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The Fire of the Mind Agitates the Atmosphere – Louis Wain

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THE FIRE OF THE MIND AGITATES THE ATMOSPHERE
– LOUIS WAIN (1860-1939)

February 27, 2008 Posted by | Louis Wain, _ART | Leave a comment

The Fire of the Mind Agitates the Atmosphere – Louis Wain

The image “https://i2.wp.com/upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/4/4c/Wain_Cats_--_The_Fire_of_the_Mind_Agitates_the_Atmosphere.jpg/455px-Wain_Cats_--_The_Fire_of_the_Mind_Agitates_the_Atmosphere.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

THE FIRE OF THE MIND AGITATES THE ATMOSPHERE
– LOUIS WAIN (1860-1939)

February 27, 2008 Posted by | Louis Wain, _ART | Leave a comment

The Fire of the Mind Agitates the Atmosphere – Louis Wain

The image “https://i2.wp.com/upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/4/4c/Wain_Cats_--_The_Fire_of_the_Mind_Agitates_the_Atmosphere.jpg/455px-Wain_Cats_--_The_Fire_of_the_Mind_Agitates_the_Atmosphere.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

THE FIRE OF THE MIND AGITATES THE ATMOSPHERE
– LOUIS WAIN (1860-1939)

February 27, 2008 Posted by | Louis Wain, _ART | Leave a comment

One Eye On You – Louis Wain (1860-1939)

LOUIS WAIN - ONE EYE ON YOU

ONE EYE ON YOULOUIS WAIN (1860-1939)

Louis Wain (1860-1939) was an English artist of the Victorian Era, best known for his drawings, which consistently featured anthropomorphised large-eyed cats and kittens. In his later years he suffered from schizophrenia, which, according to some psychologists, can be seen in his works.

Louis was the first of six children, and the only male child. None of his five sisters ever married. At the age of thirty, his youngest sister was certified as insane, and admitted to an asylum. The remaining sisters lived with their mother for the duration of their lifetimes, as did Louis for the majority of his life.

//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/ad/Louis_Wain_at_his_drawing_table_1890.png/250px-Louis_Wain_at_his_drawing_table_1890.png” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.Wain, in his mid twenties, began to specialise in odd pictures of cats and his work in time became quite popular.

Wain was a prolific artist over the next thirty years, sometimes producing as many as several hundred drawings a year. He illustrated about one hundred children’s books, and his work appeared in papers, journals, and magazines, including the Louis Wain Annual, which ran from 1901 to 1915. His work was also regularly reproduced on picture postcards, and these are highly sought after by collectors today.

Wain never made a significant amount of money, however. He was responsible for supporting his mother and sisters, and had little business sense. Wain was modest and easily exploited, ill-equipped for bargaining in the world of publishing. He often sold his drawings outright, retaining no rights over their reproduction. He was easily misled, and occasionally found himself duped by the promise of a new invention or other money-making scheme. After a trip to New York in 1907 in which his work was widely admired, he returned with even less money than before due to imprudent investment.

In his late forties, things took a severe turn for the worse both financially and personally. As well as Wain’s popularity beginning to decline, severe mental instability also began around this time, and increased gradually over the years.

He had always been considered quite charming but odd, and often had difficulty in distinguishing between fact and fantasy. Others frequently found him incomprehensible, his mode of speaking tangential.

His behaviour and personality changed, and he began to suffer from delusions, with the onset of schizophrenia.

The supreme irony is that this schizophrenia was, according to some experts, precipitated by toxoplasmosis, a parasitic infection that can be contracted from cats.

Whereas he had been a mild-mannered and trusting man, Wain became hostile and suspicious, particularly towards his sisters. He began wandering the streets at night and spent long periods locked in his room writing incoherently. When his sisters could no longer cope with his erratic and occasionally violent behavior, he was finally committed in 1924 to a pauper ward of Springfield Mental Hospital.

There’s certainly a manic feel to many of his pieces and often a similar feeling to what you get when looking at Van Gogh’s Arles works. But there’s a playfulness too in much of his work and a large slice of post-modernism well before the phrase was invented.

Wain’s works are highly sought after by collectors today. He had a tortured life. Too bad his deserved rewards came much much too late (unless he’s reincarnated now as a cat himself in a luxury palace!!)

February 27, 2008 Posted by | Louis Wain, _ART | Leave a comment

One Eye On You – Louis Wain (1860-1939)

LOUIS WAIN - ONE EYE ON YOU

ONE EYE ON YOULOUIS WAIN (1860-1939)

Louis Wain (1860-1939) was an English artist of the Victorian Era, best known for his drawings, which consistently featured anthropomorphised large-eyed cats and kittens. In his later years he suffered from schizophrenia, which, according to some psychologists, can be seen in his works.

Louis was the first of six children, and the only male child. None of his five sisters ever married. At the age of thirty, his youngest sister was certified as insane, and admitted to an asylum. The remaining sisters lived with their mother for the duration of their lifetimes, as did Louis for the majority of his life.

The image “https://i0.wp.com/upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/ad/Louis_Wain_at_his_drawing_table_1890.png/250px-Louis_Wain_at_his_drawing_table_1890.png” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.Wain, in his mid twenties, began to specialise in odd pictures of cats and his work in time became quite popular.

