love Her” (Phil Spector) – 4:31

* appears on 2004 reissue

16. “Since My Baby Left Me” (Arthur Crudup) – 4:40

* appears on 2004 reissue

17. “Just Because (Reprise)” – 1:25

* appears on 2004 reissue

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NOTE:

We do not host any files here. If this post contains a link to content hosted elsewhere, this is content found by a simple search on the worldwide freedom web. However, if for some valid reason, you object to a said content, or any content here, please let us know and we will remove the content in question.

Any content linked to here is only meant as a taster for the original work itself and is posted on the strict understanding that anyone who downloads the taster, deletes said content within 24 hours. We would assume that these fans will then buy the original work and we greatly encourage them to do so.

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December 11, 2008 Posted by | John Lennon, May Pang, Music_ClassicRock, Phil Spector, The Beatles, Yoko Ono, _MUSIC | Leave a comment

1975 Rolling Stone Interview with John Lennon / Other classic Lennon interviews


I’m a freakin’ artist, man, not a fuckin’ racehorse!

We caught the wonderful and rather scary The U.S. vs. John Lennon – by David Leaf and John Scheinfeld – again on TV the other night, and have been reading up on some stuff from that fascinating period.

This seminal RS interview with Lennon comes from 1975, from a turbulent period in Lennon’s life, personally and professionally and covers an array of stuff such as his split from Yoko Ono, his then recent musical projects and, of course, the infamous deportation attempts against him, as explored in The U.S. vs. John Lennon.

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1975 Rolling Stone Interview with John Lennon

by Pete Hamill,
June 5, 1975

Journalist Pete Hamill spoke with John Lennon for an interview that was published in Rolling Stone Magazine’s June 5th 1975 issue.

John speaks of his recent separation and reconciliation with Yoko Ono, the recent Beatles legal settlement, and also speaks positively on the possibility of a Beatles reunion.

Other topics include his own recent solo albums, his pending immigration case, and working with Phil Spector, Elton John, and Harry Nilsson.

ImageQ: “What’s your life like right now?”

JOHN: “Well, life… It’s ’75 now, isn’t it? Well, I’ve just settled the Beatles settlement. It must’ve happened in the last month. Took three years. (pause) And on this day that you’ve come here, I seem to have moved back in here. In the last three days. By the time this goes out, I don’t know… That’s a big change. Maybe that’s why I’m sleeping funny. As a friend says, I went out for coffee and some papers and I didn’t come back. (chuckles) Or vice versa. It’s always written that way, y’know. All of us. You know, the guy walked. It’s never that simple.”

Q: “What did happen with you and Yoko? Who broke it up and how did you end up back together again?”

JOHN: “Well, it’s not a matter of who broke it up. It broke up. And why did we end up back together? (pompous voice) ‘We ended up together again because it was diplomatically viable…’ Come on. We got back together because we love each other.”

Q: “I loved your line: ‘The separation didn’t work out.'”

JOHN: “That’s it. It didn’t work out. And the reaction to the breakup was all that madness. I was like a chicken without a head.”

Q: “What was the final Beatles settlement?”

JOHN: “In a nutshell, what was arranged was that everybody gets their own individual monies. Even up till this year, till the settlement was signed, all the monies were going into one pot. All individual records, mine, Ringo’s, Paul’s – all into one big pot. It had to go through this big machinery and then come out to us, eventually. So now, even the old Beatle royalties, everything goes into four separate accounts instead of one big pot all the time. That’s that. The rest of it was ground rules. Everybody said the Beatles’ve signed this paper, that means they’re no longer tied in any way. That’s bullshit. We still own this thing called Apple. Which, you can explain, is a bank. A bank the money goes into. But there’s still the entity itself known as the Beatles. The product, the name, the likeness, the Apple thing itself, which still exists, and we still have to communicate on it and make decisions on it and decide who’s to run Apple and who’s to do what. It’s not as cut and dried as the papers said.”

Q: “Do the old Beatles records still go in a pot?”

JOHN: “No one of us can say to EMI, ‘Here’s a new package of Beatle material.’ We still have to okay everything together, you know, ’cause that’s the way we want it anyway.”

Q: “There’s still a good feeling among the guys?”

JOHN: “Yeah, yeah. I talked to Ringo and George yesterday. I didn’t talk to Paul ’cause he was asleep. George and Paul are talkin’ to each other in L.A. now. There’s nothin’ going down between us. It’s all in people’s heads.”

Q: “You went to one of George’s concerts, what are your thoughts on his tour?”

JOHN: “It wasn’t the greatest thing in history. The guy went through some kind of mill. It was probably his turn to get smacked. When we were all together there was periods when the Beatles were in, the Beatles were out, no matter what we were doing. Now it’s always the Beatles were great or the Beatles weren’t great, whatever opinion people hold. There’s a sort of illusion about it. But the actual fact was the Beatles were in for eight months, the Beatles were out for eight months. The public, including the media, are sometimes a bit sheeplike and if the ball starts rolling, well, it’s just that somebody’s in, somebody’s out. George is out for the moment. And I think it didn’t matter what he did on tour.”

Q: “George told Rolling Stone that if you wanted the Beatles, go listen to Wings. It seemed a bit of a putdown.”

JOHN: “I didn’t see what George said, so I really don’t have any comment. (pause) Band on the Run is a great album. Wings is almost as conceptual a group as Plastic Ono Band. Plastic Ono was a conceptual group, meaning whoever was playing was the band. And Wings keeps changing all the time. It’s conceptual. I mean, they’re backup men for Paul. It doesn’t matter who’s playing. You can call them Wings, but it’s Paul McCartney music. And it’s good stuff. It’s good Paul music and I don’t really see the connection.”

Q: “What do you think of Richard Perry’s work with Ringo?”

JOHN: “I think it’s great. Perry’s great, Ringo’s great, I think the combination was great and look how well they did together. There’s no complaints if you’re Number One.”

Q: “George said at his press conference that he could play with you again but not with Paul. How do you feel?”

JOHN: “I could play with all of them. George is entitled to say that, and he’ll probably change his mind by Friday. You know, we’re all human. We can all change our minds. So I don’t take any of my statements or any of their statements as the last word on whether we will. And if we do, the newspapers will learn about it after the fact. If we’re gonna play, we’re just gonna play.”

Q: “In retrospect, what do you think of the whole “Lennon Remembers” episode?”

JOHN: “Well, the other guys, their reaction was public. Ringo made some sort of comment that was funny, which I can’t remember, something like, ‘You’ve gone too far this time, Johnnie.’ Paul said (stuffy voice), ‘Well, that’s his problem.’ I can’t remember what George said. I mean, they don’t care, they’ve been with me for fifteen or twenty years, they know damn well what I’m like. It just so happens it was in the press. I mean, they know what I’m like. I’m not ashamed of it at all. I don’t really like hurting people, but Jann Wenner questioned me when I was almost still in therapy and you can’t play games. You’re opened up. It was like he got me on an acid trip. Things come out. I got both reactions from that article. A lot of people thought it was right on. My only upset was Jann insisted on making a book out of it.”

Q: “‘Walls and Bridges’ has an undertone of regret to it. Did you sit down consciously to make an album like that?”

JOHN: “No, well… Let’s say this last year has been an extraordinary year for me personally. And I’m almost amazed that I could get anything out. But I enjoyed doing Walls and Bridges and it wasn’t hard when I had the whole thing to go into the studio and do it. I’m surprised it wasn’t just all bluuuugggghhhh. (pause) I had the most peculiar year. And… I’m just glad that something came out. It’s describing the year, in a way, but it’s not as sort of schizophrenic as the year really was. I think I got such a shock during that year that the impact hasn’t come through. It isn’t all on Walls and Bridges though. There’s a hint of it there. It has to do with age and God knows what else. But only the surface has been touched on Walls and Bridges, you know?”

Q: “What was it about the year? Do you want to try talking about it?”

JOHN: “Well, you can’t put your finger on it. It started, somehow, at the end of ’73, goin’ to do this Rock ‘n’ Roll album (with Phil Spector). It had quite a lot to do with Yoko and I, whether I knew it or not, and then, suddenly, I was out on me own. Next thing I’d be waking up, drunk, in strange places or reading about meself in the paper, doin’ extraordinary things, half of which I’d done and half of which I hadn’t done. But you know the game anyway. And find meself sort of in a mad dream for a year. I’d been in many mad dreams, but this… It was pretty wild. And then I tried to recover from that.

And (long pause) meanwhile life was going on, the Beatles settlement was going on, other things, life was still going on and it wouldn’t let you sit with your hangover, in whatever form that took. It was like something, probably me-self, kept hitting me while I was trying to do something. I was still trying to do something. I was still trying to carry on a normal life and the whip never let up – for eight months. So… that’s what was going on. Incidents: You can put it down to which night with which bottle or which night in which town. It was just sort of a mad year like that… And it was just probably fear, and being out on me own, and gettin’ old, and are ye gonna make it in the charts? Are ye not gonna make it? All that crap, y’know. All the garbage that y’really know is not the be-all and end-all of your life, but if other things are goin’ funny, that’s gonna hit you. If you’re gonna feel sorry for yourself, you’re gonna feel sorry for everything. What it’s really to do with is probably the same thing that it’s always been to do with all your life: whatever your own personal problems really are, you know? So it was a year that manifested itself (switches to deep actor’s voice) in most peculiar fashion. But I’m through it and it’s ’75 now and I feel better and I’m sittin’ here and not lyin’ in some weird place with a hangover.”

Q: “Why do you feel better?”

JOHN: “Because I feel like I’ve been on Sinbad’s voyage, you know, and I’ve battled all those monsters and I’ve got back. (long pause) Weird.”

Q: “Tell me about the Rock ‘n’ Roll album.”

JOHN: “It started in ’73 with Phil and fell apart. I ended up as part of mad, drunk scenes in Los Angeles and I finally finished it off on me own. And there was still problems with it up to the minute it came out. I can’t begin to say, it’s just barmy, there’s a jinx on that album. And I’ve just started writing a new one. Got maybe half of it written…”

Q: “What about the stories that Spector’s working habits are a little odd? For example, that he either showed off or shot off guns in the studios?”

JOHN: “I don’t like to tell tales out of school, y’know. But I do know there was an awful loud noise in the toilet of the Record Plant West.”

Q: “What actually did happen those nights at the Troubadour when you heckled the Smothers Brothers and went walking around with a Kotex on your head asking the waitress, ‘Do you know who I am?'”

JOHN: “Ah, y’want the juice… If I’d said, ‘Do you know who I am?’ I’d have said it in a joke. Because I know who I am, and I know she knew, because I musta been wearing a Kotex on me head, right? I picked up a Kotex in a restaurant, in the toilet, and it was clean and just for a gag I came back to the table with it on me head. And ’cause it stuck there with sweat, just stayed there, I didn’t have to keep it on. It just stayed there till it fell off. And the waitress said, ‘Yeah, you’re an asshole with a Kotex on,’ and I think it’s a good remark and so what? Tommy Smothers was a completely different night and has been covered a million times. It was my first night on Brandy Alexanders and my last (laughs). And I was with Harry Nilsson, who was no help at all (laughs).”

Q: “What’s your relationship with Nilsson? Some critics say that he’s been heavily influenced, maybe even badly screwed up by you.”

JOHN: “Oh, that’s bullshit.”

Q: “…and that you’ve also been influenced by him.”

JOHN: “That’s bullshit, too. I haven’t been influenced by Harry, only that I had a lot of hangovers whenever I was with him (laughs). I love him. He’s a great guy and I count him as one of me friends. He hasn’t influenced me musically. And there’s an illusion going around about my production of Harry’s album. That he was trying to imitate me on his album.”

Q: “You mean that he’d gone into his primal period…”

JOHN: “That’s it. They’re so sheeplike – put this in – and childlike about trying to put a tag on what’s going on. They use these expressions like ‘primal’ for anything that’s a scream. Brackets: Yoko was screaming before Janov was ever even heard of– that was her stint, usin’ her voice like an instrument. She was screamin’ when Janov was still jackin’ off to Freud. But nowadays, everything that’s got a scream in it is called primal. I know what they’re talkin’ about. The very powerful emotional pitch that Harry reaches at the end of ‘Many Rivers to Cross’ on the album I produced for him (Pussy Cats). It’s there, simply enough, because when you get to a certain point with your vocals, there ain’t nowhere else to go. Was Little Richard primaling before each sax solo? That’s what I want know. Was my imitation Little Richard screams I used to put on all the Beatles records before the solo – we all used to do it, we’d go aaaarrrrgggghhhh! Was that primaling? Right?”

