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Kate & Anna McGarrigle – Hard Times Come Again No More


There’s pale drooping maiden who foils her life away
With a worn out heart, whose better days are o’er.

Kate & Anna McGarrigle and friends – including Kate’s son Rufus Wainwright along with Emmylou Harris, Mary Black, Karen Matheson and Rod Paterson – perform a wonderful arrangement of Stephen Foster’s magnificent Hard Times Come Again No More. This comes from the Transatlantic sessions which was filmed in Scotland.

In the GOP induced world recession, this song is becoming ever more pertinent by the day!

“Hard Times Come Again No More” is a beautiful song written by Stephen C. Foster in 1854.

It attained recognition quickly and very soon became well-known and popular both in America and Europe.

The song was actually a favorite of both sides in the American Civil War.

The first audio recording was a wax cylinder by the Edison Company (Edison Gold Moulded 9120) in 1905.

“Hard Times Come Again No More” has been recorded countless times by an array of artists such as Bob Dylan, Emmylou Harris, De Danann, Kate McGarrigle and her family, James Taylor, Johnny Cash, Nanci Griffith, Ralph McTell, Willie Nelson, Jennifer Warnes and The Proclaimers, amongst others. It has also been parodied a number of times.

You can catch the Dylan version HERE!

The powerful, liturgical “Hard Times Come Again No More” is a song for the dispossessed, the trampled upon, the forgotten.

The song begins with the great line “Let us pause in life’s pleasures and count its many tears while we all sup sorrow with the poor” and strongly sympathises with those who find themselves in extremely difficult circumstances.

The heart wrenching refrain is a cry from the sorrowed soul that begs “Hard times, come again no more.”

The relevance of Foster’s great lyrics resonates from one era to the next as the greed of the wealthy elite inevitably leads not only to ongoing suffering amongst vast swathes of society – even in the better times – but over and over again too to periodic widespread economic collapse which causes universal pain, such as the “Great Depression” and this today, the “Great GOP Depression”.

We’re sure GW Bush never heard this song when he was in Office!



Stephen C. Foster – Hard Times Come Again No More


Let us pause in life’s pleasures and count its many tears
While we all sup sorrow with the poor.
There’s a song that will linger forever in our ears,
Oh, hard times, come again no more.
‘Tis the song, the sigh of the weary.
Hard times, hard times, come again no more.
Many days you have lingered all around my cabin door.
Oh, hard times, come again no more.

While we seek mirth and beauty and music light and gay.
There are frail forms fainting at the door.
Though their voices are silent, their pleading looks will say.
Oh, hard times, come again no more.
‘Tis the song, the sigh of the weary.
Hard times, hard times, come again no more.
Many days you have lingered all around my cabin door.
Oh, hard times, come again no more.

There’s pale drooping maiden who foils her life away
With a worn out heart, whose better days are o’er.
Though her voice it would be merry, ’tis sighing all the day,
Oh, hard times, come again no more.
‘Tis the song, the sigh of the weary.
Hard times, hard times, come again no more.
Many days you have lingered all around my cabin door.
Oh, hard times, come again no more.

‘Tis the song, the sigh of the weary.
Hard times, hard times, come again no more.
Many days you have lingered all around my cabin door.
Oh, hard times, come again no more.



Kate & Anna McGarrigle and friends – Hard Times Come Again No More


NOTE:

We do not host any files here. If this post contains a link to content hosted elsewhere, this is content found by a simple search on the worldwide freedom web. However, if for some valid reason, you object to a said content, or any content here, please let us know and we will remove the content in question.

Any content linked to here is only meant as a taster for the original work itself and is posted on the strict understanding that anyone who downloads the taster, deletes said content within 24 hours. We would assume that these fans will then buy the original work and we greatly encourage them to do so.

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February 25, 2009 Posted by | Anna McGarrigle, Emmylou Harris, Karen Matheson, Kate McGarrigle, Mary Black, Music_Folk, Rod Paterson, Rufus Wainwright, Stephen Foster, _MUSIC, _POETRY, _VIDEO | Leave a comment

Bob Dylan – Times They Are A Changin – Green Box (Norway)

Dylan’s classic rather oddly in an advert from some Norwegian entity called “Green Box”! Who they are or what they do, we haven’t a clue!

“Green Box”? Isn’t that some sort of slang for an Irish chick’s holy of holies? !!

Does Bob really need cash so badly? Really???

NOTE:

We do not host any files here. If this post contains a link to content hosted elsewhere, this is content found by a simple search on the worldwide freedom web. However, if for some valid reason, you object to a said content, or any content here, please let us know and we will remove the content in question.

Any content linked to here is only meant as a taster for the original work itself and is posted on the strict understanding that anyone who downloads the taster, deletes said content within 24 hours. We would assume that these fans will then buy the original work and we greatly encourage them to do so.

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January 30, 2009 Posted by | Music_Folk, _BOB DYLAN, _MUSIC, _VIDEO | Leave a comment

All Of Bob Dylan’s Non-LP Tracks; 1962-2005 (almost) – 206 Songs

Some stunning work here from the excellent nevergetoutoftheboat who has collected most of Dylan’s cast array of Non-LP tracks – garnered from the likes of singles, import albums, ‘Various Artist’ LPs, promos, radio

concerts, soundtracks, recalled releases etc etc up to around 2005!

Fucking Hell! Amazing work mate! And a million thanks for your efforts!

A Ridiculously Large Post Of Almost All Of Bob Dylan’s Non-LP Tracks (1962-2005)
206 Songs, 16 Hours Of Rare Bob
(No Bootlegs) New Additions At Bottom

Scatte
red Bob Dylan tracks from singles, import albums, various artist LPs, promos, radio

concerts, soundtracks, recalled releases… you name it (up to around 2005).

We’d been working on this project for some time, based on this ridiculously elaborate list (scroll to #647 to begin), when Neon P

ark posted his own version. Not wishing to abandon our time investment, we also pillaged his – correcting file info, adding date details, album covers and some absent tracks.

There are still a few missing (for you obsessive types – #’s 711, 713, 727, 728, 751, 801, 803, 804, 846-851, 854-863, 871 & 872), but you’ll no doubt find this nearly complete gathering satisfying – grouped and organized by release date.

No bootlegs are included, it’s all officially released stuff except for Bob’s US albums, The Bootleg Series, The Wilburys and the like (don’t forget to grab Disc 3 from 2008’s Tell Tale Signs here)

.

Of course, it cant be as simple as all that … there are a few dupes, some tracks have been re-issued in strange ways, some as DVD bon

uses, some sessions are split by release dates into different sections but… you’ll get the gist. The highlights are endless; the 2005 dub version of “I And I,” a simply gorgeous 1963 live take of “Boots Of Spanish Leather,” the “mistaken” release of “Can You Please Crawl Out Your Window,” and alternate versions of “Everything is Broken” & “Shelter From The Storm.”

And check out “Rocks And Gravel” (a precursor to “It Takes A Lot To Laugh…”), a full band take from the recalled promo of Bob’s acoustic Freewheelin’ LP. The wonders never cease.


MISCELLANEOUS ALBUM / SOUNDTRACK / VARIOUS 1963-1972

John Brown Blind Boy Grunt/Broadside Ballads, Vol. 1 (1963)
Only A Hobo Blind Boy Grunt/Broadside Ballads, Vol. 1 (1963)
Talkin’ Devil
Blind Boy Grunt/Broadside Ballads, Vol. 1 (1963)
Only A Pawn In Their Game We Shall Overcome (1964)
Ye Playboys And Playgirls w/Pete Seeger
Newport Broadside (1964)
With God On Our Side w/Joan Baez Newport Broadside (1964)
Blowin’ In The Wind Newport Folk Festival 1963 – The Evening Concerts (1964)
Nashville Skyline Rag Earl Scruggs/His Family And Friends (1971)
Train A-Travelin’
Blind Boy Grunt/Broadside Reunion (1971)
(I’d Hate To Be You On That) Dreadful Day
Blind Boy Grunt/Broadside Reunion (1971)
The Death Of Emmett Till
Blind Boy Grunt/Broadside Reunion (1971)
The Ballad Of Donald White
Blind Boy Grunt/Broadside Reunion (1971)
I Ain’t Got No Home A Tribute To Woody Guthrie (1972)
Dear Mrs. Roosevelt A Tribute To Woody Guthrie (1972)
Grand Coulee Dam A Tribute To Woody Guthrie (1972)
A Hard Rain’s A-Gonna Fall
The Concert For Bangla Desh (1972)
It Takes A Lot To Laugh, It Takes A Train To Cry The Concert For Bangla Desh (1972)
Blowin’ In The Wind The Concert For
Bangla Desh (1972)
Mr. Tambourine Man The Concert For
Bangla Desh (1972)
Just Like A Woman The Concert For
Bangla Desh (1972)

Love Minus Zero / No Limit The Concert For Bangla Desh (1972)


Wallflower Doug Sahm/Doug Sahm And Band (1972)




