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OCEAN OF SOUND (1996) [2 Discs Various Artists]


OCEAN OF SOUND (1996) [2 Discs Various Artists]
Mp3 160

This is a stunning eclectic collection of marvellous music I bought soon after it came out and thoroughly enjoyed!

Until some bimbo I was dating back then, borrowed the CD and lost it!

Subtitled; “A Collection of Music to Accompany David Toop’s book, Ocean of Sound,” this two disc set is like no other music collection you’ve ever heard!

We are grateful to isupplythecountrywithbutter

David Toop (born 5 May 1949) is an English musician and author, and as of 2001 was visiting Research Fellow in the Media School at London College of Communication. He was notably a member of The Flying Lizards. He was a prominent contributor to the British magazine The Face. He is a regular contributor to The Wire, the U.K. based music magazine.

Toop published his pioneering book on hip hop, Rap Attack, in 1984. Eleven years later, Ocean of Sound appeared, described as Toop’s “poetic survey of contemporary musical life from Debussy through Ambient, Techno, and drum ‘n’ bass.”

Since the 1970s, Toop has also been a significant presence on the British experimental and improvised music scene, collaborating with Max Eastley, Brian Eno, Scanner, and others. In 2001, Toop curated the sound art exhibition Sonic Boom, and the following year, he curated a 2-CD collection entitled Not Necessarily Enough English Music: A Collection of Experimental Music from Great Britain, 1960-1977.


The rather scholarly Toop, back in the mid nineties, produced a wonderful book on the origins and diaspora of modern music – focusing on ambient/ minimalist music – and also complied a masterful music collection to illustrate his themes and concepts.

Amazon.com describes Toop’s amazing book as;

“A member of a radical editorial collective on the cutting edge of British music criticism in the 1970s, later a critic for more standard papers, including the Times, David Toop’s second book covers a vast expanse of music. His tour-de-force survey describes a dissonant and invigorating clash of music and noise from western classical to Javanese gamelan, from Claude Debussy to Miles Davis to Brian Eno, from disco to techno to ambient. He discusses the changes in our sound world caused by the global reach of radio and recordings, and shows himself a rigorous pluralist, open to all styles and forms, but unafraid to offer robust criticism in any musical sphere.”

Altered States iii, Crystal World excerpt

In their search for absolutes, a number of music critics have looked to Riley as the definitive starting point for various trends: minimalism, extreme repetition, all-night trance improvisations and tape-delay systems.

Pieces such as In C, A Rainbow In Curved Air, and Poppy Nogood and the Phantom Band were important in their time because they signalled two important changes in the way the worlds of music and comerce worked.

One: a composer was writing pieces which had grooves and improvised around modes (just like John Coltrane, Miles Davis, Frank Zappa and half the rock bands in Psychedelia), which sounded as if psychotropics had been involved at some stage of the compositional process, which explored new technology and studio processing. Two: the albums were packaged by Columbia as rock albums, despite being on the Masterworks series, so implying that the razor wire dividing so-called classical, rock, jazz, art and commerce had been cut in a few places. Never mind the embarrasing occurence of hippie-speak on the In C sleevenotes – ‘No preconceptions, you just dig it’ – the sort of thing that Oliver Stone might exhume for another chapter of his Sixties revisionism.

The music, as musicians and sleevenote writes love to say, spoke for itself. Essentially modest, Riley downplays all of this. After all, his contribution to the late 20th Century mix emerged out of collaborative work and improvisations with La Monte Young, Pauline Oliveros and Chet Baker.

After the first flush of enthusiasm for minimalism and systems music, Riley and Young tended to be dismissed as old hippies, past their peak, while Philip Glass, Steve Reich, John Adams and Michael Nyman slid with varying degrees of compositional credibility into a new orthodoxy of avant-garde populism.

But as Riley says, life goes in cycles. Suddenly, the open works of Riley and Young seem more expansive, more useful to the fractured nature of music in the Nineties than all that knitting machine repetitiveness and it’s mutations.

— David Toop excerpt from his book “Ocean of Sound” published by Serpents Tail

Like the book, the discs cover an incredible array of sound and music. From Erik Satie to John Cage, to Ornette Coleman to Les Baxter to My Bloody Valentine to The Velvet Underground to Aphex Twin to Miles Davis to Brian Eno ! And loads more wonderfully eclectic music!

All your common or garden left of field “weird” music (well, weird to Robbie Williams fans anyway!)

But then there’s the really weird stuff!

Yap, we also get some strange but compelling stuff – sounds of Bearded Seals, recordings of Howler Monkeys (not a band, like the awful Arctic Monkeys! In fact, not a band at all!), sounds from a Buddhist Ceremony ….. you name it, it’s here!

Rather strangely, Howler Monkeys sound far better than Arctic Monkeys !!!

https://i0.wp.com/static.flickr.com/40/110826854_3ef85d90f1.jpg

Track Listing

Disc 1

King Tubby – Dub Fi Gwan
Herbie Hancock – Rain Dance
Aphex Twin – Analogue Bubblebath
Jon Hassell – Empire III
Ujang Survana – Sorban Palid
Claude Debussy – Prelude A L Apres ‘Midi D Un Faune’
Les Baxter – Sunken City
My Bloody Valentine – Loomer
Brian Eno – Lizard Point
Shunie Omizutori Buddhist Ceremony
The Vancouver Soundscape – The Music Of Horns And Whistles
Howler Monkeys
Peter Brotzmann Octet – Machine Gun
Harold Budd – Bismillahi ‘Rrahmani Rrahim’


Disc 2


Miles Davis – Black Satin
Terry Riley – Extract From Poppy Nogood “All Night Flight”
Detty Kurina – Coyor Panon
Ornette Coleman – Virgin Beauty
John Zorn/David Toop – Chen Pe I Pe I
Paul Schutze – Rivers Of Mercury
The Velvet Underground – I Heard Her Call My Name
Bearded Seals
Holger Czukay & Rolf Dammers – Boat-Woman-Song
The Beach Boys – Fall Breaks Back Into Winter (Woody Woodpecker Symphony)
African Headcharge – Faraway Chant
Sun Ra – Cosmo Enticement
Music Improvisation Company – Untitled
Deep Listening Band – Seven-Up
John Cage – In A Landscape
Erik Satie – Vexations
Suikinkutsu Water Chime

Here she be:

Rapidshare Download Disc 1

Rapidshare Download Disc 2

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Any content linked to here is only meant as a taster for the original work itself and is posted on the strict understanding that anyone who downloads the taster, deletes said content within 24 hours. We would assume that these fans will then buy the original work and we greatly encourage them to do so.

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October 1, 2008 Posted by | Erik Sati, John Cage, Miles Davis, Music_Alternative, Music_Ambient, Music_Experimental, My Bloody Valentine, Ornette Coleman, _MUSIC | Leave a comment

Miles Davis – Miles Davis in Europe (1963) [Remastered 2005]

Miles Davis – Miles Davis in Europe (1963) [Remastered 2005]
EAC rip | FLAC + CUE + LOG -> 304Mb | MP3 @320 -> 142Mb
Full Artwork @300 dpi -> 68Mb (png)
Columbia/Legacy | CK 93583

Recorded live in France at the Festival Mondial, du Jazz Antibes, Miles Davis in Europe captures trumpeter Davis in late 1963.

