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David Bowie – Live at 50


David Bowie – Live at 50


Interesting bootleg collection of live performances by Mr Ziggy with an array of other great artists such as Black Francis and Sonic Youth.

And Lou Reed, of course, who has always been, let’s say an “inspiration” to Bowie! No, we don’t necessarily mean Bowie ripped Lou off on countless albums!


Tracklisting

David Bowie & Annie Lennox – Under Pressure
David Bowie & Frank Black – Fashion
David Bowie & Frank Black – Scary Monsters
David Bowie & Jeff Beck – The Jean Genie (Ziggy Farewell Show)
David Bowie & Lou Reed – Dirty Boulevard
David Bowie & Lou Reed – Waiting for the Man
David Bowie & Marianne Faithfull – I got you babe
David Bowie & Nine Inch Nails – Hello Spaceboy
David Bowie & Nine Inch Nails – Scary Monsters
David Bowie & Sonic Youth – I`m afraid of Americans



Here be Bowie

DB-L_50.rar

Big thanks to theteacomp

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November 30, 2008 Posted by | Annie Lennox, Black Francis, David Bowie, Jeff Beck, Lou Reed, Marianne Faithfull, Music_Alternative, Nine Inch Nails, Sonic Youth, _MUSIC | Leave a comment

Lou Reed & John Cale – Waiting for the Man – Paris 1972

Feel sick and dirty, more dead than alive, I’m waiting for my man

An amazing video this!

The great John Cale performs with Lou Reed at Bataclan in Paris in 1972!

After Cale was essentially kicked out of the Velvet underground in 1969 by Reed, not long after their wonderful second LP “White Light White Heat”, I’d thought that Cale in ’72 would be more likely to punch Reed’s lights out than perform with him!

Of course, they would work together again much later on the “Songs for Drella” LP and perform in the Velvets reunion tour.

Here, they perform a slowed down re-interpretation of the amazing track Waiting for the Man from the Velvet’s seminal 1967 debut, The Velvet Underground & Nico, better known as the “Banana” album!

Am I crazy or is Lou actually happy and smiling here??!

https://i2.wp.com/upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/e/e4/Velvet_underground_album_cover_2.png https://i1.wp.com/upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/0/0c/Velvet_Underground_and_Nico.jpg/200px-Velvet_Underground_and_Nico.jpg

I’m waiting for my man
Twenty-six dollars in my hand
Up to Lexington, 125
Feel sick and dirty, more dead than alive
I’m waiting for my man

Hey, white boy, what you doin’ uptown?
Hey, white boy, you chasin’ our women around?
Oh pardon me sir, it’s the furthest from my mind
I’m just lookin’ for a dear, dear friend of mine
I’m waiting for my man

Here he comes, he’s all dressed in black
PR shoes and a big straw hat
He’s never early, he’s always late
First thing you learn is you always gotta wait
I’m waiting for my man

Up to a Brownstone, up three flights of stairs
Everybody’s pinned you, but nobody cares
He’s got the works, gives you sweet taste
Ah then you gotta split because you got no time to waste
I’m waiting for my man

Baby don’t you holler, darlin’ don’t you bawl and shout
I’m feeling good, you know I’m gonna work it on out
I’m feeling good, I’m feeling oh so fine
Until tomorrow, but that’s just some other time
I’m waiting for my man

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October 21, 2008 Posted by | Canon, John Cale, Lou Reed, Music_ClassicRock, The Velvet Underground, _MUSIC, _VIDEO | Leave a comment

Lou Reed – Berlin: Live At St. Anns Warehouse (2008)

Lou Reed – Berlin: Live At St. Anns Warehouse (2008)
Released October 1, 2008
Recorded December 15-16, 2006
Length 1:19:30
Label Matador Records
Producer Bob Ezrin, Hal Willner

In Berlin, by the wall
You were five foot ten inches tall
It was very nice
Candlelight and Dubonnet on ice
We were in a small cafe
You could hear the guitars play
It was very nice
It was paradise

Berlin: Live At St. Anns Warehouse is a concert film and live album by Lou Reed released in October, 2008.

The concert film was directed by Julian Schnabel, live at St. Ann’s Warehouse in Brooklyn, NY during five nights in December 2006. Background shots of the characters Jim and Caroline were done by Lola Schnabel.

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The Berlin tour was the first time Lou Reed had played the full album live in over 30 years, after the original album was a critical and commercial flop. Individual songs had been played, but not the whole thing.

The concert film and album both feature three additional songs, Candy Says, Rock Minuet and Sweet Jane, not from the original Berlin.

Tracklisting

1. “Intro” – 1:51
2. “Berlin” – 2:34
3. “Lady Day” – 4:12
4. “Men Of Good Fortune” – 6:35
5. “Caroline Says (I)” – 4:31
6. “How Do You Think It Feels?” – 5:37
7. “Oh, Jim” – 8:16
8. “Caroline Says (II)” – 4:33
9. “The Kids” – 8:08
10. “The Bed” – 5:59
11. “Sad Song” – 8:21
12. “Candy Says” – 6:04
13. “Rock Minuet” – 7:18
14. “Sweet Jane” – 5:31

Personnel

* Lou Reed: Lead Vocals, Guitar;
* Steve Hunter: Guitars, Bandleader;
* Fernando Saunders: Bass Guitar, Synthesizer, Guitar, Backing Vocals;
* Tony “Thunder” Smith: Drums, Backing Vocals;
* Rupert Christie: Keyboards, Backing Vocals;
* Rob Wasserman: Double Bass;
* Sharon Jones: Vocals;
* Antony Hegarty: Vocals;
* Steven Bernstein: Flugelhorn, Trumpet;
* Curtis Fowlkes: Trombone;
* Paul Shapiro: Saxophone, Flute;
* Doug Wieselman: Bass Clarinet, Clarinet;
* David Gold: Viola;
* Eyvind Kang: Viola;
* Jane Scarpantoni: Cello;
* Brooklyn Youth Chorus: Choir.

Here be Lou

PART 1

PASS=HAVEDAT

Big thanks to HAVEDAT



We do not host any files here. If this post contains a link to content hosted elsewhere, this is content found by a simple search on the worldwide freedom web. However, if for some valid reason, you object to a said content, or any content here, please let us know and we will remove the content in question.

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October 17, 2008 Posted by | Lou Reed, Music_Alternative, The Velvet Underground, _MUSIC | Leave a comment

VA – Rogue’s Gallery – Pirate Ballads, Sea Songs, and Chanteys

VA – Rogue’s Gallery – Pirate Ballads, Sea Songs, and Chanteys
2006 | FLAC | 865 MB

Avast now me mateys …. Oooooohhhh Yarrrrr! ….

I be likin this, so I be! …… Oooooohhhh Yarrrrr!……

As powerful as the Cat o’ nine tails and as wonderful as Fiddlers Green ! Yarrrrr!

Last night, when I be loaded to the Gunwales with glorious cheap sweet Jamaican grog and delectatin meself inside an army of glorious cheap sweet Jamaican wenches – who be costin me a pretty cache o’ pieces o’ eight I be tellin ya – I be hearin some lovely melodies a wiltin across the stench filled air! ….. Oooooohhhh Yarrrrr!……

A great collection, aye surely me hearties …. Oooooohhhh Yarrrrr!……and a very eclectic one too I be tellin ya ….. Oooooohhhh Yarrrrr! ……

Ahem … sorry, I get demented betimes …..Oooooohhhh Yarrrrrr ……

Some amazing sea songs sung by artists we love such as Nick Cave, Lou Reed, Antony, Stan Ridgway, Mary Margaret O’Hara, Martin Carthy, Kate McGarrigle and David Thomas etc.

Bono – that scurvy dog sure be one annoyin tosser Yarrrrr! ….. and his pal Gavin Friday ex of the Virgin Prunes are on here too!

There’s a group on here called The Old Prunes …. have the Virgin Prunes reformed?

There’s also some performances from the mysterious Jack Shit! Could this be one Johnny Depp?!!

Some unusual performers here too such as John C. Reilly – a great actor but one who lately seems to be appearing in way too many moronic “comedies” with assholes like Will Ferrell and Adam Sandler – and (one time) radical genius cartoonist Ralph Steadman!

Be warned, however, that included here is that vile Sting (that scurvy dog sure be one sickenin muzak tosser Yarrrrr!) and one of those awful Corrs (I be wantin to go a pokin with that diddly-iddle lass but not a listenin to her banshee muzak! Yarrrrr!) !!

….. All thanks be to the gods of the scurvy oceans for ye ould DELETE button! Yarrrrr!

A whopping 43 tracks in all (well, 41 after I be a deletin the Sting and the Corr, Yarrr!) …. I be likin this, so I be!

Ahoy! Get downloadin’ now me hearties!! Oooooohhhh Yarrrrrr !!!!

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Are ye gonna be a scoffin that glorious grog all day Mr Stupid or will ye be a raisin me wet sails! Yarrrr!

Johnny Depp and director Gore Verbinski hatched the idea for Rogue’s Gallery while filming “Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man’s Chest”–that idea being to cast genteel rock superstars like Bono, Lou Reed, Bryan Ferry, Andre Corr, and Sting to reinterpret gritty seafaring standards for an exhaustive 43-track double-disc set produced by Hal Wilner.

Throw in a bunch of credible folk stars (Loudon Wainwright III, Richard Thompson), their offspring (Rufus, Teddy) and a string of other curious characters (Jarvis Cocker, Antony) and what results is one of the strangest compilations in recent memory, if not exactly the most historically authentic or, well, digestible. Nick Cave embraces the role just a little too hard on “Fire Down Below,” while Ferry can’t help but sound like he’s singing for the cast of “The Love Boat,” but cut through the chaff and there is some real bootie here: Bono’s “Dying Sailor to His Shipmates,” Jolie Holland’s “The Grey Funnel Line” and “Boney” by a mysterious tramp called Jack Shit, which must be some kind of anagram* for Johnny Depp.


-Aidin Vaziri

* Anagram? Buy yourself a fucking dictionary Aidin! …. Methinks thoust been imbibin too much of ye glorious grog!! Y’arrrrr!!

[PinUp1b.jpg]

Is that a big pistol in yer pocket Mr Stupid or are ye very happy to be a seein me? Yarrrrr !

Rogue’s Gallery: Pirate Ballads, Sea Songs and Chanteys is a compilation album of sea shanties performed by a wide array of artists, ranging from Sting to Bryan Ferry, representing a variety of genres. The artists cover a large number of diverse songs of the sea, at times adding elements traditionally attributed to other types of music. The majority of the pop performers had not been known to be familiar with the sea shanty as a separate genre, though Sting, who contributed two tracks to the project, had had prior knowledge of and contact with them. Several well-known names from the folk world, where these songs have long been staples, also make appearances, including Richard Thompson, Martin Carthy and James Cooke.