MISCELLANEOUS ALBUM / SOUNDTRACK / VARIOUS 1976-1990

Buckets Of Rain Bette Midler/Songs For The New Depression
(1976)
Sign Language Eric Clapton/No Reason To Cry (1976)
Mixed-Up Confusion (Alternate) Masterpieces (1978)
Just Like Tom Thumb’s Blues Masterpieces (1978)
Spanish Is The Loving Tongue Masterpieces (1978)
George Jackson (Big Band) Masterpieces (1978)

Rita May Masterpieces (1978)
Baby Let Follow You Down The Band/The Last Waltz (1978)

Hazel The Band/The Last Waltz (1978)
I Don’t Believe You The Band/The Last Waltz (1978)

Forever Young The Band/The Last Waltz (1978)

Baby Let Me Follow You Down (Reprise) The Band/The Last Waltz (1978)
I Shall Be Released (Finale) The Band/The Last Waltz (1978)
Band Of The Hand Band Of The Hand (1986)

The Usual Hearts Of Fire (1987)
Night After Night Hearts Of Fire (1987)
Had A Dream About You, Baby (Alternate) Hearts Of Fire (1987)
Pretty Boy Floyd Folkways: A Tribute To Woody Guthrie And Leadbelly (1988)

People Get Ready Flashback (1990)


Nobody’s Child Traveling Wilburys/Nobody’s Child (1990)
Mr. Tambourine Man w/The Byrds/The Byrds (1990)



MISCELLANEOUS ALBUM / SOUNDTRACK / VARIOUS 1991-1999

This Old Man For Our Children (1991)
Heartland Willie Nelson/Across The Borderline
(1993)
Troubled And I Don’t Know Why Joan Baez/Rare, Live & Classic (1993)
Blowin’ In The Wind Joan Baez/Rare, Live & Classic (1993)
Highway 61 Revisited Woodstock 94 (1994)
The Ballad of Hollis Brown Mike Seeger/Third Annual Farewell Reunion (1994)
You Belong To Me Natural Born Killers (1994)

Boogie Woogie Country Girl Till The Night Is Gone: A Tribute To Doc Pomus (1995)
Ring Of Fire Feeling Minnesota (1996)
All Along the Watchtower The Concert For The Rock N’ Roll Hall Of Fame (1996)

It Ain’t Me Babe Live At Newport (1996)
With God On Our Side Live At Newport (1996)
Shelter From The Storm (Alternate) Jerry MaGuire (1996)
My Blue Eyed Jane The Songs Of Jimmie Rodgers (1997)
The Lonesome River Ralph Stanley/Clinch Mountain Country
(1998)
Dignity (Original Version) Touched By An Angel (1999)
Chimes Of Freedom The ’60s: Original NBC Motion Picture Soundtrack (1

999)


Things Have Changed Wonderboys (2000)
Friend of the Devil Stolen Roses: Songs of the Grateful Dead (2000)
Acne Ramblin’ Jack Elliott/The Ballad Of Ramblin’ Jack (2000)

Down In The Flood The Band/Rock Of Ages (2001)
When I Paint My Masterpiece The Band/Rock Of Ages (2001)
Don’t Ya Tell Henry The Band/Rock Of Ages (2001)
Like A Rolling Stone The Band/Rock Of Ages (2001)
Somebody Touched Me
Live 1961-2000
(Japanese Import 2001)
Wade In The Water Live 1961-2000
(Japanese Import 2001)
Dead Man, Dead Man Live 1961-2000
(Japanese Import 2001)
Cold Irons Bound Live 1961-2000 (Japanese Import 2001)
Born In Time Live 1961-2000
(Japanese Import 2001)
Country Pie Live 1961-2000 (Japanese Import 2001)
Things Have Changed Live 1961-2000
(Japanese Import 2001)
Return To Me The Sopranos – Music From The HBO Series (2001)
I Can’t Get You Off Of My Mind Timeless: Hank Williams Tribute (2001)
Red Cadillac & A Black Moustache Good Rockin’ Tonight (2001)
Roll On John There Is No Eye: Music for Photographs (2001)


MISCELLANEOUS ALBUM / SOUNDTRACK / VARIOUS 2002-2005

Man Of Peace Grateful Dead/Postcards Of The Hanging (2002)
Waitin’ For You Divine Secrets Of The Ya-Ya Sisterhood (2002)
Train Of Love Kindred Spirits: A Tribute To The Songs Of Johnny Cash (2002)
‘Cross The Green Mountain Gods and Generals (2003)
Gonna Change My Way Of Thinking The Gospel Songs Of Bob Dylan (2003)
Down In The Flood Masked & Anonymous (2003)
Diamond Joe Masked & Anonymous (2003)
Dixie Masked & Anonymous (2003)
Cold Irons Bound Masked & Anonymous (2003)
I And I (Reggae Remix) Is it Rolling Bob? A Reggae Tribute To Bob Dylan (2004)
Mutineer Enjoy Every Sandwich: The Songs Of Warren Zevon (2004)
Down Along the Cove Bonnaroo Music Festival 2004 (2005)

I And I Dub Is It Rolling Bob? Dub Versions (2005)
Tell Me, Momma The Band/A Musical History (2005)


Highway 61 Revisited The Band/A Musical History (2005)
Tell Ol’ Bill North Country – Music From The Motion Picture (2005)


Corrina Corrina (Single B-Side Version) (Single 1962)
Can You Please Crawl Out Your Window (“Mistaken Version”) (Single 1965)

If You Gotta Go Go Now (Single 1967)
George Jackson (Acoustic) (Single 1971)
Trouble In Mind (Single 1979)
Let It Be Me (Single 1981)
Angel Flying Too Close To The Ground (Single 1983)
Handle With Care (Extended) Traveling Wilburys (Single 1988)
End of the Line (Extended) Traveling Wilburys (Single 1988)

Runaway Traveling Wilburys (Single 1990)
New Blue Moon (Instrumental) Traveling Wilburys (1990)
A Hard Rain’s A-Gonna Fall (Single 1994)
Can’t Wait Love Sick (2-EP 1998)
Roving Gambler Love Sick (2-EP 1998)

Blind Willie McTell Love Sick (2-EP 1998)
Love Sick Love Sick (2-EP 1998)
Cocaine Blues Love Sick (2-EP 1998)
Boots Of Spanish Leather Not Dark Yet (EP 1999)

Tears Of Rage Not Dark Yet (EP 1998)
Senor (Tales Of Yankee Power) Not Dark Yet (EP 1998)
To Make You Feel My Love Things Have Changed (EP 2000)
Song To Woody Things Have Changed (EP 2000)

 

House Of The Risin’ Sun Highway 61 Interactive CD ROM
It’s All Over Now Baby Blue (Hotel) Don’t Look Back DVD (1965)
The Lonesome Death of Hattie Carroll Don’t Look Back DVD (1965) READ ME
Love Minus Zero-No Limit Don’t Look Back DVD (1965)
It Ain’t Me Babe Don’t Look Back DVD (1965)
It’s All Over Now Baby Blue Don’t Look Back DVD (1965)
To Ramona Don’t Look Back DVD (1965)
One Too Many Mornings w/Johnny Cash The Man His World His Music DVD (1969)
East Virginia Blues w/Earl Scruggs His Family & Friends DVD (1970)
If Not For You w/George Harrison The Concert For Bangla Desh DVD (1971)
Blowin’ In The Wind Live Aid DVD (1985)
In The Garden w/Tom Petty and The HBs Hard To Handle VHS (1986)
Just Like A Woman w/Tom Petty and The HBs Hard To Handle VHS (1986)
Like A Rolling Stone w/Tom Petty and The HBs Hard To Handle VHS (1986)

It’s Alright, Ma (I’m Only Bleeding) w/Tom Petty Hard To Handle VHS (1986)

Girl From The North Country w/Tom Petty and The HBs Hard To Handle VHS (1986)
Lenny Bruce w/Tom Petty and The HBs Hard To Handle VHS (1986)
When The Night Comes Falling w/Tom Petty Hard To Handle VHS (1986)
Ballad Of A Thin Man w/Tom Petty and The HBs Hard To Handle VHS (1986)
I’ll Remember You w/Tom Petty and The HBs Hard To Handle VHS (1986)

Knockin’ On Heaven’s Door w/Tom Petty and The HBs Hard To Handle VHS (1986)

 