Q: “Richard Perry has described you as a superb producer but maybe in too much of a hurry.”

JOHN: “That’s true [laughs].”

Q: “But supposedly, when making the Beatles records, you were painstaking and slow.”

JOHN: “No, I was never painstaking and slow. I produced ‘I Am the Walrus’ at the same speed I produced ‘Whatever Gets You Thru the Night.’ I would be painstaking on some things, as I am now. If there’s a quality that occasionally gets in the way of my talent, it’s that I get bored quick unless it’s done quick. But ‘I Am the Walrus’ sounds like a wonderful production. ‘Strawberry Fields’ sounds like a big production. But I do them as quick as I possibly can, without losing (a) the feel and (b) where I’m going.

The longest track I personally spent time on was ‘Revolution 9,’ which was an abstract track where I used a lot of tape loops and things like that. I still did it in one session. But I accept that criticism and I have it of myself. But I don’t want to make myself so painstaking that it’s boring. But I should (pause) maybe t’ink a little more. Maybe. But on the other hand I think my criticism of somebody like Richard Perry would be that he’s great but he’s too painstaking. It gets too slick and somewhere in between that is where I’d like to go. I keep finding out all the time – what I’m missing that I want to get out of it.”

Q: “Is there anybody that you’d like to produce? For example, Dylan?”

JOHN: “Dylan would be interesting because I think he made a great album in Blood on the Tracks but I’m still not keen on the backings. I think I could produce him great. And Presley. I’d like to resurrect Elvis. But I’d be so scared of him I don’t know whether I could do it. But I’d like to do it. Dylan, I could do, but Presley would make me nervous. But Dylan or Presley, somebody up there… I know what I’d do with Presley. Make a rock & roll album. Dylan doesn’t need material. I’d just make him some good backings. So if you’re reading this, Bob, you know…”

Q: “Elton John has revived ‘Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds.’ How do you feel about him as an artist?”

JOHN: “Elton sort of popped in on the session for Walls and Bridges and sort of zapped in and played the piano and ended up singing ‘Whatever Gets You Thru the Night’ with me. Which was a great shot in the arm. I’d done three quarters of it, ‘Now what do we do?’ Should we put a camel on it or a xylophone? That sort of thing. And he came in and said, ‘Hey, ah’ll play some piano!’ Then I heard he was doing ‘Lucy’ and I heard from a friend – ’cause he was shy – would I be there when he cut ‘Lucy’? Maybe not play on it but just be there? So I went along. And I sang in the chorus and contributed the reggae in the middle. And then, again through a mutual friend, he asked if it got to be Number One, would I appear onstage with him, and I said sure, not thinkin’ in a million years it was gonna get to Number One. Al Coury or no Al Coury, the promotion man at Capitol. And there I was. Onstage.”

Q: “I read somewhere that you were very moved by the whole thing.”

JOHN: “I was moved by it, but everybody else was in tears. I felt guilty ’cause I wasn’t in tears. I just went up and did a few numbers. But the emotional thing was me and Elton together. Elton had been working in Dick James’s office when we used to send our demos in and there’s a long sort of relationship musically with Elton that people don’t really know about. He has this sort of Beatle thing from way back. He’d take the demos home and play them and… well, it meant a lot to me and it mean a hell of a lot to Elton, and he was in tears. It was a great high night, a really high night… Yoko and I met backstage. And somebody said, ‘Well, there’s two people in love.’ That was before we got back together. But that’s probably when we felt something. It was very weird. She came backstage and I didn’t know she was there, ’cause if I’d known she was there I’d’ve been too nervous to go on, you know, I would have been terrified. She was backstage afterward, and there was just that moment when we saw each other and like, it’s like in the movies, you know, when time stands still? And there was silence, everything went silent, y’know, and we were just sort of lookin’ at each other and… oh, hello. I knew she’d sent Elton and I a flower each, and we were wearin’ them onstage, but I didn’t know she was there and then everybody was around us and flash flash flash. But there was that moment of silence. And somebody observed it and told me later on, after we were back together again, and said, “A friend of mine saw you backstage and thought if ever there was two in love, it’s those two.” And I thought, well, it’s weird somebody noticed it… So it was a great night.”

Q: “There seems to be a lot of generosity among the artists now.”

JOHN: “It was around before. It’s harder when you’re on the make, to be generous, ’cause you’re all competing. But once you’re sort of up there, wherever it is… The rock papers love to write about the jet-setting rock stars and they dig it and we dig it in a way. The fact is that, yeah, I see Mick, I see Paul, I see Elton, they’re all my contemporaries and I’ve known the other Beatles, of course, for years, and Mick for ten years, and we’ve been hangin’ around since Rock Dreams. And suddenly it’s written up as they’re-here-they’re-there-they’re-everywhere bit, and it looks like we’re trying to form a club. But we always were a club. We always knew each other. It just so happens that it looks more dramatic in the paper.”

Q: “How do you relate to what we might call the rock stars of the Seventies? Do you think of yourself as an uncle figure, a father figure, an old gunfighter?”

JOHN: “It depends who they are. If it’s Mick or the Old Guard, as I call them, yeah, they’re the Old Guard. Elton, David are the newies. I don’t feel like an old uncle, dear, ’cause I’m not that much older than half of ’em, heh heh. But… yeah, I’m interested in the new people. I’m interested in new people in America but I get a kick out of the new Britons. I remember hearing Elton John’s ‘Your Song,’ heard it in America – it was one of Elton’s first big hits – and remember thinking, ‘Great, that’s the first new thing that’s happened since we happened.’ It was a step forward. There was something about his vocals that was an improvement on all of the English vocals until then. I was pleased with it. And I was pleased with Bowie’s thing and I hadn’t even heard him. I just got this feeling from the image and the projections that were coming out of England of him, well, you could feel it.”

Q: “Do you think of New York as home now?”

JOHN: “Yeah, this is the longest I’ve ever been away from England. I’ve almost lived here as long as I’ve lived in London. I was in London from, let’s see, ’64, ’65, ’66, ’67, actually in London ’cause then it was your Beatlemania bit and we all ended up like a lot of rock & rollers end up, living an hour away from London in the country, the drivin’-in-from-the-big-estate bit. ‘Cause you couldn’t live in London, ’cause people just bugged the ass off you. So I’ve lived in New York longer than I actually lived in London.”

Q: “In view of the immigration case, is one reason you’ve stayed here so long because if you left, they’d pull a Charlie Chaplin on you and not let you back in?”

JOHN: “You bet. There’s no way they would let me back. And… it’s worth it to me. I can last out, without leaving here, another ten years, if that’s the way they want to play it. I’ll earn enough to keep paying them. I’m really getting blackmailed. I’m paying to stay. Paying takes, on one hand, about a half million dollars, and I’ve hardly worked very hard for that. I mean, that’s with sittin’ on me arse and I’ve paid a half million in taxes. So I’m paying them to attack me and keep me busy and harass me, on one hand, while on the other hand I’ve got to pay me own lawyers. Some people think I’m here just to make the American dollars. But I don’t have to be here to make the dollars. I could earn American dollars just sittin’ in a recording studio in Hong Kong. Wherever I am, the money follows me. It’s gonna come out of America whether they like it or not.”

Q: “Right. And the government doesn’t choose that John Lennon makes money. The people who buy your music do that.”

JOHN: “The implication that John Lennon wants to come to the land of milk and honey ’cause it’s easier to pick up the money, so I can pick it up directly instead of waiting for it to arrive in England. Or Brazil. Or wherever I decide to do it. I resent the implication, especially as I’m payin’ through the nose. I don’t mind paying taxes, either, which is strange. I never did. I don’t like ’em using it for bombs and that. But I don’t think I could do a Joan Baez. I don’t have that kind of gut. I did never complain in England either, because, well, it’s buying people teeth… I’m sick of gettin’ sick about taxes. Taxes is what seems to be it, and there’s nothin’ to be done about it unless you choose to make a crusade about it. And I’m sick of being in crusades because I always get nailed up before I’m even in the crusade. They get me in the queue while I’m readin’ the pages about it: ‘Oh, there’s a crusade on, I wonder should I…’ I mean, I get caught before I’ve ever done anything about it.”

Q: “You went through a period of really heavy involvement in radical causes. Lately you seem to have gone back to your art in a more direct way. What happened?”

JOHN: “I’ll tell you what happened literally. I got off the boat, only it was an airplane, and landed in New York, and the first people who got in touch with me was Jerry Rubin and Abbie Hoffman. It’s as simple as that. It’s those two famous guys from America who’s callin’: ‘Hey, yeah, what’s happenin’, what’s goin’ on?’ And the next thing you know, I’m doin’ John Sinclair benefits and one thing and another. I’m pretty movable, as an artist, you know. They almost greeted me off the plane and the next minute I’m involved, you know.”

Q: “How did all of this affect your work?”

JOHN: “It almost ruined it, in a way. It became journalism and not poetry. And I basically feel that I’m a poet. Even if it does go ba-deeble, eedle, eedle, it, da-deedle, deedle, it. I’m not a formalized poet, I have no education, so I have to write in the simplest forms usually. And I realized that over a period of time – and not just ’cause I met Jerry Rubin off the plane – but that was like a culmination. I realized that we were poets but we were really folk poets, and rock & roll was folk poetry – I’ve always felt that. Rock & roll was folk music. Then I began to take it seriously on another level, saying, “Well, I am reflecting what is going on, right?” And then I was making an effort to reflect what was going on. Well, it doesn’t work like that. It doesn’t work as pop music or what I want to do. It just doesn’t make sense. You get into that bit where you can’t talk about trees, ’cause, y’know, y’gotta talk about ‘Corruption on Fifty-fourth Street’! It’s nothing to do with that. It’s a bit larger than that. It’s the usual lesson that I’ve learned in me little thirty-four years: As soon as you’ve clutched onto something, you think – you’re always clutchin’ at straws – this is what life is all about. I think artists are lucky because the straws are always blowin’ out of their hands. But the unfortunate thing is that most people find the straw hat and hang on to it, like your best friend that got the job at the bank when he was fifteen and looked twenty-eight before he was twenty. ‘Oh, this is it! Now I know what I’m doing! Right? Down this road for the next hundred years…’ and it ain’t never that. Whether it’s a religious hat or a political hat or a no-political hat: whatever hat is was, always looking for these straw hats. I think I found out it’s a waste of time. There is no hat to wear. Just keep moving around and changing clothes is the best. That’s all that goes on: change.”

“At one time I thought, well, I’m avoidin’ that thing called the Age Thing, whether it hits you at twenty-one, when you take your first job – I always keep referrin’ to that because it has nothing to do, virtually, with your physical age. I mean, we all know the guys who took the jobs when we left school, the straight jobs, they all look like old guys within six weeks. You’d meet them and they’d be lookin’ like Well, I’ve Settled Down Now. So I never want to settle down, in that respect. I always want to be immature in that respect. But then I felt that if I keep bangin’ my head on the wall it’ll stop me from gettin’ that kind of age in the head. By keeping creating, consciously or unconsciously, extraordinary situations which in the end you’d write about. But maybe it has nothin’ to do with it. I’m still mullin’ that over. Still mullin’ over last year now. Maybe that was it. I was still trying to avoid somethin’ but doin’ it the wrong way ’round. Whether it’s called age or whatever.”

Q: “Is it called growing up?”

JOHN: “I don’t want to grow up but I’m sick of not growing up – that way. I’ll find a different way of not growing up. There’s a better way of doing it than torturing your body. And then your mind. The guilt! It’s just so dumb. And it makes me furious to be dumb because I don’t like dumb people. And there I am, doing the dumbest things… I seem to do the things that I despise the most, almost. All of that to – what? – avoid being normal. I have this great fear of this normal thing. You know, the ones that passed their exams, the ones that went to their jobs, the ones that didn’t become rock & rollers, the ones that settle for it, settled for it, settled for the deal! That’s what I’m trying to avoid. But I’m sick of avoiding it with violence, you know? I’ve gotta do it some other way. I think I will. I think just the fact that I’ve realized it is a good step forward. Alive in ’75 is my new motto. I’ve just made it up. That’s the one. I’ve decided I want to live. I’d decided I wanted to live before, but I didn’t know what it meant, really. It’s taken however many years and I want to have a go at it.”