While Four & More and My Funny Valentine — both taken from the same 1964 New York Philharmonic Hall concert — are most often cited as this lineup’s essential live recording, Miles Davis in Europe is a no less exciting listen.

The band, including tenor saxophonist George Coleman, pianist Herbie Hancock, bassist Ron Carter, and drummer Tony Williams, had recorded Seven Steps to Heaven a few months earlier, which would turn out to be the one studio album Davis would make with the lineup.

Already, the band’s adventurous, avant-garde leanings are on display with the young Williams propelling Davis to scorching heights on the fast swinger “Milestones.” Similarly, Hancock helps turn the standard “I Thought About You” into an impressionistic and free-flowing ballad allowing Davis to spread wide swaths of tonal color and deep note bends across the stage.

Although Coleman would depart the group in less than a year, he proves himself here to be a muscular, keen improviser who deserved more attention than he got at the time.

The 2005 Columbia reissue of Miles Davis in Europe includes one bonus track not available on the original LP as well as new liner notes from noted comic book scribe Harvey Pekar.

Tracklisting

01. Introduction (by Andre Francis)
02. Autumn Leaves
03. Milestones
04. I Thought About You
05. Joshua
06. All Of You
07. Walkin’


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Links

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June 12, 2008 Posted by | Miles Davis, Music_Jazz, _MUSIC | Leave a comment

Miles Davis Quintet – The Legendary Prestige Quintet Sessions (2006) – 4 CD Boxset

Miles Davis Quintet – The Legendary Prestige Quintet Sessions (2006) 4 CD Box Set

Enhanced and Original Recording Remastered
MP3 | 320kbps | RS.com | 556mb total | 5% File Recovery

Personnel:
Miles Davis (trumpet)
John Coltrane (tenor sax)
Red Garland, Bill Evans (piano)
Paul Chambers (bass)
Philly Joe Jones (drums)

The most-reissued performer in jazz is honoured by this 4-CD handsome package for both the 80th year of his birth and the 50th anniversary of most of the three recording sessions represented on these discs.

One of Miles’ later keyboardists observed that most of the major innovations in modern jazz can be traced back to this classic 1950s quintet.

The Legendary Prestige Quintet Sessions documents Davis’ efforts to complete his obligation to Prestige. 32 songs from his current band book were recorded by Rudy Van Gelder in three sessions, the latter two marathons, held between November 1955 and October 1956.

Ten days following the group’s first Columbia session, Davis recorded the first of the Prestige dates. Where the Columbia sides were meticulously constructed over many takes, the Prestige recordings were typically spun off as single performances.

The Prestige management asked Davis to record as if performing live in a club. With an already impressive book, these players simply recorded what they played on the bandstand every night.

The November 16, 1955 date produced six sides, including Benny Golson’s “Stablemates” and the standard “How Am I to Know.” Over the next year, the quintet would join Rudy Van Gelder two more times, on May 11 and October 26, 1956 to record a total of 26 sides, including “Four,” “If I Were a Bell,” and a followup “’Round Midnight” to the one recorded for the Columbia album “’Round About Midnight.”

On the Columbia recording, this Thelonious Monk standard provided John Coltrane the environment for the finest recorded solo of his early career. Arranged by Gil Evans, “’Round Midnight” condensed into five minutes what Miles Davis was all about in the ‘50s, perfectly framing the trumpeter’s most significant contribution to hard bop since “Walkin’.”

Included with the original recordings presented in the order recorded are previously unreleased live recordings of this band from the period of the Prestige recordings. These include the quintet’s appearance of Steve Allen’s Tonight Show (“Max is Making Wax” and “It Never Entered my Mind”), just a day after the first Prestige recordings of this collection. Also present are 1956 recordings from Philadelphia’s Blue Note (“Tune Up” and “Walkin’”) and 1958 recordings from NYC’s Café Bohemia (“Four,” “Bye Bye Blackbird,” “Walkin’” and “Two Bass Hit”). It is very easy to note the confidence of this band as it recorded over this period.

What of this music, then, fifty years later? No other collection of recorded jazz has had as great an influence, not just on American music, but American culture as this.

From movie soundtracks to written fiction, when the aural image of jazz is elicited, it is this music that presents itself to our collective subconscious. Somehow, we all know that this is what jazz is supposed to sound like. The specter of the natty Miles Davis in Italian suits blowing unfiltered cigarette smoke through a Harmon mute is the visual picture of jazz.

From the creative realm, the quintet might have looked a bit like a band of marginal misfits: Davis, a middle-register specialist; Coltrane, sporting the harshest tenor tone around; Garland, a lounge pianist; Jones, a loud and overbearing drummer; and Chambers, a kid not old enough to be doing what he was doing.

Under the direction of Davis, this band produced a seismic shift in American musical thought that can readily be heard on this collection.

For the traditionalist, this was Miles at his best. His arrangements were all well defined and performed in a delineated fashion. Davis was still a year away from increasing tempi and allowing arrangement to disintegrate into ravenous particles.

This is the perfect instrumental jazz to listen to, to understand what jazz is.

– Allaboutjazz.com

https://i0.wp.com/data1.blog.de/blog/b/belette36/img/miles_davis_tutu_b.jpg

In 1955, the 29-year old trumpeter Miles Davis was poised to make history. Having gained some fame for his work with the Charlie Parker Quintet during 1947-48 and for his own Birth Of The Cool nonet recordings (1948-50), Davis had spent several years scuffling before beating a heroin addiction. In 1955 he formed his first regularly working band, a quintet with the then -unknown tenor-saxophonist John Coltrane (who was also 29), pianist Red Garland, bassist Paul Chambers and drummer Philly Joe Jones.

The quintet recorded the record Miles on Nov. 16, 1955 and, to fulfill their contract with Prestige so they could record for Columbia, they made four studio albums on May 11 and Oct. 26, 1956 (Workin’, Relaxin’, Cookin’, and Steamin’), playing one song after another (with no second takes) as they would in a club.

This four-CD box set not only reissues the 32 familiar selections, but has a full disc of broadcasts including an odd appearance on The Tonight Show.

While some of the live music was formerly available on bootlegs, this is its first official commercial release. This is essential music, particularly to those listeners not already in possession of Miles Davis’ five Prestige albums.”