DVD / DOWNLOADS 1993-2005

Pancho And Lefty
w/Willie Nelson The Big Six-0 DVD (1993)
Hard Times w/Willie Nelson The Big Six-0 DVD (1993)
Love Minus Zero/No Limit MTV Unplugged DVD (1994)
Don’t Think Twice It’s All Right
Eric Clapton & Friends In Concert DVD (1999)
Crossroads Eric Clapton & Friends In Concert DVD (1999)
You Win Again (Live Recorded 2004) Willie Nelson & Friends DVD (2004)
I Threw It All Away – bobdylan.com Download (2003)
Everything Is Broken (Alternate)
iTunes Exclusive EP (2003)
Hero Blues – iTunes Exclusive EP (2003)
Went To See The Gypsy (Demo) – iTunes Download (2004)
Blowin’ In The Wind
No Direction Home DVD (2005)
Girl From The North Country No Direction Home DVD (2005)
Mr. Tambourine Man No Direction Home DVD (2005)
Love Minus Zero- No Limit No Direction Home DVD (2005)
I Can’t Leave Her Behind No Direction Home DVD (2005)
Like A Rolling Stone No Direction Home DVD (2005)
One Too Many Mornings No Direction Home DVD (2005)
Baby Please Don’t Go
– iTunes Exclusive Outtakes From No Direction Home (2005)
Mr. Tambourine Man – iTunes Exclusive Outtakes From No Direction Home (2005)
Outlaw Blues – iTunes Exclusive Outtakes From No Direction Home (2005)


PROMO / LIVE / RADIO SHOWS 1963-1987

Rocks And Gravel
The Freewheelin’ Bob Dylan (Promo Version) (1963)
Talkin’ John Birch Paranoid Blues The Freewheelin’ Bob Dylan (Promo) (1963)
Girl From The North Country
The World Of Folk Music (Radio Promo) (1963)
Only A Hobo The World Of Folk Music (Radio Promo) (1963)
Tangled Up In Blue
Blood On The Tracks (Promo Version) (1975)
Idiot Wind Blood On The Tracks (Promo/Test Press Version) (1975)
If You See Her Say Hello Blood On The Tracks (Promo Version) (1975)
Lily Rosemary And The Jack Of Hearts Blood On The Tracks (Promo Version) (1975)
Positively 4th Street
w/Tom Petty Westwood One Superstar Concert (1986)
All Along The Watchtower w/Tom Petty Westwood One Superstar Concert (1986)
Masters Of War w/Tom Petty & The HBs Westwood One Superstar Concert (1986)
I Forgot More Than You’ll Ever Know w/Tom Petty Westwood One Concert (1986)
Blowin’ In The Wind w/Tom Petty Westwood One Superstar Concert (1986)
That Lucky Old Sun w/Tom Petty & The HBs Westwood One Superstar Concert (1986)
It Ain’t Me, Babe w/Tom Petty & The HBs Westwood One Superstar Concert (1986)
Got Love If You Want It
Down In The Groove (Promo Version) (1987)
Important Words Down In The Groove (Promo Version) (1987)



PROMO / LIVE / RADIO SHOWS 1990-1999

Most of the Time (Promo Single) (1990)
Series Of Dreams (Alt) 5 Tracks From The Bootleg Series Vols 1-3 (Promo) (1991)
All Along the Watchtower Guitar Legends In Concert (1992)
Shake, Rattle & Roll Guitar Legends In Concert (1992)
People Get Ready Mr. D’s Collection #3 (Japanese Promo) (1993)
Never Let Me Go Mr. D’s Collection #3 (Japanese Promo) (1993)

From A Buick 6 (Alternate) Dylan Ga Rock (Japanese Promo) (1993)
It Takes A Lot To Laugh, It Takes A Train To Cry Woodstock 94 (Promo) (1994)
Rainy Day Women #12 & 35 Woodstock 94 – The Best Of The Rest (Promo) (1994)

Don’t Think Twice It’s All Right Woodstock 94 – The Best Of The Rest (Promo) (1994)
My Back Pages Live 96 (Promo EP) (1997)
Tombstone Blues Live 96 (Promo EP) (1997)
Ballad Of A Thin Man Live 96 (Promo EP) (1997)
Boots Of Spanish Leather Live 96 (Promo EP) (1997)
Million Miles Million Miles Live Recordings 1997-1999 (Promo EP) (1999)


PROMO / LIVE / RADIO SHOWS 2000-2005

Highlands Best Of Bob Dylan Vol. 2 (European Bonus Disc) (2000)
Blowin’ In The Wind Best Of Bob Dylan Vol. 2 (European Bonus Disc) (2000)
The Times They Are A-Changin’ (Alternate) Love And Theft (Bonus Disc) (2001)
Stealin’
The Grateful Dead Hour (Radio Promo) (2002)
Oh Boy The Grateful Dead Hour (Radio Promo) (2002)
John Brown The Grateful Dead Hour (Radio Promo) (2002)
Folsom Prison Blues The Grateful Dead Hour (Radio Promo) (2002)
Gotta Serve Somebody The Grateful Dead Hour (Radio Promo) (2002)
Hideaway / CC Rider The Grateful Dead Hour (Radio Promo) (2002)
Dignity (Demo) Chronicles Vol. 1 (Promo EP) (2004)
Tryin’ Get To Heaven (Promo Single) (2004)
The Times They Are A-Changin’
Live At Carnegie Hall 1963 (Promo) (2005)
Ballad Of Hollis Brown Live At Carnegie Hall 1963 (Promo) (2005)
Boots Of Spanish Leather Live At Carnegie Hall 1963 (Promo) (2005)
Lay Down Your Weary Tune Live At Carnegie Hall 1963 (Promo) (2005)
North Country Blues Live At Carnegie Hall 1963 (Promo) (2005)
With God On Our Side Live At Carnegie Hall 1963 (Promo) (2005)

ADDITIONS…

#805-#813 Like A Rolling Stone 1-9 (1965/Highway 61 Interactive CD ROM)(1995)
#872 A Hard Rain’s A-Gonna Fall (2007/Studio-Zaragoza Expo ’08 Download)(2008)

NOTE:

We do not host any files here. If this post contains a link to content hosted elsewhere, this is content found by a simple search on the worldwide freedom web. However, if for some valid reason, you object to a said content, or any content here, please let us know and we will remove the content in question.Any content linked to here is only meant as a taster for the original work itself and is posted on the strict understanding that anyone who downloads the taster, deletes said content within 24 hours. We would assume that these fans will then buy the original work and we greatly encourage them to do so.

January 25, 2009 Posted by | LINKS, Music_Blues, Music_ClassicRock, Music_Folk, _BOB DYLAN, _MUSIC | Leave a comment

The Spinsters’ Ball – The Lonesome Death of Hattie Carroll

“He beats me up, but I love him!”

– Jane Zantzinger

We’ve already written about bob Dylan’s amazing song The Lonesome Death of Hattie Carroll in the context of the recent death of her killer, racist scumbag William Zantzinger.

Hattie Carroll, a 51 year old black waitress and mother of eleven, was killed on February 9, 1963, at a white tie Ball at the Emerson Hotel in Baltimore, Maryland.

Here’s a fascinating early account of the incident from Time Magazine just 13 days later.

Reading the article, it’s strange to see what surreal and fucked up lives these landed racist gentry used to lead! Guess some still do to a lesser extent today.

Also, using modern standards, it’s strange to see the more overt and open racism then at play, reflected in Time’s many usages of the word Negro here!

The Spinsters’ Ball

Friday, Feb. 22, 1963

Holly trees arch gracefully over the neat white fences that line the dirt road leading to the brick mansion at West Hatton, the 630-acre Zantzinger farm-estate in southern Maryland. The mansion’s colonnaded porch faces the somnolent Wicomico River, which flows past a placid pond and a white summerhouse. Also on the estate is an austere farmhouse from which William Devereux Zantzinger, 24, runs one of the most prosperous tobacco operations in Charles County.

The setting befits William Zantzinger’s status as a rural aristocrat. His father, a former member of the Maryland house of delegates and the state planning commission, still lives in the mansion, where he and his wife entertain in convivial country style. William and his attractive wife, Jane, 24, organized the Wicomico Hunt Club, love to halloo after hounds across their fields. William is unlike many a gentleman farmer. His farming success is due not to the efficiency of hired supervisors, but to the long hours of gritty, grubby work he himself does afield. But by last week it was apparent that he can play even harder than he plows.

Whacks, But No Tips. The Zantzingers set out for a gay social evening of dancing at Baltimore’s annual Spinsters’ Ball, a white-tie affair in which passed-over postdebutantes in their late 20s take another try at meeting the right sort of men. With another couple, the Zantzingers stopped off for preball dinner at downtown Baltimore’s Eager House.

As witnesses tell it, Zantzinger downed two fast drinks at the bar, then whacked the restaurant’s hostess and its elderly sommelier with a wooden carnival cane that he had picked up somewhere. Coaxed into checking the cane, he lunged at the wine steward’s cordial tray, then his neck chain, caught a sharp elbow in the stomach in return. Zantzinger had two double bourbons with his steak; Jane Zantzinger, four double Cutty Sarks with her prime ribs. When the head barman refused to serve more, Jane hopped to another table, sipped from the glasses of its surprised occupants. Zantzinger left no tip for the waitress.

At the ball in the Emerson Hotel, the pace picked up. Zantzinger stung a Negro bellhop’s rear with his cane. After a few bourbons and ginger at the open bar, he asked a Negro waitress, Mrs. Ethel Hill, 30, something about a firemen’s fund. She said she did not know what he meant. “Don’t say no to me, you nigger, say no, sir,” said Zantzinger. He flailed her with the cane. She fled to the kitchen.