Q: “Do you think much of yourself as an artist at fifty or sixty?”

JOHN: “I never see meself as not an artist. I never let meself believe that an artist can run dry. I’ve always had this vision of bein’ sixty and writing children’s books. I don’t know why. It’d be a strange thing for a person who doesn’t really have much to do with children. I’ve always had that feeling of giving what Wind in the Willows and Alice in Wonderland and Treasure Island gave to me at age seven and eight. The books that really opened my whole being.”

Q: “Is there anything left to say about the immigration case?”

JOHN: “People get bored with hearin’ about Lennon’s immigration case. I’m bored with hearin’ about it. The only interesting thing is when I read these articles people write that were not instigated by me. I learn things I didn’t know anything about. I didn’t know about Strom Thurmond. I had no idea – I mean I knew something was going on, but I didn’t have any names. I’m just left in the position of just what am I supposed to do? There doesn’t seem to be anything I can do about it. It’s just… bloody crazy. Terry Southern put it in a nice sort of way. He said, ‘Well, look, y’keep ’em all happy, ya see? The conservatives are happy ’cause they’re doin’ somethin’ about ya and the liberals are happy ’cause they haven’t thrown you out. So everybody’s happy! (pause) Except you!’ (laughter) I’m happy I’m still here. I must say that. And I ain’t going. There’s no way they’re gonna get me out. No way. They’re not gonna drag me in chains, right? So I’m just gonna have to keep paying. It’s bloody ridiculous. It’s just… beyond belief.”

Q: “So nothing has changed with the departure of Nixon.”

JOHN: “I’m even nervous about commenting on politics. They’ve got me that jumpy these days. But it’s a bit of an illusion to think ’cause Old Nick went that it’s all changed. If it’s changed, prove it, show me the change.”

Q: “Does the case get in the way of your work?”

JOHN: “It did. It did. There’s no denying it. In ’72, it was really gettin’ to me. Not only was I physically having to appear in court cases, it just seemed like a toothache that wouldn’t go away. Now I just accept it. I just have a permanent toothache. But there was a period where I just couldn’t function, you know? I was so paranoid from them tappin’ the phone and followin’ me. How could I prove that they were tappin’ me phone? There was a period when I was hangin’ out with a group called Elephant’s Memory. And I was ready to go on the road for pure fun. I didn’t want to go on the road for money. That was the time when I was standing up in the Apollo with a guitar at the Attica relatives’ benefit or ending up on the stage at the John Sinclair rally. I felt like going on the road and playing music. And whatever excuse – charity or whatever – would have done me. But they kept pullin’ me back into court! I had the group hangin’ ’round, but I finally had to say, ‘Hey, you better get on with your lives.’ Now, the last thing on earth I want to do is perform. That’s a direct result of the immigration thing. In ’71, ’72, I wanted to go out and rock my balls off onstage and I just stopped.”

Q: “Have you made any kind of flat decision not to ever go on the road again?”

JOHN: “No. I’ve stopped making flat decisions. I change me mind a lot. My idea of heaven is not going on the road.”

Q: “Will you ever be free of the fact that you were once a Beatle?”

JOHN: “I’ve got used to the fact – just about – that whatever I do is going to be compared to the other Beatles. If I took up ballet dancing, my ballet dancing would be compared with Paul’s bowling. So that I’ll have to live with. But I’ve come to learn something big this past year. I cannot let the Top Ten dominate my art. If my worth is only to be judged by whether I’m in the Top Ten or not, then I’d better give up. Because if I let the Top Ten dominate my art, then the art will die. And then whether I’m in the Top Ten is a moot point. I do think now in terms of long term. I’m an artist. I have to express myself. I can’t be dominated by gold records. As I said, I’m thirty-four going on sixty. The art is more important than the thing and sometimes I have to remind meself of it. Because there’s a danger there, for all of us, for everyone who’s involved in whatever art they’re in, of needing that love so badly that… In my business, that’s manifested in the Top Ten.”

Q: “So this last year, in some ways, was a year of deciding whether you wanted to be an artist or a pop star?”
JOHN: “Yeah. What is it I’m doing. What am I doing? Meanwhile, I was still putting out the work. But in the back of me head it was that: What do you want to be? What are you lookin’ for? And that’s about it. I’m a freakin’ artist, man, not a fuckin’ racehorse.”

Image


Two Other Rolling Stone Interviews With John Lennon

1980 Rolling Stone Interview
With John Lennon
by Jonathan Cott
http://www.john-lennon.com/1980rollings … erview.htm

1968 Rolling Stone Interview
With John Lennon
by Jonathan Cott
http://www.john-lennon.com/1968rollings … erview.htm

Other classic Interviews With John Lennon

1980 Playboy Interview
With John Lennon And Yoko Ono
by David Sheff
http://www.john-lennon.com/playboyinter … okoono.htm

‘Man of the Decade’
Interview With John Lennon
http://www.john-lennon.com/manofthedeca … lennon.htm

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December 11, 2008 Posted by | John Lennon, May Pang, _ARTICLE, _MUSIC | Leave a comment

John Lennon and May Pang

“I may have been the happiest I’ve ever been … I loved this woman (Pang), I made some beautiful music and I got so fucked up with booze and shit and whatever.”

– John Lennon

As well as the great Lennon Doc The U.S. vs. John Lennon we also caught another programme on TV again exploring Lennon’s becoming a threat to the US political establishment and the consequent attempts to deport him. There were some clips where May Pang spoke about that period. It was our first time hearing her speak and she came across as a very intelligent and impressive lady. Of course, she was a hotty back in the day too!

May and Lennon famously were lovers for an extended time during Lennon’s off the rails 73-75 period! Bizarrely, Yoko Ono strongly encouraged this relationship and urged May to take up with Lennon!! Strange days indeed … most peculiar, momma!

May Fung Yee Pang (born October 24, 1950) is best known as the former lover of John Lennon. She had previously worked as a personal assistant and production coordinator for Lennon and Yoko Ono.

In 1973, Lennon and Ono separated and Lennon and Pang had a relationship that lasted over 18 months, which Lennon later referred to as his “Lost Weekend.” Pang produced two books about their relationship: a memoir called Loving John, (Warner, 1983), and a book of photographs, Instamatic Karma, (St. Martins 2008).

Pang was married to producer Tony Visconti from 1989 to 2000, and had two children, Sebastian and Lara.

Lennon called his 18-month relationship with Pang his “Lost Weekend“, a reference to the The Lost Weekend film, which starred Ray Milland, Jane Wyman and Phillip Terry. The film was based on a novel of the same title by Charles R. Jackson, about a writer who drinks heavily because of the accusation that he had had an affair with one of his male friends while in college. The reference to the gay affair was removed in the film, and the main character’s descent into an alcoholic binge is blamed on writer’s block.

In summer 1973, Pang was working on the recording of Lennon’s Mind Games album. Lennon and Ono were having marital problems and decided to separate, and Ono suggested to Pang that she become Lennon’s companion.

Ono explained that she and Lennon were not getting along, had been arguing and were growing apart, and said that Lennon would start seeing other women. She pointed out that Lennon had said he found Pang sexually attractive. Pang replied that she could never start a relationship with Lennon as he was her employer and married. Ono ignored Pang’s protests and said that she would arrange everything. Ono later confirmed this conversation in an interview.

In October 1973, Lennon and Pang left New York for Los Angeles, living at the homes of friends.

Lennon collaborated with Spector in December 1973, to record an album of Lennon’s favourite oldies Rock N Roll – which we posted about here.

Pang was credited on the finished album as “Production Coordinator and Mother Superior”, in recognition of the difficult time she had organising the production schedule and musicians.

In May 1974, Lennon and Pang returned to live in New York City. Lennon stopped drinking and concentrated on recording.

In the early summer of 1974, while Lennon was working on his Walls and Bridges album, the couple moved into a penthouse apartment at 434 East 52nd Street.

Pang is the voice whispering Lennon’s name on #9 Dream. Pang claims that Lennon’s song, “Surprise, Surprise (Sweet Bird of Paradox)“, was written about her.

Lennon achieved his only number one single in his solo career with “Whatever Gets You Thru the Night“. Pang received an RIAA gold record award for her work on Walls and Bridges and continued her work as production coordinator of Lennon’s Rock ‘n’ Roll album.

Pang also worked on albums by Nilsson, Starr, Elton John and David Bowie.

Although Lennon would publicly lament this period, he did not do so in private. Journalist Larry Kane, who befriended Lennon in 1964, wrote a comprehensive biography of Lennon which detailed the “Lost Weekend” period. In the interview with Kane, Lennon explained his feelings about his time with Pang:

You know Larry, I may have been the happiest I’ve ever been… I loved this woman (Pang), I made some beautiful music and I got so fucked up with booze and shit and whatever.”

Pang published her memoir, Loving John, in 1983. It was later updated and re-named, John Lennon: The Lost Weekend.

The original 500-page Loving John book focused more on Pang’s role on Lennon’s albums and sessions. It was edited down to 300 pages, concentrating mostly on the sensational aspects of their relationship. It also included postcards that Lennon had written to Pang during his travels throughout the world in the late 70s.

Pang claims that she and Lennon remained lovers until 1977, and stayed in contact until his death.

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December 11, 2008 Posted by | John Lennon, May Pang, Yoko Ono, _PHOTOGRAPHY | Leave a comment

The 10 Most Covered Songs Ever ?

www.independent.co.uk has produced a piece listing the 10 Most Covered Songs Ever!

Basically a Beatles love-in!

This can’t be right -can it? Why are most of these songs basically …. erm … crap?

Guess we know! There’s a famous, and true, saying, along the lines that art for the masses is art for nobody!

About the mawkish Macca Yesterday, the facts are that “According to ‘Guinness World Records’ this song was covered seven million times in the 20th century.” Erm … why the fuck is it not easily the “winner” of this then?

In a few years, Lenny’s sublime Hallelujah will surely be the most covered song, thanks to a slew of awful saccharine versions proliferating lately!

1. Eleanor Rigby (The Beatles)
A surprising choice for the top spot. But the enigmatic tale has been reworked 131 times, by Joan Baez and Aretha Franklin among others.

2. Yesterday (The Beatles)
According to ‘Guinness World Records’ this song was covered seven million times in the 20th century. Official versions range from the sublime (Frank Sinatra) to the ridiculous (Wet Wet Wet and Boyz II Men).

3. Cry Me a River (Julie London)
Not the Justin Timberlake one. This bluesy jazz number has been covered by other luminaries of the genre, including Ella Fitzgerald and Ray Charles, and even Aerosmith.

4. And I Love Her (The Beatles)
From ‘A Hard Day’s Night’, Smokey Robinson, Bob Marley and Barry Manilow have all recorded it.

5. (I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction (The Rolling Stones)
With 98 covers recorded, the Stones make the top 10. A surprising range of artists have lapped this one up, including Aretha Franklin, Jimi Hendrix, Cat Power and Vanilla Ice.

6. Imagine(John Lennon)
Elton John, David Bowie, Diana Ross, Avril Lavigne and Jack Johnson… the list is endless.

7. Summertime (Abbie Mitchell)
Ella Fitzgerald and Louis Armstrong provide the best known adaptation, so no one remembers the original. Sonny and Cher, Nina Simone and REM have recorded their take.

8. Blackbird (The Beatles)
Another album track from the Fab Four, which has been covered by Carly Simon and Dave Grohl.

9. Over the Rainbow (Judy Garland)
Dorothy was blissfully unaware of how popular the tune would be. Special mentions to Eva Cassidy and the brilliant partial cover by Israel Kamakawiwo’ole.

10. The Look of Love (Dusty Springfield)
After husky Dusty, the CV is impressive, with Nina Simone, Diana Krall and Neil Diamond all doing it.

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December 6, 2008 Posted by | John Lennon, Paul McCartney, The Beatles, _ARTICLE, _MUSIC, _PHOTOGRAPHY | Leave a comment

Joan Baez – Let it Be

https://i0.wp.com/www.altmanphoto.com/Joan.Baez.fr.jpeg

“I know he wanted to write a ‘Bridge over Troubled Waters.”

– John Lennon

Nice vid with lots of great Dylan pix compiled by shitascandal with one-time Dylan paramour Joan Baez doing a decent version of a poor late Beats track. Baez aways knew how to make the most out of an anthem!

