STUPID and Contagious

Our holiday home from stupidd.blogspot.com !

Good Fella

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May 29, 2008 Posted by | Martin Scorcese, OTHER_CINEMA, Robert DeNiro, _CARTOON, _OTHER | Leave a comment

The Rolling Stones – Shine A Light (Flac )

The Rolling Stones – Shine a Light OST (2008)
Flac | 731 Mb | Rock

‘Shine A Light’ is the third official live album to released by the Rolling Stones and serves as the soundtrack to Martin Scorsese’s documentary of the same name.

Recorded in the Autumn of 2006 at New York’s Beacon Theatre over two nights, the album features a selection of live favourites taken from the band’s huge catalogue of work.

Included are guest appearances from The White Stripes’ Jack White, legendary blues guitarist Buddy Guy and American pop singer Christina Aguilera. (Aguilera?WTF? Guess I’ll be deleting that track straight away!)

Some real classics in here, rattled off magnificently by Keef and the boys. There’s also a great supporting band and wonderful backing singers.

The Stones have been touring for almost 1,000 years now, so their live shows are honed down to perfection at this stage!

Tracklisting


Disc 1

01 – Jumpin’ Jack Flash
02 – Shattered
03 – All Down The Line
04 – Loving Cup (With Jack White)
05 – As Tears Go By
06 – Some Girls
07 – Just My Imagination
08 – Far Away Eyes
09 – Champagne & Reefer (With Buddy Guy)
10 – Tumbling Dice
11 – Band Introductions
12 – You Got The Silver
13 – Connection

https://i1.wp.com/images.businessweek.com/ss/06/12/1229_rocktours/image/intro.jpg


Disc 2

01 – Martin Scorese Intro
02 – Sympathy For The Devil
03 – Live With Me (With Christina Aguilera)
04 – She Was Hot
05 – Start Me Up
06 – Brown Sugar
07 – (I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction
08 – Paint It Black
09 – Little T&A
10 – I’m Free
11 – Shine A Light

Here be some stones that roll and catch no kate moss;

http://rapidshare.com/files/116096236/disc_1.part1.rar

http://rapidshare.com/files/116095536/disc_1.part2.rar

http://rapidshare.com/files/116097241/disc_1.part3.rar

http://rapidshare.com/files/116097190/disc_1.part4.rar

http://rapidshare.com/files/116159332/disc_2.part1.rar

http://rapidshare.com/files/116159381/disc_2.part2.rar

http://rapidshare.com/files/116159397/disc_2.part3.rar

http://rapidshare.com/files/116153850/disc_2.part4.rar

Thanks to the original poster

http://stupidd.blogspot.com/

Mail us: stupidand@gmail.com

May 20, 2008 Posted by | Buddy Guy, Jack White, Martin Scorcese, Music_ClassicRock, Music_OST, Rolling Stones, _MUSIC | Leave a comment

The Rolling Stones – Shine A Light (Flac )

The Rolling Stones – Shine a Light OST (2008)
Flac | 731 Mb | Rock

‘Shine A Light’ is the third official live album to released by the Rolling Stones and serves as the soundtrack to Martin Scorsese’s documentary of the same name.

Recorded in the Autumn of 2006 at New York’s Beacon Theatre over two nights, the album features a selection of live favourites taken from the band’s huge catalogue of work.

Included are guest appearances from The White Stripes’ Jack White, legendary blues guitarist Buddy Guy and American pop singer Christina Aguilera. (Aguilera?WTF? Guess I’ll be deleting that track straight away!)

Some real classics in here, rattled off magnificently by Keef and the boys. There’s also a great supporting band and wonderful backing singers.

The Stones have been touring for almost 1,000 years now, so their live shows are honed down to perfection at this stage!

Tracklisting


Disc 1

01 – Jumpin’ Jack Flash
02 – Shattered
03 – All Down The Line
04 – Loving Cup (With Jack White)
05 – As Tears Go By
06 – Some Girls
07 – Just My Imagination
08 – Far Away Eyes
09 – Champagne & Reefer (With Buddy Guy)
10 – Tumbling Dice
11 – Band Introductions
12 – You Got The Silver
13 – Connection

https://i1.wp.com/images.businessweek.com/ss/06/12/1229_rocktours/image/intro.jpg


Disc 2

01 – Martin Scorese Intro
02 – Sympathy For The Devil
03 – Live With Me (With Christina Aguilera)
04 – She Was Hot
05 – Start Me Up
06 – Brown Sugar
07 – (I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction
08 – Paint It Black
09 – Little T&A
10 – I’m Free
11 – Shine A Light

Here be some stones that roll and catch no kate moss;

http://rapidshare.com/files/116096236/disc_1.part1.rar

http://rapidshare.com/files/116095536/disc_1.part2.rar

http://rapidshare.com/files/116097241/disc_1.part3.rar

http://rapidshare.com/files/116097190/disc_1.part4.rar

http://rapidshare.com/files/116159332/disc_2.part1.rar

http://rapidshare.com/files/116159381/disc_2.part2.rar

http://rapidshare.com/files/116159397/disc_2.part3.rar

http://rapidshare.com/files/116153850/disc_2.part4.rar

Thanks to the original poster

http://stupidd.blogspot.com/

Mail us: stupidand@gmail.com

May 20, 2008 Posted by | Buddy Guy, Jack White, Martin Scorcese, Music_ClassicRock, Music_OST, Rolling Stones, _MUSIC | Leave a comment

Gravure Idol Mikie Hara & the Mean Streets Mook riddle explained !