Wain was a prolific artist over the next thirty years, sometimes producing as many as several hundred drawings a year. He illustrated about one hundred children’s books, and his work appeared in papers, journals, and magazines, including the Louis Wain Annual, which ran from 1901 to 1915. His work was also regularly reproduced on picture postcards, and these are highly sought after by collectors today.

Wain never made a significant amount of money, however. He was responsible for supporting his mother and sisters, and had little business sense. Wain was modest and easily exploited, ill-equipped for bargaining in the world of publishing. He often sold his drawings outright, retaining no rights over their reproduction. He was easily misled, and occasionally found himself duped by the promise of a new invention or other money-making scheme. After a trip to New York in 1907 in which his work was widely admired, he returned with even less money than before due to imprudent investment.

In his late forties, things took a severe turn for the worse both financially and personally. As well as Wain’s popularity beginning to decline, severe mental instability also began around this time, and increased gradually over the years.

He had always been considered quite charming but odd, and often had difficulty in distinguishing between fact and fantasy. Others frequently found him incomprehensible, his mode of speaking tangential.

His behaviour and personality changed, and he began to suffer from delusions, with the onset of schizophrenia.

The supreme irony is that this schizophrenia was, according to some experts, precipitated by toxoplasmosis, a parasitic infection that can be contracted from cats.

Whereas he had been a mild-mannered and trusting man, Wain became hostile and suspicious, particularly towards his sisters. He began wandering the streets at night and spent long periods locked in his room writing incoherently. When his sisters could no longer cope with his erratic and occasionally violent behavior, he was finally committed in 1924 to a pauper ward of Springfield Mental Hospital.

There’s certainly a manic feel to many of his pieces and often a similar feeling to what you get when looking at Van Gogh’s Arles works. But there’s a playfulness too in much of his work and a large slice of post-modernism well before the phrase was invented.

Wain’s works are highly sought after by collectors today. He had a tortured life. Too bad his deserved rewards came much much too late (unless he’s reincarnated now as a cat himself in a luxury palace!!)

February 27, 2008 Posted by | Louis Wain, _ART | Leave a comment

One Eye On You – Louis Wain (1860-1939)

LOUIS WAIN - ONE EYE ON YOU

ONE EYE ON YOULOUIS WAIN (1860-1939)

Louis Wain (1860-1939) was an English artist of the Victorian Era, best known for his drawings, which consistently featured anthropomorphised large-eyed cats and kittens. In his later years he suffered from schizophrenia, which, according to some psychologists, can be seen in his works.

Louis was the first of six children, and the only male child. None of his five sisters ever married. At the age of thirty, his youngest sister was certified as insane, and admitted to an asylum. The remaining sisters lived with their mother for the duration of their lifetimes, as did Louis for the majority of his life.

The image “https://i0.wp.com/upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/ad/Louis_Wain_at_his_drawing_table_1890.png/250px-Louis_Wain_at_his_drawing_table_1890.png” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.Wain, in his mid twenties, began to specialise in odd pictures of cats and his work in time became quite popular.

Wain was a prolific artist over the next thirty years, sometimes producing as many as several hundred drawings a year. He illustrated about one hundred children’s books, and his work appeared in papers, journals, and magazines, including the Louis Wain Annual, which ran from 1901 to 1915. His work was also regularly reproduced on picture postcards, and these are highly sought after by collectors today.

Wain never made a significant amount of money, however. He was responsible for supporting his mother and sisters, and had little business sense. Wain was modest and easily exploited, ill-equipped for bargaining in the world of publishing. He often sold his drawings outright, retaining no rights over their reproduction. He was easily misled, and occasionally found himself duped by the promise of a new invention or other money-making scheme. After a trip to New York in 1907 in which his work was widely admired, he returned with even less money than before due to imprudent investment.

In his late forties, things took a severe turn for the worse both financially and personally. As well as Wain’s popularity beginning to decline, severe mental instability also began around this time, and increased gradually over the years.

He had always been considered quite charming but odd, and often had difficulty in distinguishing between fact and fantasy. Others frequently found him incomprehensible, his mode of speaking tangential.

His behaviour and personality changed, and he began to suffer from delusions, with the onset of schizophrenia.

The supreme irony is that this schizophrenia was, according to some experts, precipitated by toxoplasmosis, a parasitic infection that can be contracted from cats.

Whereas he had been a mild-mannered and trusting man, Wain became hostile and suspicious, particularly towards his sisters. He began wandering the streets at night and spent long periods locked in his room writing incoherently. When his sisters could no longer cope with his erratic and occasionally violent behavior, he was finally committed in 1924 to a pauper ward of Springfield Mental Hospital.

There’s certainly a manic feel to many of his pieces and often a similar feeling to what you get when looking at Van Gogh’s Arles works. But there’s a playfulness too in much of his work and a large slice of post-modernism well before the phrase was invented.

Wain’s works are highly sought after by collectors today. He had a tortured life. Too bad his deserved rewards came much much too late (unless he’s reincarnated now as a cat himself in a luxury palace!!)

February 27, 2008 Posted by | Louis Wain, _ART | Leave a comment