Too Slow. Minutes later, Zantzinger strode to the bar for another drink. Mrs. Hattie Carroll, 51, a Negro barmaid, did not move fast enough for him. “What’s the matter with you, you black son of a bitch, serving my drinks so slow?” he railed. He beat her with his cane. She collapsed and an ambulance was called.

Through it all, the orchestra of Howard Lanin* played on, many of the spinsters missing the commotion—even when Zantzinger turned on his 125-lb. wife, who fell to the floor. More blows flew as two men struggled to calm Zantzinger. A physician felt Mrs. Zantzinger’s pulse, decided she would be all right.

“I Love Him.” Two policemen arrived to lead Zantzinger away. Jane Zantzinger. much revived, cried: “He beats me up, but I love him!” She jumped down five stairs, knocking both her husband and Patrolman Warren Tood to the floor. Both of the Zantzingers were taken to jail, later released on bail.

The whole wild night could have wound up as just another bender, something with which the Zantzingers might later wow their guests (“What a night!”) after riding to hounds. Even the disorderly-conduct and assault charges lodged against Mrs. Zantzinger would only add zest to the tale. But one thing changed all of that. Mrs. Carroll, a mother of eleven and president of a Negro social club, died eight hours after the caning. A medical examiner found that the cause of her death was a brain hemorrhage. The charge against Zantzinger: homicide.

*Brother of Lester Lanin. whose orchestra sometimes entertains at the White House.

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January 23, 2009 Posted by | Mason Jennings, Music_Folk, William Zantzinger, _BOB DYLAN, _MUSIC, _PHOTOGRAPHY, _POETRY, _VIDEO | Leave a comment

The Lonesome Death of William Zantzinger

And she never done nothing to William Zantzinger

-Bob Dylan


“(
Dylan)‘s a no-account son of a bitch, he’s just like a scum of a scum bag of the earth, I should have sued him and put him in jail.”

-William Zantzinger
from Howard Sounes”Down the Highway, the Life of Bob Dylan”


In the momentous week when, in a few days, Barack Obama will make magnificent history and be inaugurated as the first black President of the United States, it’s shocking to consider that only a few decades back – within Obama’s lifetime! – an ingrained racist and wealthy estate owner from a renowned landlord family, William Zantzinger could casually kill a black waitress he’d just met- the hard working mother of ten children – just a stone’s throw away from New York and Washington DC, in Baltimore and receive essentially no punishment!

With assistance from the racist status quo, racist authorities, racist systems and ‘good ole boys’ networks, the charge was knocked down by the Courts from Murder to Manslaughter.

Worse, Zantzinger served only 6 months for this most heinous evil crime – the same term as he might have served had he committed a negligible crime such as letting some speeding tickets go unpaid!

Furthermore, the Courts allowed Zantzinger to serve his time in a local cell where there would be no black co-habitees intent on payback and making his time rather unpleasant!

There’s even more! Yes, the racist Courts even allowed deferral of the start of his jail sentence to give Zantzinger time to harvest his tobacco crop!

This craziness is sickeningly incomprehensible!

The message sent out by the authorities was that, since Hattie Carroll was poor, and more importantly, black, her life was worthless. The taking away of that life was therefore nothing important and merited no proper sanction.

The abhorrent crime took place on February 9, 1963, at a white tie Ball at the Emerson Hotel in Baltimore, Maryland when one William Zantzinger casually – for no reason at all – killed a totally innocent black woman, Ms Hattie Carroll with two blows to the head from a cane. And thereby suddenly left 11 children without a mother.

Earlier that evening, Zantzinger had also casually assaulted another black waitress with his cane at the same event!

Zantzinger and his first wife Jane were attending the charity ball in Baltimore. Zantzinger was drunk when he arrived, decked out in top hat, white tie and tails, and grew even drunker as the evening wore on. After collapsing on top of his wife during a dance, he went to the bar demanding yet another drink. When it failed to materialise at once, he swore at the barmaid. “I’m hurrying as fast as I can,” press accounts quoted Carroll as replying – to which Zantzinger declared, “I don’t have to take that kind of shit off a nigger,” and hit her with a cane he was carrying.

The vile name of William Zantzinger and his vile crime were forever made infamous by Bob Dylan in his magnificent “The Lonesome Death of Hattie Carroll“. This song was recorded a few months after the murder, on 23 October 1963, and released on Dylan’s 1964 album The Times They Are A-Changin’.

This event has come into the public domain again in the past week with the death of the murdering scumbag Zantzinger who kicked the bucket last week aged 69, having lived a full 46 years longer than he would have, had he slain a white person in 1963. Years during which this abhorrent cretin continued to commit a litany of crimes and abuse.

His further crimes included federal tax delinquencies and landlord related crimes pursuant to “properties” rented to poor black people – properties described by the Maryland Real Estate Commission as “ramshackle, primitive structures reminiscent of slave quarters.”

Zantzinger had for years been exploiting poor black people as a landlord and charging exorbitant rent to live in shacks which were in violation of county habitability codes and lacking water and sewer connections. He, at one stage, was even charging rent on certain shacks he no longer owned.

Ironically for the various illegal rent crimes, Zantzinger in 1991 was fined $50,000 and sentenced to a 19 months in prison – over 3 times the sentence he received for murder!

Unlike the judge in the Hattie Carroll case, the judge in 1991 refused his request to delay the start of his sentence to get his affairs in order. However, some of his prison sentence was served in a work release program.

The Lonesome Death of Hattie Carroll” is a momentous work, in more ways than one, and ranks amongst Dylan’s finest.

In this song, Dylan firmly upholds one of the main pillars of the folk music tradition from it’s Irish / Scots homeland where for hundreds of years, going back to the Gaelic tradition, folk music was used as a tool to document historic events – especially atrocities and other significant crimes – and to inform as many people as possible about the facts of an event, thereby keeping the event alive in the public consciousness.

Aside from the magnificence of the song itself in terms of structure, lyrics and melody, the most notable Dylan achievement was the fact that he was able to properly damn the appalling Zantzinger and his appalling crime to the annals of infamy and to spread knowledge of the specific atrocity – and by extension the abhorrent racist structures which enabled the crime and later allowed it go unpunished – not only far and wide at that time, but also across many generations of music fans down the decades.

A truly remarkable and commendable achievement, probably unique in modern music.

Were it not for Dylan, the sick story of Zantzinger would have been lost to the annals of history and oblivion soon after he served his sentence.

The proper blackening of Zantzinger’s name achieved via “The Lonesome Death of Hattie Carroll” was in many ways greater punishment than the Courts gave him!

Aside from that phenomenal achievement, the song itself is a magnificent work – beautifully structured, with simple yet poetic lyrics which wonderful express rightful indignation while managing to avoid bombast.

There are a few factual changes though; Zantzinger’s name is rendered as “Zanzinger”, probably to avoid a libel charge – while Dylan says Hattie had 10 children, not the true number of 11 – as eleven, it was said, did not fit the meter!

Starting with stark powerful and factual line “William Zantzinger killed poor Hattie Carroll” the song continues by simply setting out the shocking factual details of this shocking crime. It also contrasts the social status and wealth of Hattie against that of Zantzinger and his ilk as well as subtly describing the clear racial divide and protocols which lay between them.

We particularly like the line “Got killed by a blow, lay slain by a cane” which, aside from factually describing what happened, can of course also can be read as an allusion to the first ever murderer, as set out in the Bible!

“The Lonesome Death of Hattie Carroll” is a sublime timeless work which will still haunt Zantzinger as he wallows in Hell!

A few good links on the Hattie and Zantzinger story, here;

Zantzinger (left)

Dylan continues to perform “The Lonesome Death of Hattie Carroll” to this day. His live-audience renditions of it appear on the albums Live 1975 (2002) and Live 1964 (2004).

Below is;

  • a video of a fine Dylan TV performance of this great song from 1964
  • the original LP version
  • another Dylan live version from a London show in 1965
  • a nice, suitably understated cover version by Mason Jennings from last year’s I’m Not There OST.


Note: Audio files available for a limited time only. Not in breach of copyright as in accompaniment to a legitimate review of the song.


The Lonesome Death of Hattie Carroll

William Zanzinger killed poor Hattie Carroll

With a cane that he twirled around his diamond ring finger

At a Baltimore hotel society gath’rin’.

And the cops were called in and his weapon took from him

As they rode him in custody down to the station

And booked William Zanzinger for first-degree murder.

But you who philosophize disgrace and criticize all fears,

Take the rag away from your face.

Now ain’t the time for your tears.

William Zanzinger, who at twenty-four years

Owns a tobacco farm of six hundred acres

With rich wealthy parents who provide and protect him

And high office relations in the politics of Maryland,

Reacted to his deed with a shrug of his shoulders

And swear words and sneering, and his tongue it was snarling,

In a matter of minutes on bail was out walking.