Relax. Mikie Hara is not some simian Irish G.A.A. hurling star from Connemara!

No, Mikie is actually a gorgeous Japland Gravure Star and actress.

She just loves to kneel, wearing only striped underwear, in old cars!

Mickie, I’ve got a lovely old car here. It’s perfect for you! You can kneel here all day!

I notice that Mikie has appeared in a number of mooks!

What? As in … “… Mook? … I’ll give you mook! ” ?

I’d always wondered what that term in the seminal “Abbot & Costello” type pool-hall scene in Mean Streets meant!

– We don’t pay mooks.

– A mook? I’m a mook?

– Yeah.

– What’s a mook? …… What’s a mook?

– I don’t know.

– What’s a mook?

– You can’t call me a mook.

– I can’t?

– No!

– I’ll give you mook!


But now I know! “Mook” is apparently a hybrid of a magazine and a book, commonly found in Japan and China!

I wonder why they didn’t call it “Bagazine“?!!!

One question … How the fuck did Scorcese know about these “Mook” hybrids back in 1973?!

May 1, 2008 Posted by | Japan, Martin Scorcese, Mikie Hara, _BABE | Leave a comment

Scorcese – "The Last Waltz," and "Shine a Light"

NY Daily News ran an interesting piece on Sunday comparing Scorcese’s two excellent concert movies, “The Last Waltz,” from 1978 – the final show of The Band with a plethora of stars such as Bob Dylan, Van Morrison, Neil Young etc etc. – and his new Stones release “Shine a Light”


http://www.nydailynews.com/entertainment/movies/

Martin Scorsese keeps rockin’ with ‘Shine a Light’

Sunday, March 30th 2008

'The Last Waltz' Three decades separate Martin Scorsese’s two great music documentaries.

In 1978, the director of “Taxi Driver” and “Goodfellas” released “The Last Waltz,” a gripping account of the very last concert granted by the Band.

This Friday, Scorsese’s “Shine a Light” finds him turning his wild crane shots and nimble dolly action on another classic rock band: the Rolling Stones.

A gorgeous and rhythmically attuned movie, “Light” captures the world’s oldest bad boys during two concerts at the Beacon Theater last fall.

'Shine a Light'Here’s a compare and contrast between a pair of movies that, essentially, serve as bookends to some of the boomer generation’s most significant songs.

MOVIE: “The Last Waltz”

SETTING: San Francisco’s sainted Winterland Ballroom on Thanksgiving night, 1976.

GUEST STARS: A pinch-me-I’m-dreaming lineup that skims the cream of ’60s and ’70s singer-songwriters, from Bob Dylan to Joni Mitchell to Neil Young to Van Morrison. Also included are cameos for such older touchstones as the Staples Singers and Ronnie Hawkins. Every single performance electrifies.

SCORSESE’S VISUAL STYLE: Smooth and unhurried camera work, elevated by richly textured cinematography.

CULTURAL SIGNIFICANCE: Profound. The show not only captures the end of a great American band but also the collapse of the entire post-’60s, intimate singer-songwriter sensibility, right at the cusp of punk.

SEX APPEAL: Everyone is seen at their peak of beauty, highlighted by Rick Danko, who then looked like a young Richard Gere.

MOVIE: “Shine a Light”

SETTING: New York’s rococo Beacon Theater last fall.

GUEST STARS: A haphazard sprinkling of names with widely varying results: Christina Aguilera’s clueless vocal on “Live With Me” ruins the song, but Buddy Guy (below l., with Keith Richards) brings a bluesy authority to Muddy Waters’ “Champagne & Reefer.” Jack White falls somewhere in between on “Loving Cup.”

SCORSESE’S VISUAL STYLE: The state-of-the-art IMAX screen puts the viewer smack in the middle of the stage action. It has such a tactile effect, you’ll feel like you’re playing the guitars yourself.

CULTURAL SIGNIFICANCE: Nil. A professional show by a group that tours every year and probably will do so until Earth collides with the sun.

SEX APPEAL: Have you looked at the Stones lately? A horror movie could make good use of their faces. Then again, Mick still has his girlish figure. And when he dances, he retains all his erotic charge.

April 1, 2008 Posted by | Martin Scorcese, OTHER_CINEMA, Rolling Stones, _MUSIC, _OTHER, _VIDEO | Leave a comment

Martin Scorsese: The Rolling Stones provided the soundtrack to my decade of sex and drugs

“The documentaries on music and film regenerate me.”

