STUPID and Contagious

Our holiday home from stupidd.blogspot.com !

Jonny Greenwood – There Will Be Blood OST

//ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51MiLSr1GLL._AA240_.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

Jonny Greenwood – There Will Be Blood OST
[Nonesuch; 2008]


Guitarist Jonny Greenwood has composed a hauntingly dramatic instrumental score for Oscar nominated writer-director Paul Thomas Anderson s ambitious new film, There Will Be Blood. An adaptation of the Upton Sinclair novel Oil!, the movie features Daniel Day-Lewis in what The Hollywood Reporter has described as a powerhouse performance … it’s a certain awards contender.

https://i0.wp.com/thoughtlet.com/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2007/10/167902257_c94b2f0f24.jpg Greenwood’s remarkable compositions, written primarily for strings, have already garnered considerable praise in advance reviews.

The score resembles his rock compositions only in the level of daring and inventiveness to be found throughout these tracks and in the unsettling atmosphere he is able to conjure at key moments. Greenwood s score is more indicative of his current collaborations with the BBC Orchestra as Composer In Residence activities closely followed by Pitchfork Media and The Daily Swarm.

In fact, the score incorporates material from two orchestral pieces he created in that position, Smear and Popcorn Superhet Receiver, which will have its U.S. concert premiere this January when Greenwood appears at the Wordless Music Series in New York City.

There Will Be Blood takes Anderson in a radically different direction than his celebrated earlier films, Boogie Nights and Magnolia dazzling, attention-grabbing movies marked by multiple plot lines, ensemble casts and surreal visual elements. His last project, Punch Drunk Love, was a flawed comedy-drama (with, incomprehensibly, uber-moron Adam Sandler! Adam, stay in the moron-comedies and don’t fuck up what would otherwise be decent movies, pleassseee!) with a smart pop score by composer-producer Jon Brion, released on Nonesuch in 2002.

Anderson s new work is a stark period piece filmed on arid Texas plains; critics have likened it to the brilliantly austere work of such revered directors as Stanley Kubrick and Terence Malick (Days Of Heaven). The Hollywood Reporter called Greenwood’s score captivating … greatly contributing to the sense that tectonic forces lie beneath the drama.

https://i2.wp.com/www.nndb.com/people/986/000030896/jonnygreenwood5-crop.jpgThe soundtrack to There Will Be Blood will appeal to serious movie-music fans, who will appreciate this rare find: an intelligent, beautifuland deeply cinematic orchestrated score performed by the BBC Orchestra and London Sinfonietta that can hold its own next to the classic work of such composers as Bernard Herrman, Elmer Bernstein and Ennio Morricone.

This album marks Radiohead guitarist Jonny Greenwood’s first high-profile soundtrack-and one that’s also easily among the most striking offerings of 2007. Music is particularly important for director Paul Thomas Anderson (especially in the great Magnolia) and here, his choice of Greenwood is a gamble that more than paid off.

The score is extremely string-heavy, and tension (of which there’s plenty in the Upton Sinclair-based movie) derives from the score instead of the usual percussive Hollywood tropes (indeed, percussions are almost entirely absent from the CD). “Henry Plainview” and “Proven Lands” are part of a larger piece, Popcorn Superhet Receiver, that Greenwood wrote as Composer-in-Residence at the BBC; both cues display the musician’s imaginative use of strings, suggestively scary on the first, pounding and creepy on the second.

But Greenwood also knows when to bring in a new instrumental voice, as with the Satie-like piano on “Prospectors Arrive.”

Equally at ease writing for a string quartet and for a larger orchestra, Greenwood has come up with compositions closer to the new-music world that to the vast majority of scores coming out of Tinseltown–something we should be really grateful for. This is a new, exciting direction for film music.


Pitchfork review

The first hint that Jonny Greenwood might make a gifted composer came in 1997, when, bored with the syrupy, provincial strings that dominated the tail-end of Britpop, he channeled Polish composer Krzysztof Penderecki for the arrangement on OK Computer‘s “Climbing Up The Walls”. Essentially a wall of quarter notes played against each other, that noisy squall stood out in dramatic opposition to the “Bittersweet Symphony”s of the world. Where the traditional rock approach had always been to use strings to amplify melody and opulence, Greenwood was using them to create discord and ambience; in other words, he was playing orchestras like he played his guitar.