Onewaymagazine.com

http://cache.eb.com/eb/image?id=7922&rendTypeId=4


Tracklisting

Disc 1

1. Stablemates (5:24)
2. How Am I To Know (4:41)
3. Just Squeeze Me (7:28)
4. There Is No Greater Love (5:21)
5. The Theme (5:52)
6. S’Posin (5:17)
7. In Your Own Sweet Way (5:47)
8. Diane (7:51)
9. Trane’s Blues (8:37)
10. Something I Dreamed Last Night (6:15)

Disc 2

1. It Could Happen To You (6:40)
2. Woody’n You (5:04)
3. Ahmad’s Blues (7:28)
4. Surrey With The Fringe On Top (9:07)
5. It Never Entered My Mind (5:27)
6. When I Fall In Love (4:27)
7. Salt Peanuts ((6:10)
8. Four (7:17)
9. The Theme [take 1] (2:02)
10. The Theme [take 2] (1:02)
11. If I Were A Bell (8:20)
12. Well, You Needn’t (6:20)

Disc 3


1. ‘Round Midnight (5:25)
2. Half Nelson (4:49)
3. You’re My Everything (5:21)
4. I Could Write A Book (5:11)
5. Oleo (6:31)
6. Airegin (4:27)
7. Tune Up (5:41)
8. When Lights Are Low (7:35)
9. Blues By Five (10:26)
10. My Funny Valentine (6:01)

Disc 4

1. Steve Allen Intro (1:51)
2. Max Is Making Wax [aka Chance It] (3:05)
3. Steve Allen Intro 2 (2:01)
4. It Never Entered My Mind (2:58)
5. Tune Up (4:23)
6. Walkin’ (5:22)
7. Four (4:54)
8. Bye Bye Blackbird (6:55)
9. Walkin’ (6:35)
10. Two Bass Hit (3:17)



Downloads:
(5x 100mb + 56mb)

File 1
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File 3
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File 6

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May 22, 2008 Posted by | Miles Davis, Music_Jazz, _MUSIC | Leave a comment

Miles Davis – At Newport (1958)

Miles Davis – At Newport (1958)
MP3 | 320kbps | Covers | RS.com | 94mb | 5% File Recovery/Genre: Jazz

Personnel:

Miles Davis (trumpet)
Cannonnball Adderley (alto sax)
John Coltrane (tenor sax)
Bill Evans (piano)
Paul Chambers (bass)
Jimmy Cobb (drums)

Recording Date: July 3, 1958

Thanks to the research that went into the box set The Complete Miles Davis/John Coltrane Sessions, there’s a the definitive Newport 1958 date that features the debut live performances to the Miles Davis Sextet’s two newest members: drummer Jimmy Cobb and pianist Bill Evans.

The gig was part of a festival tribute to Duke Ellington, but that didn’t stop Davis from showing off — aggressively — what his new band was capable of (six months later he would show the world when the band went to record Kind of Blue).

This is a revelatory performance for fans of Evans. When Cobb kicks off into Charlie Parker’s “Au-Leu-Cha,” the tempo is breakneck. Davis’ solo is all fire, pure heat, and inspiration. The melody goes by in a blink, and Cobb and Chambers carry the dictum to go faster as Davis gives way first to Coltrane, already moving his angular lines to the harmonic breaking point and doing them not in scales but in modes, fast and footloose. He’s down in the groove before giving it to Cannonball Adderley to show off his bebop chops — which he possesses in spades. He’s out of the Bird book to be sure, but his tone is stunning and he’s loose, free as a bird as he leaps from one idea to the next before the melody shifts the tune back to Earth for only a second.

The sextet doesn’t stop when it literally rocks through Thelonious Monk’s “Straight No Chaser.” Evans’ harmonic invention on the tune couldn’t be further from the composer’s, but it hardly matters. His melodic fire and ability to move tonal mountains in the harmonic intervals is near effortless.

Coltrane’s solo is notable in that he’s squeaking and squawking for the first time on record, and Adderley’s for how rich and melodic it is. By the time Evans gets to his solo, he’s down in Monk’s blues all right, but they’re so ornate and beautiful, they swing, sway, and are full of color, as nuanced as they come. There is no academia in his approach — it’s all emotion and sophistication.

The rest of the set follows suit: “Fran-Dance,” “Two Bass Hit,” “Bye Bye Blackbird” (which has never sounded like this before or since), and the blistering “The Theme” all burn with white heat.

It’s obvious Davis was pulling out all the stops for this audience, bringing down the house, and perhaps realizing himself just what this band was capable of musically. Who knows? It doesn’t matter, fans can finally have an accurate record of this performance that has been scattered over other issues, misdated, miscredited, and badly mastered.

This volume finally sets straight what happened on that afternoon in 1958 at the Newport Jazz Festival.

– Allmusic.com

Amazon reviewer Samuel Chell:

There’s certainly nothing inferior, nothing missed or bungled on this set, which Columbia inexplicably held for 6 years before its initial release, then waited another 20 for a subsequent release, finally producing this bright and bracing remastered version.

Miles is definitely out to prove that the loss of two key members of his previous sextet– pianist Red Garland and percussionist Philly Joe Jones–was in no way injurious to its level of creativity or intensity. The tempos are way up (as Miles was inclined to call them when not in the studio), and Coltrane tears through changes like a man possessed–a harbinger of what was to come, but at an earlier stage than many listeners might have previously assumed.

Anyone who has read Peter Pettinger’s biography of Bill Evans is aware of the tensions–racial as well as musical–that Bill felt during his relatively brief stint with Miles. Caught between the onslaught of Coltrane and Cannonball, it’s a wonder that he gets heard at all. But he chooses his moments carefully, and makes the most of each, making the album an especially valuable record of the band during Bill’s occupation of the piano chair. And Paul Chambers is a bedrock through the entire session.

Miles was the “enabler,” placing Coltrane and Evans together on the same stage from which each would depart to become, arguably, the two most influential voices in jazz post-1960. Coltrane was the “winner” on this date, but the Evans’ influence would prevail when Miles summoned Bill to rejoin the band for its recording a year later on what would become the most successful, popular, seminal jazz album of all time, “Kind of Blue.”

“Miles at Newport 1958” represents a key chapter in the story of jazz after bebop, and this reissued, expertly remastered recording helps make up for the exclusion of Miles’ group in “Jazz on a Summer’s Day,” the highly regarded filming of the 1958 festival.

Tracklisting

1. Introduction by Willis Conover (2:16)
2. Ah-Leu-Cha (5:52)
3. Straight, No Chaser (8:47)
4. Fran-Dance (7:13)
5. Two Bass Hit (4:10)
6. Bye Bye Blackbird (9:10)
7. The Theme (2:48)

Here’s Miles;

Newport

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May 22, 2008 Posted by | Miles Davis, Music_Jazz, _MUSIC | Leave a comment

OST – Miles Davis – John Lee Hooker: The Hot Spot

OST – Miles Davis – John Lee Hooker: The Hot Spot
Soundtrack | Jazz | Blues | mp3 320 kbps Stereo | 96 Mb
The Hot Spot blends Miles Davis’ lonely blue trumpet, with John Lee Hooker’s moans and machine-gun electric guitar, Taj Mahal’s country guitar picking, and Ry Cooder’s peerless slide guitar.

It’s a musical Dream Team of sorts and the potential is staggering. Each of these artists is an icon in his own right. How do they blend together?

To be honest, the results are mixed. There are some absolute standout songs here—a few choice tracks that merit you rushing down to your local record store and buying this album straightaway: Bank Robbery, for instance, is the pitch-perfect blend of jazz and blues—a hard driving, blend…equal parts sophisticated bop and raw blasts of juke joint guitar. There are moments of absolute, jaw-dropping beauty, in which each artist displays their trademark style without smothering anyone else’s sound.”