But you who philosophize disgrace and criticize all fears,

Take the rag away from your face.

Now ain’t the time for your tears.

Hattie Carroll was a maid of the kitchen.

She was fifty-one years old and gave birth to ten children

Who carried the dishes and took out the garbage

And never sat once at the head of the table

And didn’t even talk to the people at the table

Who just cleaned up all the food from the table

And emptied the ashtrays on a whole other level,

Got killed by a blow, lay slain by a cane

That sailed through the air and came down through the room,

Doomed and determined to destroy all the gentle.

And she never done nothing to William Zanzinger.

But you who philosophize disgrace and criticize all fears,

Take the rag away from your face.

Now ain’t the time for your tears.

In the courtroom of honor, the judge pounded his gavel

To show that all’s equal and that the courts are on the level

And that the strings in the books ain’t pulled and persuaded

And that even the nobles get properly handled

Once that the cops have chased after and caught ’em

And that the ladder of law has no top and no bottom,

Stared at the person who killed for no reason

Who just happened to be feelin’ that way without warnin’.

And he spoke through his cloak, most deep and distinguished,

And handed out strongly, for penalty and repentance,

William Zanzinger with a six-month sentence.

Oh, but you who philosophize disgrace and criticize all fears,

Bury the rag deep in your face

For now’s the time for your tears.

Bob Dylan – The Lonesome Death of Hattie Carroll
Steve Allen TV show
1964

Bob Dylan – The Lonesome Death of Hattie Carroll

Original version

Bob Dylan – The Lonesome Death of Hattie Carroll

Live – 5/10/65, London

hattie_london_65.mp3

Mason Jennings – The Lonesome Death of Hattie Carroll

I’m Not There OST

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January 15, 2009 Posted by | Mason Jennings, Music_Folk, William Zantzinger, _BOB DYLAN, _MUSIC, _PHOTOGRAPHY, _POETRY, _VIDEO | 1 Comment

Bob Dylan’s Big Freeze – Bob Harris(BBC Radio 2)

Bob Dylan’s Big Freeze – Bob Harris(BBC Radio 2)

During the freezing winter of 1962-’63, Bob Dylan made his first trip to London. BBC DJ Bob Harris tells the story of his stay, with contributions from some of the people who met him.

Bob Harris tells the fascinating story of a significant but largely unknown chapter in the life of that living god, Bob Dylan.

In 1962 the newly famous Bobster came to Britain to appear in a BBC TV play called Madhouse On Castle Street.

While he was here he stayed with that eminent British folkie, Martin Carthy, who opened Dylan’s ears to a whole new way of making music (Don’t Think Twice It’s Alright, and Bob Dylan’s Dream were heavily influenced by his exposure to traditional English folk music).

He also had the unequalled joy of living through the famously bitter winter of 1962-63, when Carthy was reduced to chopping up a piano for firewood.

I have a friend who swears blind he was at the Doors’ legendary Roundhouse gig, the Stones in Hyde Park, the Who live at Leeds and Cream’s farewell do at the Albert Hall – and maybe he was.

He’s certainly convinced himself. Memories mingle and fade – sometimes we think we’re remembering stuff when in fact it’s just the newsreels we’ve seen since. So when it comes to the visit to Britain 46 years ago of a rising but obscure American folk singer, there are bound to be differing perspectives.

“Whispering” Bob Harris narrates the story of the couple of months Bob Dylan spent in England during the long, cold winter of 1962-63. Halfway through there’s a collage of memories from various contributors: “Very youthful looking, tousled hair, slimmish … chubby little Jewish boy … like the rest of us, a bit scruffy … looked quite sophisticated … tight-jeaned, very tight–jeaned … shabby … I thought he was incredibly sexy … he was rather a lost kid … monosyllabic … a lovely, lovely smile …bohemian … very precise …” A different Dylan for everyone.

Some of the old folkies were sceptical. “He went down like a lead balloon,” says one. “He did a bad imitation of Woody Guthrie.” And Ewan MacColl and Peggy Seeger, the king and queen of English folk, were sniffy about protest songs such as “Masters of War” because it didn’t name names.

The shiniest, least complicated memories come from a fan. Natasha Morgan had just done her O-levels, and was primed for the nascent new age – “we’d had the Cuban missile crisis, and I’d been on my first Aldermaston march”. There’s a lovely bit where she looks at some photographs of his visit that surfaced only last year. She’s at his feet, gazing up at him. “I can see that I’m gobsmacked,” she says, still gobsmacked. “My eyes are absolutely on him and I’m in awe and so thrilled. It’s so alive, how he is.”

The singer Martin Carthy, who put him up (at one point they smashed up a piano with a samurai sword for firewood), was one folkie who didn’t look down his nose. He has what appear to be the least varnished memories of Dylan. He was “an ordinary bloke”, Carthy says. “An ordinary bloke with an extraordinary talent.”

by Chris Maume

Sunday, 30 November 2008

www.independent.co.uk



Here be Bob and Bob, bop bop bopping along!

Thanks to DylanNL Blog / belubettlo

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November 29, 2008 Posted by | Music_ClassicRock, Music_Folk, _BOB DYLAN, _MUSIC | Leave a comment

City of Chicago – Christy Moore & Luka Bloom

Irish trad legend Christy Moore and his brother Barry aka Luka Bloom perform Barry’s beautiful lament City of Chicago – about immigrants forced to the New World pining for their faraway homeland – on a special tribute show to Christy on Irish TV (a talkshow called The Late Late Show) back in 1994.

In the city of Chicago

As the evening shadows fall

There are people dreaming

Of the hills of Donegal

Eighteen forty seven

was the year it all began

Deadly pains of hunger

Drove a million from the land

They journeyed not for glory

Their motive wasn’t greed

A voyage of survival

Across the stormy sea

To the city of Chicago

As the evening shadows fall

There are people dreaming

Of the hills of Donegal

Some of them knew fortune

Some of them knew fame

More of them knew hardship

They died upon the plain

They spread throughout the nation

They rode the railroad cars

Brought their songs and music

To ease their lonely hearts

To the city of Chicago

As the evening shadows fall

There are people dreaming

Of the hills of Donegal

Eighteen forty seven

was the year it all began

Deadly pains of hunger

Drove a million from this land

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November 5, 2008 Posted by | Christy Moore, Luka Bloom, Music_Folk, _MUSIC, _VIDEO | Leave a comment

Bob Dylan, Carolyn Dennis, Creole girls and The Lakes of Pontchartrain


So handsome was my Creole girl on the lakes of Pontchartrain

You’re welcome here kind stranger, our house is very plain
But we never turn a stranger out on the lakes of Pontchartrain

-Trad

I came in from the wilderness, a creature void of form.
“Come in,” she said, “I’ll give you shelter from the storm.”

-Bob Dylan

A great performance of the classic ballad Lakes of Pontchartrain by Bob Dylan in Madrid on June 15th, 1989.

This song was a regular part of Dylan’s live repertoire during the late eighties.

Dylan had long been known for his love of black culture and indeed, apparently, black women! He was also in that period recently married to a lady of black/mixed ethnicity, Carolyn Dennis.

Perhaps, consciously or subconsciously, as well as the song’s many other attractions, one of them may have been the fact it allowed Bob sing about the beauty of a lady of colour, a Creole girl … “a dark girl towards me came and I fell in love with a Creole girl on the lakes of Pontchartrain”, “Her hair upon her shoulders in jet black ringlets fell, to try to paint her beauty I’m sure would be in vain, so handsome was my Creole girl on the lakes of Pontchartrain” etc.

Guitarist Billy Cross in the Howard Sounes’ biography “Down the Highway: The Life Of Bob Dylan”, in a passage about the 1978 tour, is quoted as saying “Bob is really into black culture. He loves black women. He likes black music. He likes black style.”

Black paramours of course crop up in numerous Dylan lyrics … “Well, I return to the Queen of Spades and talk with my chambermaid. She knows that I’m not afraid to look at her. She is good to me ….”, (from I want You ), “The night is pitch black, come an’ make my pale face fit into place, ah, please” (from Spanish Harlem Incident), etc.

Carolyn Dennis


In the eighties, Bob had conducted a secretive love affair with one of his backing singers, Carolyn Dennis, with whom he had a daughter and to whom he was married in 1986.

The 2001 Howard Sounes’ biography “Down the Highway: The Life Of Bob Dylan” was the first to unearth the fact that Dylan secretly married Dennis in 1986 after the birth of their daughter Desiree Gabrielle Dennis-Dylan. They would be married from 1986 to 1992.

Carolyn was a backup singer for Dylan from soon after they met in 1978 until 1987.

Dennis’ mother is the singer Madelyn Quebec – a former member of The Raelettes.

During the last two years of her spell in Dylan’s touring band, her mother, Quebec, was also a member of the vocal quartet which was known during that period as The Queens Of Rhythm.

Bob with Carolyn and The Queens Of Rhythm (and some guy!)