While the marketing insanity for Pirates of the Caribbean II continues to echo in the
popular mindset, this whopping yet seemingly near-underground document — born from the minds of the film’s director, Gore Verbinski, his pal Johnny Depp, and Anti-Epitaph label boss (and Verbinski buddy) Brett Gurewitz — may end up as a lasting contribution to the populace at large without them even knowing it. Surely it lends its own weighty blend of blood, sweat, and tears to the folkloric literature of sea shanties and pirate songs, though cranks like Alan Lomax and John Jacob Niles are certainly turning over in their graves if they have any extraterrestrial knowledge of its existence. Rogue’s Gallery: Pirate Ballads, Sea Songs, and Chanteys, produced by Hal Willner, has gathered up the usual outrageous, inspired, ambitious, sometimes ridiculously grouped musicians to record folksongs of the sea, from the call-and-response grunting and occasionally obscene work songs sung by men from the old seas who worked the riggings in rhythm, to pirates who needed (much as modern-day rappers) to boast of their exploits. Willner gathered together some 75 songs and went to Seattle to hang with Bill Frisell to discuss the project. Frisell gathered the Akron Family, Wayne Horvitz, and Eyvind Kang to be a kind of house band there, and netted a slew of songs from the likes of Robin Holcomb (whose reading of “Dead Horse” is one of the most beautiful and haunting things here); the notorious Baby Gramps (whose version of “Cape Cod Girls” starts everything off with a harrumph), and a slew of others. He later went to Los Angeles, New York, London, Dublin, and god knows where else, finding roots musicians to be an ad hoc house band. In London, Warren Ellis of Dirty Three and Bad Seeds fame and Kate St. John formed a unit with some other folks, and in L.A. it was Jack Shit and friends. But this is the back of the story, actually.

The singers include everybody from pop blowhards like Sting and Bono, who do respectable jobs (well, not Bono: he blows it big-time on “A Dying Sailor to His Shipmates” because he can’t help himself), to wildmen like David Thomas (of Pere Ubu) and Nick Cave; from modern-day darlings like Lucinda Williams and Rufus Wainwright (who sings with his mom, Kate McGarrigle while his cranky old dad Loudon Wainwright III makes an appearance for two cuts); to strange adventurers like Mark Anthony Thompson, Jarvis Cocker, and Bob Neuwirth; from bona fide rock eccentrics like Antony, Jolie Holland, Bryan Ferry, Van Dyke Parks, Stan Ridgway, and Gavin Friday (in Ireland anyway) to rock legends (Ferry fits here, too) like Lou Reed); to indie rock songwriting iconoclasts Joseph Arthur and Ed Harcourt; bona fide recluses like Mary Margaret O’Hara; true traditionalists like John C. Reilly, Martin Carthy and family (Eliza Carthy on her own, too), and Richard and Teddy Thompson. Oh yeah, and one true counterculture icon: Ralph Steadman!

https://i2.wp.com/img.photobucket.com/albums/v347/Valeron/MySpace2/HotPirateBabe1.jpg

There’s a whale load of 43 cuts spread out over two discs in a handsome package. It’s bound to lose money unless some uptight Amerikanskis get adventurous real quick and buy it to put on their iPods to play on their sailboats and yachts, or if NPR does a feature on it for the yups (that would make both Ishmael and Captain Ahab proud). There are many standouts here, but those that really shake up the decks are Eliza Carthy’s “Rolling Sea,” Bryan Ferry’s two contributions — the entirely creepy “The Cruel Ship’s Captain,” and his duet with Antony “Lowlands Low” — Nick Cave’s “Pinery Boy” and his hilariously evil “Fire Down Below,” Gavin Friday’s “Baltimore Whores,” Richard Thompson’s reverential and lonesome “Mingualy Boat Song,” Martin Carthy and family’s “Hog-Eye Man,” O’Hara’s stirring “The Cry of Man,” Cocker’s wondrously cannibalistic “A Drop of Nelson’s Blood,” and Mark Anthony Thompson’s hunted “Haul Away Joe.” This doesn’t mean there are other things here that will appeal to the masses, or even to the few. Let’s face it, Baby Gramps, as great as he is, is only gonna make a few hearts (those that are diseased, most likely, or warped, most surely) flutter. Williams is good, but Parks is better, and Joseph Arthur can be downright scary when he wants to be: remember Tom Waits’ contribution to another Willner project, Stay Awake: Interpretations of Vintage Disney Films? There you have it.

There is something here for most, and something to piss off everyone else. The real deal is this: by bringing up these old relics — some of which took considerable research to find — Willner has done a service to folk culture by presenting it in such an oddball, loose, and fun way to the masses. Perhaps that rarefied world of folk culture fascists (who will remain unnamed here) may take umbrage, but consider those who will actually get turned on by this music and research the old songs themselves. Certainly that may be a choice few; for the rest, there is untold knowledge to be gained for random conversation, filling in the “personal weird stuff” file in their brains, and perhaps, if urbane enough, may spark a discussion for a moment or so until the next really “big” thing distracts them. Any way you hoist it, Rogue’s Gallery: Pirate Ballads, Sea Songs, and Chanteys is a treasure trove of the beautiful, the weird, the arcane, and the dangerous right out there on the record store shelves for anyone with a few dollars to spare to be awed or amused by.


[Miko.jpg]

Oh Ya Ya. Yarrrrr !
Ya Ya. Yarrrrr ! Yarrrrrrrrrrrrr !


Tracklisting

Disc: 1

1. Cape Cod Girls – Baby Gramps
2. Mingulay Boat Song – Richard Thompson
3. My Son John – John C. Reilly
4. Fire Down Below – Nick Cave
5. Turkish Revelry – Loudon Wainwright III
6. Bully In The Alley – The Old Prunes
7. The Cruel Ship’s Captain – Bryan Ferry
8. Dead Horse – Robin Holcomb
9. Spansih Ladies – Bill Frisell
10. High Barbary – Joseph Arthur
11. Haul Away Joe – Mark Anthony Thompson
12. Dan Dan – David Thomas
13. Blood Red Roses – Sting
14. Sally Brown – Teddy Thompson
15. Lowlands Away – Rufus Wainwright & Kate McGarrigle
16. Baltimore Whores – Gavin Friday
17. Rolling Sea – Eliza McCarthy
18. Haul On The Bowline – Bob Neuwirth
19. Dying Sailor to His Shipmates – Bono
20. Bonnie Portmore – Lucinda Williams
21. The Mermaid – Martin Carthy & the UK Group
22. Shenandoah – Richard Greene & Jack Shit
23. The Cry Of Man – Mary Margaret O’Hara

Disc: 2

1. Boney – Jack Shit
2. Good Ship Venus – Loudon Wainwright III
3. Long Time Ago -White Magic
4. Pinery Boy – Nick Cave
5. Lowlands Low – Bryan Ferry w/Antony
6. One Spring Morning – Akron/Family
7. Hog Eye Man – Martin Carthy & Family
8. The Fiddler/A Drop Of Nelson’s Blood – Ricky Jay & Richard Greene
9. Caroline and Her Young Sailor Bold – Andrea Corr
10. Fathom The Bowl – John C. Reilly
11. Drunken Sailor – Dave Thomas
12. Farewell Nancy – Ed Harcourt
13. Hanging Johnny – Stan Ridgway
14. Old Man of The Sea – Baby Gramps
15. Greenland Whale Fisheries – Van Dyke Parks
16. Shallow Brown – Sting
17. The Grey Funnel Line – Jolie Holland
18. A Drop of Nelson’s Blood – Jarvis Cocker
19. Leave Her Johnny – Lou Reed
20. Little Boy Billy – Ralph Steadman

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Here she be me hearties! Yarrrr …

Format:

Flac (Compression Level 8)

Links:

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RSDF:

http://secured.in/download-285750-f6ff246a.html

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Big thanks to ceart-bootlegs



We do not host any files here. If this post contains a link to content hosted elsewhere, this is content found by a simple search on the worldwide freedom web. However, if for some valid reason, you object to a said content, or any content here, please let us know and we will remove the content in question.

Any content linked to here is only meant as a taster for the original work itself and is posted on the strict understanding that anyone who downloads the taster, deletes said content within 24 hours. We would assume that these fans will then buy the original work and we greatly encourage them to do so.

October 7, 2008 Posted by | Antony, Bono, Bryan Ferry, David Thomas, Gavin Friday, Johnny Depp, Lou Reed, Music_Folk, Nick Cave, Stan Ridgway, _BABE, _MUSIC | Leave a comment

Lou Reed Discography

Anyone for a Lou Reed overdose?

I’m not sure where this comes from but kudos to the posters!

Transformer (1972)

01 – Vicious
02 – Andy’s Chest
03 – Perfect Day
04 – Hangin’ Round
05 – Walk On The Wild Side
06 – Make Up
07 – Satellite Of Love
08 – Wagon Wheel
09 – New York Telephone Conversation
10 – I’m So Free
11 – Goodnight Ladies
12 – Hangin’ Round (Acoustic Demo)
13 – Perfect Day (Acoustic Demo)

link

David Bowie has never been shy about acknowledging his influences, and since the boho decadence and sexual ambiguity of the Velvet Underground’s music had a major impact on Bowie’s work, it was only fitting that as Ziggy Stardust mania was reaching its peak, Bowie would offer Lou Reed some much needed help with his career, which was stuck in neutral after his first solo album came and went.

Musically, Reed’s work didn’t have too much in common with the sonic bombast of the glam scene, but at least it was a place where his eccentricities could find a comfortable home, and on Transformer Bowie and his right-hand man, Mick Ronson, crafted a new sound for Reed that was better fitting (and more commercially astute) than the ambivalent tone of his first solo album. Ronson adds some guitar raunch to “Vicious” and “Hangin’ Round” that’s a lot flashier than what Reed cranked out with the Velvets, but still honors Lou’s strengths in guitar-driven hard rock, while the imaginative arrangements Ronson cooked up for “Perfect Day,” “Walk on the Wild Side,” and “Goodnight Ladies” blend pop polish with musical thinking just as distinctive as Reed’s lyrical conceits.

And while Reed occasionally overplays his hand in writing stuff he figured the glam kids wanted (“Make Up” and “I’m So Free” being the most obvious examples), “Perfect Day,” “Walk on the Wild Side,” and “New York Telephone Conversation” proved he could still write about the demimonde with both perception and respect. The sound and style of Transformer would in many ways define Reed’s career in the 1970s, and while it led him into a style that proved to be a dead end, you can’t deny that Bowie and Ronson gave their hero a new lease on life — and a solid album in the bargain. (allmusic.com)

Berlin (1973)

01 – Berlin
02 – Lady Day
03- Men Of Good Fortune
04 – Caroline Says
05 – How Do You Think It Feels
06 – Oh Jim
07 – Caroline Says II
08 – The Kids
09 – The Bed
10 – Sad Song

link

Transformer and “Walk on the Wild Side” were both major hits in 1972, to the surprise of both Lou Reed and the music industry, and with Reed suddenly a hot commodity, he used his newly won clout to make the most ambitious album of his career, Berlin. Berlin was the musical equivalent of a drug-addled kid set loose in a candy store; the album’s songs, which form a loose story line about a doomed romance between two chemically fueled bohemians, were fleshed out with a huge, boomy production (Bob Ezrin at his most grandiose) and arrangements overloaded with guitars, keyboards, horns, strings, and any other kitchen sink that was handy (the session band included Jack Bruce, Steve Winwood, Aynsley Dunbar, and Tony Levin).

And while Reed had often been accused of focusing on the dark side of life, he and Ezrin approached Berlin as their opportunity to make The Most Depressing Album of All Time, and they hardly missed a trick.

This all seemed a bit much for an artist who made such superb use of the two-guitars/bass/drums lineup with the Velvet Underground, especially since Reed doesn’t even play electric guitar on the album; the sheer size of Berlin ultimately overpowers both Reed and his material. But if Berlin is largely a failure of ambition, that sets it apart from the vast majority of Reed’s lesser works; Lou’s vocals are both precise and impassioned, and though a few of the songs are little more than sketches, the best — “How Do You Think It Feels,” “Oh, Jim,” “The Kids,” and “Sad Song” — are powerful, bitter stuff. It’s hard not to be impressed by Berlin, given the sheer scope of the project, but while it earns an A for effort, the actual execution merits more of a B-. (allmusic.com)

Rock N Roll Animal (1974)

01 – Intro – Sweet Jane
02 – Heroin
03 – White Light – White Heat
04 – Lady Day
05 – Rock ‘N’ Roll

link

In 1974, after the commercial disaster of his album Berlin, Lou Reed needed a hit, and Rock N Roll Animal was a rare display of commercial acumen on his part, just the right album at just the right time. Recorded in concert with Reed’s crack road band at the peak of their form, Rock N Roll Animal offered a set of his most anthemic songs (most dating from his days with the Velvet Underground) in arrangements that presented his lean, effective melodies and street-level lyrics in their most user-friendly form (or at least as user friendly as an album with a song called “Heroin” can get).