Another interesting piece in the Independent last Sunday about director supreme – and apparently once debaucher supreme! – one of our great heroes, Marty S.!

We all know that Scorsese’s soundtracks have consistently been nigh on perfect. He has immaculate music taste and more importantly knows where to strategically place a song for best dramatic/ emotional effect!

He speaks, of course, on the advent of his concert film of The Rolling Stones “Shine a Light”.

I notice that Marty is on (metaphorically!) his fifth wife now. Five wives? What a fucking masochist!

Is he trying to become the Henry VIII of New York?! Only one more chick needed!

http://www.independent.co.uk/

Martin Scorsese: The Rolling Stones provided the soundtrack to my decade of sex and drugs

By James Mottram
Sunday, 30 March 2008

There’s a telling moment in the opening exchanges of Shine a Light, the new concert film of The Rolling Stones. Sitting on a plane, sipping champagne in first- class, and peering over his reading glasses, Mick Jagger is deliberating over the set-list for a gig at New York’s Beacon Theatre in 2006. You can’t help but think of Robert Frank’s notorious film of the Stones’ 1972 American tour, Cocksucker Blues, which depicted the group’s orgies, drug-taking and vandalism.

How times have changed, and not only for the Stones. Back in the early 1970s, Martin Scorsese, the director of Shine a Light, was a young film-maker enjoying his breakthrough film, Mean Streets. In the stand-out scene of that tale of New York Italian-American low-life, Robert De Niro’s cocksure Johnny Boy saunters into a bar to the sound of “Jumpin’ Jack Flash”. “I listened to their music all the time,” the director admits – yet he hadn’t grown up a fan of rock’n’roll.

Scorsese grew up in New York’s Little Italy and studied film at New York University. He didn’t see the Stones in concert until he was in his late twenties, in 1970, and admits that he didn’t listen to much rock in the years before. “It was a working-class, conservative background in my family, so we listened to AM radio,” he says. “But FM was just beginning, with rock’n’roll. So then I heard The Rolling Stones and Bob Dylan…” His first major credit, editing Mike Wadleigh’s Woodstock documentary in 1970, was an education. “When I was on the stage at Woodstock, some of the groups I’d never heard before.” In the four decades since, Scorsese has made films about Bob Dylan, The Band and the blues, but it’s the music of the Stones to which he has returned again and again.

He has used “Gimme Shelter” alone in three films; and appropriately enough for the song in which Jagger howls that rape and murder are “just a shot away”, the films are Scorsese’s trio of blood-soaked gangster dramas, Goodfellas, Casino and The Departed. And such is his knowledge of the band’s back-catalogue, “some of the songs I used in Casino, Jagger doesn’t remember recording!”

Watch a trailer for ‘Shine a Light’

Courtesy of Twentieth Century Fox

Scorsese has been working with Jagger since the late 1990s, on a project about the American music business; before that, he thinks he “met Mick Jagger once in 1976 or 1977 at a party somewhere in LA”. His confusion is understandable, not merely because it was 30 years ago. Taxi Driver won the Palme d’Or at Cannes in 1976, and though this announced the director as a major player, he was by then suffering from the excesses of his own rock’n’roll lifestyle. A bout of drug abuse led to the collapse of his second marriage (he’s now on his fifth), precipitating a bout of depression and taking its toll on his already fragile health (he is asthmatic).

Despite his personal difficulties, Scorsese’s film of the 1970s revealed his love of music and its artists. In his 1974 film Alice Doesn’t Live Here Anymore, Ellen Burstyn (whose performance won her the Best Actress Oscar) played an abused spouse who dreams of becoming a singer. He followed Taxi Driver with New York, New York, his tribute to the big band sound of the 1940s. Then, in the midst of his cocaine blizzard, he documented the final gig by Dylan’s backing group, The Band, in the 1978 movie The Last Waltz.

Not only does Shine a Light have to live up to Scorsese’s own formidable body of work, but the work of other film-makers, too. The Maysles brothers filmed the Stones’ Altamont Speedway gig in 1969, the concert at which an audience member was knifed to death by a Hell’s Angel – it’s perhaps no accident that one of the 15 or so top-notch cameramen employed to capture the gig at the heart of Shine a Light is Albert Maysles. Nevertheless, Scorsese avoids comparison with Gimme Shelter: “That film was about not only performance, but a time and a place. It’s a very historic film for that. Shine a Light goes more towards the music.” And, he adds, Shine a Light is emphatically a concert film.

“What more can the Stones say?” he says. “What can you do that’s new backstage, that wasn’t already shown in Gimme Shelter or Cocksucker Blues? The only thing left is the music, ultimately. The last time I saw them in a small venue it was the early 1970s, in the Academy of Music on 14th Street in New York, which no longer exists. Every time I’ve seen them since then, they’ve been in these giant arenas, I couldn’t see them. Little figures, y’know? Every now and then, they’d bring me down to the stage and I’d look up and think, ‘Oh wow, if I had a camera here!’ ” And if you want to see the Stones in concert, as they are now in all their wrinkly glory, Shine a Light delivers: “Brown Sugar”, “Sympathy For the Devil” and even the Scorsese-requested “As Tears Go By” all get an airing.