More specifically, this is the rather mawkish Macca track Let it Be from the Beatle’s disappointing final LP of the same name released in 1970 (but originally recorded some extended time earlier).

It was the final single released by the Beatles while the band was still active.

This is a song that was lapped up by the idiot music masses and has attained an incomprehensible level of critical acclaim!

Maybe we’re crazy but this track reminds us of any number of ridiculous songs we used to hear people proudly rattle out in Catholic Church back in the day, when we were forced to attend as kids. Meaningless anthemic hymnals overladen with bland imagery, vacuous saccharine songs saying nothing, probably clobbered together by oompa-loompas in some religious muzak factory!

There’s an inane cliche about giving enough monkeys enough time – and enough typewriters (or maybe now it’s laptops!) – and they will come up with the works of Shakespeare! However nonsensical that may be, the monkeys could at least come up with those awful Church ditties!

Rather insanely, in 2004, this was ranked number 20 on Rolling Stone magazine’s list of the 500 greatest songs of all time! We don’t know how the hell that could be – in our view, it’s not even in the top 20 Beatles songs!

//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/d/d7/Letitbe_single.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

John Lennon was not exactly a huge fan of this bland Macca anthem either, most damningly of all, likening it to a Wings track!!

Prior to a take during the 31 January 1969 recording session, Lennon famously asked, “Are we supposed to giggle in the solo?”. This is captured in an early version of the track released on Anthology 3, which features this interchange between Lennon and McCartney prior to another take:

John: Are we supposed to giggle in the solo?
Paul: Yeah.
John: OK.
Paul: This’ll – this is gonna knock you out, boy.

In a Playboy interview in 1980, Lennon totally disavowed any involvement with composing the song, saying;

“That’s Paul. What can you say? Nothing to do with the Beatles. It could’ve been Wings. I don’t know what he’s thinking when he writes ‘Let It Be.’ I think it was inspired by ‘Bridge over Troubled Waters.’ That’s my feeling, although I have nothing to go on. I know he wanted to write a ‘Bridge over Troubled Waters.’

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We do not host any files here. If this post contains a link to content hosted elsewhere, this is content found by a simple search on the worldwide freedom web. However, if for some valid reason, you object to a said content, or any content here, please let us know and we will remove the content in question.

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December 3, 2008 Posted by | Joan Baez, John Lennon, Paul McCartney, The Beatles, _BOB DYLAN, _MUSIC, _VIDEO | Leave a comment

Imagine: Vatican newspaper praises John Lennon

More religious madness! The mad Vatican has apparently “forgiven” Lennon for his “more popular than Jesus” quote over forty years ago!

The quote that, encouraged by the Church, inspired unimaginable furore, especially in redneck areas of USA.

The quote that, encouraged by the Church, led to countless death threats against Lennon and the Beatles.

The quote that, encouraged by the Church, got Lennon killed by that psycho whackjob Mark Chapman on the night of 8 December 1980.

Were anyone sensible to analyse what John actually did say, they would find it quite intelligent and philosophical. More importantly, correct and even prophetic!

Christianity will go. It will vanish and shrink. I needn’t argue with that; I’m right and I will be proved right. We’re more popular than Jesus now; I don’t know which will go first — rock ‘n’ roll or Christianity. Jesus was all right but his disciples were thick and ordinary. It’s them twisting it that ruins it for me.”

However, the adjective “sensible” is not commonly associated with Religion! Particularly the crazy Vatican!

Yap, the same lunacy prevails today when certain priests have told parishioners that those who voted for Barack Obama (an evil heathen, or something!) placed themselves under divine judgment because of his stance on abortion and should not receive Holy Communion until they’ve done penance!

Maybe in 40 years, these lunatics will forgive Obama voters too!

http://content.usatoday.com

Catholic bloggers are singing about the Vatican newspaper’s praise for the Beatles, 40 years after the debut of the White Album.

L’Osservatore Romano even gave John Lennon a gracious pass for his 1966 wisecrack that the rockers were more popular than Jesus.

According to the Associated Press, the Vatican paper is writing this off now “as the bragging of a young man wrestling with unexpected success.”

The newspaper as well as Vatican Radio last week noted the 40th anniversary of the White Album.

Rocco Palmo of Whispers in the Loggia digs up John’s original lines:

Christianity will go. It will vanish and shrink. I needn’t argue with that; I’m right and I will be proved right. We’re more popular than Jesus now; I don’t know which will go first — rock ‘n’ roll or Christianity. Jesus was all right but his disciples were thick and ordinary. It’s them twisting it that ruins it for me.”

At Pontifications, David Gibson, muses that the musical commentary by the papal paper is a “brow-furrowing” effort to make the paper a modern must-read. Gibson is also offering extra credit for identifying which Beatle is/was Catholic.

No points for me there. I’m a Stones fan. Will L’Osservatore offer a note of praise for Sympathy for the Devil? Somehow I doubt it.

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November 28, 2008 Posted by | John Lennon, Roykeanz, _CARTOON, _MUSIC, _OTHER, _RELIGION | 2 Comments

Bob Dylan sings Yesterday …. The McCartney Dylan love-in!

Now I need a place to hide away


” It had no words. I used to call it ‘Scrambled Eggs’.”

– Paul McCartney

“The only thing you done was Yesterday
and since you’ve gone, you’re just Another Day.”

– John Lennon

“If you go into the Library of Congress, you can find a lot better than that. There are millions of songs like ‘Michelle’ and ‘Yesterday’ written in Tin Pan Alley”.

– Bob Dylan

“Scrambled eggs, Oh, baby how I love your legs.”

– Paul McCartney

His Bobness performs a version of the Beatles song “Scrambled Eggs” – possibly better known as “Yesterday” – from their 1965 album Help!.

And it’s a fine version of the Macca classic – his only good song, according to a scathing John Lennon on the vitriolic “How Do You Sleep?“!!

“How Do You Sleep?” appeared on Lennon’s 1971 album Imagine, and is a track that savagely attacks his former Beatles songwriting partner McCartney. Interestingly, it features a slide guitar part played by George Harrison.

Despite the overtness of the attack, Lennon later claimed that the song was more about himself than McCartney! That claim cannot be believed though! The song is an obvious attack on McCartney, evidenced clearly by lines such as; “The only thing you done was yesterday/And since you’ve gone you’re just another day.” Considering the puns involved, these two lines particularly stand out since it was McCartney who composed “Yesterday” and also later in his solo career wrote “Another Day.” Besides making satirical reference to other McCartney songs, the lyrics also refer to the Paul is dead hoax (“Those freaks was right when they said you was dead“).

Lennon seemed to have a complex adversarial relationship with the track and intense jealousy that it was Macca who wrote it!

Shortly before his death in 1980, Lennon said that he thought the lyrics didn’t “resolve into any sense… They’re good — but if you read the whole song, it doesn’t say anything; you don’t know what happened. She left and he wishes it were yesterday — that much you get — but it doesn’t really resolve. … Beautiful”

However, in typically ironic Lennon fashion, he added “.. and I never wished I’d written it.”

Yesterday is a simple yet powerful song straight out of the classic school of songwriting. Although credited to “Lennon/McCartney”, the song was written solely by McCartney.

Yesterday was a song totally out of synch with what the beats had been doing at that stage. And indeed it was a song that not only Lennon, but also George and Ringo never seemed to have much time for. In fact, had the other three Beats had their way, the song would never have seen light of day!

John, George and Ringo vetoed the release of the track. Thus, initially, the track looked like never getting a release in the UK. In fact, the first version of Yesterday to hit the Brit charts was a cover version!

However, their US record company went behind the group’s backs and released Yesterday Stateside. However, only as a B-side to a single!

The song soon caught on like wildfire, and the rest, as the cliche goes, is history!

So much so that Yesterday is officially the most covered song in history!

Yes, even more than The Pop Group’s “We Are All Prostitutes“!

Like Lennon, Dylan seems to have an ambiguous relationship with the song! In 2000, he stated in an interview that “If you go into the Library of Congress, you can find a lot better than that. There are millions of songs like ‘Michelle’ and ‘Yesterday’ written in Tin Pan Alley”.

However, Dylan then recorded his own version of “Yesterday” four years later, but it was never released.

Dylan’s cover is typically low-key, which is how this song ought properly to be performed. Not in the OTT manner it has been covered down the years by countless so-called “artists”!

According to the Guinness Book of Records, “Yesterday” has the most cover versions of any song ever written. The song remains popular today with more than 3,000 recorded cover versions, the first hitting the United Kingdom top 10 three months after the release of Help!.

Broadcast Music Incorporated (BMI) asserts that it was performed over seven million times in the 20th century alone!

The song was not released as a single in the UK at the time of the US release, and thus never gained number 1 single status in that country. However, “Yesterday” was voted the best song of the 20th century in a 1999 BBC Radio 2 poll of music experts and listeners.

“Yesterday” takes the form of a melancholic acoustic ballad about a break-up. It was the first official recording by The Beatles that relied upon a performance by a single member of the band — Paul McCartney was accompanied solely by a string quartet.

The final recording differed so greatly from other works by The Beatles that the other three members of the band vetoed the release of the song as a single in the United Kingdom.

Although McCartney had fallen in love with the song, he had a much harder time convincing the other members of the band that it was worthy of an album place, the main objection being that it did not fit in with their image, especially considering that “Yesterday” was very unlike other Beatles’ songs at the time. This feeling was so strong that the other Beatles—Lennon, Harrison and Ringo Starr—refused to permit the release of a single in the United Kingdom.

This did not prevent Matt Monro from recording the first of many cover versions of “Yesterday” to come. His version made it into the top ten in the UK charts soon after its release in the autumn of 1965.

The Beatles’ influence over their U.S. record label, Capitol, was not as strong as it was over EMI’s Parlophone in Britain. A single was released in the U.S., pairing “Yesterday” as the B-Side of “Act Naturally”, a track which featured vocals by Ringo, the most popular Beatle in the States at that time.

After the tremendous success of “Yesterday”, the order in which the songs appeared on the sleeves was changed. The single was charting by 29 September 1965, and topped the charts for a full month, beginning on 9 October. The song spent a remarkable total of 11 weeks in the American charts, selling a million copies within five weeks.

“Yesterday” was the most-played song on American radio for eight consecutive years, its popularity refusing to abate.


Meanwhile, in the UK, Help! debuted at number one on 14 August 1965 (the first album ever to do so), and continued to top the charts for nine weeks.

//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/e/e4/Beatles-singles-yesterday-uk.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.On 4 March 1966, “Yesterday” was released as an EP in the UK, joined by “Act Naturally” on the A-side with “You Like Me Too Much” and “It’s Only Love” on the B-side. By 12 March, it had begun its run on the charts. On 26 March 1966, the EP went to number one, a position it held for two months!

Later that same year, “Yesterday” was included as the title track for the U.S.-only Yesterday and Today album, which was originally packaged in the “butcher sleeve”.

Ten years later on 8 March 1976, “Yesterday” was released by Parlophone as a single in the UK, featuring “I Should Have Known Better” on the B-side. Entering the charts on 13 March, the single stayed there for seven weeks, but it never rose higher than number 8. The release came about due to the expiration of The Beatles’ contract with EMI, Parlophone’s parent. EMI released as many singles by The Beatles as they could on the same day, leading to 23 of them hitting the top 100 in the United Kingdom charts, including six in the top 50

Yesterday,
All my troubles seemed so far away,
Now it looks as though they’re here to stay,
Oh, I believe in yesterday.

Suddenly,
I’m not half the man I used to be,
There’s a shadow hanging over me,
Oh, yesterday came suddenly.

Why she had to go I don’t know,
she wouldn’t say.
I said something wrong,
now I long for yesterday.

Yesterday,
Love was such an easy game to play,
Now I need a place to hide away,
Oh, I believe in yesterday.

Why she had to go I don’t know,
she wouldn’t say.
I said something wrong,
now I long for yesterday.

Yesterday,
Love was such an easy game to play,
Now I need a place to hide away,
Oh, I believe in yesterday.

So, here’s Bobby doing Paul (erm … that sounds like a gay porno movie title!)

Thanks thcarmine

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November 27, 2008 Posted by | John Lennon, Paul McCartney, The Beatles, _BOB DYLAN, _MUSIC, _VIDEO | Leave a comment

Beatlemania? … you betcha!