While his interest in what he’s since referred to in interviews as a “wrong” string sound manifested in later Radiohead highlights like “How to Disappear Completely” and “Pyramid Song”, his compositional talents didn’t become readily apparent until his imaginative score for 2003’s sweeping documentary Bodysong. A lush mixture of strings, pianos, percussions, electronics, and otherwise unrecognizable textures, Bodysong’s sprawling fourteen tracks allowed Greenwood to indulge in a level of experimentation and free-jazz complexity that wouldn’t have otherwise fit on a Radiohead record.

Since then, Greenwood’s graduation to mainstream film work has been pretty much inevitable, but even still, he’d probably be the first to admit that a Paul Thomas Anderson (Boogie Nights, Magnolia, Punch-Drunk Love) project represents a pretty plum debut. Regardless of how you feel about Anderson as a director, few of his contemporaries manage to weave original music into the fabric of their films quite as devotedly. To score an Anderson project is to have a starring role in it; that this particular film– a loose adaptation of Upton Sinclair’s Oil!— is set in a desolate California town circa 1920 only makes the task that much bigger.

After his initial contact with Anderson, Greenwood apparently wrote hours and hours of music for the film; in the end, the duo pared the score back to a very tidy 33 minutes, a small portion of which was lifted from Greenwood’s 2005 BBC-commissioned suite Popcorn Superhet Receiver. Nonetheless, this is all new ground for Greenwood. If the fidgety Bodysong was proof that he isn’t ever likely to be short of ideas, There Will Be Blood feels tighter, more disciplined, and lonelier than anything he’s done before.

Piano, percussion, and Greenwood’s beloved Ondes-Martenot all feature, but it’s the strings that take center stage here. While Greenwood has always been vocal about the originators and inspirations behind a lot of his techniques (Penderecki, Gorecki, and Messiaen come up often), There Will Be Blood‘s string arrangements nonetheless sound vanguard and exploratory in the context of Hollywood film scores. From the goosebump-inducing glissandos on opener “Wide Open Spaces” to the spiralling staccatos on “Future Markets” to the creeping dissonance in “Henry Plainview” (there’s that “wrong” sound again), Greenwood’s alien, experimental sensibilities lurk around each corner.

Mark Pytlik, January 02, 2008


Tracklisting

1. Open Spaces – BBC Concert Orchestra

2. Future Markets – BBC Concert Orchestra

3. Prospectors Arrive – Burgess, Martin & Caroline Dale/Michael Dussek

4. Eat Him By His Own Light – Burgess, Martin & Caroline Dale/Michael Dussek

5. Henry Plainview – BBC Concert Orchestra

6. There Will Be Blood – BBC Concert Orchestra

7. Oil – Emperor Quartet

8. Proven Lands – BBC Concert Orchestra

9. HW/Hope Of New Fields – Emperor Quartet

10. Stranded The Line – Emperor Quartet

11. Prospectors Quartet – Emperor Quartet

https://i2.wp.com/www.channel4.com/culture/microsites/B/bodysong/press/jonny_greenwood.jpg

Here’s Jonny!!

http://link-protector.com/381459/

January 7, 2008 Posted by | Jonny Greenwood, Music_OST, _MUSIC | Leave a comment

Jonny Greenwood – There Will Be Blood OST

The image “https://i1.wp.com/ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51MiLSr1GLL._AA240_.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

Jonny Greenwood – There Will Be Blood OST
[Nonesuch; 2008]


Guitarist Jonny Greenwood has composed a hauntingly dramatic instrumental score for Oscar nominated writer-director Paul Thomas Anderson s ambitious new film, There Will Be Blood. An adaptation of the Upton Sinclair novel Oil!, the movie features Daniel Day-Lewis in what The Hollywood Reporter has described as a powerhouse performance … it’s a certain awards contender.

https://i0.wp.com/thoughtlet.com/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2007/10/167902257_c94b2f0f24.jpg Greenwood’s remarkable compositions, written primarily for strings, have already garnered considerable praise in advance reviews.

The score resembles his rock compositions only in the level of daring and inventiveness to be found throughout these tracks and in the unsettling atmosphere he is able to conjure at key moments. Greenwood s score is more indicative of his current collaborations with the BBC Orchestra as Composer In Residence activities closely followed by Pitchfork Media and The Daily Swarm.

In fact, the score incorporates material from two orchestral pieces he created in that position, Smear and Popcorn Superhet Receiver, which will have its U.S. concert premiere this January when Greenwood appears at the Wordless Music Series in New York City.