It’s a slick experience, in which, instead of seeing Keith Richards chucking a TV out of a window, as he did in Cocksucker Blues, you see Bill Clinton and family arrive and the wizened guitarist greet Clinton’s aged mother like an old friend. Scorsese, too, has finally joined the establishment. The 65-year-old is only a little older than Jagger and Richards, and last year he was, after six nominations, finally awarded Best Director Oscar for The Departed. He admits he was “very surprised” that it finally came for this film, a remake of the Hong Kong crime drama Infernal Affairs. “What I was pleased about was that it was a film in the same genre as Mean Streets and Goodfellas,” he says. “It wasn’t for me doing a children’s film or a musical.”

Already in pre-production on his next feature, the psychological thriller Ashcliffe starring Leonardo DiCaprio, Scorsese attributes this post-Oscar lease of life to another music project – his 2005 Dylan documentary No Direction Home, which took him nearly five years to complete. “It was agony, but the Dylan film made me extremely happy,” he notes. Following on from his 2003 television series about the blues, as well as his exhaustive studies on American and Italian cinema, Scorsese calls it a “compulsion” to capture contemporary culture in this way. “The documentaries on music and film regenerate me,” he adds.

Besides his work for The Film Foundation on preserving old movies, Scorsese is in production on a documentary on the evolution of British cinema, and there are others in the pipeline, on George Harrison and Bob Marley. And what about the Stones? As entertaining as Shine a Light is, it’s not the definitive Stones documentary. “To do a chronicle of the Stones, you take 40 years of history,” he admits. “I’d still like to do that.”

‘Shine a Light’ is released on 11 April

Pitch perfect: Five films where Marty hits the high notes


Round Midnight (1986)
Scorsese makes a cameo appearance as a ruthless club-owner in Bertrand Tavernier’s tribute to the be-bop jazz era

The Last Waltz (1978)
Virtually spawning the phrase “rockumentary”, Scorsese gathers everyone from Eric Clapton to Neil Diamond for this farewell gig by The Band

No Direction Home (2005)
Covering mid-1960s Dylan, Scorsese leaves no rolling stone unturned in this essential three-and-a-half-hour documentary

New York, New York (1977)
Around the stormy relationship between Robert De Niro’s saxophonist and Liza Minnelli’s singer, Scorsese presents his rich take on the showbiz epic and big-band era

Woodstock (1970)
Scorsese’s only major credit as editor; he was one of several who cut this seminal survey of the seminal rock festival

April 1, 2008 Posted by | Martin Scorcese, OTHER_CINEMA, Rolling Stones, _MUSIC, _OTHER, _VIDEO | 20 Comments

The sounds of Scorsese



As the veteran film-maker releases his concert movie on the Rolling Stones, Nick Coleman applauds a director who’s always put music at the heart of the action

Wednesday, 26 March 2008

http://www.independent.co.uk/arts-entertainment/


The image “https://i2.wp.com/www.independent.co.uk/multimedia/archive/00021/IN3644907Shine_A_Lig_21186t.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors. Martin Scorsese has made a concert film of the Rolling Stones. Shine a Light is a record of a single live date in 2006, a benefit for the Clinton Foundation. By all accounts it’s a straightforward, linear affair, achieved in high style and with palpable affection.

You can see why Mick Jagger might fancy such a thing. Cinema has not over-dignified the Stones over the years and the group themselves have made no suitable celluloid gift to posterity. Who better, then, to make them look the way they’d want to look in their dotage than the original Rockin’ Movie Brat?

It’s harder to see why Scorsese might fancy such a project. His artistic legacy is so secure that he no more needs to make an edifice out of the Rolling Stones than he needs to direct an episode of Basil Brush. But it only takes a look at the Scorsese canon to see that Shine a Light was almost inevitable. From the very start it was obvious Scorsese was going to do something like this. He’s even done something like it before. In 1976 he recorded the valedictory performance by The Band at Winterland, San Francisco. The Last Waltz is as lapidary and monumental as rock concert films get.

Scorsese has always loved music immoderately. Certainly, no single film director of his clout has made such essentially musical films. Even with the sound turned down, the best Scorsese films shout and shimmy and reach, as if in reflex, for the transcending arc of aria. They are music in film form.

Here’s the great New Yorker film critic Pauline Kael on Mean Streets (1973): “The music is the electricity in the air of this movie; the music is like an engine that the characters move to. Johnny Boy, the most susceptible, half dances through the movie… He enjoys being out of control – he revels in it – and we can feel the music turning him on.”