A shedload of Beatles goodies here!

https://i2.wp.com/i46.photobucket.com/albums/f131/4jsgroup/Beatles%20Blog/LeeCooper1.jpg
The Best Beatles Collection Vol 1


Một số album của The Beatles ^_^

The Beatles – Let It Be

[SND] 01- Two of Us.mp3       29-Jun-2005 21:48  5.0M
[SND] 02- Dig a Pony.mp3 29-Jun-2005 21:48 5.4M
[SND] 03- Across the Unive..> 29-Jun-2005 21:48 5.2M
[SND] 04- I Me Mine.mp3 29-Jun-2005 21:48 3.3M
[SND] 05- Dig It.mp3 29-Jun-2005 21:48 1.1M
[SND] 06- Let It Be.mp3 29-Jun-2005 21:48 5.6M
[SND] 07- Maggie Mae.mp3 29-Jun-2005 21:48 954K
[SND] 08- I've Got a Feeli..> 29-Jun-2005 21:48 5.0M
[SND] 09- One After 909.mp3 29-Jun-2005 21:48 4.0M
[SND] 10- The Long and Win..> 29-Jun-2005 21:48 5.0M
[SND] 11- For You Blue.mp3 29-Jun-2005 21:48 3.5M
[SND] 12- Get Back.mp3 29-Jun-2005 21:48 4.3M

https://i1.wp.com/www.eszlinger.com/beatles/beatles%20images/beatles%20images/Beatles%20-%20For%20Sale.jpg

The Beatles – Beatles For Sale

[SND] 01- No Reply.mp3        29-Jun-2005 21:48  3.2M
[SND] 02- I'm a Loser.mp3 29-Jun-2005 21:48 3.5M
[SND] 03- Baby's in Black.mp3 29-Jun-2005 21:48 2.9M
[SND] 04- Rock and Roll Mu..> 29-Jun-2005 21:48 3.5M
[SND] 05- I'll Follow the ..> 29-Jun-2005 21:48 2.5M
[SND] 06- Mr. Moonlight.mp3 29-Jun-2005 21:48 3.6M
[SND] 07- Medley- Kansas C..> 29-Jun-2005 21:48 3.5M
[SND] 08- Eight Days a Wee..> 29-Jun-2005 21:48 3.8M
[SND] 09- Words of Love.mp3 29-Jun-2005 21:48 3.1M
[SND] 10- Honey Don't.mp3 29-Jun-2005 21:48 4.1M
[SND] 11- Every Little Thi..> 29-Jun-2005 21:48 2.9M
[SND] 12- I Don't Want to ..> 29-Jun-2005 21:48 3.6M
[SND] 13- What You're Doin..> 29-Jun-2005 21:48 3.5M
[SND] 14- Everybody's Tryi..> 29-Jun-2005 21:48 3.3M

https://i2.wp.com/www.abc.net.au/myfavouritealbum/albumart/img/whitealbum.jpg

The Beatles – The White Album

[SND] 01- Back in the U.S...> 29-Jun-2005 21:48  3.7M
[SND] 02- Dear Prudence.mp3 29-Jun-2005 21:48 5.4M
[SND] 03- Glass Onion.mp3 29-Jun-2005 21:48 3.2M
[SND] 04- OB-La-Di, OB-La-..> 29-Jun-2005 21:48 4.3M
[SND] 05- Wild Honey Pie.mp3 29-Jun-2005 21:48 1.2M
[SND] 07- While My Guitar ..> 29-Jun-2005 21:48 6.0M
[SND] 08- Happiness Is a W..> 29-Jun-2005 21:48 3.7M
[SND] 09- Martha My Dear.mp3 29-Jun-2005 21:48 3.4M
[SND] 10- I'm So Tired.mp3 29-Jun-2005 21:48 2.8M
[SND] 11- Blackbird.mp3 29-Jun-2005 21:48 3.2M
[SND] 12- Piggies.mp3 29-Jun-2005 21:48 2.8M
[SND] 13- Rocky Raccoon.mp3 29-Jun-2005 21:48 4.9M
[SND] 14- Birthday.mp3 29-Jun-2005 21:48 3.7M
[SND] 14- Don't Pass Me By..> 29-Jun-2005 21:48 5.3M
[SND] 15- Yer Blues.mp3 29-Jun-2005 21:48 5.5M
[SND] 16- I Will.mp3 29-Jun-2005 21:48 2.4M
[SND] 16- Mother Nature's ..> 29-Jun-2005 21:48 3.8M
[SND] 17- Julia.mp3 29-Jun-2005 21:48 4.0M
[SND] 17- Sexy Sadie.mp3 29-Jun-2005 21:48 4.5M
[SND] 18- Helter Skelter.mp3 29-Jun-2005 21:48 6.2M
[SND] 19- Long, Long, Long..> 29-Jun-2005 21:48 4.2M
[SND] 20- Revolution 1.mp3 29-Jun-2005 21:48 5.9M
[SND] 21- Honey Pie.mp3 29-Jun-2005 21:48 3.7M
[SND] 22- Savoy Truffle.mp3 29-Jun-2005 21:48 4.0M
[SND] 23- Cry Baby Cry.mp3 29-Jun-2005 21:48 4.2M
[SND] 24- Revolution 9.mp3 29-Jun-2005 21:48 11M
[SND] 25- Good Night.mp3 29-Jun-2005 21:48 4.4M

The Beatles – 1

[SND] 01- Love Me Do.mp3      03-Jul-2005 15:42  3.2M

[SND] 02- From Me To You.mp3 03-Jul-2005 15:41 2.7M

[SND] 03- She Loves You.mp3 03-Jul-2005 15:42 3.2M

[SND] 04- I Want To Hold Y..> 03-Jul-2005 15:42 3.3M

[SND] 05- Can't Buy Me Lov..> 03-Jul-2005 15:40 3.0M

[SND] 06- A Hard Day's Nig..> 03-Jul-2005 15:40 3.5M

[SND] 07- I Feel Fine.mp3 03-Jul-2005 15:41 3.2M

[SND] 08- Eight Days A Wee..> 03-Jul-2005 15:41 3.8M

[SND] 09- Ticket To Ride.mp3 03-Jul-2005 15:43 4.4M

[SND] 10- Help!.mp3 03-Jul-2005 15:41 3.2M

[SND] 11- Yesterday.mp3 03-Jul-2005 15:43 2.9M

[SND] 12- Day Tripper.mp3 03-Jul-2005 15:40 3.9M

[SND] 13- We Can Work It O..> 03-Jul-2005 15:43 3.1M

[SND] 14- Paperback Writer..> 03-Jul-2005 15:42 3.2M

[SND] 15- Yellow Submarine..> 03-Jul-2005 15:43 3.6M

[SND] 16- Eleanor Rigby.mp3 03-Jul-2005 15:41 2.9M

[SND] 17- Penny Lane.mp3 03-Jul-2005 15:42 4.1M

[SND] 18- All You Need Is ..> 03-Jul-2005 15:40 5.2M

[SND] 19- Hello, Goodbye.mp3 03-Jul-2005 15:41 4.7M

[SND] 20- Lady Madonna.mp3 03-Jul-2005 15:42 3.1M

[SND] 21- Hey Jude.mp3 03-Jul-2005 15:41 9.7M

[SND] 22- Get Back.mp3 03-Jul-2005 15:41 4.4M

[SND] 23- The Ballad Of Jo..> 03-Jul-2005 15:42 4.1M

[SND] 24- Something.mp3 03-Jul-2005 15:42 4.2M

[SND] 25- Come Together.mp3 03-Jul-2005 15:40 5.9M

[SND] 26- Let It Be.mp3 03-Jul-2005 15:42 5.3M

[SND] 27- The Long And Win..> 04-Jul-2005 01:03 5.0M



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October 22, 2008 Posted by | Canon, George Harrison, John Lennon, Music_Pop, Paul McCartney, Ringo Starr, The Beatles, _MUSIC | Leave a comment

The Beatles – Discography (41 Albums) – Remastered by Dr. Ebbetts


The Beatles – Discography (41 Albums)
MP3@320Kbps | Remastered by Dr. Ebbetts
41 Albums | 614 Tracks | TT 1:03:48:51 | iTunes-compliant tags | 4.2 GB
Dr. Ebbetts specializes in releasing digital remasterings from long-deleted and hard-to-obtain vinyl records, particularly issues from the audiophile Mobile Fidelity Sound Labs (MFSL) label. Although the Ebbetts catalogue has many artists, it is most known for Beatles CDs transferred from the best quality MFSL releases, US releases and mono vinyl sources. While lables like Millenium, BEAT, Mirror Spock and Fabulous Sound Labs (FSL) also issue ‘needle drops’ of Beatles vinyl, Dr. Ebbetts is regarded by many audiophiles as being the highest quality. For those interested in the technical, one source close to the Dr says that Ebbetts says that he uses no noise reduction and that there’s no magic formula…just a good ear and patience.

Album List

  • 1962-1966 (US Stereo) (Covers)
  • 1967-1970 (US Stereo)
  • A Hard Day’s Night (MFSL) (Covers)
  • A Hard Day’s Night (UK Mono)
  • Abbey Road (MFSL)
  • Beatles For Sale (MFSL) (Covers)
  • Beatles for Sale (UK Mono)
  • Beatles VI (US Mono) (Covers)
  • Beatles VI (US Stereo) (Covers)
  • Casualties (US Mono-Stereo)
  • Help! (MFSL) (Covers)
  • Help! (UK Mono)
  • Introducing The Beatles (v2 US Mono) (Covers)
  • Introducing The Beatles (v2 US Stereo) (Covers)
  • Last Licks Live (2005) (Covers)
  • Let It Be (MFSL) (Covers)
  • Magical Mystery Tour (MFSL) (Covers)
  • Magical Mystery Tour (US Mono 2005) (Covers)
  • Meet the Beatles (US Stereo 2005)
  • Please Please Me (MFSL)
  • Please Please Me (UK Mono)
  • Rarities (US Mono-Stereo) (Covers)
  • Revolver (MFSL) (Covers)
  • Revolver (UK Mono) (Covers)
  • Rock ‘n’ Roll Music (US Stereo) (Covers)
  • Rubber Soul (MFSL) (Covers)
  • Rubber Soul (UK Mono)
  • Rubber Soul (US Mono) (Covers)
  • Second Album (US Stereo 2005)
  • Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band (MFSL) (Covers)
  • Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band (US Mono) (Covers)
  • The Beatles (MFSL) (Covers)
  • The Beatles (UK Mono)
  • With The Beatles (Canadian Stereo 2005) (Covers)
  • With The Beatles (MFSL) (Covers)
  • With The Beatles (UK Mono)
  • Yellow Submarine (MFSL) (Covers)
  • Yellow Submarine (UK Mono) (Covers)
  • Yellow Submarine Songtrack (Mono 2005) (Covers)
  • Yesterday & Today (US Stereo 2005) (Covers)
  • Yesterday & Today (US Mono) (Covers)

Album Track List
    1962-1966 (US Stereo)

    CD1

  • 01. Love Me Do
  • 02. Eight Days a Week
  • 03. I Feel Fine
  • 04. Ticket to Ride
  • 05. Yesterday
  • 06. Help!
  • 07. You’ve Got to Hide Your Love Away
  • 08. We Can Work it Out
  • 09. Day Tripper
  • 10. Drive My Car
  • 11. Norwegian Wood
  • 12. Please Please Me
  • 13. Nowhere Man

    CD2

  • 01. Michelle
  • 02. In My Life
  • 03. Girl
  • 04. Paperback Writer
  • 05. Eleanor Rigby
  • 06. Yellow Submarine
  • 07. From Me to You
  • 08. She Loves You
  • 09. I Want to Hold Your Hand
  • 10. All My Loving
  • 11. Can’t Buy me Love
  • 12. A Hard Day’s Night
  • 13. And I Love Her

    1967-1970 (US Stereo)

    CD1

  • 01. Strawberry Fields Forever
  • 02. The Fool on the Hill
  • 03. Magical Mystery Tour
  • 04. Lady Madonna
  • 05. Hey Jude
  • 06. Revolution
  • 07. Penny Lane
  • 08. Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band
  • 09. With a Little Help from My Friends
  • 10. Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds
  • 11. A Day in the Life
  • 12. All You Need is Love
  • 13. I am the Walrus
  • 14. Hello, Goodbye