– Vernon Felton

Tracklisting

1. Coming To Town – John Lee Hooker, Earl Palmer, Tim Drummond, Miles Davis, Roy Rogers
2. Empty Bank – Taj Mahal, Miles Davis, Earl Palmer, Tim Drummond, Roy Rogers
3. Harry’s Philosophy – John Lee Hooker
4. Dolly’s Arrival – Earl Palmer, Tim Drummond, Roy Rogers, Taj Mahal
8. Moanin’ – John Lee Hooker
9. Gloria’s Story – Miles Davis, Bradford Ellis
10. Harry Sets Up Sutton – John Lee Hooker, Tim Drummond, Miles Davis, Roy Rogers, Taj Mahal
11. Murder – John Lee Hooker, Miles Davis, Tim Drummond, Roy Rogers, Bradford Ellis
12. Blackmail – Miles Davis, John Lee Hooker, Earl Palmer, Tim Drummond, Roy Rogers, Taj Mahal
13. End Credits – John Lee Hooker, Earl Palmer, Tim Drummond, Miles Davis, Roy Rogers, Taj Mahal

Here be legends

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May 22, 2008 Posted by | Miles Davis, Milt Jackson, Music_Jazz, _MUSIC | Leave a comment

Miles Davis and Milt Jackson – Quintet and Sextet (1955)

Miles Davis and Milt Jackson – Quintet and Sextet (1955)
MP3 | 192kbps | Cover + Tray | RS.com | 51mb
Genre: Jazz
This classic was recorded at the Van Gelder Studio, Hackensack, New Jersey on August 5, 1955.

The LP was originally released on Prestige (7034).

The personnel as well of course as Miles on trumpet, are Milt Jackson (vibraphone), Jackie McLean (alto saxophone), Ray Bryant (piano), Percy Heath (bass) and Art Taylor (drums).
Quintet and Sextet is notable for two compositions by Jackie McLean: “Dr. Jackle” and “Minor March” (which appears on his famous 1959 Blue Note date New Soil as “Minor Apprehension”).

“Dr. Jackle” is a Charlie Parker-ish line featuring a masterful Milt Jackson symposium on the blues – Miles’ typically lyric approach, a tart, spacious flight from McLean, and a soulful, dancing Ray Bryant.

“Minor March” is a mysterious minor figure with jabbing rhythm breaks and a joyous bridge that recalls “Tempus Fugit.” McLean’s vaulting cadences and fervent cry anticipate the rapture of his mature style, and Bryant takes a harmonically adventuresome solo.

Elsewhere the group digs into the Bud Powell-like changes of Ray Bryant’s low, slow “Changes” (over the rock solid groove of Percy Heath and Art Taylor), and the quirky harmonies and angular melodies of Thad Jones’ “Bitty Ditty.”

“Changes” inspires a lovely muted statement from Davis, and illustrates Bryant’s unique blend of blues, sanctified gospel and bebop. Davis and Jackson combine for pungent voicings on the head to “Bitty Ditty,” then demonstrate their elegant mastery of harmony and swing. Both are inspired by the shape of Jones’ line, completely unfazed by its intricacies.

Allmusic.com:

Most of Miles Davis’ Prestige recordings (all of which are currently available in the Original Jazz Classics series) have also been reissued by the audiophile CD label DCC Jazz. This is one of the trumpeter’s lesser-known sets, an outing with friends: the up-and-coming pianist Ray Bryant, bassist Percy Heath, drummer Art Taylor, vibraphonist Milt Jackson and (on two of the four songs) altoist Jackie McLean. The brevity of the program (only a touch over 30 minutes) keeps this enjoyable outing from being too essential.

Q Magazine (3/00, p.118) – 4 stars out of 5

“…packs more excitement and inspiration into half an hour than a good deal of the more substantial and feted Davis/Coltrane sessions that would follow….vibraphonist Milt Jackson is in unusually aggressive mood and Davis himself is at his sweetest.”


Cduniverse.com:

Lesser heralded than their collaboration with Monk (as documented on BAGS’ GROOVE and MILES DAVIS AND THE MODERN JAZZ GIANTS), this August 5, 1955 session with vibraphonist Milt Jackson was Miles’ last all-star collaboration before the formation of his first classic quintet. It marked a farewell to an older generation of acolytes and fellow travellers. Miles was entering a new era of leadership and international stardom, and generally he would only record with his working groups.

Tracklisting

1. Dr.Jackle 8.47
2. Bitty Ditty 6.31
3. Minor March 8.12
4. Changes 7.08

Here be Miles and Milt

Miles and Milt

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May 21, 2008 Posted by | Miles Davis, Milt Jackson, Music_Jazz, _MUSIC | 3 Comments

Miles Davis – Complete Live at Plugged Nickel 1965 (8 CDs!!)

Miles Davis - Complete Live at Plugged Nickel 1965
Miles Davis – Complete Live at Plugged Nickel 1965
Jazz | mp3 VBR 256kbps-320kbps | 158MB+121MB+150MB+159MB+107MB | 1965

Performers

* Miles Davis – trumpet
* Wayne Shorter – tenor saxophone
* Herbie Hancock – piano
* Ron Carter – double bass
* Tony Williams – drums

A seminal and extensive recording which documents Miles and his famous Quintet (his second great ensemble) during their famous two night stint at Chicago’s Plugged Nickel in 1965.

All Thanks to museboat for this wonderful post!

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This magnificent eight-CD set captures Miles Davis’s second great quintet at its fiercest, loose with both the blossoming of familiarity between the players and the broadness of its attacks on the mostly well known tunes the group called during two nights at Chicago’s Plugged Nickel in 1965.

And you can hear it all, from “The Theme” that closed the quintet’s sets to multiple, radically different takes of several tunes. Davis formed this band with just its heated potential in mind, opting for youth in Wayne Shorter’s tenor sax, Herbie Hancock’s piano, Ron Carter’s bass, and, especially, Tony Williams’s unlocked rhythmic energy.

It does the mind good when listening to these takes on “If I Were a Bell,” “Stella by Starlight,” and the polarizing “All Blues” and “No Blues” that Williams was under 20 when punching this group’s forward motion.

These live shows make clear that Davis was a savvy cat, sticking to the tried ‘n’ true when playing live and then indulging new tunes that eschewed formulaic jazz structures on the string of his new quintet’s explosive studio recordings that began months earlier with E.S.P. (all of them found on the Grammy-winning Complete Columbia Studio Sessions, 1965-’68 box set).

But the Plugged Nickel tunes show that familiar or not, these tunes are platforms for creative apexes when played live. Davis’s trumpet is typically midrange, except when he deconstructs even his own range limitations with squawks and artful miscues.

Shorter braves convolutions that tear into his tone, taking his solos far afield from the harmony and melodies at hand only to reshape the tunes. As live jazz, this collection is possibly some of the best in recorded history, adventurous without leaving the ears boxed and powerfully enlightening about where Miles Davis would go in the 1960s.