Early-’70s arena rock bombast is often the order of the day, but guitarists Dick Wagner and Steve Hunter use their six-string muscle to lift these songs up, not weigh them down, and with Reed’s passionate but controlled vocals riding over the top, “Sweet Jane,” “White Light/White Heat,” and “Rock ‘n’ Roll” finally sound like the radio hits they always should have been. Reed would rarely sound this commercial again, but Rock N Roll Animal proves he could please a crowd when he had to.

The revised CD reissue of Rock N Roll Animal released in 2000 offers markedly better sound than the album’s initial release, along with two bonus cuts that give a better idea of how this band approached the material from Berlin on-stage, as well as an amusing moment of Reed verbally sparring with a heckler. (allmusic.com)

Sally Can’t Dance (1974)

01 – Ride Sally Ride
02 – Animal Language
03 – Baby Face
04 – N. Y. Stars
05 – Kill Your Sons
06 – Ennui
07 – Sally Can’t Dance
08 – Billy
09 – Good Taste

link

On the live album Rock N Roll Animal, Lou Reed showed he’d learned how to give his audience what they wanted, and do it well. Sally Can’t Dance, on the other hand, was the polar opposite, a remarkably cynical album that pandered to the lowest common denominator of the market that had bought Transformer and Rock N Roll Animal, and didn’t even do it with much flair. Reed’s performances here are limited to vocals, except for some sloppy acoustic guitar on one track (this from the man who helped reinvent electric guitar with the Velvet Underground), and the sodden, overblown arrangements sink most of these tunes before they get past the first chorus; much of the time, Reed sounds like an afterthought on his own album.

And while Reed’s best songwriting ranks with the best rock of his generation, Sally Can’t Dance is cluttered with throwaways that reach for the boho decadence of Transformer and come up empty (with special recognition going to the bizarre and truly puzzling “Animal Language”).

Side two does offer two worthwhile songs: “Kill Your Sons,” a powerful and deeply personal remembrance of Reed’s bouts with shock treatment and brutal psychotherapy, which he would revisit in a much stronger performance on 1984’s Live in Italy, and “Billy,” a witty and surprisingly poignant remembrance of an old friend and how their paths in life diverged. But otherwise, Sally Can’t Dance has the distinction of being the worst studio album of Reed’s career; Metal Machine Music may have been a lot more annoying, but at least he was trying on that one. (allmusic.com)

Coney Island Baby (1976)

01 – Crazy Feeling
02 – Charley’s Girl
03 – She’s My Best Friend
04 – Kicks
05 – A Gift
06 – Ooohhh Baby
07 – Nonody’s Business
08 – Coney Island Baby
link

From 1972’s Transformer onward, Lou Reed spent most of the ’70s playing the druggy decadence card for all it was worth, with increasingly mixed results. But on 1976’s Coney Island Baby, Reed’s songwriting began to move into warmer, more compassionate territory, and the result was his most approachable album since Loaded.

On most of the tracks, Reed stripped his band back down to guitar, bass, and drums, and the results were both leaner and a lot more comfortable than the leaden over-production of Sally Can’t Dance or Berlin. “Crazy Feeling,” “She’s My Best Friend,” and “Coney Island Baby” found Reed actually writing recognizable love songs for a change, and while Reed pursued his traditional interest in the underside of the hipster’s life on “Charlie’s Girl” and “Nobody’s Business,” he did so with a breezy, freewheeling air that was truly a relief after the lethargic tone of Sally Can’t Dance. “Kicks” used an audio-tape collage to generate atmospheric tension that gave its tale of drugs and death a chilling quality that was far more effective than his usual blasé take on the subject, and “Coney Island Baby” was the polar opposite, a song about love and regret that was as sincere and heart-tugging as anything the man has ever recorded. Coney Island Baby sounds casual on the surface, but emotionally it’s as compelling as anything Lou Reed released in the 1970s, and proved he could write about real people with recognizable emotions as well as anyone in rock music — something you might not have guessed from most of the solo albums that preceded it. (allmusic.com)

Rock and Roll Heart (1976)

01 – I Belive In Love
02 – Banging On My Drum
03 – Follow The Leader
04 – You Wear It So Well
05 – Ladies Pay
06 – Rock And Roll Heart
07 – Chooser And The Chosen One
08 – Senselessly Cruel
09 – Chain To Fame
10 – Vicious Circle
11 – A Sheltered Life
12 – Temporary Thing

link

Rock and Roll Heart was Lou Reed’s first album for Arista Records, and one senses that he wanted to come up with something saleable for his new sponsors. Uptempo numbers with pop hooks dominate the set, the 12 songs zip by in an efficient 38 minutes, and instead of Reed’s trademark meditations on the dark side of life, the lyrics are (for the most part) lean bursts of verse and chorus, in which the artist sings the praises of good times in general and rock & roll in particular (then again, on “I Believe in Love,” Reed pledges his allegiance to both “good time music” and “the iron cross,” a bit of perversity to remind us whose album this is).

But if Rock and Roll Heart sounds like “Lou Reed Lite,” there are more than a few flashes of Reed’s inarguable talent. His band is in fine form (especially Marty Fogel on sax and Michael Fonfara on keyboards). “Banging on My Drum” is a crunchy rocker that recalls his work with the Velvet Underground; “A Sheltered Life” is an amusing bit of VU archeology (the Velvets demoed the song, but this marked its first appearance on record); and the closer, “Temporary Thing,” is a bitter, haunting narrative that foreshadows Reed’s next album, the harrowing masterpiece Street Hassle. (allmusic.com)

Street Hassle (1978)

01 – Gimmie Some Good Times
02 – Dirt
03 – Street Hassle
04 – I Wanna Be Black
05 – Real Good Time Together
06 – Shooting Star
07 – Leave Me Alone
08 – Wait

link

The rise of the punk/new wave movement in the late ’70s proved just how pervasive Lou Reed’s influence had been through the past decade, but it also gave him some stiff competition, as suddenly Reed was no longer the only poet of the New York streets. 1978’s Street Hassle was Reed’s first album after punk had gained public currency, and Reed appeared to have taken the minimal approach of punk to heart.

With the exception of Metal Machine Music, Street Hassle was Reed’s rawest set of the 1970s; partly recorded live, with arrangements stripped to the bone, Street Hassle was dark, deep, and ominous, a 180-degree turn from the polished neo-glam of Transformer. Lyrically, Street Hassle found Reed looking deep into himself, and not liking what he saw. Opening with an uncharitable parody of “Sweet Jane,” Street Hassle found Reed acknowledging just how much a self-parody he’d become in the 1970s, and just how much he hated himself for it, on songs like “Dirt” and “Shooting Star.”

Street Hassle was Reed’s most creatively ambitious album since Berlin, and it sounded revelatory on first release in 1978. Sadly, time has magnified its flaws; the Lenny Bruce-inspired “I Wanna Be Black” sounds like a bad idea today, and the murk of the album’s binaural mix isn’t especially flattering to anyone.

But the album’s best moments are genuinely exciting, and the title cut, a three-movement poetic tone poem about life on the New York streets, is one of the most audacious and deeply moving moments of Reed’s solo career. Raw, wounded, and unapologetically difficult, Street Hassle isn’t the masterpiece Reed was shooting for, but it’s still among the most powerful and compelling albums he released during the 1970s, and too personal and affecting to ignore. (allmusic.com)

The Blue Mask (1982)

01 – My House
02 – Women
03 – Underneath the Bottle
04 – Gun
05 – The Blue Mask
06 – Average Guy
07 – Heroine
08 – Waves of Fear
09 – Day John Kennedy Died
10 – Heavenly Arms
link

In 1982, 12 years after he left the Velvet Underground, Lou Reed released The Blue Mask, the first album where he lived up to the potential he displayed in the most groundbreaking of all American rock bands. The Blue Mask was Reed’s first album after he overcame a long-standing addiction to alcohol and drugs, and it reveals a renewed focus and dedication to craft — for the first time in years, Reed had written an entire album’s worth of moving, compelling songs, and was performing them with keen skill and genuine emotional commitment. Reed was also playing electric guitar again, and with the edgy genius he summoned up on White Light/White Heat.

Just as importantly, he brought Robert Quine on board as his second guitarist, giving Reed a worthy foil who at once brought great musical ideas to the table, and encouraged the bandleader to make the most of his own guitar work. (Reed also got superb support from his rhythm section, bassist extraordinaire Fernando Saunders and ace drummer Doane Perry).

As Reed stripped his band back to a muscular two-guitars/bass/drums format, he also shed the faux-decadent “Rock N Roll Animal” persona that had dominated his solo work and wrote clearly and fearlessly of his life, his thoughts, and his fears, performing the songs with supreme authority whether he was playing with quiet subtlety (such as the lovely “My House” or the unnerving “The Gun”) or cranked-to-ten fury (the paranoid “Waves of Fear” and the emotionally devastating title cut). Intelligent, passionate, literate, mature, and thoroughly heartfelt, The Blue Mask was everything Reed’s fans had been looking for in his work for years, and it’s vivid proof that for some rockers, life can begin on the far side of 35. (allmusic.com)

Legendary Hearts (1983)

01 – Legendary Hearts
02 – Don’t Talk to Me About Work
03 – Make Up Mind
04 – Martial Law
05 – The Last Shot
06 – Turn Out the Light
07 – Pow Wow
08 – Betrayed
09 – Bottoming Out
10 – Home of the Brave
11 – Rooftop Garden
link

If Legendary Hearts seemed like a disappointment in 1983, that was largely because the year before Lou Reed had released The Blue Mask, one of the finest albums of his career, and Legendary Hearts just wasn’t quite as good. But pull it off the shelf today, give it a listen, and Legendary Hearts easily shuts down nearly anything Reed released in the 1970s; if it’s a less obvious masterpiece than The Blue Mask, it makes clear that Reed was once again in firm command of his strengths, and making the most of them in the studio. Guitarist Robert Quine and bassist Fernando Saunders were both back on board from The Blue Mask, and they reaffirmed their status as the linchpins of the strongest band of Reed’s solo career, and drummer Fred Maher rocked harder (and with fewer frills) than Doane Perry.

The bracing cross-talk of Reed’s and Quine’s guitars had lost nothing in the year separating the two albums, and if Reed didn’t seem to be aiming quite as high as a songwriter this time out, most of the tracks were every bit as intelligent and soul-searching as The Blue Mask‘s lineup; if there were a few moments of comic relief, like “Don’t Talk to Me About Work” and “Pow Wow,” no one could argue that Reed hadn’t earned a few laughs after songs like “Make Up Mind,” “The Last Shot,” and “Betrayed.” On Legendary Hearts, Reed was writing great songs, playing them with enthusiasm and imagination, and singing them with all his heart and soul, and if it wasn’t his best album, it was more than good enough to confirm that the brilliance of The Blue Mask was no fluke, and that Reed had reestablished himself as one of the most important artists in American rock. (allmusic.com)

New York (1989)

01 – Romeo Had Juliette
02 – Halloween Parade (Aids)
03 – Dirty Blvd.
04 – Endless Cycle
05 – There Is No Time
06 – Last Great American Whale
07 – Beginning of a Great Adventure
08 – Busload of Faith
09 – Sick of You
10 – Hold On
11 – Good Evening Mr. Waldheim
12 – Xmas in February
13 – Strawman
14 – Dime Story Mystery [To Andy – Honey]

link

New York City figured so prominently in Lou Reed’s music for so long that it’s surprising it took him until 1989 to make an album simply called New York, a set of 14 scenes and sketches that represents the strongest, best-realized set of songs of Reed’s solo career. While Reed’s 1982 comeback, The Blue Mask, sometimes found him reaching for effects, New York‘s accumulated details and deft caricatures hit bull’s-eye after bull’s-eye for 57 minutes, and do so with an easy stride and striking lyrical facility.