We should not expect Scorsese’s films to be any other way. He is, after all, the kingpin of the “movie brat” generation that emerged snapping their fingers from the film schools of the Sixties, as much in thrall to hipsterism and its soundtrack as they were to the European New Wave cinema and Forties American films noir.

For Scorsese in particular, the music in a film is not ancilliary to what he has to say, it is, in part, what he has to say. And to say it properly he requires his music to do its work internally, within the world of his cinematic stories. As often as not in Scorsese films, the music emanates from the drama, like a smell. Here’s Kael again, on the music in Mean Streets: “[It] doesn’t use music, as Easy Rider sometimes did, to do the movie’s work for it … The music here isn’t our music, meant to put us in the mood of the movie, but the characters’ music.”

‘Shine a Light’ opens on 11 April

March 29, 2008 Posted by | Martin Scorcese, _CINEMA, _EDITORIAL, _MUSIC, _OTHER | Leave a comment

The sounds of Scorsese



As the veteran film-maker releases his concert movie on the Rolling Stones, Nick Coleman applauds a director who’s always put music at the heart of the action

Wednesday, 26 March 2008

http://www.independent.co.uk/arts-entertainment/


//www.independent.co.uk/multimedia/archive/00021/IN3644907Shine_A_Lig_21186t.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors. Martin Scorsese has made a concert film of the Rolling Stones. Shine a Light is a record of a single live date in 2006, a benefit for the Clinton Foundation. By all accounts it’s a straightforward, linear affair, achieved in high style and with palpable affection.

You can see why Mick Jagger might fancy such a thing. Cinema has not over-dignified the Stones over the years and the group themselves have made no suitable celluloid gift to posterity. Who better, then, to make them look the way they’d want to look in their dotage than the original Rockin’ Movie Brat?

It’s harder to see why Scorsese might fancy such a project. His artistic legacy is so secure that he no more needs to make an edifice out of the Rolling Stones than he needs to direct an episode of Basil Brush. But it only takes a look at the Scorsese canon to see that Shine a Light was almost inevitable. From the very start it was obvious Scorsese was going to do something like this. He’s even done something like it before. In 1976 he recorded the valedictory performance by The Band at Winterland, San Francisco. The Last Waltz is as lapidary and monumental as rock concert films get.

Scorsese has always loved music immoderately. Certainly, no single film director of his clout has made such essentially musical films. Even with the sound turned down, the best Scorsese films shout and shimmy and reach, as if in reflex, for the transcending arc of aria. They are music in film form.

Here’s the great New Yorker film critic Pauline Kael on Mean Streets (1973): “The music is the electricity in the air of this movie; the music is like an engine that the characters move to. Johnny Boy, the most susceptible, half dances through the movie… He enjoys being out of control – he revels in it – and we can feel the music turning him on.”

We should not expect Scorsese’s films to be any other way. He is, after all, the kingpin of the “movie brat” generation that emerged snapping their fingers from the film schools of the Sixties, as much in thrall to hipsterism and its soundtrack as they were to the European New Wave cinema and Forties American films noir.

For Scorsese in particular, the music in a film is not ancilliary to what he has to say, it is, in part, what he has to say. And to say it properly he requires his music to do its work internally, within the world of his cinematic stories. As often as not in Scorsese films, the music emanates from the drama, like a smell. Here’s Kael again, on the music in Mean Streets: “[It] doesn’t use music, as Easy Rider sometimes did, to do the movie’s work for it … The music here isn’t our music, meant to put us in the mood of the movie, but the characters’ music.”

‘Shine a Light’ opens on 11 April

March 29, 2008 Posted by | Martin Scorcese, OTHER_CINEMA, _EDITORIAL, _MUSIC, _OTHER | Leave a comment

The sounds of Scorsese



As the veteran film-maker releases his concert movie on the Rolling Stones, Nick Coleman applauds a director who’s always put music at the heart of the action

Wednesday, 26 March 2008

http://www.independent.co.uk/arts-entertainment/


The image “https://i2.wp.com/www.independent.co.uk/multimedia/archive/00021/IN3644907Shine_A_Lig_21186t.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors. Martin Scorsese has made a concert film of the Rolling Stones. Shine a Light is a record of a single live date in 2006, a benefit for the Clinton Foundation. By all accounts it’s a straightforward, linear affair, achieved in high style and with palpable affection.

You can see why Mick Jagger might fancy such a thing. Cinema has not over-dignified the Stones over the years and the group themselves have made no suitable celluloid gift to posterity. Who better, then, to make them look the way they’d want to look in their dotage than the original Rockin’ Movie Brat?

It’s harder to see why Scorsese might fancy such a project. His artistic legacy is so secure that he no more needs to make an edifice out of the Rolling Stones than he needs to direct an episode of Basil Brush. But it only takes a look at the Scorsese canon to see that Shine a Light was almost inevitable. From the very start it was obvious Scorsese was going to do something like this. He’s even done something like it before. In 1976 he recorded the valedictory performance by The Band at Winterland, San Francisco. The Last Waltz is as lapidary and monumental as rock concert films get.