    CD2

  • 01. Back in the USSR
  • 02. Something
  • 03. Octopus’s Garden
  • 04. Let It be
  • 05. Across the Universe
  • 06. The Long and Winding Road
  • 07. While My Guitar Gently Weeps
  • 08. Ob La Di, Ob La Da
  • 09. Get Back
  • 10. Don’t Let Me Down
  • 11. The Balad Of John and Yoko
  • 12. Old Brown Shoe
  • 13. Here Comes the Sun
  • 14. Come Together

    A Hard Day’s Night (MFSL)

  • 01. A Hard Day’s Night
  • 02. I Should Have Known Better
  • 03. If I Fell
  • 04. I’m Happy Just To Dance with You
  • 05. And I Love Her
  • 06. Tell Me Why
  • 07. Can’t Buy Me Love
  • 08. Any Time at All
  • 09. I’ll Cry Instead
  • 10. Things We Said Today
  • 11. When I Get Home
  • 12. You Can’t Do That
  • 13. I’ll Be Back

    A Hard Day’s Night (UK Mono)

  • 01. A Hard Day’s Night
  • 02. I Should Have Known Better
  • 03. If I Fell
  • 04. I’m Happy Just to Dance With You
  • 05. And I Love Her
  • 06. Tell Me Why
  • 07. Can’t Buy Me Love
  • 08. Any Time at All
  • 09. I’ll Cry Instead
  • 10. Things We Said Today
  • 11. When I Get Home
  • 12. You Can’t Do That
  • 13. I’ll Be Back

    Abbey Road (MFSL)

  • 01. Come Together
  • 02. Something
  • 03. Maxwell’s Silver Hammer
  • 04. Oh! Darling
  • 05. Octopus’s Garden
  • 06. I Want You (She’s So Heavy)
  • 07. Here Comes the Sun
  • 08. Because
  • 09. You Never Give Me Your Money
  • 10. Sun King
  • 11. Mean Mr. Mustard
  • 12. Polythene Pam
  • 13. She Came in Through the Bathroom Window
  • 14. Golden Slumbers
  • 15. Carry That Weight
  • 16. Oh_ Yeah…Alright…
  • 17. The End
  • 18. Her Majesty

    Beatles For Sale (MFSL)

  • 01. No Reply
  • 02. I’m A Loser
  • 03. Baby’s In Black
  • 04. Rock and Roll Music
  • 05. I’ll Follow the Sun
  • 06. Mr. Moonlight
  • 07. Kansas City (Hey Hey Hey)
  • 08. Eight Days a Week
  • 09. Words of Love
  • 10. Honey Don’t
  • 11. Every Little Thing
  • 12. I Don’t Want to Spoil the Party
  • 13. What You’re Doing
  • 14. Everybody’s Trying to be My Baby

    Beatles for Sale (UK Mono)

  • 01. No Reply
  • 02. I’m A Loser
  • 03. Baby’s in Black
  • 04. Rock and Roll Music
  • 05. I’ll Follow the Sun
  • 06. Mr. Moonlight
  • 07. Kansas City (Hey Hey Hey)
  • 08. Eight Days a Week
  • 09. Words of Love
  • 10. Honey Don’t
  • 11. Every Little Thing
  • 12. I Don’t Want to Spoil the Party
  • 13. What You’re Doing
  • 14. Everybody’s Trying to be My Baby

    Beatles VI (US Mono)

  • 01. Kansas City
  • 02. Eight Days a Week
  • 03. You Like Me too Much
  • 04. Bad Boy
  • 05. I Don’t Want to Spoil the Party
  • 06. Words of Love
  • 07. What You’re Doing
  • 08. Yes It Is
  • 09. Dizzy Miss Lizzy
  • 10. Tell Me What You See
  • 11. Every Little Thing

    Beatles VI (US Stereo)

  • 01. Kansas City
  • 02. Eight Days a Week
  • 03. You Like Me Too Much
  • 04. Bad Boy
  • 05. I Don’t Want to Spoil the Party
  • 06. Words of Love
  • 07. What You’re Doing
  • 08. Yes It Is
  • 09. Dizzy Miss Lizzie
  • 10. Tell Me What You See
  • 11. Every Little Thing

    Casualties (US Mono-Stereo)

  • 01. Please Please Me
  • 02. I Want to Hold Your Hand
  • 03. Money (That’s What I Want)
  • 04. A Hard Day’s Night
  • 05. I’ll Cry Instead
  • 06. Ticket to Ride
  • 07. Yes It Is
  • 08. Day Tripper
  • 09. I’m Only Sleeping
  • 10. Strawberry Fields Forever
  • 11. I Am the Walrus
  • 12. Only a Northern Song
  • 13. Revolution
  • 14. Her Majesty
  • 15. Let It Be
  • 16. Love Me Do
  • 17. From Me to You

    Help! (MFSL)

  • 01. Help!
  • 02. Night Before, The
  • 03. You’ve Got To Hide Your Love Away
  • 04. I Need You
  • 05. Another Girl
  • 06. You’re Going to Lose that Girl
  • 07. Ticket to Ride
  • 08. Act Naturally
  • 09. It’s Only Love
  • 10. You Like Me Too Much
  • 11. Tell Me What You See
  • 12. I’ve Just Seen a Face
  • 13. Yesterday
  • 14. Dizzy Miss Lizzy

    Help! (UK Mono)

  • 01. Help!
  • 02. The Night Before
  • 03. You’ve Got to Hide Your Love Away
  • 04. I Need You
  • 05. Another Girl
  • 06. You’re Going to Lose that Girl
  • 07. Ticket to Ride
  • 08. Act Naturally
  • 09. It’s Only Love
  • 10. You Like Me Too Much
  • 11. Tell Me What You See
  • 12. I’ve Just Seen a Face
  • 13. Yesterday
  • 14. Dizzy Miss Lizzy

    Introducing The Beatles (v2 US Mono)

  • 01. I Saw Her Standing There
  • 02. Misery
  • 03. Anna (Go to Him)
  • 04. Chains
  • 05. Boys
  • 06. Ask Me Why
  • 07. Please Please Me
  • 08. Baby It’s You
  • 09. Do You Want to Know a Secret
  • 10. A Taste of Honey
  • 11. There’s a Place
  • 12. Twist and Shout

    Introducing The Beatles (v2 US Stereo)

  • 01. I Saw Her Standing There
  • 02. Misery
  • 03. Anna (Go to Him)
  • 04. Chains
  • 05. Boys
  • 06. Ask Me Why
  • 07. Please Please Me
  • 08. Baby It’s You
  • 09. Do You Want to Know a Secret
  • 10. A Taste of Honey
  • 11. There’s a Place
  • 12. Twist and Shout

    Last Licks Live (2005)

  • 01. Get Back #1
  • 02. Get Back #2
  • 03. Don’t Let Me Down #1
  • 04. I’ve Got a Feeling #1
  • 05. One After 909
  • 06. Dig a Pony
  • 07. I’ve Got a Feeling #2
  • 08. Don’t Let Me Down #2
  • 09. Get Back #3

    Let It Be (MFSL)

  • 01. Two of Us
  • 02. Dig A Pony
  • 03. Across The Universe
  • 04. I Me Mine
  • 05. Dig It
  • 06. Let It Be
  • 07. Maggie Mae
  • 08. I’ve Got a Feeling
  • 09. One After 909
  • 10. The Long and Winding Road
  • 11. For You Blue
  • 12. Get Back

    Magical Mystery Tour (MFSL)

  • 01. Magical Mystery Tour
  • 02. The Fool on the Hill
  • 03. Flying
  • 04. Blue Jay Way
  • 05. Your Mother Should Know
  • 06. I Am the Walrus
  • 07. Hello Goodbye
  • 08. Strawberry Fields Forever
  • 09. Penny Lane
  • 10. Baby You’re a Rich Man
  • 11. All You Need is Love

    Magical Mystery Tour (US Mono 2005)

  • 01. Magical Mystery Tour
  • 02. The Fool on the Hill
  • 03. Flying
  • 04. Blue Jay Way
  • 05. Your Mother Should Know
  • 06. i Am the Walrus
  • 07. Hello Goodbye
  • 08. Strawberry Fields Forever
  • 09. Penny Lane
  • 10. Baby Your a Rich Man
  • 11. All You Need is Love

    Meet the Beatles (US Stereo 2005)

  • 01. I Want to Hold Your Hand
  • 02. I Saw Her Standing There
  • 03. This Boy
  • 04. It Won’t be Long
  • 05. All I’ve Got to Do
  • 06. All My Loving
  • 07. Don’t Bother Me
  • 08. Little Child
  • 09. Every Little Thing
  • 10. Hold Me Tight
  • 11. I Wanna be Your Man
  • 12. Not a Second Time

    Please Please Me (MFSL)

  • 01. I Saw Her Standing There
  • 02. Misery
  • 03. Anna (Go to Him)
  • 04. Chains
  • 05. Boys
  • 06. Ask Me Why
  • 07. Please Please Me
  • 08. Love Me Do
  • 09. P.S. I Love You
  • 10. Baby It’s You
  • 11. Do You Want to Know a Secret
  • 12. A Taste of Honey
  • 13. There’s a Place
  • 14. Twist and Shout

    Please Please Me (UK Mono)

  • 01. I Saw Her Standing There
  • 02. Misery
  • 03. Anna (Go to Him)
  • 04. Chains
  • 05. Boys
  • 06. Ask Me Why
  • 07. Please Please Me
  • 08. Love Me Do
  • 09. P.S. I Love You
  • 10. Baby It’s You
  • 11. Do You Want To Know A Secret
  • 12. A Taste of Honey
  • 13. There’s a Place
  • 14. Twist and Shout

    Rarities (US Mono-Stereo)

  • 01. Love Me Do
  • 02. Misery
  • 03. There’s a Place
  • 04. Sie Liebt Dich
  • 05. And I Love Her
  • 06. Help!
  • 07. I’m Only Sleeping
  • 08. I Am the Walrus
  • 09. Penny Lane
  • 10. Helter Skelter
  • 11. Don’t Pass Me By
  • 12. The Inner Light
  • 13. Across the Universe
  • 14. You Know My Name (Look Up My Number)
  • 15. Sgt. Pepper Inner Groove

    Revolver (MFSL)

  • 01. Taxman
  • 02. Eleanor Rigby
  • 03. I’m Only Sleeping
  • 04. Love You To
  • 05. Here, There and Everywhere
  • 06. Yellow Submarine
  • 07. She Said She Said
  • 08. Good Day Sunshine
  • 09. And Your Bird Can Sing
  • 10. For No One
  • 11. Doctor Robert
  • 12. I Want To Tell You
  • 13. Got To Get You Into My Life
  • 14. Tomorrow Never Knows

    Revolver (UK Mono)

  • 01. Taxman
  • 02. Eleanor Rigby
  • 03. I’m Only Sleeping
  • 04. Love You To
  • 05. Here, There and Everywhere
  • 06. Yellow Submarine
  • 07. She Said She Said
  • 08. Good Day Sunshine
  • 09. And Your Bird Can Sing
  • 10. For No One
  • 11. Doctor Robert
  • 12. I Want To Tell You
  • 13. Got To Get You Into My Life
  • 14. Tomorrow Never Knows

    Rock ‘n’ Roll Music (US Stereo)

  • 01. Twist and Shout
  • 02. I Saw Her Standing There
  • 03. You Can’t Do That
  • 04. I Wanna Be Your Man
  • 05. I Call Your Name
  • 06. Boys
  • 07. Long Tall Sally
  • 08. Rock and Roll Music
  • 09. Slow Down
  • 10. Kansas City
  • 11. Money (That’s What I Want)
  • 12. Bad Boy
  • 13. Matchbox
  • 14. Roll Over Beethoven
  • 15. Dizzy Miss Lizzie
  • 16. Anytime at All
  • 17. Drive My Car
  • 18. Everybody’s Trying to be My Baby
  • 19. The Night Before
  • 20. I’m Down
  • 21. Revolution
  • 22. Back In The USSR
  • 23. Helter Skelter
  • 24. Taxman
  • 25. Got To Get You Into My Life
  • 26. Hey Bulldog
  • 27. Birthday
  • 28. Get Back

    Rubber Soul (MFSL)

  • 01. Drive My Car
  • 02. Norwegian Wood (this Bird has Flown)
  • 03. You Won’t See Me
  • 04. Nowhere Man
  • 05. Think for Yourself
  • 06. The Word
  • 07. Michelle
  • 08. What Goes On
  • 09. Girl
  • 10. I’m Looking Through You
  • 11. In My Life
  • 12. Wait
  • 13. If I Needed Someone
  • 14. Run for Your Life