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Tracklisting ( plus links) by CD

CD1

01 – If I Were A Bell
02 – Stella By Starlight
03 – Walkin’
04 – I Fall In Love Too Easily
05 – The Theme

CD2

01 – My Funny Valentine
02 – Four
03 – When I Fall In Love

CD3

01 – Agitation
02 – Round About Midnight
03 – Milestones
04 – The Theme


CD4

01 – All Of You
02 – Oleo.mp3
03 – I Fall In Love Too Easily
04 – No Blues.mp3
05 – I Thought About You
06 – The Theme

//tn3-1.deviantart.com/300W/fs7.deviantart.com/i/2005/253/9/7/Miles_Davis_by_Icarian.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.


CD5


01 – If I Were A Bell
02 – Stella By Starlight
03 – Walkin’
04 – I Fall In Love Too Easily
05 – The Theme

CD6

01 – All Of You
02 – Agitation
03 – My Funny Valentine
04 – On Green Dolphin Street
05 – So What
06 – The Theme

Part 2

(NOTE: Part 2 link now fixed!)

CD7


01 – When I Fall In Love
02 – Milestones
03 – Autumn Leaves
04 – I Fall In Love Too Easily
05 – No Blues
06 – The Theme

CD8

01 – Stella By Starlight
02 – All Blues
03 – Yesterdays
04 – The Theme

All Thanks to museboat for this wonderful post

http://stupidd.blogspot.com/

Mail us: stupidand@gmail.com

May 20, 2008 Posted by | Miles Davis, Music_Jazz, _MUSIC | 3 Comments

Miles Davis Quintet – Steamin’ With The Miles Davis Quintet (FLAC – DCC Gold)

Miles Davis Quintet – Steamin’ With The Miles Davis Quintet (DCC Gold)

Genre: Jazz/Audiophile | FLAC – Lossless with Cue and Log | 3 files 247 MB | 5% Recovery | Complete Scans – 300 dpi | RS

Audio CD (August 29, 1994)

Original Release Date: May 11, 1956
Number of Discs: 1
Format: Limited Edition, Gold CD, Original recording reissued, Original recording remastered
Label: Dcc Compact Classics
ASIN: B00000017N

“A Truly Special Moment in American Music”
This was the last of four albums recorded by the Miles Davis Quintet for Prestige records in 1956 (Cookin’, Relaxin’, and Workin’ are the others.)

The highlight, and without a doubt one of the best recordings from the 1956 Prestige sessions, is The Surrey with the Fringe on Top”. The rhythm section sets up their perfect light swinging groove, over which Miles’s weaves a witty, melodic trumpet solo. Coltrane follows, barrelling ahead and providing the perfect constrast. “Diane” mines a similar groove though not quite reaching the same heights. The two ballads (“Something I Dreamed Last Night” and “When I Fall in Love”) are typical for Miles during this time, with Coltrane sitting out.

Tracklisting

1. Surrey With The Fringe On Top (9:08)
2. Salt Peanuts (6:10)
3. Something I Dreamed Last Night (6:17)
4. Diane (7:53)
5. Well, You Needn’t (6:22)
6. When I Fall In Love (4:26)


Here be miles and
miles of Miles!

DOWNLOAD

Thanks to chronograph

February 12, 2008 Posted by | John Coltrane, Miles Davis, Music_Jazz, _MUSIC | Leave a comment

Miles Davis Quintet – Steamin’ With The Miles Davis Quintet (FLAC – DCC Gold)

Miles Davis Quintet – Steamin’ With The Miles Davis Quintet (DCC Gold)

Genre: Jazz/Audiophile | FLAC – Lossless with Cue and Log | 3 files 247 MB | 5% Recovery | Complete Scans – 300 dpi | RS

Audio CD (August 29, 1994)

Original Release Date: May 11, 1956
Number of Discs: 1
Format: Limited Edition, Gold CD, Original recording reissued, Original recording remastered
Label: Dcc Compact Classics
ASIN: B00000017N

“A Truly Special Moment in American Music”
This was the last of four albums recorded by the Miles Davis Quintet for Prestige records in 1956 (Cookin’, Relaxin’, and Workin’ are the others.)

The highlight, and without a doubt one of the best recordings from the 1956 Prestige sessions, is The Surrey with the Fringe on Top”. The rhythm section sets up their perfect light swinging groove, over which Miles’s weaves a witty, melodic trumpet solo. Coltrane follows, barrelling ahead and providing the perfect constrast. “Diane” mines a similar groove though not quite reaching the same heights. The two ballads (“Something I Dreamed Last Night” and “When I Fall in Love”) are typical for Miles during this time, with Coltrane sitting out.

Tracklisting

1. Surrey With The Fringe On Top (9:08)
2. Salt Peanuts (6:10)
3. Something I Dreamed Last Night (6:17)
4. Diane (7:53)
5. Well, You Needn’t (6:22)
6. When I Fall In Love (4:26)


Here be miles and
miles of Miles!

DOWNLOAD

Thanks to chronograph

February 12, 2008 Posted by | John Coltrane, Miles Davis, Music_Jazz, _MUSIC | Leave a comment

Miles Davis – Kind of Blue (FLAC – Master Sound – Super Bit Mapping)


Miles Davis – Kind of Blue (Master Sound – Super Bit Mapping)
Genre: Jazz/Audiophile | FLAC – Lossless with Cue and Log | 4 files 349 MB | 5% Recovery | Complete Scans – 300 dpi | RS

“It’s one thing to just play a tune, or play a program of music, but it’s another thing to practically create a new language of music, which is what Kind of Blue did”

Chick Corea

Not only has Kind of Blue has been cited as the best jazz record of all time, it is actually fair to say that in all of the twentieth century, and indeed beyond, this majestic work from 1959 by Davis, with some great Jazz musicians such as John Coltrane, stands proudly with the greatest music created in any genre.
Miles Davis, after purveying the be-bop style of jazz for many years, became greatly influenced by the ideas of pianist George Russell who in 1953 published his Lydian Chromatic Concept of Tonal Organization, which offered an alternative to the practice of improvisation based on chords. Abandoning the traditional major and minor key relationships of Western music, Russell developed a new formulation using scales or a series of scales for improvisations; this approach came to be known as Modal in jazz.

Davis implemented his first modal composition with the title track of his 1958 album Milestones, and, satisfied with the results, Davis now wanted to create an entire album based on modality.

Pianist Bill Evans, also an enthusiast of Russell, but recently departed from the Davis band to pursue his own career, was successfully drafted in to the new recording project – the sessions that would become Kind of Blue.

The entire album was composed as a series modal sketches, in which each performer was given a set of scales that defined the parameters of their improvisation. This was in contrast to more typical means of composing, such as providing musicians with a complete score or, as was more common for improvisational jazz, providing the musicians with a chord progression or series of harmonies.

Davis saw Russell’s methods of composition as a means of getting away from the dense chord-laden compositions of his time, which Davis had labeled “thick”. Modal composition, with its reliance on scales and modes, represented “a return to melody.”