Scorsese has always loved music immoderately. Certainly, no single film director of his clout has made such essentially musical films. Even with the sound turned down, the best Scorsese films shout and shimmy and reach, as if in reflex, for the transcending arc of aria. They are music in film form.

Here’s the great New Yorker film critic Pauline Kael on Mean Streets (1973): “The music is the electricity in the air of this movie; the music is like an engine that the characters move to. Johnny Boy, the most susceptible, half dances through the movie… He enjoys being out of control – he revels in it – and we can feel the music turning him on.”

We should not expect Scorsese’s films to be any other way. He is, after all, the kingpin of the “movie brat” generation that emerged snapping their fingers from the film schools of the Sixties, as much in thrall to hipsterism and its soundtrack as they were to the European New Wave cinema and Forties American films noir.

For Scorsese in particular, the music in a film is not ancilliary to what he has to say, it is, in part, what he has to say. And to say it properly he requires his music to do its work internally, within the world of his cinematic stories. As often as not in Scorsese films, the music emanates from the drama, like a smell. Here’s Kael again, on the music in Mean Streets: “[It] doesn’t use music, as Easy Rider sometimes did, to do the movie’s work for it … The music here isn’t our music, meant to put us in the mood of the movie, but the characters’ music.”

‘Shine a Light’ opens on 11 April

March 29, 2008 Posted by | Martin Scorcese, _ARTICLE, _CINEMA, _MUSIC, _OTHER | Leave a comment

Scorsese’s greatest moments

A selection of Martin Scorsese’s many great great moments!

Raging Bull (1980)

You want cinematic aria? Cinematic aria with blood and splintering bone? And Madonnas in white dresses? Here’s your baby: the story of Italian-American middleweight self-punisher Jake LaMotta in the monochrome America of the Forties and Fifties working out his addiction to being beaten to a pulp by better pugilists than he (not to mention the beatings he takes from the system, the Mafia and as a consequence of his dumb way with women). It’s a Stations of the Cross, really, and Scorsese enacts the ritual with a toweringly emotive orchestral score, plus an eclectic mess of the popular music of the era.

Taxi Driver (1975)

The last film scored by the great Bernard Herrmann is arguably undermined by the very voluptuousness of that score. Taken on its own, the music is a lush meditation on the snaky-noir jazz of Charles Mingus, all loops and coils, suggesting the serpentine involutions of the city that makes the titular cabbie, Travis Bickle, into the dangerous creature he is. But the New Yorker critic Pauline Kael took exception: “[The movie], with its suppressed sex and suppressed violence, is already pitched so high that it doesn’t need ominous percussion, snake rattles and rippling scales. These musical nudges belong back with the rampaging thrillers Taxi Driver transcends.” Gorgeous as those ripples are, it’s hard to argue with her.

Mean Streets (1973)

Has there ever been a hipper soundtrack? Mean Streets does not have an accompanying score. The music you hear is the music the characters in the story hear, as they ricochet like stray bullets between the hard surfaces of the Mafia underworld and the dark interior of Sicilian Catholicism – the double-helix of crime and self-punishment animated to the sound of The Chantells, The Shirelles, The Chips, The Aquatones, The Miracles, The Marvelettes, Derek and the Dominoes and, yes, the Rolling Stones.

The Last Waltz (1978)

Scorsese played a major part in the editing of both Woodstock and Elvis on Tour, so he already knew what it takes to record live music in a concert setting. The Last Waltz is a loving movie, as effective in its rendering of a one-off performance by a legend of rock – in this case The Band – as it is over-fond in its treatment of the group’s soi-disant spokesman Robbie Robertson. You’d have to be a frustrated musician to make so plain a film work so musically.

New York, New York (1977)

If Taxi Driver was a genre piece working its way out of its generic bonds, New York, New York was a meta-musical wondering if it oughtn’t to bust its way back in. The music itself is in many ways incidental to this story of love, jealousy and the super-heated career arc, yet Scorsese’s passion for the stuff ensures it earns its corn. The robust big band-to-modern jazz routines, and Kander/Ebb’s original numbers, which fairly rip off the screen, gave Sinatra a late hit and Liza Minnelli the most suitable songs she ever got to sing.

The Last Temptation of Christ (1987)

For his solemn treatment of Nikos Kazantzakis’s novel about the spiritual racking of Jesus, Scorsese elected to commission an original score by Peter Gabriel. “The brief,” says Gabriel, “was to create a landscape that was part ancient, part contemporary, part familiar, part unknown, and very soulful. We both wanted to break away from the traditional choral and orchestral music connected with the Passion story, to create a new canvas. I was concerned whether Marty would respond to the idea of the voice of Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan, bringing his majestic Sufi singing to the Christian story, but he loved the idea.” Whether or not the film works as a film, the music certainly works as music.