New York also found Reed writing about the larger world rather than personal concerns for a change, and in the beautiful, decaying heart of New York City, he found plenty to talk about — the devastating impact of AIDS in “Halloween Parade,” the vicious circle of child abuse “Endless Cycle,” the plight of the homeless in “Xmas in February” — and even on the songs where he pointedly mounts a soapbox, Reed does so with an intelligence and smart-assed wit that makes him sound opinionated rather than preachy — like a New Yorker. And when Reed does look into his own life, it’s with humor and perception; “Beginning of a Great Adventure” is a hilarious meditation on the possibilities of parenthood, and “Dime Store Mystery” is a moving elegy to his former patron Andy Warhol.

Reed also unveiled a new band on this set, and while guitarist Mike Rathke didn’t challenge Reed the way Robert Quine did, Reed wasn’t needing much prodding to play at the peak of his form, and Ron Wasserman proved Reed’s superb taste in bass players had not failed him. Produced with subtle intelligence and a minimum of flash, New York is a masterpiece of literate, adult rock & roll, and the finest album of Reed’s solo career. (allmusic.com)

Songs for Drella (1990)

01 – Smalltown
02 – Open House
03 – Style It Takes
04 – Work
05 – Trouble With Classicists
06 – Starlight
07 – Faces and Names
08 – Images
09 – Slip Away (A Warning)
10 – It Wasn’t Me
11 – I Believe
12 – Nobody But You
13 – A Dream
14 – Forever Changed
15 – Hello It’s Me
link

John Cale, the co-founder of The Velvet Underground, left the group in 1968 after tensions between himself and Lou Reed became intolerable; neither had much charitable to say about one other after that, and they seemed to share only one significant area of agreement — they both maintained a great respect and admiration for Andy Warhol, the artist whose patronage of the group helped them reach their first significant audience.

So it was fitting that after Warhol’s death in 1987, Reed and Cale began working together for the first time since White Light/White Heat on a cycle of songs about the artist’s life and times. Starkly constructed around Cale’s keyboards, Reed’s guitar, and their voices, Songs for Drella is a performance piece about Andy Warhol, his rise to fame, and his troubled years in the limelight. Reed and Cale take turns on vocals, sometimes singing as the character of Andy and elsewhere offering their observations on the man they knew.

On a roll after New York, Reed’s songs are strong and pithy, and display a great feel for the character of Andy, and while Cale brought fewer tunes to the table, they’re all superb, especially “Style It Takes” and “A Dream,” a spoken word piece inspired by Warhol’s posthumously published diaries. If Songs for Drella seems modest from a musical standpoint, it’s likely neither Reed nor Cale wanted the music to distract from their story, and here they paint a portrait of Warhol that has far more depth and poignancy than his public image Identity-Issues would have led one to expect.

It’s a moving and deeply felt tribute to a misunderstood man, and it’s a pleasure to hear these two comrades-in-arms working together again, even if their renewed collaboration was destined to be short-lived. (allmusic.com)

Magic and Loss (1992)

01 – Dorita
02 – What’s Good
03 – Power and Glory
04 – Magician
05 – Sword of Damocles
06 – Goodby Mass
07 – Cremation
08 – Dreamin’
09 – No Chance
10 – Warrior King
11 – Harry’s Circumcision
12 – Gassed and Stoked
13 – Power and Glory, Pt. 2
14 – Magic and Loss

link

With 1982’s The Blue Mask, Lou Reed began approaching more mature and challenging themes in his music, and in 1992, Reed decided it was time to tackle the Most Serious Theme of All — Death. Reed lost two close friends to cancer within the space of a year, and the experience informed Magic and Loss, a set of 14 songs about loss, illness, and mortality.

It would have been easy for a project like this to sound morbid, but Reed avoids that; the emotions that dominate these songs are fear and helplessness in the face of a disease (and a fate) not fully understood, and Reed’s songs struggle to balance these anxieties with bravery, humor, and an understanding of the notion that death is an inevitable part of life — that you can’t have the magic without the loss.

It’s obvious that Reed worked on this material with great care, and Magic and Loss contains some of his most intelligent and emotionally intense work as a lyricist. However, Reed hits many of the same themes over and over again, and while Reed and his accompanists — guitarist Mike Rathke, bassist Rob Wasserman, and percussionist Michael Blair — approach the music with skill and impeccable chops, many of these songs are a bit samey; the album’s most memorable tunes are the ones that pull it out of its mid-tempo rut, like the grooving “What’s Good” and the guitar workout “Gassed and Stoked.”

Magic and Loss is an intensely heartfelt piece of music, possessing a taste and subtlety one might never have expected from Reed, but its good taste almost works against it; it’s a sincere bit of public mourning, but perhaps a more rousing wake might have been a more meaningful tribute to the departed. (allmusic.com)

Set the Twilight Reeling (1996)

01 – Egg Cream
02 – NYC Man
03 – Finish Line
04 – Trade In
05 – Hang on to Your Emotions
06 – Sex With Your Parents (Motherfucker), Pt. II [Live]
07 – Hookywooky
08 – The Proposition
09 – Adventurer
10 – Riptide
11 – Set the Twilight Reeling

link

After contemplating the decline of New York City, the passing of his mentor Andy Warhol Noteworthy-Art-Basel-Buys Mar-08 , his place in (perhaps) the greatest American rock band Harmonix-Profile of all time, and the very nature of life and death, in 1996 Lou Reed finally began to consider a really important subject — where to get a good chocolate egg cream.

“Egg Cream” kicked off Set the Twilight Reeling, and for many fans it was a kick to hear Reed cranking up his amps and having some fun again, but much of the rest of the album turned out not to be as lightweight as the opener would have led you to expect. On Set the Twilight Reeling, Reed is preoccupied with relationships, as he tries to figure if he wants a long-term commitment (“Trade In”), if he’s better off as a lone wolf (“NYC Man”), if he’s in love (“The Proposition”), or if he just wants to fool around (“Hookywooky”).

Reed rocks a lot harder here than on the two albums that preceded it (and plays plenty of great crunchy guitar), but much of the album is set in a mellow mid-tempo groove that’s casual and comfortable but not especially compelling. And while “Sex With Your Parents (Motherfucker), Pt. II” is an amusing attack on conservative politicians, his logic isn’t exactly clear.

Longtime fans are no doubt grateful that Reed’s relatively unfocused and unsubstantial albums these days are such a vast improvement over his fallow period in the 1970s, but for the most part Set the Twilight Reeling sounds like a standard issue 1990s Lou Reed album — smart, well-crafted, with plenty of guitar, but nothing terribly special, either. (allmusic.com)

Ecstasy (2000)

01 – Paranoia Key of E
02 – Mystic Child
03 – Mad
04 – Ecstasy
05 – Modern Dance
06 – Tatters
07 – Future Farmers of America
08 – Turning Time Around
09 – White Prism
10 – Rock Minuet
11 – Baton Rouge
12 – Like a Possum
13 – Rouge
14 – Big Sky

link

Never let it be said that Lou Reed has lost the ability to surprise his audience; who would have thought that at the age of 58, on his first album of the new millennium, Reed would offer us an 18-minute guitar distortion workout with lyrics abut kinky sex, dangerous drugs, and (here’s the surprise) imagining what it would be like to be a possum? For the most part, Ecstasy finds Reed obsessed with love and sex, though (as you might expect) his take on romance is hardly rosy (“Paranoia Key of E,” “Mad,” and “Tatters” all document a relationship at the point of collapse, while “Baton Rouge” is an eccentric but moving elegy for a love that didn’t last) and Eros is usually messy (“White Prism”), obsessive (“Ecstasy”), or unhealthy and perverse (“Rock Minuet”).

Reed genuinely seems to be stretching towards new lyrical and musical ground here, but while some of his experiments work, several pointedly do not, with the epic “Like a Possum” only the album’s most spectacular miscalculation. Still, Reed and producer Hal Wilner take some chances with the arrangements that pay off, particularly the subtle horn charts that dot several songs, and Reed’s superb rhythm section (Fernando Saunders on bass and Tony “Thunder” Smith on drums) gives these songs a rock-solid foundation for the leader’s guitar workouts.

As Reed and his band hit fifth gear on the album’s rousing closer, “Big Sky,” he once again proves that even his uneven works include a few songs you’ll certainly want to have in your collection — as long as they’re not about possums. (allmusic.com)

The Raven (2003)

01 – Overture
02 – Edgar Allan Poe
03 – Call On Me
04 – The Valley of Unrest
05 – A Thousand Departed Friends
06 – Change
07 – The Bed
08 – Perfect Day
09 – The Raven
10 – Balloon
11 – Broadway Song
12 – Blind Rage
13 – Burning Embers
14 – Vanishing Act
15 – Guilty
16 – I Wanna Know (The Pit and the Pendulum)
17 – Science of the Mind
18 – Hop Frog
19 – Tripitena’s Speech
20 – Who Am I (Tripitena’s Song)
21 – Guardian Angel

>download part1
>download part2

Edgar Allan Poe was a man who usually looked on the dark side of life, had more than a few less-than-healthy romantic and sexual obsessions, was known to dabble in dangerous drugs, and was fascinated with the possibilities of the English language, so it’s no wonder why Lou Reed regards Poe as a kindred spirit.

In his liner notes to the album The Raven, Reed touches on the parallels between their work when he writes, “I have reread and rewritten Poe to ask the same questions again. Who am I? Why am I drawn to do what I should not?…Why do we love what we cannot have? Why do we have a passion for exactly the wrong thing?” Reed’s obsession with Poe’s work found a creative outlet when visionary theatrical director Robert Wilson commissioned Reed to adapt Poe’s works to music for a production called POE-Try, and The Raven collects the material Reed wrote for this project, as well as a number of dramatic interpretations of Poe’s work, featuring performances by Willem Dafoe, Steve Buscemi, Elizabeth Ashley, Amanda Plummer, and others.

The limited-edition two-disc version of The Raven gives a nearly equal balance to words and music; while the single-disc edition is dominated by Reed’s songs, the double-disc set features a much greater number of spoken-word pieces, most of which have been filtered through Reed’s imagination, with a more intense focus on sex, drugs, and conflict as a result.

While the condensed version of The Raven sounds like one of the oddest and most audacious rock albums of recent memory, the complete edition feels more like a lengthy performance piece (albeit a rather unusual one), and while it lacks something in the way of a central narrative, the focus on the letter as well as the spirit of Poe’s work seems a great deal clearer here. The pitch of the acting is sometimes a bit sharp (especially Dafoe, who seems to be projecting to the last row of the balcony), but the con brio performances certainly suit the tenor of the material and Poe’s writing style. Musically, The Raven is all over the map, leaping from low-key acoustic pieces to full-bore, window-rattling rock & roll, with a number of stops along the way.