Carolyn Dennis is a very enigmatic figure and not much seems to be publicly known about her. Neither are there many pictures of her in circulation. She seem like a very decent sort though.

Their marriage and parenthood was completely unknown to Dylan’s fans and the media until Sounes’ book.

Dennis is quoted as saying, “I have three children, but I’m not going to say which ones are Bob Dylan’s.”

She also, according to her spokesman, had made a pact with her children not to publicize their paternity. “Bob Dylan has eight or nine children,” Dennis says. “We’re not trading on that.”

Bob with Carolyn and The Queens Of Rhythm

A brief yet interesting interview with Carol Dennis was published in December 1992, in the Bruce Springsteen fanzine “Follow That Dream International“. dyl_Ann posted the Bob related section from that interview on allalongthewatchtower which speaks about Carol’s first offer to play with Dylan in 1978 and the fact that she then had no clue who Bob was!!

Q. After getting involved with theatre and working with Stevie Wonder and Burt Bacharach you started your long collaboration with Bob Dylan…

A. Yeah, I went on the road for a couple of weeks with Burt Bacharach doing a tour in South America, and I came back to a surprising phone call from a girl who was dating Mr. Dylan at the time, for him. I have say – as embarrassing as it might be – I didn’t know who he was, because my young life had been so reclusive and so sheltered. So I called and I asked “Who is Bob Dylan? I got a call, they want me to come and audition for this guy named Bob Dylan. Who is he?”. And the Union went “What? Oh My God! In the sixties there was nobody but Bob Dylan and the Beatles!”. It was May 1978 when I first met him and started working for him, did the United States, started recording with him.

Q. After your first tour with him, you had a kind of special role in helping with the vocal parts…

A. Well, I mean, I would call background singers and then, you know, he’d hear them of course, the final decision was his, you know. But he knew that I’d basically bring in what he was after, people that could go after a feeling, that it wasn’t so much standing there with the music and trying to prove how perfectly you could sing, but people who had a story in their voices, when they’d sing there was a feeling there. That feeling comes from life experiences, and that’s what he was after. He wanted his show to have that kind of spontaneous spiritual type of feeling to it, a lot similar to what Bruce is requesting.

Bob with Madelyn Quebec


She walked up to me so gracefully and took my crown of thorns.“Come in,” she said, “I’ll give you shelter from the storm.”

Dylan’s interpretation of “The Lakes of Pontchartrain” is typically excellent. He makes the ancient song his own. The rasping performance is wonderful on this clip.
It’s said that Dylan was introduced to the song by Paul Brady who recorded a successful version in 1978. That does not really seem likely though – with Dylan’s encyclopedic knowledge of music (especially folk music), it seems more than probable that Dylan would have been very familiar with the song years earlier.

The great Dylan interpretation of this classic song, sadly, never made its way onto vinyl. Of course, it can be found on numerous live boots though.

You can see the strong influences this amazing song had on some of Dylan’s great works, most obviously on “Shelter From The Storm” from his greatest LP Blood on the Tracks. “Shelter From The Storm” is heavily influenced by the Pontchartrain melody while lyrically, and especially thematically, there are many similarities too.

The Lakes of Pontchartrain is a beautiful lament for some lost moments of idyllic love experienced by a stranger with an exotic lady in a strange land.

Wonderfully crafted poetry of loss entwined with a haunting sumptuous melody make this song as close to perfect as one could ever expect!

The song is an American ballad about an impoverished immigrant (the song is not not explicit about his origin, but it’s thought to be Ireland) who is given shelter by a beautiful Louisiana Creole woman. He falls in love with her and asks her to marry him but, alas, she is already promised to a sailor and must decline the offer. The exact origin of the song is however unknown.

The song is named for, and set on, the shores of Louisiana’s “lakes” of Pontchartrain, which actually is only a single body of water, Lake Pontchartrain! As a geographical aside, Lake Pontchartrain does, however, connect to two other lakes, Lake Borgne to the east and Lake Maurepas to the west, which may explain the plural in the title! Of course too, the phrase “Lakes of Pontchartrain” sounds much more poetic and memorable than “Lake of Pontchartrain.”

Although deemed American, you can see prominent elements in the song’s melody as well as in its lyrical structure and imagery that clearly trace its original heritage back to Irish traditional music and Gaelic language Irish laments.

I first recall hearing this great song, as a kid, performed on some Irish TV show years and years ago by the great Christy Moore in a very sparse acoustic performance. I was so much younger then (I’m older than that now!) but the song had a powerful and long lasting impact.

Among other countless versions of the song are the versions recorded by the great Irish trad group Planxty (with Christy Moore then in tow) on Cold Blow and the Rainy Night in 1974 and by the Irish musician Paul Brady on Welcome Here Kind Stranger in 1978.

Other well known renditions include those by Peter Case, the Be Good Tanyas, and Mark Knopfler performing with the Chieftains on the group’s album The Long Black Veil. Rather oddly, the OTT band Tangerine Dream recorded a version of the song for their 2007 album Madcap’s Flaming Duty.

As mentioned above, the exact origin of the song is unknown, although much of it’s kernel influences are clearly Irish. However, the version closest to that we know today – like all great traditional classics, a composite of numerous earlier variant versions arising from countless influences – is commonly held to have come out of the southern United States in the 19th century.

In the liner notes of Déanta’s album Ready for the Storm, which includes the song, “The Lakes of Pontchartrain” is described as a “traditional Creole love song, which is of Irish origin.”

The liner notes accompanying Planxty’s version state that the tune was probably brought back by soldiers fighting for the British or French armies in Louisiana and Canada in the War of 1812.

Regardless of it’s origins, The Lakes of Pontchartrain is a classic, beautiful, poetic piece of music art that has stood the test of time and that shall still be sung hundreds of years hence!

It was on one fine march morning when I bid New Orleans adieu
And I was on the road to Jackson town my fortunes to renew
I cursed all foreign money, no credit could I gain
Which filled my heart with longing for the lakes of Pontchartrain

I sat on board a railway car beneath the morning sun
And I rode the rails ‘till evening when I lay me down again
Ah strangers they’re no friends to me till a dark girl towards me came
And I fell in love with a Creole girl on the lakes of Pontchartrain

I said my pretty Creole girl my money here is no good
If it weren’t for the alligators, I would sleep out in the woods
You’re welcome here kind stranger, our house is very plain
But we never turn a stranger out on the lakes of Pontchartrain

She took me out to her mama’s house and treated me right well
Her hair upon her shoulders in jet black ringlets fell
To try to paint her beauty I’m sure would be in vain
So handsome was my Creole girl on the lakes of Pontchartrain

I asked her would she marry me and she said it never would be
For she had got a lover and he was off at sea
She said that she would wait for him, that faithful she remained
Waiting for her sailor on the lakes of Pontchartrain

So fair you well my bonny ol’ girl, I may never see you no more
I won’t forget your kindness in that cottage by the shore
At every social gathering a golden glass I drink
And I’ll drink all health to the Creole girl on the lakes of Pontchartrain.

Bob Dylan – Lakes of Pontchartrain Live
Madrid
June 15th, 1989

From: 4thTimeAround

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November 5, 2008 Posted by | Carolyn Dennis, Music_Folk, _BOB DYLAN, _MUSIC, _VIDEO | 3 Comments

Eliza Carthy – Dreams Of Breathing Underwater (2008)

Eliza Carthy – Dreams Of Breathing Underwater (2008)

Pioneer of new folk and inheritor of the great Carthy folk heritage!

This is another fine LP from Eliza.

It’s hard to believe now, with the sheer volume of new acoustic heroes banging on about the virtues of folk, that there was a time when the whole genre was viewed as a musty old bag of bearded fustiness. One of the main reasons it’s managed to shed such negative connotations is the hard work and constant invention of Eliza Carthy. There may be a plethora of folk evangelists now, but a few short years back, it felt like Eliza was about all we had to push things forward and out into the mainstream.

And push she has. Amongst her back catalogue, there’s the double album Red Rice, where drum and bass meets folk fiddle, and Rough Music: a very modern exploration of the traditional country music of England. She is, it has to be said, never predictable.

Even so, that Dreams Of Breathing Underwater opens with a blues guitar, rather than her brilliant violin, comes as something of a shock, and it’s not the only one to be found on the album, her seventh solo collection.

Dreams of Breathing Underwater is penned almost entirely by Eliza and writing partner Ben Ivitsky. Only the downbeat ghostliness of Hug You Like A Mountain comes from another hand: Rory MacLeod. It’s an album which, even by Carthy’s own standards, is pretty random, in the best way possible.

From the ethereal wonder of Lavenders, through the swelling, swaying meander of Rosalie, the squeeze-box comedic heartbreak of Little Bigman and the thrilling finale of Oranges And Seasalt, which is easily the best and most honest drinking song written for many a year, the majority of the experimentation works. Though the aforementioned opening blues number Follow The Dollar, feels increasingly dull as the rest of the album unfolds behind it.