The album was recorded in two sessions, on March 2 for the tracks “So What,” “Freddie Freeloader,” and “Blue in Green,” composing side one of the original LP, and April 22 for the tracks “All Blues,” “Flamenco Sketches,” making up side two.

As was Davis’ penchant, he called for almost no rehearsal and the musicians had little idea what they were to record; as described in the original liner notes by Evans, the band had only sketches of scales and melody lines to go on.

Once the great musicians were assembled, Davis gave brief instructions for each piece, then set to taping. While the results are impressive with so little preparation, the persistent legend of the entire album being recorded in one pass is untrue. Only “All Blues” was completed in a single take, with the other tracks being finalized after 3-6 takes each, including a piano solo insert for “Freddie Freeloader”.

Kind of Blue is not only regarded as one of Davis’s masterworks, but one of the most influential albums in the history of jazz. One reviewer has called it “a record generally considered as the definitive jazz album, a universally acknowledged standard of excellence.” Several of the songs from the album have become jazz standards.

The influence of the album quickly built, and all of the sidemen from the album would achieve success on their own.

Evans formed his influential jazz trio with bassist Scott LaFaro and drummer Paul Motian; “Cannonball” Adderley would front his popular bands with his brother Nat; Kelly, Chambers, and Cobb would continue as a touring unit, recording under Kelly’s name as well as in support of Coltrane and Wes Montgomery, among others; Coltrane would go on to become one of the most revered and innovative jazz musicians in history. Even more than Davis, Coltrane took the modal approach and ran with it during his brief career as a leader in the 1960s, leavening his music with Ornette Coleman’s ideas of free jazz innovations, as the decade progressed.

In his book, Kind of Blue: The Making of a Miles Davis Masterpiece, author Ashley Kahn wrote that “still acknowledged as the height of hip four decades after it was recorded, Kind of Blue is the premier album of its era, jazz or otherwise. Its vapory piano introduction is universally recognized” (Kahn 2001:16).

Producer Quincy Jones, one of Davis’ longtime friends, wrote: “That [Kind of Blue] will always be my music, man. I play Kind of Blue every day — it’s my orange juice. It still sounds like it was made yesterday” (Kahn 2001:19).

https://i2.wp.com/www.smr-home-theatre.org/Reviews/images/Miles_Davis_Kind_of_Blue.gifPianist Chick Corea, one of Miles’ acolytes, was also struck by its majesty. He said: “It’s one thing to just play a tune, or play a program of music, but it’s another thing to practically create a new language of music, which is what Kind of Blue did” (Kahn 2001:19).

One significant aspect of Kind of Blue is that the entire record, not just one track, was revolutionary. Gary Burton noted this occurrence. “It wasn’t just one tune that was a breakthrough, it was the whole record. When new jazz styles come along, the first few attempts to do it are usually kind of shaky. Early Charlie Parker records were like this. But with Kind of Blue [the sextet] all sound like they’re fully into it” (Kahn 2001:179).

“As the painter needs his framework of parchment, the improvising musical group needs its framework in time,” says Bill Evans in the liner notes to Kind of Blue. “Miles Davis presents here frameworks which are exquisite in their simplicity and yet contain all that is necessary to stimulate performance with a sure reference to the primary conception.” Amen. During the past 40 years, the performances Davis’ stimulated from Evans, John Coltrane, Cannonball Adderley, Paul Chambers, Jimmy Cobb, and Wynton Kelly have become some of the most storied in jazz, and all of them – classics such as “Freddie the Freeloader,” “All Blues,” “Blue in Green,” and, of course, “So What” (featured) – are featured on this Columbia/Legacy reissue.

Many, many, many things in life are over-hyped. Especially things that were huge and revolutionary at their times, things you have been told to check out and haven’t gotten around to. Movies in particular are like this for me. I’ll put on a movie like the Graduate or the Shining, things I’ve been told are great, and please don’t tell anybody but I can’t believe how bored I can be. I like them only because I know I’m supposed to like them to show how truly sophisticated I am.

Kind of Blue is the exception to this rule. It is hyped, it is the one jazz album you are told to own if you only own one jazz album, and it is absolutely worthy of the adulation. I promise.

When I first started collecting jazz albums, I was told by an old Chicago cat that Kind of Blue was “the Bible” and Coltrane’s rendition of “My Favorite Things” was the national anthem. He was right. No matter how my collection has grown, no matter through how many different alleyways and conduits my taste has wandered, no matter what’s stewing in my synapses, I always return to So What, Freddie Freeloader, Blue in Green, and All Blues (that’s right, I skip Flamenco Sketches, but So What?). Buy it and listen to it until it seeps into your dreams, becomes the soundtrack to your strut, and fills your soul with the sacred expanding nothingness.”

Tracklisting

1. So What (9:10)
2. Freddie Freeloader (9:47)
3. Blue In Green (5:37)
4. All Blues (11:37)
5. Flamenco Sketches (9:22)

Personnel

– Miles Davis – trumpet, leader

– Julian “Cannonball” Adderley – alto saxophone, except on “Blue in Green”

– John Coltrane – tenor saxophone

– Wynton Kelly – piano, only on “Freddie Freeloader”

– Bill Evans – piano, liner notes

– Paul Chambers – bass

– Jimmy Cobb – drums

Additional personnel

– Teo Macero – producer

– Irving Townsend – original recording producer

– Fred Plaut – recording engineer

– Michael Cuscuna – reissue producer

– Mark Wilder – remix engineer

– Gil Evans – arranger

https://i2.wp.com/www.smr-home-theatre.org/Reviews/images/Miles_Davis_Kind_of_Blue.gif
Here be the Miles’ majestic milestone music:

DOWNLOAD

Big Thanks to chronograph !

February 12, 2008 Posted by | Miles Davis, Music_Jazz, _MUSIC | Leave a comment

Miles Davis – Kind of Blue (FLAC – Master Sound – Super Bit Mapping)


Miles Davis – Kind of Blue (Master Sound – Super Bit Mapping)
Genre: Jazz/Audiophile | FLAC – Lossless with Cue and Log | 4 files 349 MB | 5% Recovery | Complete Scans – 300 dpi | RS

“It’s one thing to just play a tune, or play a program of music, but it’s another thing to practically create a new language of music, which is what Kind of Blue did”

Chick Corea

Not only has Kind of Blue has been cited as the best jazz record of all time, it is actually fair to say that in all of the twentieth century, and indeed beyond, this majestic work from 1959 by Davis, with some great Jazz musicians such as John Coltrane, stands proudly with the greatest music created in any genre.
Miles Davis, after purveying the be-bop style of jazz for many years, became greatly influenced by the ideas of pianist George Russell who in 1953 published his Lydian Chromatic Concept of Tonal Organization, which offered an alternative to the practice of improvisation based on chords. Abandoning the traditional major and minor key relationships of Western music, Russell developed a new formulation using scales or a series of scales for improvisations; this approach came to be known as Modal in jazz.

Davis implemented his first modal composition with the title track of his 1958 album Milestones, and, satisfied with the results, Davis now wanted to create an entire album based on modality.