Reed also touches more than casually on his own past as well, with new recordings of “The Bed” and “Perfect Day” added to the sequence, and for a man not known for his ability to collaborate well, The Raven is jam-packed with guest artists, including David Bowie , the Five Blind Boys of Alabama, Kate and Anna McGarrigle, Ornette Coleman, and Laurie Anderson, all of whom are used to their best advantage.

The mix of ingredients on The Raven is heady, and the result is more than a little bizarre, but there’s no mistaking the fact that Reed’s heart and soul are in this music; even the most oddball moments bleed with passion and commitment, whether he’s handing the vocal mic over to Buscemi for a faux-lounge number, conjuring up brutal guitar distortion while his band wails behind him, or confronting his fears and desires with just a piano to guide him.

Truth to tell, Reed hasn’t sounded this committed and engaged on record since Magic and Loss over a decade before; The Raven reaches for more than it can grasp, especially in its two-hours-plus expanded edition, and is dotted with experiments that don’t work and ideas that don’t connect with their surroundings.

But the good stuff is strong enough that anyone who cares about Lou Reed’s body of work, or Edgar Allan Poe’s literary legacy, ought to give it a careful listen.

The edition contained herein, ladies and gentlemen, is the double disc version!

Big thanks to the original posters



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September 16, 2008 Posted by | David Bowie, John Cale, Lou Reed, Music_Alternative, Music_ClassicRock, Music_Punk, _MUSIC | 1 Comment

The Velvet Underground – Another View [1986]

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The Velvet Underground – Another View [1986]
Mp3@192
Released September, 1986
Recorded 1967–1969, New York City, United States
Genre Rock and roll
Length 36:21
Label Verve Records
Producer The Velvet Underground
This is basically VU, take 2! Nevertheless, cos it’s the Velvets, it’s a great comp!

This one is a must have for fans as it includes rarities and obscure tracks. Especially some unreleased stuff when the great John Cale was on board before being kicked out by Reed.

When The Velvet Underground moved from Verve Records (who had released their first two albums) to parent company MGM Records, they signed a two-album deal, releasing their third and eponymous album The Velvet Underground in March 1969.

Later that same year, however, there was a management change and MGM Records’ new CEO, Mike Curb, wanted to purge the record company of all acts he considered offensive to his moral standards. The Velvet Underground quickly became one of the groups blacklisted and were released from their contract.

The band had, however, in the meantime recorded fourteen tracks for possible release as their second MGM album. Shockingly, all of these were shelved and forgotten by their record company until the early Eighties.

As Verve (by then an imprint of Polygram) prepared to re-release the band’s three Verve/MGM albums on vinyl and, for the first time, on CD, they found nineteen previously unreleased tracks: five Cale-era tracks and the fourteen “lost album” tracks, some of them in two-track mixdown format, some of them even on multitracks.

The cream of the nineteen tracks was released in February of 1985 on VU; the rest remained for the time being in the vaults.

In 1986, Polydor decided to prepare a vinyl box set for European release. Simply titled The Velvet Underground, this box, which was released in June, consisted of the bands first three albums, VU, and an untitled bonus album containing the remaining nine tracks from Polygram’s vaults. That untitled album was later separately released on vinyl and CD as Another View.

Lou Reed, Sterling Morrison, John Cale,Nico, Maureen Tuckerphoto by David Horvitz and Adam Dower

Certain critics concluded that since the best ten tracks had gone on VU, Another View suffered somewhat in both quality and coherence – as well as suffering from the same lack of coherence as VU, in that the albums contain both Cale-era and Yule-era tracks.

Nevertheless, lighter and simpler as Another View may be, it contains some fine songs that show the transition from the subdued less-is-more The Velvet Underground style to the more mainstream-oriented rock of 1970’s Loaded.

An acetate-sourced alternate mix of this album’s version of “Ride Into The Sun”, featuring vocals by Lou Reed, has appeared on bootlegs and on the Australian boxed set What Goes On.

As The Velvet Underground moved from MGM to Atlantic, they re-recorded two of the songs on Another View, “Ride into the Sun” and “Rock and Roll”, for possible inclusion on Loaded. Only “Rock and Roll” made the grade, but two of the Another View songs would be recycled by Lou Reed during his early solo career: “Ride into the Sun” (on Lou Reed, 1972) and “We’re Gonna Have a Real Good Time Together” (on Street Hassle, 1978).

Drummer Maureen Tucker believes there is still one “lost” song recorded during these sessions that was not included on either VU or Another View, titled “Lonesome Cowboys”, which was based on an Andy Warhol film. (not to be confused with “Lonesome Cowboy Bill”, which was released on the Loaded album)

Tracklisting

Side A

1. “We’re Gonna Have a Real Good Time Together” – 2:56 (Reed)
* Recorded September 30, 1969
2. “I’m Gonna Move Right In” – 6:30
* Recorded September 27, 1969
3. “Hey Mr. Rain” (version 1) – 4:56
* Recorded May 29, 1968
4. “Ride into the Sun” – 3:20
* Recorded September 5, 1969
5. “Coney Island Steeplechase” – 2:20
* Recorded May 6, 1969

Side B

1. “Guess I’m Falling in Love” (instrumental version) – 3:35
* Recorded December 5, 1967
2. “Hey Mr. Rain” (version 2) – 5:16
* Recorded May 29, 1968
3. “Ferryboat Bill” – 2:10 (Reed, Morrison, Yule, Tucker)
* Recorded June 19, 1969
4. “Rock and Roll” (1969 version) – 5:18 (Reed)
* Recorded June 19, 1969

The band

* Lou Reed – vocals, guitar, piano
* Sterling Morrison – guitar, backing vocals, bass guitar on “Hey Mr. Rain”
* Maureen Tucker – percussion
* John Cale – viola, bass guitar (A3, B1-2)
* Doug Yule – bass guitar, keyboards, backing vocals (A1-2, A4-5, B3-4)

Here she be;

VelvetUndAnoView.rar

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Big thanks to crunchiedo

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September 4, 2008 Posted by | John Cale, Lou Reed, Mo Tucker, Music_Alternative, Music_ClassicRock, Sterling Morrison, The Velvet Underground, _MUSIC | 1 Comment

Nico sings Chelsea Girls in the Chelsea Hotel

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Shes turned another trick. Her treats and times revolves, she’s got problems.

A great VU-like track from Nico’s first post-Velvets solo album. A fine LP it is too which we’ve posted already.

Here’s a wonderful video clip where Nico performs a marvellous live version of Chelsea Girls in a room at the Chelsea Hotel. as well as talking about that place and that time.

Who else but Lou Reed could have written these lyrics!

The great music comes from his VU side-kick, Sterling Morrison.

Here’s room five four six
Its enough to make you sick
Bridget’s all wrapped up in foil
You wonder if
She can uncoil

Here they come now
See them run now
Here they come now
Chelsea girls

Here’s room one fifteen
Filled with SM queens
Magic marker row
You wonder just
How high they go

Here they come now
See them run now
Here they come now
Chelsea girls

Heres pope dear Ondine
Rona’s treated him so mean
She wants another scene
She wants to be
A human being

Here they come now
See them run now
Here they come now
Chelsea girls

Pepper, she’s having fun
She thinks shes some man’s son
Her perfect loves don’t last
Her future died
In someone’s past

Here they come now
See them run now
Here they come now
Chelsea girls

Dear Ingrid’s found her lick
Shes turned another trick
Her treats and times revolves
She’s got problems
To be solved

Here they come now
See them run now
Here they come now
Chelsea girls

Poor Mary, she’s uptight
She can’t turn out her light
She rolled Susan in a ball
And now she can’t
See her at all

Here they come now
See them run now
Here they come now
Chelsea girls

Drop out, she’s in a fix
Amphetamine has made her sick
White powder in the air
She’s got no bones
And can’t be scared

Here they come now
See them run now
Here they come now
Chelsea girls

Here comes Johnny Bore
He collapsed on the floor
They shut him up with milk
And when he died
Sold him for silk

Here they come now
See them run now
Here they come now
Chelsea girls

Here they come now
See them run now
Here they come now
Chelsea girls

(Lou Reed, Sterling Morrison)

Nico sings Chelsea Girls in the Chelsea Hotel

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August 28, 2008 Posted by | Lou Reed, Music_Alternative, Nico, Sterling Morrison, The Velvet Underground, _MUSIC, _POETRY, _VIDEO | Leave a comment

Lou Reed Discography

Some amazing Reed music here!

A few of em are stone cold classics!

All thanks to disc0volante


Transformer (1972)

01 – Vicious
02 – Andy’s Chest
03 – Perfect Day
04 – Hangin’ Round
05 – Walk On The Wild Side
06 – Make Up
07 – Satellite Of Love
08 – Wagon Wheel
09 – New York Telephone Conversation
10 – I’m So Free
11 – Goodnight Ladies
12 – Hangin’ Round (Acoustic Demo)
13 – Perfect Day (Acoustic Demo)

Grab her here!
MP3 / 81mb


Berlin (1973)

01 – Berlin
02 – Lady Day
03- Men Of Good Fortune
04 – Caroline Says
05 – How Do You Think It Feels
06 – Oh Jim
07 – Caroline Says II
08 – The Kids
09 – The Bed
10 – Sad Song

Grab her here!
MP3 / 72mb


Rock N Roll Animal (1974) (Live)

01 – Intro – Sweet Jane
02 – Heroin
03 – White Light – White Heat
04 – Lady Day
05 – Rock ‘N’ Roll

Grab her here!
MP3 / 73mb


Sally Can’t Dance (1974)

01 – Ride Sally Ride
02 – Animal Language
03 – Baby Face
04 – N. Y. Stars
05 – Kill Your Sons
06 – Ennui
07 – Sally Can’t Dance
08 – Billy
09 – Good Taste

Grab her here!
MP3 / 43mb


Coney Island Baby (1976)

01 – Crazy Feeling
02 – Charley’s Girl
03 – She’s My Best Friend
04 – Kicks
05 – A Gift
06 – Ooohhh Baby
07 – Nonody’s Business
08 – Coney Island Baby

Grab her here!
MP3 / 86mb


Rock and Roll Heart (1976)

01 – I Belive In Love
02 – Banging On My Drum
03 – Follow The Leader
04 – You Wear It So Well
05 – Ladies Pay
06 – Rock And Roll Heart
07 – Chooser And The Chosen One
08 – Senselessly Cruel
09 – Chain To Fame
10 – Vicious Circle
11 – A Sheltered Life
12 – Temporary Thing

Grab her here!
MP3 / 93mb


Street Hassle (1978)

01 – Gimmie Some Good Times
02 – Dirt
03 – Street Hassle
04 – I Wanna Be Black
05 – Real Good Time Together
06 – Shooting Star
07 – Leave Me Alone
08 – Wait

Grab her here!
MP3 / 88mb


The Blue Mask (1982)

01 – My House
02 – Women
03 – Underneath the Bottle
04 – Gun
05 – The Blue Mask
06 – Average Guy
07 – Heroine
08 – Waves of Fear
09 – Day John Kennedy Died
10 – Heavenly Arms

Grab her here!
MP3 / 61mb


Legendary Hearts (1983)

01 – Legendary Hearts
02 – Don’t Talk to Me About Work
03 – Make Up Mind
04 – Martial Law
05 – The Last Shot
06 – Turn Out the Light
07 – Pow Wow
08 – Betrayed
09 – Bottoming Out
10 – Home of the Brave
11 – Rooftop Garden

Grab her here!
MP3 / 56mb


New York (1989)