No Direction Home: Bob Dylan (2005)

A labour of love and of almost infinite patience. This is the music doc to end them all, extracting the juice from the fruit that is Bob Dylan and mixing it with a steady flux of archive footage and talking heads. Magnificent, if you like Bob Dylan; still magnificent but a bit slow if you’re not fussed. You can imagine Mick Jagger snuggling down with L’Wren Scott and the DVD and the light bulb going on in his head…

March 29, 2008 Posted by | Martin Scorcese, OTHER_CINEMA, _EDITORIAL, _MUSIC, _OTHER | Leave a comment

Scorsese’s greatest moments

A selection of Martin Scorsese’s many great great moments!

Raging Bull (1980)

You want cinematic aria? Cinematic aria with blood and splintering bone? And Madonnas in white dresses? Here’s your baby: the story of Italian-American middleweight self-punisher Jake LaMotta in the monochrome America of the Forties and Fifties working out his addiction to being beaten to a pulp by better pugilists than he (not to mention the beatings he takes from the system, the Mafia and as a consequence of his dumb way with women). It’s a Stations of the Cross, really, and Scorsese enacts the ritual with a toweringly emotive orchestral score, plus an eclectic mess of the popular music of the era.

http://www.youtube.com/v/YiVOwxsa4OM&hl=en

Taxi Driver (1975)

The last film scored by the great Bernard Herrmann is arguably undermined by the very voluptuousness of that score. Taken on its own, the music is a lush meditation on the snaky-noir jazz of Charles Mingus, all loops and coils, suggesting the serpentine involutions of the city that makes the titular cabbie, Travis Bickle, into the dangerous creature he is. But the New Yorker critic Pauline Kael took exception: “[The movie], with its suppressed sex and suppressed violence, is already pitched so high that it doesn’t need ominous percussion, snake rattles and rippling scales. These musical nudges belong back with the rampaging thrillers Taxi Driver transcends.” Gorgeous as those ripples are, it’s hard to argue with her.

http://www.youtube.com/v/bqLyTdcMLhc&hl=en

Mean Streets (1973)

Has there ever been a hipper soundtrack? Mean Streets does not have an accompanying score. The music you hear is the music the characters in the story hear, as they ricochet like stray bullets between the hard surfaces of the Mafia underworld and the dark interior of Sicilian Catholicism – the double-helix of crime and self-punishment animated to the sound of The Chantells, The Shirelles, The Chips, The Aquatones, The Miracles, The Marvelettes, Derek and the Dominoes and, yes, the Rolling Stones.

http://www.youtube.com/v/GAQZzfwQGHQ&hl=en

The Last Waltz (1978)

Scorsese played a major part in the editing of both Woodstock and Elvis on Tour, so he already knew what it takes to record live music in a concert setting. The Last Waltz is a loving movie, as effective in its rendering of a one-off performance by a legend of rock – in this case The Band – as it is over-fond in its treatment of the group’s soi-disant spokesman Robbie Robertson. You’d have to be a frustrated musician to make so plain a film work so musically.

http://www.youtube.com/v/3ZUHgIu8ODE&hl=en

New York, New York (1977)

If Taxi Driver was a genre piece working its way out of its generic bonds, New York, New York was a meta-musical wondering if it oughtn’t to bust its way back in. The music itself is in many ways incidental to this story of love, jealousy and the super-heated career arc, yet Scorsese’s passion for the stuff ensures it earns its corn. The robust big band-to-modern jazz routines, and Kander/Ebb’s original numbers, which fairly rip off the screen, gave Sinatra a late hit and Liza Minnelli the most suitable songs she ever got to sing.

http://www.youtube.com/v/1kzaSUItFA0&hl=en

The Last Temptation of Christ (1987)

For his solemn treatment of Nikos Kazantzakis’s novel about the spiritual racking of Jesus, Scorsese elected to commission an original score by Peter Gabriel. “The brief,” says Gabriel, “was to create a landscape that was part ancient, part contemporary, part familiar, part unknown, and very soulful. We both wanted to break away from the traditional choral and orchestral music connected with the Passion story, to create a new canvas. I was concerned whether Marty would respond to the idea of the voice of Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan, bringing his majestic Sufi singing to the Christian story, but he loved the idea.” Whether or not the film works as a film, the music certainly works as music.

http://www.youtube.com/v/O0Olgsutz-o&hl=en

No Direction Home: Bob Dylan (2005)

A labour of love and of almost infinite patience. This is the music doc to end them all, extracting the juice from the fruit that is Bob Dylan and mixing it with a steady flux of archive footage and talking heads. Magnificent, if you like Bob Dylan; still magnificent but a bit slow if you’re not fussed. You can imagine Mick Jagger snuggling down with L’Wren Scott and the DVD and the light bulb going on in his head…

http://www.youtube.com/v/SSaqSWIaMSw&hl=en

March 29, 2008 Posted by | Martin Scorcese, _ARTICLE, _CINEMA, _MUSIC, _OTHER | Leave a comment

The Rolling Stones – Shine a Light OST (2008)

The Rolling Stones – Shine a Light OST (2008)

‘Shine A Light’ is the third official live album to released by the Rolling Stones and serves as the soundtrack to Martin Scorsese’s documentary of the same name.