Pianist Bill Evans, also an enthusiast of Russell, but recently departed from the Davis band to pursue his own career, was successfully drafted in to the new recording project – the sessions that would become Kind of Blue.

The entire album was composed as a series modal sketches, in which each performer was given a set of scales that defined the parameters of their improvisation. This was in contrast to more typical means of composing, such as providing musicians with a complete score or, as was more common for improvisational jazz, providing the musicians with a chord progression or series of harmonies.

Davis saw Russell’s methods of composition as a means of getting away from the dense chord-laden compositions of his time, which Davis had labeled “thick”. Modal composition, with its reliance on scales and modes, represented “a return to melody.”

The album was recorded in two sessions, on March 2 for the tracks “So What,” “Freddie Freeloader,” and “Blue in Green,” composing side one of the original LP, and April 22 for the tracks “All Blues,” “Flamenco Sketches,” making up side two.

As was Davis’ penchant, he called for almost no rehearsal and the musicians had little idea what they were to record; as described in the original liner notes by Evans, the band had only sketches of scales and melody lines to go on.

Once the great musicians were assembled, Davis gave brief instructions for each piece, then set to taping. While the results are impressive with so little preparation, the persistent legend of the entire album being recorded in one pass is untrue. Only “All Blues” was completed in a single take, with the other tracks being finalized after 3-6 takes each, including a piano solo insert for “Freddie Freeloader”.

Kind of Blue is not only regarded as one of Davis’s masterworks, but one of the most influential albums in the history of jazz. One reviewer has called it “a record generally considered as the definitive jazz album, a universally acknowledged standard of excellence.” Several of the songs from the album have become jazz standards.

The influence of the album quickly built, and all of the sidemen from the album would achieve success on their own.

Evans formed his influential jazz trio with bassist Scott LaFaro and drummer Paul Motian; “Cannonball” Adderley would front his popular bands with his brother Nat; Kelly, Chambers, and Cobb would continue as a touring unit, recording under Kelly’s name as well as in support of Coltrane and Wes Montgomery, among others; Coltrane would go on to become one of the most revered and innovative jazz musicians in history. Even more than Davis, Coltrane took the modal approach and ran with it during his brief career as a leader in the 1960s, leavening his music with Ornette Coleman’s ideas of free jazz innovations, as the decade progressed.

In his book, Kind of Blue: The Making of a Miles Davis Masterpiece, author Ashley Kahn wrote that “still acknowledged as the height of hip four decades after it was recorded, Kind of Blue is the premier album of its era, jazz or otherwise. Its vapory piano introduction is universally recognized” (Kahn 2001:16).

Producer Quincy Jones, one of Davis’ longtime friends, wrote: “That [Kind of Blue] will always be my music, man. I play Kind of Blue every day — it’s my orange juice. It still sounds like it was made yesterday” (Kahn 2001:19).

https://i2.wp.com/www.smr-home-theatre.org/Reviews/images/Miles_Davis_Kind_of_Blue.gifPianist Chick Corea, one of Miles’ acolytes, was also struck by its majesty. He said: “It’s one thing to just play a tune, or play a program of music, but it’s another thing to practically create a new language of music, which is what Kind of Blue did” (Kahn 2001:19).

One significant aspect of Kind of Blue is that the entire record, not just one track, was revolutionary. Gary Burton noted this occurrence. “It wasn’t just one tune that was a breakthrough, it was the whole record. When new jazz styles come along, the first few attempts to do it are usually kind of shaky. Early Charlie Parker records were like this. But with Kind of Blue [the sextet] all sound like they’re fully into it” (Kahn 2001:179).

“As the painter needs his framework of parchment, the improvising musical group needs its framework in time,” says Bill Evans in the liner notes to Kind of Blue. “Miles Davis presents here frameworks which are exquisite in their simplicity and yet contain all that is necessary to stimulate performance with a sure reference to the primary conception.” Amen. During the past 40 years, the performances Davis’ stimulated from Evans, John Coltrane, Cannonball Adderley, Paul Chambers, Jimmy Cobb, and Wynton Kelly have become some of the most storied in jazz, and all of them – classics such as “Freddie the Freeloader,” “All Blues,” “Blue in Green,” and, of course, “So What” (featured) – are featured on this Columbia/Legacy reissue.

Many, many, many things in life are over-hyped. Especially things that were huge and revolutionary at their times, things you have been told to check out and haven’t gotten around to. Movies in particular are like this for me. I’ll put on a movie like the Graduate or the Shining, things I’ve been told are great, and please don’t tell anybody but I can’t believe how bored I can be. I like them only because I know I’m supposed to like them to show how truly sophisticated I am.

Kind of Blue is the exception to this rule. It is hyped, it is the one jazz album you are told to own if you only own one jazz album, and it is absolutely worthy of the adulation. I promise.

When I first started collecting jazz albums, I was told by an old Chicago cat that Kind of Blue was “the Bible” and Coltrane’s rendition of “My Favorite Things” was the national anthem. He was right. No matter how my collection has grown, no matter through how many different alleyways and conduits my taste has wandered, no matter what’s stewing in my synapses, I always return to So What, Freddie Freeloader, Blue in Green, and All Blues (that’s right, I skip Flamenco Sketches, but So What?). Buy it and listen to it until it seeps into your dreams, becomes the soundtrack to your strut, and fills your soul with the sacred expanding nothingness.”

Tracklisting

1. So What (9:10)
2. Freddie Freeloader (9:47)
3. Blue In Green (5:37)
4. All Blues (11:37)
5. Flamenco Sketches (9:22)

Personnel

– Miles Davis – trumpet, leader

– Julian “Cannonball” Adderley – alto saxophone, except on “Blue in Green”

– John Coltrane – tenor saxophone

– Wynton Kelly – piano, only on “Freddie Freeloader”

– Bill Evans – piano, liner notes

– Paul Chambers – bass

– Jimmy Cobb – drums

Additional personnel

– Teo Macero – producer

– Irving Townsend – original recording producer

– Fred Plaut – recording engineer

– Michael Cuscuna – reissue producer

– Mark Wilder – remix engineer

– Gil Evans – arranger

https://i2.wp.com/www.smr-home-theatre.org/Reviews/images/Miles_Davis_Kind_of_Blue.gif
Here be the Miles’ majestic milestone music:

DOWNLOAD

Big Thanks to chronograph !

February 12, 2008 Posted by | Miles Davis, Music_Jazz, _MUSIC | Leave a comment

Miles Davis – The Complete On the Corner Sessions [BOX SET] (2007)

Miles Davis – The Complete On the Corner Sessions [BOX SET] (2007)

In a sense, the 1972 release ON THE CORNER was the culmination of what Miles Davis had been working towards since 1969’s IN A SILENT WAY, where he began experimenting with a full-on electric ensemble and moving beyond straight-ahead jazz. THE COMPLETE ON THE CORNER SESSIONS, boasting six discs and a wealth of previously unheard music, shines a light on just how groundbreaking these sessions were.