01 – Romeo Had Juliette
02 – Halloween Parade (Aids)
03 – Dirty Blvd.
04 – Endless Cycle
05 – There Is No Time
06 – Last Great American Whale
07 – Beginning of a Great Adventure
08 – Busload of Faith
09 – Sick of You
10 – Hold On
11 – Good Evening Mr. Waldheim
12 – Xmas in February
13 – Strawman
14 – Dime Story Mystery

Grab her here!
MP3 / 84mb


Songs for Drella (1990) (Con John Cale)

01 – Smalltown
02 – Open House
03 – Style It Takes
04 – Work
05 – Trouble With Classicists
06 – Starlight
07 – Faces and Names
08 – Images
09 – Slip Away (A Warning)
10 – It Wasn’t Me
11 – I Believe
12 – Nobody But You
13 – A Dream
14 – Forever Changed
15 – Hello It’s Me

Grab her here!
MP3 / 80mb


Magic and Loss (1992)

01 – Dorita
02 – What’s Good
03 – Power and Glory
04 – Magician
05 – Sword of Damocles
06 – Goodby Mass
07 – Cremation
08 – Dreamin’
09 – No Chance
10 – Warrior King
11 – Harry’s Circumcision
12 – Gassed and Stoked
13 – Power and Glory, Pt. 2
14 – Magic and Loss

Grab her here!
MP3 / 85mb


Set the Twilight Reeling (1996)

01 – Egg Cream
02 – NYC Man
03 – Finish Line
04 – Trade In
05 – Hang on to Your Emotions
06 – Sex With Your Parents (Motherfucker), Pt. II (Live)
07 – Hookywooky
08 – The Proposition
09 – Adventurer
10 – Riptide
11 – Set the Twilight Reeling

Grab her here!
MP3 / 74mb


Ecstasy (2000)

01 – Paranoia Key of E
02 – Mystic Child
03 – Mad
04 – Ecstasy
05 – Modern Dance
06 – Tatters
07 – Future Farmers of America
08 – Turning Time Around
09 – White Prism
10 – Rock Minuet
11 – Baton Rouge
12 – Like a Possum
13 – Rouge
14 – Big Sky

Grab her here!
MP3 / 75mb


The Raven (2003)

01 – Overture
02 – Edgar Allan Poe
03 – Call On Me
04 – The Valley of Unrest
05 – A Thousand Departed Friends
06 – Change
07 – The Bed
08 – Perfect Day
09 – The Raven
10 – Balloon
11 – Broadway Song
12 – Blind Rage
13 – Burning Embers
14 – Vanishing Act
15 – Guilty
16 – I Wanna Know (The Pit and the Pendulum)
17 – Science of the Mind
18 – Hop Frog
19 – Tripitena’s Speech
20 – Who Am I (Tripitena’s Song)
21 – Guardian Angel

Grab her here!
MP3 / 95mb

Big thanks to disc0volante

Mail us: stupidand@gmail.com

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July 23, 2008 Posted by | Lou Reed, Music_Alternative, Music_ClassicRock, Music_Experimental, _MUSIC | Leave a comment

Lou Reed & John Cale – Waiting for the Man – Bataclan ’72

I’m just lookin for a dear, dear friend of mine.
I’m waiting for my man.

A rare and fascinating video of Lou Reed and John Cale performing the VU classic, Waiting for My Man at the Bataclan in Paris in 1972.

An interesting version of this great track too. Much different emphasis and slower tempo than the original.

I always assumed that at that point, Cale was more likely to slit Reed’s throat than play live with him!

I’m waiting for my man
Twenty-six dollars in my hand
Up to Lexington, 125
Feel sick and dirty, more dead than alive
I’m waiting for my man

Hey, white boy, what you doin uptown?
Hey, white boy, you chasin our women around?
Oh pardon me sir, its the furthest from my mind
I’m just lookin for a dear, dear friend of mine
I’m waiting for my man

Here he comes, he’s all dressed in black
PR shoes and a big straw hat
He’s never early, he’s always late
First thing you learn is you always gotta wait
I’m waiting for my man

Up to a brownstone, up three flights of stairs
Everybody’s pinned you, but nobody cares
He’s got the works, gives you sweet taste
Ah then you gotta split because you got no time to waste
I’m waiting for my man

Baby don’t you holler, darlin don’t you bawl and shout
I’m feeling good, you know I’m gonna work it on out
I’m feeling good, I’m feeling oh so fine
Until tomorrow, but thats just some other time
I’m waiting for my man

Big thanks to the original poster

Mail us: stupidand@gmail.com

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June 15, 2008 Posted by | John Cale, Lou Reed, Music_Alternative, The Velvet Underground, _ART, _MUSIC, _POETRY, _VIDEO | Leave a comment

The Stone : Issue Three (April 2008) – Lou Reed, Laurie Anderson, John Zorn

The Stone : Issue Three (April 2008)
– Lou Reed, Laurie Anderson, John Zorn
A special concert to benefit The Stone by three legends of the New York Underground!

Indisputably one of the greatest and most influential musicians in Rock History, Lou Reed has been exploding and exploring new sounds since the mid sixties.

Always with a connection to the avant-garde, Lou here teams up with maverick composer/performer John Zorn for a series of improvisations and sound compositions that will surprise and startle even their hardcore fans.

With a special appearance by Laurie Anderson, aka Mrs Lou Reed, one of the most original voices of this or any other century, this is one of the most unusual and legendary meetings in the New Music scene.

Read more here;

Tracklisting

1 Part 1 (22:40)
2 Part 2 (13:04)
3 Part 3 (12:37)

Here be Lou and the missus and Zorny

May 21, 2008 Posted by | Laurie Anderson, Lou Reed, Music_Alternative, Music_Experimental, _MUSIC | 1 Comment

The Stone : Issue Three (April 2008) – Lou Reed, Laurie Anderson, John Zorn

The Stone : Issue Three (April 2008)
– Lou Reed, Laurie Anderson, John Zorn
A special concert to benefit The Stone by three legends of the New York Underground!

Indisputably one of the greatest and most influential musicians in Rock History, Lou Reed has been exploding and exploring new sounds since the mid sixties.

Always with a connection to the avant-garde, Lou here teams up with maverick composer/performer John Zorn for a series of improvisations and sound compositions that will surprise and startle even their hardcore fans.

With a special appearance by Laurie Anderson, aka Mrs Lou Reed, one of the most original voices of this or any other century, this is one of the most unusual and legendary meetings in the New Music scene.

Read more here;

Tracklisting

1 Part 1 (22:40)
2 Part 2 (13:04)
3 Part 3 (12:37)

Here be Lou and the missus and Zorny

May 21, 2008 Posted by | John Zorn, Laurie Anderson, Lou Reed, Music_Alternative, Music_Experimental, _MUSIC | Leave a comment

The Velvet Underground – First Album Test Acetate (1966 ) – RARE!

The Velvet Underground – 1st Album Test Acetate ( 1966 )

The Mystery Of The Velvet Underground’s “Real First Record”
(And How The Only Existing Copy Was Bought For 75 Cents!!)

Any VU fan would already know the score, but if you don’t the whole story of this record is set out below.

The acetate was so pricey because it’s thought to be the only surviving copy of the early version of The Velvet Undergrounds’ classic eponymous album.

The 1966 recording features nine alternative versions of Velvet Underground tracks and is thought to be part of the much reported lost Scepter Studio Recordings.

Arguably the rarest and most important rock’n’roll /art artefact in the world”. They claim that this is, in fact, the original version of the Velvets’ legendary first album The Velvet Underground and Nico, their proof being that producer Andy Warhol apparently sent it as the finished article to Columbia records – who responded to the depravity within with the words to the effect of “do you think we’re out of our fucking minds?”

Norman Dolph’s original acetate pressing of the Scepter Studios material contains several recordings that would make it onto the final album, though many are different mixes of those recordings and three are different takes entirely.

The acetate was pressed on April 25, 1966, shortly after the recording sessions. It would resurface decades later when it was bought by collector Warren Hill of Montreal, Canada in September 2002 at a flea market in the Chelsea neighborhood of New York City for $0.75.

Hill put the album up for auction on eBay in November 2006.

On December 8, 2006, a winning bid for $155,401 was placed, but not honoured. The album was again placed for auction on eBay and was successfully sold on December 16, 2006 for $25,200.

It is important to note that ten songs were recorded during the Scepter sessions and only nine appear on the acetate cut. Dolph recalls “There She Goes Again” being the missing song (and, indeed, the version of “There She Goes Again” that appears on the final LP is attributed to the Scepter Studios session).

Though rumours have circulated concerning an eventual official release of this version of the album, this has yet to be confirmed or announced by any major record label. However, a ripped version of the acetate began circulating the internet in January 2007. Bootleg versions of the acetate tracks have also become available on vinyl and CD.

Tracklisting

  1. “European Son” – 8:49†
  2. “The Black Angel’s Death Song” – 3:13†
  3. “All Tomorrow’s Parties” – 5:51†
  4. “I’ll Be Your Mirror” – 2:07†
  5. “Heroin” – 6:12‡
  6. “Femme Fatale” – 2:36†
  7. “Venus In Furs” – 4:35‡
  8. “I’m Waiting For The Man” – 4:11‡
  9. “Run Run Run” – 4:23†
† – denotes track as same take, but different mix from album version
‡ – denotes track as different take from album version
Here she be:

velvet_underground_acetate.rar.html

thanks thewickedthing

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stupidand@gmail.com


May 21, 2008 Posted by | John Cale, Lou Reed, Music_Alternative, The Velvet Underground, _MUSIC | 1 Comment

The Velvet Underground – Loaded (1970)

//ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41TBKNZK83L._SL500_AA240_.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.The Velvet Underground – Loaded (1970)

Although for me The Velvets were never really The Velvets after John Cale’s expulsion – more Lou Teed and his band – this one is pretty fucking good!

http://pictopia.com/perl/get_image?provider_id=33&size=550x550_mb&ptp_photo_id=437068While John Cale certainly gave the first couple of Velvet Underground albums a signature sound, his departure enabled Lou Reed to do exactly what he does best: write kick-ass, stripped-down rock songs.

On Loaded his talent comes to full fruition. Who can imagine a world without “Sweet Jane” and “Rock & Roll,” arguably two of the greatest rock tunes ever penned.

The brilliance of those songs is so bright, it’s easy to overlook a couple of other Reed masterpieces: the tender, epic discourse of “New Age” (which highlights his assured sense of poetic wordplay: “And when you kissed Robert Mitchum / Gee, but I thought you’d never catch him!”) and the extended sweet blues romp of “Oh! Sweet Nuthin’.”

On Loaded the Velvet Underground – who before had hit the sonic ceiling experimenting with shattered chords, feedback, screeching violas, and what Reed once claimed was “the fastest guitar playing ever” – eschew the dark side of noise for clarity.

Check out the ringing chime that begins “Who Loves the Sun” and the sterling (no pun intended) guitar riff that drives “Rock & Roll.”

This is not to say that the old ragged punch of the original Velvets is completely gone. Moe Tucker still beats a mean set of skins; there’s no stopping Sterling Morrison’s train-wreck rhythm guitar on “Train Round the Bend”; and “Head Held High” achieves near-“Sister Ray” moments of madness.


– Tod Nelson

Revered or despised by fans, I’m one of those who finds “Loaded” to be one of the masterpieces of its generation. Granted, Lou Reed abandoned all the things that made the old Velvet Underground what it was, but this is a good straightahead rock record, full of fantastic songwriting, sarcasm, and brilliance.

So what makes “Loaded” so good? Stunning songwriting ably supported by sympathetic musicians. Reed, at the height of his powers as a rock and roll composer pulled off at least two classic songs that have worked their way into the collective unconsciousness in “Sweet Jane” and “Rock and Roll”. These two pieces have been imitated so heavily and fiercely that they sound familiar the first time you hear them, and both of them have a little something, quite undefinable (Reed claims in the case of “Sweet Jane” that it’s the extra chord that quickly sweeps by in the progression, I think it’s an unnerving amount of passion in the vocal presonally) that makes them perfect.