Recorded in the autumn of 2006 at New York’s Beacon Theatre over two nights, the album features a selection of live favourites taken from the band’s huge catalogue of work.

Included are guest appearances from The White Stripes’ Jack White, legendary blues guitarist Buddy Guy and American pop singer Christina Aguilera. (Aguilera?WTF? Guess I’ll be deleting that track straight away!)

Some real classics in here, rattled off magnificently by Keef and the boys. There’s also a great supporting band and singers.

The Stones have been touring for almost 1000 years now, so their live shows are honed down to perfection at this stage!

Disc 1

1. Jumping Jack Flash
2. Shattered
3. She Was Hot
4. All Down the Line
5. Loving Cup (with Jack White III)
6. As Tears Go By
7. Some Girls
8. Just My Imagination
9. Faraway Eyes
10. Champagne & Reefer (With Buddy Guy)
11. Tumbling Dice
12. You Got the Silver
13. Connection

Disc 2

1. Sympathy for the Devil
2. Live With Me (With Christina Aguilera)
3. Start Me Up
4. Brown Sugar
5. (I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction
6. Paint it Black
7. Little T&A
8. I’m Free
9. Shine A Light

Thanks to fratan

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March 27, 2008 Posted by | Buddy Guy, Jack White, Martin Scorcese, Music_ClassicRock, Music_OST, Rolling Stones, _MUSIC | Leave a comment

The Rolling Stones – Shine a Light OST (2008)

The Rolling Stones – Shine a Light OST (2008)

‘Shine A Light’ is the third official live album to released by the Rolling Stones and serves as the soundtrack to Martin Scorsese’s documentary of the same name.

Recorded in the autumn of 2006 at New York’s Beacon Theatre over two nights, the album features a selection of live favourites taken from the band’s huge catalogue of work.

Included are guest appearances from The White Stripes’ Jack White, legendary blues guitarist Buddy Guy and American pop singer Christina Aguilera. (Aguilera?WTF? Guess I’ll be deleting that track straight away!)

Some real classics in here, rattled off magnificently by Keef and the boys. There’s also a great supporting band and singers.

The Stones have been touring for almost 1000 years now, so their live shows are honed down to perfection at this stage!

Disc 1

1. Jumping Jack Flash
2. Shattered
3. She Was Hot
4. All Down the Line
5. Loving Cup (with Jack White III)
6. As Tears Go By
7. Some Girls
8. Just My Imagination
9. Faraway Eyes
10. Champagne & Reefer (With Buddy Guy)
11. Tumbling Dice
12. You Got the Silver
13. Connection

Disc 2

1. Sympathy for the Devil
2. Live With Me (With Christina Aguilera)
3. Start Me Up
4. Brown Sugar
5. (I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction
6. Paint it Black
7. Little T&A
8. I’m Free
9. Shine A Light

Thanks to fratan

The image “https://i0.wp.com/myimg.info/thumbs/opt0447042001205737261x.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

March 27, 2008 Posted by | Buddy Guy, Jack White, Martin Scorcese, Music_ClassicRock, Music_OST, Rolling Stones, _MUSIC | Leave a comment

The Rolling Stones – Shine a Light OST (2008)

The Rolling Stones – Shine a Light OST (2008)

‘Shine A Light’ is the third official live album to released by the Rolling Stones and serves as the soundtrack to Martin Scorsese’s documentary of the same name.

Recorded in the autumn of 2006 at New York’s Beacon Theatre over two nights, the album features a selection of live favourites taken from the band’s huge catalogue of work.

Included are guest appearances from The White Stripes’ Jack White, legendary blues guitarist Buddy Guy and American pop singer Christina Aguilera. (Aguilera?WTF? Guess I’ll be deleting that track straight away!)

Some real classics in here, rattled off magnificently by Keef and the boys. There’s also a great supporting band and singers.

The Stones have been touring for almost 1000 years now, so their live shows are honed down to perfection at this stage!

Disc 1

1. Jumping Jack Flash
2. Shattered
3. She Was Hot
4. All Down the Line
5. Loving Cup (with Jack White III)
6. As Tears Go By
7. Some Girls
8. Just My Imagination
9. Faraway Eyes
10. Champagne & Reefer (With Buddy Guy)
11. Tumbling Dice
12. You Got the Silver
13. Connection

Disc 2

1. Sympathy for the Devil
2. Live With Me (With Christina Aguilera)
3. Start Me Up
4. Brown Sugar
5. (I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction
6. Paint it Black
7. Little T&A
8. I’m Free
9. Shine A Light

Thanks to fratan

The image “https://i0.wp.com/myimg.info/thumbs/opt0447042001205737261x.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

March 27, 2008 Posted by | Buddy Guy, Jack White, Martin Scorcese, Music_ClassicRock, Music_OST, Rolling Stones, _MUSIC | Leave a comment