There Will Be Blood takes Anderson in a radically different direction than his celebrated earlier films, Boogie Nights and Magnolia dazzling, attention-grabbing movies marked by multiple plot lines, ensemble casts and surreal visual elements. His last project, Punch Drunk Love, was a flawed comedy-drama (with, incomprehensibly, uber-moron Adam Sandler! Adam, stay in the moron-comedies and don’t fuck up what would otherwise be decent movies, pleassseee!) with a smart pop score by composer-producer Jon Brion, released on Nonesuch in 2002.

Anderson s new work is a stark period piece filmed on arid Texas plains; critics have likened it to the brilliantly austere work of such revered directors as Stanley Kubrick and Terence Malick (Days Of Heaven). The Hollywood Reporter called Greenwood’s score captivating … greatly contributing to the sense that tectonic forces lie beneath the drama.

https://i2.wp.com/www.nndb.com/people/986/000030896/jonnygreenwood5-crop.jpgThe soundtrack to There Will Be Blood will appeal to serious movie-music fans, who will appreciate this rare find: an intelligent, beautifuland deeply cinematic orchestrated score performed by the BBC Orchestra and London Sinfonietta that can hold its own next to the classic work of such composers as Bernard Herrman, Elmer Bernstein and Ennio Morricone.

This album marks Radiohead guitarist Jonny Greenwood’s first high-profile soundtrack-and one that’s also easily among the most striking offerings of 2007. Music is particularly important for director Paul Thomas Anderson (especially in the great Magnolia) and here, his choice of Greenwood is a gamble that more than paid off.

The score is extremely string-heavy, and tension (of which there’s plenty in the Upton Sinclair-based movie) derives from the score instead of the usual percussive Hollywood tropes (indeed, percussions are almost entirely absent from the CD). “Henry Plainview” and “Proven Lands” are part of a larger piece, Popcorn Superhet Receiver, that Greenwood wrote as Composer-in-Residence at the BBC; both cues display the musician’s imaginative use of strings, suggestively scary on the first, pounding and creepy on the second.

But Greenwood also knows when to bring in a new instrumental voice, as with the Satie-like piano on “Prospectors Arrive.”

Equally at ease writing for a string quartet and for a larger orchestra, Greenwood has come up with compositions closer to the new-music world that to the vast majority of scores coming out of Tinseltown–something we should be really grateful for. This is a new, exciting direction for film music.


Pitchfork review

The first hint that Jonny Greenwood might make a gifted composer came in 1997, when, bored with the syrupy, provincial strings that dominated the tail-end of Britpop, he channeled Polish composer Krzysztof Penderecki for the arrangement on OK Computer‘s “Climbing Up The Walls”. Essentially a wall of quarter notes played against each other, that noisy squall stood out in dramatic opposition to the “Bittersweet Symphony”s of the world. Where the traditional rock approach had always been to use strings to amplify melody and opulence, Greenwood was using them to create discord and ambience; in other words, he was playing orchestras like he played his guitar.

While his interest in what he’s since referred to in interviews as a “wrong” string sound manifested in later Radiohead highlights like “How to Disappear Completely” and “Pyramid Song”, his compositional talents didn’t become readily apparent until his imaginative score for 2003’s sweeping documentary Bodysong. A lush mixture of strings, pianos, percussions, electronics, and otherwise unrecognizable textures, Bodysong’s sprawling fourteen tracks allowed Greenwood to indulge in a level of experimentation and free-jazz complexity that wouldn’t have otherwise fit on a Radiohead record.

Since then, Greenwood’s graduation to mainstream film work has been pretty much inevitable, but even still, he’d probably be the first to admit that a Paul Thomas Anderson (Boogie Nights, Magnolia, Punch-Drunk Love) project represents a pretty plum debut. Regardless of how you feel about Anderson as a director, few of his contemporaries manage to weave original music into the fabric of their films quite as devotedly. To score an Anderson project is to have a starring role in it; that this particular film– a loose adaptation of Upton Sinclair’s Oil!— is set in a desolate California town circa 1920 only makes the task that much bigger.

After his initial contact with Anderson, Greenwood apparently wrote hours and hours of music for the film; in the end, the duo pared the score back to a very tidy 33 minutes, a small portion of which was lifted from Greenwood’s 2005 BBC-commissioned suite Popcorn Superhet Receiver. Nonetheless, this is all new ground for Greenwood. If the fidgety Bodysong was proof that he isn’t ever likely to be short of ideas, There Will Be Blood feels tighter, more disciplined, and lonelier than anything he’s done before.