The rest of the album doesn’t quite live up to them, but it’s full of superb songs, from the Beatlesque “Who Loves the Sun” to the sarcastic “New Age” and “Lonesome Cowboy Bill” to the the explosive “Held Held High” and the churning “Train Round the Bend”. There are no real low points on the record, it’s in fact all quite good. Highly recommended.

– Amazon reviewer

Tracklisting

1. Who Loves The Sun 2:45

2. Sweet Jane 4:09

3. Rock And Roll 4:45

4. Cool It Down 3:06

5. New Age 5:09

6. Head Held High 2:58

7. Lonesome Cowboy Bill 2:45

8. I Found A Reason 4:17

9. Train Round The Bend 3:22

10. Oh! Sweet Nuthin’ 7:29

Let’s get loaded mofos!

http://rapidshare.com/files/29…..t_1970.rar

Thanks to the original poster

http://stupidd.blogspot.com/

Mail us: stupidand@gmail.com

May 21, 2008 Posted by | Canon, Lou Reed, Music_Alternative, The Velvet Underground, _MUSIC | Leave a comment

Femme Fatale – Lou Reed

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Here she comes, you better watch your step
She’s going to break your heart in two, it’s true
It’s not hard to realize
Just look into her false colored eyes
She builds you up to just put you down, what a clown

‘Cause everybody knows, She’s a femme fatale
The things she does to please, She’s a femme fatale
She’s just a little tease, She’s a femme fatale
See the way she walks
Hear the way she talks

You’re written in her book
You’re number 37, have a look
She’s going to smile to make you frown, what a clown
Little boy, she’s from the street
Before you start, you’re already beat
She’s gonna play you for a fool, yes it’s true

‘Cause everybody knows, She’s a femme fatale
The things she does to please, She’s a femme fatale
She’s just a little tease, She’s a femme fatale
See the way she walks
Hear the way she talks

A beautiful and moody shot by streetQueen

May 3, 2008 Posted by | Lou Reed, streetQueen, The Velvet Underground, _PHOTOGRAPHY, _POETRY | Leave a comment

Lou Reed & Laurie Anderson – Hitched!

So Lou ties the knot with Laurie Anderson, at the sprightly age of 66!

Of course, he was wed before, in 1980, to Sylvia Morales. You really would expect people to learn more and not go through the horror of marriage any more than once! ( Oh! … Sorry honey! I don’t really mean that! Put the rolling pin down! Every day married to you is a dream (albeit a dark dream betimes!))

The electroconvulsive therapy Reed received in his teen years, allegedly in response to his homosexual behaviour (as referred to in his 1974 track “Kill Your Sons”), must’ve worked!

I’m totally convinced anyway!


Lou Reed Marries Partner Laurie Anderson In Secret Ceremony


http://www.gigwise.com/news.asp?contentid=42641

Lou Reed married his long term partner, Laurie Anderson, in a private ceremony in Colorado earlier this month, it’s been confirmed.

Lou Reed Marries Partner Laurie Anderson In Secret Ceremony

The couple tied the knot on April 12th but news of their marriage only became public as celebrations moved to New York this week.

Reed, formerly of Velvet Underground, and Anderson have been together since 1995, reports the Guardian.

Anderson, who is most famous for her performance art, has collaborated with Reed on a number of occasions, including, his 2003 concept project ‘The Raven’.

The couple’s private party, held at the home of photographer Timothy Greenfield-Sanders, was attended by a number of cultural icons, including, actors Richard Belzer and Hal Willner.

April 28, 2008 Posted by | Laurie Anderson, Lou Reed, _ARTICLE, _OTHER | Leave a comment

Lou Reed -A True Rock ‘n Roller (1996)



Lou Reed -A True Rock ‘n Roller (1996)
Mp3 – 128kbps

A great Reed bootleg with nuggets from his time in the Velvets – including two tracks from the legendary VU, The Gymnasium, April 1967 – his early solo work and some stuff recorded with the great Feelies in 1990.

Tracklisting

1. Wild Child
2. Walk And Talk It
3. Booker T
4. Run Run Run
5. Real Good Time Together
6. What Goes On
7. Sweet Jane
8. Run Run Run -European Son
9. I Can’t Stand It
10. Sister Ray
11. Oh Jim
12. Coney Island Baby
13. Guess I’m Falling In Love

Tracks 1 & 2: original studio mix for UK 45

Tracks 3 & 13: VU, The Gymnasium, April 1967

Track 4: The Velvet Underground, Hiltop Festival, 2/8/69

Tracks 5 to 8: with The Feelies, Babylon, Long Island, New York, 90

Track 9: The Velvet Underground, La Cave, 4/10/68

Track 10: The Velvet Underground,live at End Cole Ave, 19/10/69

Track 11: Copenhagen, Denmark, 19/9/73

Track 12: Adelaide, Australia, 28/7/75.

All titles composed by Lou Reed, except; “Booker T”, “Sister Ray”, “European Son” and “Guess I’m Falling In Love”, by Reed/Cale/Morrison/Tucker

Here’s Lou!

Link Badongo

Link Rapidshare (Mirror)

Link Megaupload (Mirror)

Thanks to blogstoned.blogspot


http://stupidd.blogspot.com/

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Mail us: stupidand@gmail.com

April 24, 2008 Posted by | Lou Reed, Music_Alternative, Music_ClassicRock, _MUSIC | Leave a comment

The Velvet Underground – The Very Best of the Velvet Underground


The Very Best of the Velvet Underground
(2006)

A great collection of 18 great Velevets tracks.

It’s always difficult to compile a Best Of VU, aside from subjectivity on individual tracks, the work is so consistently magnificent that you really need to listen to all their albums.

I personally much prefer the avant-garde edginess of the first two albums – The Velvet Underground & Nico and White Light/White Heat – when John Cale’s post-modern music sensibilities perfectly meshed with Reed’s poetry of the real.

This was sold as the definitive collection from one of the most influential bands of all time. Contains all their singles & album highlights. Featuring six tracks from their classic, seminal debut album, ‘The Velvet Underground & Nico’ (1967). 18 tracks in all packaged in a slipcase.


Thought of you as my mountain top,
Thought of you as my peak.
Thought of you as everything,
I’ve had but couldn’t keep.
I’ve had but couldn’t keep.
Linger on, your pale blue eyes.
Linger on, your pale blue eyes.
If I could make the world as pure
and strange as what I see,

I’d put you in the mirror,
I put in front of me.



Most fans of the VU are very dedicated and over-familiar with this legendary band’s classic albums. That means they may not like this non-chronological sequence of tracks. I find it a refreshing listening experience because it highlights the individual songs instead of the overall feel of those album masterpieces.

It’s great to hear Pale Blue Eyes after All Tomorrow’s Parties and to have it followed by Femme Fatale, it somehow seems right. Another refreshing sequence is the wistful Sunday Morning being followed by Rock `n Roll, which concludes the album.

Of course this collection excludes some familiar tracks like The Gift but it does include most of their most accessible numbers like Sweet Jane, Waiting For The Man Venus In Furs and the aforementioned Pale Blue Eyes. Plus the controversial and experimental White Light White Heat and the overwhelming Heroin. A good selection, in my book, that’s why I don’t hesitate to give it five stars.

– Amazon Reviewer

Tracklisting

01. Sweet Jane
02. I’m Sticking with You (1969 version)
03. I’m Waiting for the Man
04. What Goes On
05. White Light/White Heat
06. All Tomorrow’s Parties
07. Pale Blue Eyes
08. Femme Fatale
09. Heroin
10. Here She Comes Now
11. Stephanie Says
12. Venus in Furs
13. Beginning to See the Light
14. I Heard Her Call My Name
15. Some Kinda Love (alternate take)
16. I Can’t Stand It
17. Sunday Morning
18. Rock and Roll

Here be greatness;

http://lix.in/44d598

http://lix.in/e13d88

Thanks to the original poster

//myimg.info/thumbs/opt0447042001205737261x.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

stupidand@gmail.com

April 12, 2008 Posted by | John Cale, Lou Reed, Moe Tucker, Music_Alternative, Sterling Morrison, The Velvet Underground, _MUSIC | Leave a comment

Velvet Underground & Nico – Deluxe Edition

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Velvet Underground & Nico – Velvet Underground & Nico – Deluxe Edition

Extra Tracks
Original Recording Remastered

I’m not prone to hyperbole, but the Velvet Underground & Nico is surely one of the greatest albums ever made, or ever will be made, in the history of the universe!

I fucking love it to death, anyway!

This album has been hugely influential on countless great groups that came after.

What’s amazing is how fresh the album sounds. It seems to exist somewhere out of time.

This album was hugely innovative in terms of its musicality and edginess, primarily thanks to the avant-garde sensibilities of the great John Cale combined with Lou Reed’s wonderful, poetry of the streets, which called to mind great writers such as Huber Selby Jr (who I fucking love), Burroughs, Celine etc. Sterling Morrison and Moe tucker also contributed immensely to the power of the music.

Each song on this classic album is a masterpiece in its own right.

This is true art. Timeless art.

Up to a Brownstone, up three flights of stairs
Everybody’s pinned you, but nobody cares
He’s got the works, gives you sweet taste
Ah then you gotta split because you got no time to waste
I’m waiting for my man
Baby don’t you holler, darlin’ don’t you bawl and shout
I’m feeling good, you know I’m gonna work it on out
I’m feeling good, I’m feeling oh so fine
Until tomorrow, but that’s just some other time

The Velvet Underground and Nico was the debut album by The Velvets and vocal collaborator Nico, and was originally released in March 1967 by Verve Records.

//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/7/74/VU%26N_CD_comparison.JPG/150px-VU%26N_CD_comparison.JPG” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.In 2002, Universal released this two-disc “Deluxe Edition” set containing both stereo and mono mixes of the entire album, along with five songs taken from Nico’s Chelsea Girl (“Little Sister”, “Winter Song”, “It Was a Pleasure Then”, “Chelsea Girls”, and “Wrap Your Troubles in Dreams”) and single versions of “All Tomorrow’s Parties”, “I’ll Be Your Mirror”, “Sunday Morning”, and “Femme Fatale”. A limited edition release of the set featured a reproduction of the original cover’s peelable banana sticker.

Recorded in 1966 during Andy Warhol’s Exploding Plastic Inevitable multimedia event tour, The Velvet Underground and Nico would gain notoriety for its experimentalist performance sensibilites, as well as its focus on controversial subject matter in songs such as “Heroin”.

Though largely ignored upon its release, it has since become one of the most influential and critically lauded rock albums in history, appearing as #13 on Rolling Stone magazine’s list of the 500 greatest albums of all time as well as being added to the 2006 National Recording Registry by the Librarian of Congress.

I am tired, I am weary
I could sleep for a thousand years
A thousand dreams that would awake me
Different colors made of tears
Kiss the boot of shiny, shiny leather
Shiny leather in the dark
Tongue of thongs, the belt that does await you
Strike, dear mistress, and cure his heart
Severin, Severin, speak so slightly
Severin, down on your bended knee
Taste the whip, in love not given lightly
Taste the whip, now plead for me

The Velvet Underground and Nico was recorded with the first professional line up of The Velvet Underground, including Lou Reed, John Cale, Sterling Morrison and Maureen “Moe” Tucker; with Nico, who would occasionally sing lead with the band at the instigation of their mentor and manager, Andy Warhol.