The fact that it works is partly due to the musicianship on offer – there are turns for rambunctious folk duo, Spiers and Boden, Edinburgh rock ‘n’ rollers, Mystery Juice, and Scottish songstress, Eddi Reader, amongst others – and is partly down to the thoughtful songwriting, which never overfills the songs, allowing them to breathe and flourish. It can also be put down to Eliza’s magnificent voice, the depth and richness of which can now comfortably sit next to her mother, Norma Waterson’s, as one of the finest you will ever hear.

Dreams Of Breathing Underwater is a brilliant album that deserves applause as much for its occasional failures as it does for its multiple successes, as indeed does Eliza Carthy herself. Never one to rest on her laurels, this album shows just why she is one of music’s, and not just folk’s, most important and innovative artists.

Tracklisting

01 – Follow the Dollar (3.40)
02 – Two Tears (4.14)
03 – Rows of Angels (3.12)
04 – Rosalie (3.43)
05 – Mr Magnifico (6.06)
06 – Like I Care (Wings) (3.28)
07 – Lavenders (4.19)
08 – Little Bigman (4.58)
09 – Simple Things (4.19)
10 – Hug You Like a Mountain (4.30)
11 – Oranges & Seasalt (3.34)

Big thanks to victory



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October 20, 2008 Posted by | Eliza Carthy, Music_Folk, _MUSIC | 2 Comments

W. (Oliver Stone’s Bush Biopic) [OST] (10/2008)

W. (Oliver Stone’s Bush Biopic) [OST] (10/2008)

“I want a fair, true portrait of the man. How did Bush go from an alcoholic bum to the most powerful figure in the world? It’s like Frank Capra territory on one hand, but I’ll also cover the demons in his private life, his bouts with his dad and his conversion to Christianity, which explains a lot of where he is coming from. It includes his belief that God personally chose him to be president of the United States, and his coming into his own with the stunning, preemptive attack on Iraq. It will contain surprises for Bush supporters and his detractors.”

-Oliver Stone

Another Stone biopic, this time about the dumbest asshole this side of a troop of jungle monkeys! Or this side of Sarah Palin!

A moron whose tenure as President, amongst many other atrocities, dug America into a needless, unwinnable war for oil, and oversaw the tumbling of world economies back towards the great Depression.

Interesting soundtrack though. Artists such as Bob Dylan, Roy Orbison, and Willie Nelson along with portions of the original score by Paul Cantelon.

https://i2.wp.com/www.bushflash.com/jpg/a23_b.jpg

W. is the new biographical film based on the life and presidency of George W. Bush. The film was produced and directed by Oliver Stone, written by Stanley Weiser, and stars Josh Brolin as Bush.

Stone compares his goal for W. to the approach of The Queen (2006) and his own Nixon (1995).

Filming began on May 12, 2008, in Louisiana with the release date being set for October 17, 2008.

The Motion Picture Association of America rated the film PG-13 in the United States for “language including sexual references, some alcohol abuse, smoking and brief disturbing war images.”

More here: wiki/W._(film)

Tracklisting

01. War Introduction – from the W. original film score (Paul Cantelon)
02. The Whiffenpoof Song – Collegians Male Chorus
03. Claudette – Roy Orbison
04. Chattahoochee – Alan Jackson
05. Shotgun Boogie – Hank Thompson
06. Bayou – from the W. original film score (Paul Cantelon)
07. Mammas Don t Let Your Babies Grow Up To Be Cowboys – Willie Nelson
08. Wasted Days and Wasted Nights – Freddy Fender
09. Delta Waltz – from the W. original film score (Paul Cantelon)
10. Robin Hood – Dick James with Stephen James and His Chums
11. Deep In The Heart of Texas – Gene Autry
12. The Differencemaker – from the W. original film score (Paul Cantelon)
13. What A Wonderful World – Eddy Arnold
14. Yellow Rose Of Texas – Mitch Miller
15. War – from the W. original film score (Paul Cantelon)
16. I m Winging My Way Back Home – The Blackwood Brothers
17. With God on Our Side – Bob Dylan

Here she be:

Big thanks to the original poster



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October 12, 2008 Posted by | Music_ClassicRock, Music_Country, Music_Folk, Music_OST, Paul Cantelon, Roy Orbison, Willie Nelson, _BOB DYLAN, _CARTOON, _MUSIC | 1 Comment

Leonard Cohen – Live Songs (1973) (Better links)

Album : Live Songs
Artist : Leonard Cohen
Release Date : 2001
Original Release Date : 1973
Columbia | CD 32272
Number of Discs : 1
Total time : 00:49:08
EAC (APE+CUE+LOG) | full 300dpi scans | 174 MB
rar files | 3% recovery

I am dirty as a glass roof in a train station
I feel like an empty cast iron exhibition


A great Lenny live LP. This 1973 album is comprised of live recordings made in 1970 and 1972 in London, Brussels, Paris, Berlin, Isle Of Wight and Tennessee.

Cohen’s fourth album was released during the three-year silence between Songs of Love and Hate and New Skin for the Old Ceremony.

Live Songs is a live album, or, more accurately -and as the title suggests – a compilation of live recordings, performed mostly in Europe in 1970 and 1972. Cohen is backed by an excellent country-influenced group, which includes guitarist/ fiddler Charlie Daniels and vocalist “Jennifer Warren”, who would soon become famous as Jennifer Warnes who, amongst other things (some good solo stuff and some succesful stuff too – especially the “Up Where We Belong” movie tie-in single with Joe Cocker) became a renowned interpreter of Lenny’s songs.

The album consists mostly of reinterpretations (often with additional or significantly altered lyrics) of songs from Cohen’s second album, Songs From a Room.

For example, “Nancy” is a version of “Seems So Long Ago, Nancy”, and “Improvisation” is an extended instrumental guitar trio version of the vamp from “You Know Who I Am”, which is also featured.

Strangely, neither Songs of Leonard Cohen nor Songs of Love and Hate (which itself had featured a live track, “Let’s Sing Another Song, Boys”, culled from the same tour as the 1970 recordings here) are represented.

The other tracks are a cover of the folk standard “Passing Through”, and two new compositions: “Please Don’t Pass Me By (A Disgrace)” (a thirteen-minute singalong recorded in 1970) and “Minute Prologue”.

At the beginning of a Paris, France performance of “Bird on the Wire”, Cohen recites the first verse of a French translation of the song’s lyric.

A “bonus” track, the sublime “Queen Victoria”, was recorded by Cohen alone in his Tennessee hotel room in 1972. This was later covered wonderfully by the great John Cale!

Lenny must have had a thing for weird stoic right-wing German-Brit bitches! Guess he must’ve later loved Maggie Thatcher!
https://i0.wp.com/www.cathedralcatholic.org/academics/homework/johnson/Queen_Victoria_.jpg


Queen Victoria,
My father and all his tobacco loved you,
I love you too in all your forms,
the slim unlovely virgin floating among German beards,
the mean governess of the huge pink maps,
the solitary mourner of a prince.

Queen Victoria,
I am cold and rainy,
I am dirty as a glass roof in a train station,
I feel like an empty cast iron exhibition,
I want ornaments on everything,
because my love, she gone with other boys.

Queen Victoria,
do you have a punishment under the white lace,
will you be short with her, make her read those little Bibles,
will you spank her with a mechanical corset.
I want her pure as power, I want her skin slightly musty with petticoats
will you wash the easy bidet out of her head?

Queen Victoria,
I’m not much nourished by modern love,
will you come into my life
with your sorrow and your black carriages,
And your perfect
memories.

Queen Victoria,
the Twentieth Century belongs to you and me.
Let us be two severe giants not less lonely for our partnership,
who discoloured test tubes in the halls of Science,
who turned up unwelcome at every World’s Fair,
heavy with proverb and correction
confusing the star-dazed tourists
with our incomparable sense of loss.

Tracklisting

1. Minute Prologue
2. Passing Through
3. You Know Who I Am
4. Bird on the Wire
5. Nancy
6. Improvisation
7. Song of Isaac
8. Please Don’t Pass Me By
9. Tonight Will Be Fine
10. Queen Victoria

Here be Lenny:

DL 2 parts

Password: www.AvaxHome.ru

HINT: careful of space

All thanks Bumbo


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October 11, 2008 Posted by | Canon, Leonard Cohen, Music_ClassicSong, Music_Folk, _MUSIC | Leave a comment

Charlie Louvin – Steps to Heaven (2008)

Charlie Louvin – Steps to Heaven (2008)

An amazing album from one of the stalwarts of folk music, of country music … of all music!

One question though … why the fuck is Bob Dylan not on here, to pay rightful tribute to an artist who has been hugely influential on him (and thousands others!)? Charlie’s over 80 now, so there won’t be to many more fucking chances!

2007 saw Louvin celebrate his 80th birthday amidst a swirl of activity around the release of his first studio album in ten years, Charlie Louvin. Grammy-nominated for Best Traditional Folk Album, the disc features George Jones, Wilco’s Jeff Tweedy, Will Oldham, Elvis Costello and many others.