With a huge cast of accompanists including John McLaughlin, Chick Corea, Bernard Purdie, and many more, Davis definitively transcended the jazz template and fully embraced a new form that incorporated jazz, rock, funk, and the avant garde, but was truly its own beast.

Eschewing harmonic/melodic development, these tracks are powered by shifts in dynamics and texture over percolating grooves, and would prove hugely influential to hip-hop, dub, electronica, and more, for decades to come.

By including outtakes and full versions of edited tracks, this collection finally lets the layers of Miles and producer Teo Macero’s complex tapestry unfold with the proper breathing room, making it clear why what was initially one of Miles’ worst-selling albums would eventually be regarded as a high-water mark even he would never surpass.

http://home.ica.net/~blooms/MILES%20DAVIS%20B_W.jpg

DISC 1:

1. On the Corner – (Unedited Master)
2. On the Corner – (Take 4)
3. One And One – (Unedited Master)
4. Helen Butte / Mr. Freedom X – (Unedited Master)
5. Jabali – (previously unreleased)

DISC 2:

1. Ife
2. Chieftain – (previously unreleased)
3. Rated X
4. Turnaround – (previously unreleased)
5. U-Turnaround – (previously unreleased)

DISC 3:

1. Billy Preston
2. Hen, The – (previously unreleased)
3. Big Fun / Holly-Wuud – (previously unreleased)
4. Big Fun / Holly-Wuud – (Take 3)
5. Peace – (previously unreleased)
6. Mr. Foster – (previously unreleased)

DISC 4:

1. Calypso Frelimo
2. He Loved Him Madly

DISC 5:

1. Maiysha
2. Mtume
3. Mtume – (previously unreleased, Take 11)
4. Hip-Skip – (previously unreleased)
5. What They Do – (previously unreleased)
6. Minnie – (previously unreleased)

DISC 6:

1. Red China Blues
2. On the Corner / New York Girl / Thinkin’ Of One Thing And Doin’ Another / Vote For Miles
3. Black Satin
4. One And One
5. Helen Butte / Mr. Freedom X
6. Big Fun
7. Holly-Wuud

Personnel:

Miles Davis (trumpet, electric piano); Pete Cosey (guitar, drums); Cornell Dupree, Dominique Gaumont, John McLaughlin, Reggie Lucas, Dave Creamer (guitar); Colin Walcott, Khalil Balakrishna (electric sitar); Bennie Maupin (flute, bass clarinet); Dave Liebman (flute, soprano saxophone, tenor saxophone); Sonny Fortune (flute, soprano saxophone); Wally Chambers (harmonica); Carlos Garnett (sopranino saxophone, soprano saxophone, tenor saxophone); Dave Lieberman, John Stubblefield (soprano saxophone); Harold Ivory Williams, Herbie Hancock (electric piano, organ, synthesizer); Cedric Lawson (electric piano, organ); Lonnie Liston Smith (electric piano); Chick Corea (synthesizer); Michael Henderson (electric bass); Billy Hart (drums, cowbells, wood block, percussion); Jack DeJohnette, Al Foster, Bernard Purdie (drums); Mtume (congas, claves, percussion); Don Alias (congas, kalimba, percussion); Badal Roy (tabla).

January 7, 2008 Posted by | Miles Davis, Music_Jazz, _MUSIC | Leave a comment

Miles Davis – The Complete On the Corner Sessions [BOX SET] (2007)

Miles Davis – The Complete On the Corner Sessions [BOX SET] (2007)

In a sense, the 1972 release ON THE CORNER was the culmination of what Miles Davis had been working towards since 1969’s IN A SILENT WAY, where he began experimenting with a full-on electric ensemble and moving beyond straight-ahead jazz. THE COMPLETE ON THE CORNER SESSIONS, boasting six discs and a wealth of previously unheard music, shines a light on just how groundbreaking these sessions were.

With a huge cast of accompanists including John McLaughlin, Chick Corea, Bernard Purdie, and many more, Davis definitively transcended the jazz template and fully embraced a new form that incorporated jazz, rock, funk, and the avant garde, but was truly its own beast.

Eschewing harmonic/melodic development, these tracks are powered by shifts in dynamics and texture over percolating grooves, and would prove hugely influential to hip-hop, dub, electronica, and more, for decades to come.

By including outtakes and full versions of edited tracks, this collection finally lets the layers of Miles and producer Teo Macero’s complex tapestry unfold with the proper breathing room, making it clear why what was initially one of Miles’ worst-selling albums would eventually be regarded as a high-water mark even he would never surpass.

http://home.ica.net/~blooms/MILES%20DAVIS%20B_W.jpg

DISC 1:

1. On the Corner – (Unedited Master)
2. On the Corner – (Take 4)
3. One And One – (Unedited Master)
4. Helen Butte / Mr. Freedom X – (Unedited Master)
5. Jabali – (previously unreleased)

DISC 2:

1. Ife
2. Chieftain – (previously unreleased)
3. Rated X
4. Turnaround – (previously unreleased)
5. U-Turnaround – (previously unreleased)

DISC 3:

1. Billy Preston
2. Hen, The – (previously unreleased)
3. Big Fun / Holly-Wuud – (previously unreleased)
4. Big Fun / Holly-Wuud – (Take 3)
5. Peace – (previously unreleased)
6. Mr. Foster – (previously unreleased)

DISC 4:

1. Calypso Frelimo
2. He Loved Him Madly

DISC 5:

1. Maiysha
2. Mtume
3. Mtume – (previously unreleased, Take 11)
4. Hip-Skip – (previously unreleased)
5. What They Do – (previously unreleased)
6. Minnie – (previously unreleased)

DISC 6:

1. Red China Blues
2. On the Corner / New York Girl / Thinkin’ Of One Thing And Doin’ Another / Vote For Miles
3. Black Satin
4. One And One
5. Helen Butte / Mr. Freedom X
6. Big Fun
7. Holly-Wuud

Personnel:

Miles Davis (trumpet, electric piano); Pete Cosey (guitar, drums); Cornell Dupree, Dominique Gaumont, John McLaughlin, Reggie Lucas, Dave Creamer (guitar); Colin Walcott, Khalil Balakrishna (electric sitar); Bennie Maupin (flute, bass clarinet); Dave Liebman (flute, soprano saxophone, tenor saxophone); Sonny Fortune (flute, soprano saxophone); Wally Chambers (harmonica); Carlos Garnett (sopranino saxophone, soprano saxophone, tenor saxophone); Dave Lieberman, John Stubblefield (soprano saxophone); Harold Ivory Williams, Herbie Hancock (electric piano, organ, synthesizer); Cedric Lawson (electric piano, organ); Lonnie Liston Smith (electric piano); Chick Corea (synthesizer); Michael Henderson (electric bass); Billy Hart (drums, cowbells, wood block, percussion); Jack DeJohnette, Al Foster, Bernard Purdie (drums); Mtume (congas, claves, percussion); Don Alias (congas, kalimba, percussion); Badal Roy (tabla).

January 7, 2008 Posted by | Miles Davis, Music_Jazz, _MUSIC | 1 Comment