//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/4/41/The_Velvet_Underground_and_Nico_back_cover.JPG” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.Nico sings lead on three of the album’s tracks (“Femme Fatale”, “All Tomorrow’s Parties” and “I’ll Be Your Mirror”) and back up on “Sunday Morning”.

In 1966, as the album was being recorded, this was also the line up that would perform live as a part of Warhol’s Exploding Plastic Inevitable.

The bulk of the songs that would become The Velvet Underground and Nico were recorded in mid-April, 1966, during a four-day stint at Scepter Studios, a decrepit recording studio in New York City. This recording session was financed by Warhol and Columbia Records’ sales executive Norman Dolph, who also acted as an engineer with John Licata. Though exact total cost of the project is unknown, estimates vary from $1500 to $3000.

There is some confusion as to who actually produced The Velvet Underground and Nico. Although Andy Warhol was the only formally credited producer, he had very little direct influence or authority over the album beyond paying for the recording sessions. In fact, several other individuals who worked on the album are often mentioned as the album’s technical producer.

Lou Reed discussed the matter in an interview:

He just made it possible for us to be ourselves and go right ahead with it because he was Andy Warhol. In a sense, he really did produce it, because he was this umbrella that absorbed all the attacks when we weren’t large enough to be attacked… and as a consequence of him being the producer, we’d just walk in and set up and do what we always did and no one would stop it because Andy was the producer.
Of course he didn’t know anything about record production—but he didn’t have to. He just sat there and said “Oooh, that’s fantastic,” and the engineer would say, “Oh yeah! Right! It is fantastic, isn’t it?
I’ll be your mirror
Reflect what you are, in case you don’t know
I’ll be the wind, the rain and the sunset
The light on your door to show that you’re home
When you think the night has seen your mind
That inside you’re twisted and unkind
Let me stand to show that you are blind
Please put down your hands
‘Cause I see you
I find it hard to believe you don’t know
the beauty you are


The Velvet Underground and Nico is sometimes referred to as the “banana album” as it features a Warhol print of a banana on the cover. Early copies of the album invited the owner to “Peel slowly and see”; peeling back the banana skin revealed a flesh-colored banana underneath.

A special machine was needed to manufacture these covers (one of the causes of the album’s delayed release), but MGM paid for costs figuring that any ties to Warhol would boost sales of the album.

When the Velvets recorded this debut, they were best known as the protégés of Andy Warhol (who of course designed the sleeve), and as a grating, combustive live band.

Fuelled by drummer Moe Tucker’s no-nonsense wham and John Cale’s howling viola, some of the straight-up rock & roll and arty noise extravaganzas here bear that out.

But before Lou Reed was singing about sadomasochism and drug deals and writing lyrics inspired by his favorite poets, he was a pop songwriter, and this album has some of his prettiest tunes, mostly sung by Nico, the German dark angel who appeared with the band only this disc.

Even the sordid rockers are underscored by graceful pop tricks, like the two-chord flutter at the center of the classic “Heroin.”

– Amazon

Reviews

Tracklisting

Disc: 1

1. Sunday Morning
2. I’m Waiting For The Man
3. Femme Fatale
4. Venus In Furs
5. Run Run Run
6. All Tomorrow’s Parties
7. Heroin
8. There She Goes Again
9. I’ll Be Your Mirror
10. The Black Angel’s Death Song
11. European Son
12. Little Sister
13. Winter Song
14. It Was A Pleasure Then
15. Chelsea Girls
16. Wrap Your Troubles In Dreams

Disc: 2

1. Sunday Morning
2. I’m Waiting For The Man
3. Femme Fatale
4. Venus In Furs
5. Run Run Run
6. All Tomorrow’s Parties
7. Heroin
8. There She Goes Again
9. I’ll Be Your Mirror
10. The Black Angel’s Death Song
11. European Son
12. All Tomorrow’s Parties
13. I’ll Be Your Mirror (Mono)
14. Sunday Morning
15. Femme Fatale (Mono)

//ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/31ZNZFP3GNL._SL500_AA240_.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.Here be beauty;

no pass

You have to dl the 2 separate files

Mirror
VU1_.rar
VU2_.rar

pw for MIRROR= posted_first_at_chocoreve

//myimg.info/thumbs/opt0447042001205737261x.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

stupidand@gmail.com


April 12, 2008 Posted by | John Cale, Lou Reed, Moe Tucker, Music_Alternative, Nicolas Hodge, Sterling Morrison, The Velvet Underground, _MUSIC | 4 Comments

Lou Reed – Live: Take No Prisoners (Japan MiniLP)

Lou Reed – Live: Take No Prisoners (Japan MiniLP)

Original LP release: 1978
This CD released: 2006-09-20
Label: BMG Japan / Arista
Catalog #: BVCM-37746/47


Lineage:

EAC Secure Rip (test & copy) > FLAC
Mp3’s are encoded using All2Lame @ preset V0 VBR

Some classic Reed recorded live at The Bottom Line in NYC (where else!) by Record Plant Mobile over the nights 17 – 21 May 1978.

Here Lou and a top band blast off a slew of true classics with loads of typically acerbic comedic Reed new-yawwk banter in between!

I notice that in the band is one Moose Bowles. Isn’t that some sort of serious gastro-intestinal ailment?!

Info here: http://www.minilps.net/japan-m…..ml#content

“I do Lou Reed better than anybody ….. so I thought I’d get in on it,”

Recorded during a week of shows at New York’s Bottom Line in 1978, Live: Take No Prisoners presents Lou Reed the Standup Comic, doing schtick on Patti Smith (“F*ck Radio Ethiopia, man! I’m Radio Brooklyn!”), political activism (“Give me an issue, I’ll give you a tissue, and you can wipe my ass with it”), and the agony of playing “Walk on the Wild Side” (“It’s not that I don’t want to play your favorites, but there are so many favorites to choose from!”) while occasionally pausing to play a song.

As a comic, Lou is no Lenny Bruce or Bill Hicks, but he’s funny by fits and starts (and he plays guitar better than either of them). On the odd moments when Lou is focused enough to actually perform a song from start to finish (such as “Pale Blue Eyes” or “Coney Island Baby”), he’s in fine form, sounding loose but enthusiastic, but those moments don’t happen especially often, and this album plows through a mere ten songs in close to 100 minutes, which gives you an idea of just how far he stretches out here.

If you’re a fan who wants a look into the mind of Lou Reed, comic or otherwise, Live: Take No Prisoners certainly fills the bill, but if you want to hear Lou actually play his music, you’re better off with Rock N Roll Animal or Live in Italy. But then again, as Lou himself points out, “What’s wrong with cheap dirty jokes? I never said I was tasteful.”

AMG review by Mark Deming

Tracklisting

Disc 1:

1. Sweet Jane [10:45]
2. I Wanna Be Black [6:28]
3. Satellite of Love [7:07]
4. Pale Blue Eyes [7:37]
5. Berlin [6:14]
6. I’m Waiting For My Man [14:00]

Disc 2:

1. Coney Island Baby [8:39]
2. Street Hassle [13:16]
3. Walk on the Wild Side [16:54]
4. Leave Me Alone [7:30]

The Band:

Lou Reed – Guitar, Roland Guitar Synthesizer, Vocals
Marty Fogel – Electric Saxophone

Michael Fonfara – Yamaha Electric Piano
Stuart Heinrich – Guitar, Vocals
Ellard “Moose” Bowles – Bass, Vocals
Michael Suchorsky – Drums
Angela Howell – Vocals, Tambourine
Chrissy Faith – Vocals

Mickel’s kindly uploaded this both as MP3 and FLAC. The Flac is uploaded to his own serverspace and the Mp3 to RS.

Occassionally the speed when downloading from the serverspace is somewhat crappy. If you can’t get the file fast enough please use FlashGet or some other download manager/accelerator.

FLAC (662MB)


Mp3 (197MB)

pass = mickel

All Thanks to Mickel !!

The image “https://i0.wp.com/myimg.info/thumbs/opt0447042001205737261x.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

March 25, 2008 Posted by | Lou Reed, Music_Alternative, _MUSIC | Leave a comment

Lou Reed – Live: Take No Prisoners (Japan MiniLP)

Lou Reed – Live: Take No Prisoners (Japan MiniLP)

Original LP release: 1978
This CD released: 2006-09-20
Label: BMG Japan / Arista
Catalog #: BVCM-37746/47


Lineage:

EAC Secure Rip (test & copy) > FLAC
Mp3’s are encoded using All2Lame @ preset V0 VBR

Some classic Reed recorded live at The Bottom Line in NYC (where else!) by Record Plant Mobile over the nights 17 – 21 May 1978.

Here Lou and a top band blast off a slew of true classics with loads of typically acerbic comedic Reed new-yawwk banter in between!

I notice that in the band is one Moose Bowles. Isn’t that some sort of serious gastro-intestinal ailment?!

Info here: http://www.minilps.net/japan-m…..ml#content

“I do Lou Reed better than anybody ….. so I thought I’d get in on it,”

Recorded during a week of shows at New York’s Bottom Line in 1978, Live: Take No Prisoners presents Lou Reed the Standup Comic, doing schtick on Patti Smith (“F*ck Radio Ethiopia, man! I’m Radio Brooklyn!”), political activism (“Give me an issue, I’ll give you a tissue, and you can wipe my ass with it”), and the agony of playing “Walk on the Wild Side” (“It’s not that I don’t want to play your favorites, but there are so many favorites to choose from!”) while occasionally pausing to play a song.

As a comic, Lou is no Lenny Bruce or Bill Hicks, but he’s funny by fits and starts (and he plays guitar better than either of them). On the odd moments when Lou is focused enough to actually perform a song from start to finish (such as “Pale Blue Eyes” or “Coney Island Baby”), he’s in fine form, sounding loose but enthusiastic, but those moments don’t happen especially often, and this album plows through a mere ten songs in close to 100 minutes, which gives you an idea of just how far he stretches out here.

If you’re a fan who wants a look into the mind of Lou Reed, comic or otherwise, Live: Take No Prisoners certainly fills the bill, but if you want to hear Lou actually play his music, you’re better off with Rock N Roll Animal or Live in Italy. But then again, as Lou himself points out, “What’s wrong with cheap dirty jokes? I never said I was tasteful.”

AMG review by Mark Deming

Tracklisting

Disc 1:

1. Sweet Jane [10:45]
2. I Wanna Be Black [6:28]
3. Satellite of Love [7:07]
4. Pale Blue Eyes [7:37]
5. Berlin [6:14]
6. I’m Waiting For My Man [14:00]

Disc 2:

1. Coney Island Baby [8:39]
2. Street Hassle [13:16]
3. Walk on the Wild Side [16:54]
4. Leave Me Alone [7:30]

The Band:

Lou Reed – Guitar, Roland Guitar Synthesizer, Vocals
Marty Fogel – Electric Saxophone

Michael Fonfara – Yamaha Electric Piano
Stuart Heinrich – Guitar, Vocals
Ellard “Moose” Bowles – Bass, Vocals
Michael Suchorsky – Drums
Angela Howell – Vocals, Tambourine
Chrissy Faith – Vocals

Mickel’s kindly uploaded this both as MP3 and FLAC. The Flac is uploaded to his own serverspace and the Mp3 to RS.

Occassionally the speed when downloading from the serverspace is somewhat crappy. If you can’t get the file fast enough please use FlashGet or some other download manager/accelerator.

FLAC (662MB)


Mp3 (197MB)

pass = mickel

All Thanks to Mickel !!

//myimg.info/thumbs/opt0447042001205737261x.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

March 25, 2008 Posted by | Lou Reed, Music_Alternative, _MUSIC | Leave a comment