Piano, percussion, and Greenwood’s beloved Ondes-Martenot all feature, but it’s the strings that take center stage here. While Greenwood has always been vocal about the originators and inspirations behind a lot of his techniques (Penderecki, Gorecki, and Messiaen come up often), There Will Be Blood‘s string arrangements nonetheless sound vanguard and exploratory in the context of Hollywood film scores. From the goosebump-inducing glissandos on opener “Wide Open Spaces” to the spiralling staccatos on “Future Markets” to the creeping dissonance in “Henry Plainview” (there’s that “wrong” sound again), Greenwood’s alien, experimental sensibilities lurk around each corner.

Mark Pytlik, January 02, 2008


Tracklisting

1. Open Spaces – BBC Concert Orchestra

2. Future Markets – BBC Concert Orchestra

3. Prospectors Arrive – Burgess, Martin & Caroline Dale/Michael Dussek

4. Eat Him By His Own Light – Burgess, Martin & Caroline Dale/Michael Dussek

5. Henry Plainview – BBC Concert Orchestra

6. There Will Be Blood – BBC Concert Orchestra

7. Oil – Emperor Quartet

8. Proven Lands – BBC Concert Orchestra

9. HW/Hope Of New Fields – Emperor Quartet

10. Stranded The Line – Emperor Quartet

11. Prospectors Quartet – Emperor Quartet

https://i2.wp.com/www.channel4.com/culture/microsites/B/bodysong/press/jonny_greenwood.jpg

Here’s Jonny!!

http://link-protector.com/381459/

January 7, 2008 Posted by | Jonny Greenwood, Music_OST, _MUSIC | Leave a comment

Jonny Greenwood – There Will Be Blood OST

The image “https://i1.wp.com/ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51MiLSr1GLL._AA240_.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

Jonny Greenwood – There Will Be Blood OST
[Nonesuch; 2008]


Guitarist Jonny Greenwood has composed a hauntingly dramatic instrumental score for Oscar nominated writer-director Paul Thomas Anderson s ambitious new film, There Will Be Blood. An adaptation of the Upton Sinclair novel Oil!, the movie features Daniel Day-Lewis in what The Hollywood Reporter has described as a powerhouse performance … it’s a certain awards contender.

https://i0.wp.com/thoughtlet.com/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2007/10/167902257_c94b2f0f24.jpg Greenwood’s remarkable compositions, written primarily for strings, have already garnered considerable praise in advance reviews.

The score resembles his rock compositions only in the level of daring and inventiveness to be found throughout these tracks and in the unsettling atmosphere he is able to conjure at key moments. Greenwood s score is more indicative of his current collaborations with the BBC Orchestra as Composer In Residence activities closely followed by Pitchfork Media and The Daily Swarm.

In fact, the score incorporates material from two orchestral pieces he created in that position, Smear and Popcorn Superhet Receiver, which will have its U.S. concert premiere this January when Greenwood appears at the Wordless Music Series in New York City.

There Will Be Blood takes Anderson in a radically different direction than his celebrated earlier films, Boogie Nights and Magnolia dazzling, attention-grabbing movies marked by multiple plot lines, ensemble casts and surreal visual elements. His last project, Punch Drunk Love, was a flawed comedy-drama (with, incomprehensibly, uber-moron Adam Sandler! Adam, stay in the moron-comedies and don’t fuck up what would otherwise be decent movies, pleassseee!) with a smart pop score by composer-producer Jon Brion, released on Nonesuch in 2002.

Anderson s new work is a stark period piece filmed on arid Texas plains; critics have likened it to the brilliantly austere work of such revered directors as Stanley Kubrick and Terence Malick (Days Of Heaven). The Hollywood Reporter called Greenwood’s score captivating … greatly contributing to the sense that tectonic forces lie beneath the drama.

https://i2.wp.com/www.nndb.com/people/986/000030896/jonnygreenwood5-crop.jpgThe soundtrack to There Will Be Blood will appeal to serious movie-music fans, who will appreciate this rare find: an intelligent, beautifuland deeply cinematic orchestrated score performed by the BBC Orchestra and London Sinfonietta that can hold its own next to the classic work of such composers as Bernard Herrman, Elmer Bernstein and Ennio Morricone.

This album marks Radiohead guitarist Jonny Greenwood’s first high-profile soundtrack-and one that’s also easily among the most striking offerings of 2007. Music is particularly important for director Paul Thomas Anderson (especially in the great Magnolia) and here, his choice of Greenwood is a gamble that more than paid off.