    Rubber Soul (UK Mono)

  • 01. Drive My Car
  • 02. Norwegian Wood (this Bird has Flown)
  • 03. You Won’t See Me
  • 04. Nowhere Man
  • 05. Think for Yourself
  • 06. The Word
  • 07. Michelle
  • 08. What Goes On
  • 09. Girl
  • 10. I’m Looking Through You
  • 11. In My Life
  • 12. Wait
  • 13. If I Needed Someone
  • 14. Run for Your Life

    Rubber Soul (US Mono)

  • 01. I’ve Just Seen a Face
  • 02. Norwegian Wood
  • 03. You Won’t See Me
  • 04. Think for Yourself
  • 05. The Word
  • 06. Michelle
  • 07. It’s Only Love
  • 08. Girl
  • 09. I’m Looking Through You
  • 10. In My Life
  • 11. Wait
  • 12. Run For Your Life

    Second Album (US Stereo 2005)

  • 01. Roll Over Beethoven
  • 02. Thank You Girl
  • 03. You Really Got a Hold on Me
  • 04. Devil in Her Heart
  • 05. Money (That’s What I Want)
  • 06. You Can’t Do That
  • 07. Long Tall sally
  • 08. I Call Your Name
  • 09. Please Mr. Postman
  • 10. I’ll Get You
  • 11. She Loves You

    Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band (MFSL)

  • 01. Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band
  • 02. With A Little Help From My Friends
  • 03. Lucy In The Sky With Diamonds
  • 04. Getting Better
  • 05. Fixing A Hole
  • 06. She’s Leaving Home
  • 07. Being For The Benefit Of Mr. Kite
  • 08. Within You, Without You
  • 09. When I’m Sixty-Four
  • 10. Lovely Rita
  • 11. Good Morning, Good Morning
  • 12. Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band (Reprise)
  • 13. A Day In The Life

    Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band (US Mono)

  • 01. Sgt Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band
  • 02. A Little Help from My Friends
  • 03. Lucy in the Sky With Diamonds
  • 04. Getting Better
  • 05. Fixing a Hole
  • 06. She’s Leaving Home
  • 07. Being for the Benefit of Mr. Kite
  • 08. Within You Without You
  • 09. When I’m Sixty-Four
  • 10. Lovely Rita
  • 11. Good Morning Good Morning
  • 12. Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band (Reprise)
  • 13. A Day in the Life

    The Beatles (MFSL)

    CD1

  • 01. Back in the USSR
  • 02. Dear Prudence
  • 03. Glass Onion
  • 04. Ob-La-Di, Ob-La-Da
  • 05. Wild Honey Pie
  • 06. The Continuing Story of Bungalow Bill
  • 07. While My Guitar Gently Weeps
  • 08. Happiness is a Warm Gun
  • 09. Martha My Dear
  • 10. I’m So Tired
  • 11. Blackbird
  • 12. Piggies
  • 13. Rocky Raccoon
  • 14. Don’t Pass Me By
  • 15. Why Don’t We Do it in the Road
  • 16. I Will
  • 17. Julia

    CD2

  • 01. Birthday
  • 02. Yer Blues
  • 03. Mother Nature’s Son
  • 04. Everybody’s Got Something To Hide Except Me And My Monkey
  • 05. Sexy Sadie
  • 06. Helter Skelter
  • 07. Long Long Long
  • 08. Revolution 1
  • 09. Honey Pie
  • 10. Savoy Truffle
  • 11. Cry Baby Cry
  • 12. Can You Take Me Back
  • 13. Revolution 9
  • 14. Good Night

    The Beatles (UK Mono)

    CD1

  • 01. Back in The USSR
  • 02. Dear Prudence
  • 03. Glass Onion
  • 04. Ob-La-Di Ob-La-Da
  • 05. Wild Honey Pie
  • 06. The Continuing Story of Bungalow Bill
  • 07. While My Guitar Gently Weeps
  • 08. Happiness is a Warm Gun
  • 09. Martha My Dear
  • 10. I’m So Tired
  • 11. Blackbird
  • 12. Piggies
  • 13. Rocky Raccoon
  • 14. Don’t Pass Me By
  • 15. Why Don’t We Do it in the Road
  • 16. I Will
  • 17. Julia

    CD2

  • 01. Birthday
  • 02. Yer Blues
  • 03. Mother Nature’s Son
  • 04. Everbody’s Got Something to Hide Except Me And My Monkey
  • 05. Sexy Sadie
  • 06. Helter Skelter
  • 07. Long, Long, Long
  • 08. Revolution 1
  • 09. Honey Pie
  • 10. Savoy Truffle
  • 11. Cry Baby Cry
  • 12. Revolution 9
  • 13. Good Night

    With the Beatles (Canadian Stereo 2005)

  • 01. It Won’t be Long
  • 02. All I’ve Got to Do
  • 03. All My Loving
  • 04. Don’t Bother Me
  • 05. Little Child
  • 06. Till There was You
  • 07. Please Mister Postman
  • 08. Roll Over Beethoven
  • 09. Hold Me Tight
  • 10. You Really Got a Hold on Me
  • 11. I Wanna be Your Man
  • 12. Devil in Her Heart
  • 13. Not a Second Time
  • 14. Money

    With The Beatles (MFSL)

  • 01. It Won’t be Long
  • 02. All I’ve Got To Do
  • 03. All My Loving
  • 04. Don’t Bother Me
  • 05. Little Child
  • 06. Till There Was You
  • 07. Please Mister Postman
  • 08. Roll Over Beethoven
  • 09. Hold Me Tight
  • 10. You Really Got a Hold On Me
  • 11. I Wanna Be Your Man
  • 12. Devil In Her Heart
  • 13. Not A Second Time
  • 14. Money (That’s What I Want)

    With the Beatles (UK Mono)

  • 01. It Won’t be Long
  • 02. All I’ve Got to Do
  • 03. All My Loving
  • 04. Don’t Bother Me
  • 05. Little Child
  • 06. Till There was You
  • 07. Please Mister Postman
  • 08. Roll Over Beethoven
  • 09. Hold Me Tight
  • 10. You Really Got a Hold on Me
  • 11. I Wanna be Your Man
  • 12. Devil in Her Heart
  • 13. Not a Second Time
  • 14. Money (That’s What I Want)

    Yellow Submarine (MFSL)

  • 01. Yellow Submarine
  • 02. Only a Northern Song
  • 03. All Together Now
  • 04. Hey Bulldog
  • 05. It’s All Too Much
  • 06. All You Need is Love
  • 07. Pepperland
  • 08. Sea of Time
  • 09. Sea of Holes
  • 10. Sea of Monsters
  • 11. March of the Meanies
  • 12. Pepperland Laid Waste
  • 13. Yellow Submarine in Pepperland

    Yellow Submarine (UK Mono)

  • 01. Yellow Submarine
  • 02. Only a Northern Song
  • 03. All Together Now
  • 04. Hey Bulldog
  • 05. It’s All too Much
  • 06. All You Need is Love
  • 07. Pepperland
  • 08. Sea of Time
  • 09. Sea of Holes
  • 10. Sea of Monsters
  • 11. March of the Meanies
  • 12. Pepperland Laid Waste
  • 13. Yellow Submarine in Pepperland

    Yellow Submarine Songtrack (Mono 2005)

  • 01. Yellow Submarine
  • 02. Only A Northern Song
  • 03. All Together Now
  • 04. Hey Bulldog
  • 05. It’s All Too Much
  • 06. All You Need is Love
  • 07. Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds
  • 08. Eleanor Rigby
  • 09. Nowhere Man
  • 10. When I’m Sixty Four
  • 11. Love You To
  • 12. Sgt. Pepper’s Lonley Hearts C
  • 13. With A Little Help From My Fr
  • 14. Baby, You’re a Rich Man
  • 15. Think for Yourself

    Yesterday & Today (US Stereo 2005)

  • 01. Drive My Car
  • 02. I’m Only Sleeping
  • 03. Nowhere Man
  • 04. Doctor Robert
  • 05. Yesterday
  • 06. Act Naturally
  • 07. And Your Bird Can Sing
  • 08. If I Needed Someone
  • 09. We Can Work It Out
  • 10. What Goes On
  • 11. Day Tripper

    Yesterday and Today (US Mono)

  • 01. Drive My Car
  • 02. I’m Only Sleeping
  • 03. Nowhere Man
  • 04. Dr. Robert
  • 05. Yesterday
  • 06. Act Naturally
  • 07. And Your Bird Can Sing
  • 08. If I Needed Someone
  • 09. We Can Work It Out
  • 10. What Goes On
  • 11. Day Tripper

Here she be:

RapidShare Folder

(All files are always-online. Please, refresh the folder on dead links)

Huge thanks to WellIThink

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October 11, 2008 Posted by | Canon, George Harrison, John Lennon, Music_Pop, Paul McCartney, Ringo Starr, The Beatles, _MUSIC | 1 Comment

John Lennon: The Life by Philip Norman – The Sunday Times review

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Good review by Robert Sandall of the latest Lennon bio!

If anyone want to send me this book – John Lennon: The Life by Philip Norman – feel free!


John Lennon: The Life by Philip Norman – The Sunday Times review

A compulsive biography that uncovers the conflicts that made John Lennon a mess of insecurities


by Robert Sandall

from:http://entertainment.timesonline.co.uk

Unlike most rock stars — unlike most people — the life of John Lennon would probably have been a compulsive read whatever he’d achieved as an adult. From the moment he entered the world in 1940 during a German bombing raid on Liverpool, to the point at which he left it 40 years later, shot dead on his New York doorstep by a schizophrenic fan, Lennon was a lifelong stranger to normality.

Emotionally, he was a mess of insecurities. The son of a working-class merchant seaman with showbiz aspirations and a flighty middle-class woman in permanent denial of her genteel background, Lennon fervently believed that he had been, as a child, “never really wanted”. Scarred by a bizarre scene when his soon-to-be-absent father ordered him, at the age of six, to choose which of his separated parents he wanted to stay with, he ended up with neither following the intervention of his mother’s older sister, a strict and childless former nurse, aunt Mimi. Mimi’s motivation for taking John off to live with her and uncle George in the polite Liverpool suburb of Woolton was not maternal or conventionally affectionate: it was driven by her class-bound disapproval of what she regarded as the proletarian habits of John’s mum Julia, a free-spirited fan of pubs, banjo-playing and extramarital relationships.

Lennon’s affinity for his errant mother, whom he visited on a regular basis, extended way beyond her taste for popular music. In the course of his conversations with Lennon’s inner circle, Philip Norman heard several reports of an incident when John was 14 in which he accidentally touched his mother’s breast one afternoon while lying next to her on a bed. “I was wondering if I should do anything else,” Lennon later told a journalist from the Daily Express. “I always think I should have done it. Presumably she would have allowed it.”

Feelings of intimacy were, for this extra- ordinarily unlucky man, often a prelude to bereavement. When Lennon was 17, Julia was run over and killed by a speeding off- duty policeman, a tragedy that left him, he said, “in a blind rage for two years”. He had barely recovered from that when the Beatles’ first bassist Stu Sutcliffe — whom Lennon worshipped with a quasi-sexual intensity and to whom he wrote letters similar in length and tone, he claimed, to the ones he later sent Yoko — died sudd- enly of a brain haemorrhage. (Norman discounts the possibility that this was provoked by an earlier, drunken attack on Sutcliffe in which Lennon-allegedly kicked him in the head.)

The fatal drugs overdose that did for his surrogate father figure, Brian Epstein, in 1967 hit him much harder than it did the rest of the Beatles. For one thing, Lennon blamed himself “for introducing Brian to pills”.

More to the point, he was devastated to lose the cultivated, sensitive soul he had once holidayed alone with in Spain and who, despite all the cruel jibes about Epstein’s being “a faggot and a Jew”, deeply touched the middle-class sensibility implanted by Mimi. When Epstein first checked into a London rehab centre to try to deal with his problem, Lennon sent him a huge floral bouquet with the message, “You know I love you . . . I really mean that. John.”