The score is extremely string-heavy, and tension (of which there’s plenty in the Upton Sinclair-based movie) derives from the score instead of the usual percussive Hollywood tropes (indeed, percussions are almost entirely absent from the CD). “Henry Plainview” and “Proven Lands” are part of a larger piece, Popcorn Superhet Receiver, that Greenwood wrote as Composer-in-Residence at the BBC; both cues display the musician’s imaginative use of strings, suggestively scary on the first, pounding and creepy on the second.

But Greenwood also knows when to bring in a new instrumental voice, as with the Satie-like piano on “Prospectors Arrive.”

Equally at ease writing for a string quartet and for a larger orchestra, Greenwood has come up with compositions closer to the new-music world that to the vast majority of scores coming out of Tinseltown–something we should be really grateful for. This is a new, exciting direction for film music.


Pitchfork review

The first hint that Jonny Greenwood might make a gifted composer came in 1997, when, bored with the syrupy, provincial strings that dominated the tail-end of Britpop, he channeled Polish composer Krzysztof Penderecki for the arrangement on OK Computer‘s “Climbing Up The Walls”. Essentially a wall of quarter notes played against each other, that noisy squall stood out in dramatic opposition to the “Bittersweet Symphony”s of the world. Where the traditional rock approach had always been to use strings to amplify melody and opulence, Greenwood was using them to create discord and ambience; in other words, he was playing orchestras like he played his guitar.

While his interest in what he’s since referred to in interviews as a “wrong” string sound manifested in later Radiohead highlights like “How to Disappear Completely” and “Pyramid Song”, his compositional talents didn’t become readily apparent until his imaginative score for 2003’s sweeping documentary Bodysong. A lush mixture of strings, pianos, percussions, electronics, and otherwise unrecognizable textures, Bodysong’s sprawling fourteen tracks allowed Greenwood to indulge in a level of experimentation and free-jazz complexity that wouldn’t have otherwise fit on a Radiohead record.

Since then, Greenwood’s graduation to mainstream film work has been pretty much inevitable, but even still, he’d probably be the first to admit that a Paul Thomas Anderson (Boogie Nights, Magnolia, Punch-Drunk Love) project represents a pretty plum debut. Regardless of how you feel about Anderson as a director, few of his contemporaries manage to weave original music into the fabric of their films quite as devotedly. To score an Anderson project is to have a starring role in it; that this particular film– a loose adaptation of Upton Sinclair’s Oil!— is set in a desolate California town circa 1920 only makes the task that much bigger.

After his initial contact with Anderson, Greenwood apparently wrote hours and hours of music for the film; in the end, the duo pared the score back to a very tidy 33 minutes, a small portion of which was lifted from Greenwood’s 2005 BBC-commissioned suite Popcorn Superhet Receiver. Nonetheless, this is all new ground for Greenwood. If the fidgety Bodysong was proof that he isn’t ever likely to be short of ideas, There Will Be Blood feels tighter, more disciplined, and lonelier than anything he’s done before.

Piano, percussion, and Greenwood’s beloved Ondes-Martenot all feature, but it’s the strings that take center stage here. While Greenwood has always been vocal about the originators and inspirations behind a lot of his techniques (Penderecki, Gorecki, and Messiaen come up often), There Will Be Blood‘s string arrangements nonetheless sound vanguard and exploratory in the context of Hollywood film scores. From the goosebump-inducing glissandos on opener “Wide Open Spaces” to the spiralling staccatos on “Future Markets” to the creeping dissonance in “Henry Plainview” (there’s that “wrong” sound again), Greenwood’s alien, experimental sensibilities lurk around each corner.

Mark Pytlik, January 02, 2008


Tracklisting

1. Open Spaces – BBC Concert Orchestra

2. Future Markets – BBC Concert Orchestra

3. Prospectors Arrive – Burgess, Martin & Caroline Dale/Michael Dussek

4. Eat Him By His Own Light – Burgess, Martin & Caroline Dale/Michael Dussek

5. Henry Plainview – BBC Concert Orchestra

6. There Will Be Blood – BBC Concert Orchestra

7. Oil – Emperor Quartet

8. Proven Lands – BBC Concert Orchestra

9. HW/Hope Of New Fields – Emperor Quartet

10. Stranded The Line – Emperor Quartet

11. Prospectors Quartet – Emperor Quartet

https://i2.wp.com/www.channel4.com/culture/microsites/B/bodysong/press/jonny_greenwood.jpg

Here’s Jonny!!

http://link-protector.com/381459/

January 7, 2008 Posted by | Jonny Greenwood, Music_OST, _MUSIC | Leave a comment