The loss of Epstein was a disaster which presaged the end of Lennon’s first marriage to the long-suffering Cynthia, as well as his creative relationship with the Beatles. It seems to have coincided with, if not contributed to, the falling-out with Paul McCartney, another close buddy for whom Lennon, Norman suggests, might have harboured some sexual feelings. He quotes Yoko remembering people in the Apple office referring to McCartney as “John’s princess”. But rather than outing his subject, in the stridently accusatory style of his previous biographer Albert Goldman, Norman is more wisely tuned to Lennon’s wayward intellectual curiosity. He attributes his gay moments to a commitment to “the principle that bohemians should try everything” and concludes that, where McCartney was concerned, Lennon had been “deterred by Paul’s immovable heterosexuality”.

Norman has written about Lennon twice before but he has uncovered much new mat-erial in his research for this impressive and highly readable book. One intriguing nugget concerns the revelation that the unidentified girl Lennon sings about “having” in Norwegian Wood was the German wife of the Beatles’ photographer Robert Freeman, with whom Lennon had a clandestine affair while the couple were living in the flat beneath his and Cynthia’s in South Kensington.

The fact that Norman has had the blessing and full co-operation of Yoko Ono means that he is not short of new things to say about the relationship which, according to popular writ, broke up the world’s favourite pop group. He argues convincingly that, far from being an opportunistic schemer, the high-born, wealthy Yoko was reluctant to take up with the Beatle she regarded as her social and artistic inferior, and whose crude sexual foreplay — employing the Beatles’ roadies to cart her off to a bed in a flat near the Abbey Road studio — she initially rejected.

The most interesting part of Lennon’s complicated life on which Norman sheds fresh light is the troubled relationship with his seaman father, Alfred. Usually seen as an absconding rascal, Alf emerges here as a stoic victim of the caprices of his serially unfaithful wife and volatile son. He tried to hang on to John, offering to take him to New Zealand after Julia walked out on their marriage; and when he finally re-established contact with his Beatle son, he seems not to have expected anything much in the way of help, despite being broke and virtually jobless. Like just about everybody else in John’s family and life, Alf was, in his way, a remarkable man. At 54, he successfully romanced a 19-year-old girl, whom he married and had two sons with. Shortly after this, in what was to be their final meeting, John unleashed the fury he had long nurtured for his hapless dad and threatened to have him killed. The statement a terrified Alf filed with a solicitor in the event of this threat being carried out is one of the most moving and scary pieces of Lennon’s sprawling legacy. It is greatly to Norman’s credit as a biographer that he does justice to all of it in a book whose 854 pages simply fly by.

Book available at the Sunday Times BooksFirst price of £22.50 (inc p&p) on 0870 165 8585


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October 1, 2008 Posted by | John Lennon, OTHER_ARTICLE, OTHER_BOOK, _MUSIC | Leave a comment

What Lennon’s sexual fantasies have to do with Gandhi and Keats…

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Curiously titled but interesting piece from the Independent about the latest John Lennon “proper” biography John Lennon: The Life by Philip Norman … another review of which we’ve posted here

I really want to get this book.

If anyone want to send me this book – John Lennon: The Life by Philip Norman – feel free!!

What Lennon’s sexual fantasies have to do with Gandhi and Keats…

Tales of the city … Tuesday, 23 September 2008

John Walsh


http://www.independent.co.uk/opinion/columnists/john-walsh/

Do we need another book on John Lennon? In the 28 years since his death, a tsunami of Beatles history, biography, song analysis and memorabilia has engulfed fans of the Working-Class Hero. Lennon’s own family have joined in; only last year Julia Baird, his half-sister, published a harrowing description of the tug-of-love between their mother Julia and their aunt Mimi, with whom John grew up. Can there be more to find out?

And can Philip Norman, the author of the new 300,000-word John Lennon: The Life, be serious when he tells The Word magazine, “[Lennon deserves a] real biography, as if he were John Keats or Mahatma Gandhi. Not a pop person, but a major towering presence in his century”?

The answer to both questions is emphatically Yes. Norman is perhaps going a bit far with the Gandhi comparison, but it’s undoubtedly time we started taking the architects of the cathedral of rock more seriously, before the rest of them (Chuck Berry, Dylan, Jagger and Richards, McCartney, Ray Davies, the remainder of Pink Floyd) are mown down by Time. They presided over a revolution in human sensibility more profound and lasting than anything engendered by politics in the Sixties and Seventies.

And yes, Norman has unearthed startling things. We knew, for instance, that Lennon adored his mother, Julia: she was exuberant, headstrong, red-haired and musical, and taught him his first instrument, the ukulele, standing behind him with her hands on his (she also did a fine George Formby impression). We didn’t, however, know that Lennon fantasised about having sex with her, and told many people. At 14, apparently, he lay down beside Julia during her afternoon rest, “and wondered how far she would let him go”. He also, according to Norman, flirted with the idea of having sex with Paul McCartney. Norman also reveals that the short-lived girlfriend in “Norwegian Wood” wasn’t Maureen Cleave of the Evening Standard, but Sonny Freeman, the German wife of his friend Robert Freeman who lived downstairs from John and Cynthia, and whom John used to visit when Robert was working and Cynthia was changing the infant Julian.

Hints that John Lennon could be a prize shit to his intimates are amply borne out by Norman. He tells the story about Lennon’s father, Alfred, a chronically absent merchant seaman who reappeared from time to time to say “hi” to his son. Once he visited the grown-up Lennon, bearing a gift of some aftershave. Lennon by then was sporting a beard and the gift (which showed how much his father knew him) sent him into a fury. He threatened to have Alf killed. His father took the threat seriously enough to contact a lawyer.

You might argue that this is mere smut and family tittle-tattle. That would be to misunderstand a) what we like to read in biographies and b) the importance to Lennon of his problematic childhood. It lurks behind so many of his world-changing songs. His half-sister Julia told me: “John once said in an interview, ‘I’m not one for doing autobiography, I’ll never do anything like that.’ And I thought, ‘John, all your songs are autobiographical.’ Didn’t he see it?”

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October 1, 2008 Posted by | John Lennon, OTHER_ARTICLE, _MUSIC | Leave a comment

John Lennon Bootleg Bonanza!! – F**ken Amazing!!

tete_general
John Lennon-Publications 1968-2007
MP3 VBR 192-320 | RAR | Release, Bootleg, Video | 18,5 Go | RS.com

Stunning collection of Lennon boots released over the past 40 years, may of them very rare!

And a few great Lennon vids too!

An amazing horde of goodies for true music fans!

John Lennon – 1968-1969
1968_69

John Lennon

1968
Unfinished Music No. 1 Two Virgins 1968 November 11 @192
1969
Live Peace in Toronto 1969 @160
Sweet Toronto 1969
Unfinished Music No. 2 Life with the Lions 1969 May 26 @192
Wedding Album @192

Liens/Links

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John Lennon – 1970
1970

Hushed Bells Over-1970 @256
Plastic Ono Band home and studio-1970 @192
Plastic Ono Band-1970 @VBR
Plastic Ono Band @320
Liens/Links

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John Lennon – 1971
1971

Imagine Demos @320
Imagine-1971 @320
St. Regis Hotel & Hotel Syracuse, NY-1971 @320
Liens/Links

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John Lennon – 1972
1972

Sometime In New York City-1972 @192
Christmas Present-1972 @VBR 176
John Lennon-Chuck_Berry-Johnny B. Goode-Mike Douglas Show 72 mpeg
Live in New York City (dvd)-1972
Liens/Links

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John Lennon – 1973
1973

Mind Games @m4a-192
Mind Games Alternates And Demos-1991 @192
Liens/Links

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John Lennon – 1974
1974

Elton John & Lennon-1974-11-28-NY @320
WABX Phone Call-1974 @320
Walls and Bridges (Original recording remastered)-2005 @320
Liens/Links

——————— // ———————

John Lennon – 1975
1975

Rock N Roll (Remastered)(AAC@192)
Shaved Fish ( 1975 ) @192
Sir Lew Grade TV Tribute show 1975 @320
Liens/Links

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John Lennon – 1980 †
1980

Double Fantasy-1980 @192
Infamous.Assassinations.The.Assassination
John & Yoko Lennon – The Last Interview (BBC 1980) @128
Liens/Links

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John Lennon – 1982
1982

the john lennon collection-1982 @320
Liens/Links

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John Lennon – 1984

1984

Before Play 1984 @128
MILK AND HONEY @192
Liens/Links

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John Lennon – 1986
1986

Live In New York City-1986 @320
Menlove Avenue (sessions 1974–75) (1986 October 30) @320
Liens/Links

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John Lennon – 1988
1988

Imagine (soundtrack (1988 October 4 ) @320
Imagine Video-1988
Liens/Links

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John Lennon – 1989
1989

Gone From This Place-1989 @320
Johnny L-1989 @320
Let’s Have A Party-John Lennon & Friends-1989 @192
Out Of The Blue-1989 @320
Liens/Links

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John Lennon – 1990
1990

Lennon [4 CD Set]-1990 @320
Studio Tracks-1990 @320
Yer Blues-1990 @320
Liens/Links

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John Lennon – 1991
1991

(The Alternate) Sometime in New York City-1991
Lost In The Studio-1991 192 Kbps
Liens/Links

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John Lennon – 1992 & 1993
1992-93

Missing In Action/Pill -1993 (256)
Lennon & McCartney-A Toot And A Snore In ’74-1992 @192
Liens/Links
Liens/Links

——————— // ———————

John Lennon – 1994
1994_tete

Imagine Outtakes (1994) @192
Liens/Links

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John Lennon – 1995
1995_tete

Dreaming Of the Past-1995,@160VBR
The Village Tapes (Last Sessions)-1995@160
Free As A Bird-The Dakota Beatle Demos-1995 @320
Look At Me-1995 @160
S.I.R. John Winston Ono Lennon-1995 @192
San Francisco Bay Blues-1995 @320
Something precious and rare-1995 @192 VBR
Liens/Links

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John Lennon – 1996 (Lost Tapes-44 cd)

1996_tete

Complete Lost Lennon Tapes [1 à 22]-1996 @224 VBR
Liens/Links

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John Lennon – 1997 – La Légende
1997_tete

Legend- The Very Best Of John Lennon @320
Lennon Legend – DVDrip
Over Walls, under Bridges-1997 @160VBR
The Dream Is Over-1997 @192
Unplugged (Bootleg)-1997 @160
Liens/Links

——————— // ———————

John Lennon – 1998
1998_tete

A Heart Play-1998 @160
Absolute Elsewhere the ultimate mind games anthology – 1998 [VT-158 to VT-160]
Anthology (1998 November 3 @192
We’d Like To Change The Tempo Now-1998 @256
Wonsaponatime-1998 @192
Liens/Links

——————— // ———————

John Lennon – 1999
1999_tete

Your Daddy’s Here-1999 @192
Liens/Links

——————— // ———————

John Lennon – 2000
2000_tete

Compositions-2000 @192
Filming the fantasies-2000 @320
Remembers-The Working Class Hero-2000 @128
Rock ‘N’ Roll Sessions-2000 @320
SOMEWHERE IN NEW YORK CITY-THE UN-TELECAST PERFORMANCES-1971-72-2000 @256
Walls And Bridges Revisited-2000 @160
Liens/Links

——————— // ———————

John Lennon – 2001
2001_tete

Acetates and Alternates-2001 @256
Liens/Links

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John Lennon 2002
2002_tete

Ascot Sound Studios – SAM-011-2002 @320
The Dirty Mac Sessions-2002 @160
Liens/Links

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John Lennon 2004
2004_tete

Acoustic-2004-@192
Liens/Links

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John Lennon 2005
2005_tete

Peace Love and Truth (2005) @192
Working Class Hero / The Definitive Lennon-2CD-2005 @192
Liens/Links

——————— // ———————

John Lennon 2006
2006_tete

The U.S. Vs. John Lennon-(OST)-2006 @192 VBR
The U.S. vs. John Lennon Video Documental-2006
Remember – 2006 @VBR
Memories-2006 @192
Clock-2006 @256
Between The Lines-Complete home recordings 1975–1980 (9CDs)-2006 @192
Liens/Links

——————— // ———————

John Lennon 2007
2007_tete

Acoustic-(Bootleg)-2007-@VBR 200
Remember New York City-2007 @320
Come On Listen To Me-2007 @320
Instant Karma-The Amnesty International Campaign To Save Darfur (2007) @320
It’s Gonna Be Alright-2007 @128
Life Is What Happens-2007 @320
Liens/Links

——————— // ———————

Enormous thanks to rstgermain



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September 28, 2008 Posted by | Elton John, John Lennon, Music_ClassicRock, Music_Pop, The Beatles, _MUSIC | Leave a comment