Charlie toured and recorded with Lucinda Williams, made a video for the song “Ira”, released a field recording of one of his many in-store performances, Live at Shake It Records, played over 100 concert dates sharing stages with Ryan Adams and Neko Case, appeared on giant festivals like Bonnaroo and Hardly Strictly Bluegrass, and placed a medallion around Emmylou Harris’ neck inducting her into the Country Music Hall of Fame. Charlie’s self-titled album earned 4 out of 5 stars in Uncut and Mojo Magazine, and sparked a bevy of great press and renewed interest in his fascinating career.

Instead of hanging back at age 80, Charlie has instead chosen to challenge himself. Steps to Heaven was recorded live with a gospel choir comprised of three sisters, journeyman gospel pianist Derrick Lee, and Chris Scruggs adding doghouse bass and electric guitar. Louvin had never recorded with black gospel musicians before, and in doing so discovered a new musical path. “I did things on the gospel record I had no idea I could do. I’d be thinking along the way, `How can I do things I’ve never done before?’ And I did it.”

Tracklisting

1. Love at Home
2. How Beautiful Heaven Must Be
3. Precious Lord, Take My Hand
4. There’s a Higher Power
5. Where We’ll Never Grow Old
6. If We Never Meet Again This Side of Heaven
7. Jest Rehearsing
8. When the Roll Is Called Up Yonder
9. I Feel Like Traveling On
10. I Am Bound for the Promised Land

Big thanks to Victory for this amazing post



We do not host any files here. If this post contains a link to content hosted elsewhere, this is content found by a simple search on the worldwide freedom web. However, if for some valid reason, you object to a said content, or any content here, please let us know and we will remove the content in question.

Any content linked to here is only meant as a taster for the original work itself and is posted on the strict understanding that anyone who downloads the taster, deletes said content within 24 hours. We would assume that these fans will then buy the original work and we greatly encourage them to do so.

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October 9, 2008 Posted by | Charlie Louvin, Elvis Costello, George Jones, Jeff Tweedy, Music_Country, Music_Folk, Music_Gospel, Will Oldham, _MUSIC | Leave a comment

Joan Baez w ith The Smothers Bros. – I Shall Be Released

Tom and Dick provide some nice harmonies while Joan performs one of Bob Dylan’s greatest.

Baez sure does have a great voice, and an uncanny knack for getting her interpretations spot on!

thanks 2old2Rock

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October 8, 2008 Posted by | Joan Baez, Music_Folk, The Smothers Brothers, _BOB DYLAN, _MUSIC | Leave a comment

Bob Dylan, Bertolt Brecht and "When the Ship Comes In"

Album cover

Album The Times They Are a-Changin’
Released January 13, 1964
Recorded October 23, 1963
Genre Folk
Length 3:18
Label Columbia
Writer Bob Dylan
Producer Tom Wilson

The “Folky” created the classic “When the Ship Comes In” back in 1963 for his third studio album The Times They Are a-Changin’, released in 1964.

Joan Baez stated in the documentary film No Direction Home that “When the Ship Comes In” was, to a great extent inspired by an actual event when a hotel clerk that refused to give the young Dylan a room due to his “unwashed” appearance – of course, Dylan was not a superstar, or even famous outside of the folk movement back in 63!

The song then grew into a sprawling epic allegory, about vanquishing the oppressive “powers that be”.

It soon became a folk classic, a standard that was covered by a slew of famous artists within the folk movement, and some artists without.

Dylan’s main inspiration for this song is said to be Pirate Jenny (1928) by Bertolt Brecht & Kurt Weill, both thematically and in lines such as;

You gentlemen can wipe off that smile off your face
Cause every building in town is a flat one
This whole frickin’ place will be down to the ground
Only this cheap hotel standing up safe and sound

Inspiration was also likely gleamed from My Ship (1941), written by Kurt Weill & Ira Gershwin wherein are found lines such as;

My ship’s aglow with a million pearls
And rubies fill each bin
The sun sits high in a sapphire sky
When my ship comes in

In Dylan’s magnificent 2004 memoir, “Chronicles: Volume One,” – a must have not only for Dylan fans, not only for music fans and not only for fans of great literature! – there is a fascinating section exploring how Bob Dylan went from being an ingenue unable to write or structure an original song, to being – in an incredibly short timeframe – someone with an almost preternatural expertise in the art of songwriting.

https://i0.wp.com/upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/a/ae/Bob_Dylan_Chronicles,_Volume_1.jpgBob writes about how he took certain great songs from artists he worshiped and tried to break them down into kernel parts, so that he might attain some understanding of how their creators created them.

Among the slew of such artists he worshiped, as set out in “Chronicles”, prominent therein is Bertolt Brecht, who Bob writes had an enormous impact on his development as an artist.

As if describing a conversion on the road to Damascus, Dylan recalls in great detail “Brecht on Brecht,” a musical revue he saw in the Village in ’63. He only happened upon the show by chance while waiting for his girlfriend, , who was on the production staff.

“My little shack in the universe was about to expand into some glorious cathedral, at least in songwriting terms,” he writes, describing his reaction to the music. “They were like folk songs in nature, but unlike folk songs, too, because they were sophisticated.”

Bob was struck in particular by “Pirate Jenny” from “The Threepenny Opera.” This bracing song, with music by Kurt Weill, tells the story, from the point of view of a maid, of an ominous black ship coming into town.

https://i2.wp.com/upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/f/f0/Bob_Dylan_in_November_1963.jpg“Each phrase comes at you from a 10-foot drop, scuttles across the road and then another comes like a punch on the chin,” Bob writes in “Chronicles.”

“This piece left you flat on your back and it demanded to be taken seriously. It lingered. Woody had never written a song like that,” he says, referring to his folk hero Woody Guthrie. “It wasn’t a protest or topical song and there was no love for people in it.”

After seeing the show, he writes, he painstakingly took apart the song’s structure, lyrics and melody to figure out what made it work.

“It was the form, the free verse association, the structure and disregard for the known certainty of melodic patterns to make it seriously matter, give it its cutting edge. It also has the ideal chorus for the lyrics. I wanted to figure out how to manipulate and control this particular structure and form.”

He continues, “I could see that the type of songs I was leaning towards singing didn’t exist and I began playing with the form, trying to grasp it — trying to make a song that transcended the information in it, the character and plot.”

So, “totally influenced by ‘Pirate Jenny,’ ” Bob says he began experimenting with his own songwriting!


Oh the time will come up
When the winds will stop
And the breeze will cease to be breathin’.
Like the stillness in the wind
‘Fore the hurricane begins,
The hour when the ship comes in.

Oh the seas will split
And the ship will hit
And the sands on the shoreline will be shaking.
Then the tide will sound
And the wind will pound
And the morning will be breaking.

Oh the fishes will laugh
As they swim out of the path
And the seagulls they’ll be smiling.
And the rocks on the sand
Will proudly stand,
The hour that the ship comes in.

And the words that are used
For to get the ship confused
Will not be understood as they’re spoken.
For the chains of the sea
Will have busted in the night
And will be buried at the bottom of the ocean.

A song will lift
As the mainsail shifts
And the boat drifts on to the shoreline.
And the sun will respect
Every face on the deck,
The hour that the ship comes in.

Then the sands will roll
Out a carpet of gold
For your weary toes to be a-touchin’.
And the ship’s wise men
Will remind you once again
That the whole wide world is watchin’.

Oh the foes will rise
With the sleep still in their eyes
And they’ll jerk from their beds and think they’re dreamin’.
But they’ll pinch themselves and squeal
And know that it’s for real,
The hour when the ship comes in.

Then they’ll raise their hands,
Sayin’ we’ll meet all your demands,
But we’ll shout from the bow your days are numbered.
And like Pharaoh’s tribe,
They’ll be drownded in the tide,
And like Goliath, they’ll be conquered.


Bob Dylan
Copyright ©1963; renewed 1991 Special Rider Music


There’s an interesting piece on the origins of this song, which talks about Pirate Jenny (1928) by Bertolt Brecht & Kurt Weill, and My Ship (1941), music by Kurt Weill and lyrics by Ira Gershwin, amongst others; allalongthewatchtower.dk/phorum/read as well including as a nice piece fromm Jason Zinoman, a few snippets of which we’ve borrowed above!

https://i2.wp.com/www.gmcreations.com/catalog/images/Ship%20Comes%20In.jpg

There’s a nice piece below about this great song from Jeff Nielsen at musicruinedmylife – a very fine blog!

musicruinedmylife? What a coincidence! Music ruined my life too! Well, music and alcohol. Actually, music and alcohol and drugs. Well, more accurately, music and nasty alcohol and nastier women!

Ahem … sorry …. A nice piece on Dylan, the protest song and some twenty two different versions of the classic “When the Ship Comes In“!

Great work mate!

Here’s the piece below …. Check out more stuff like this at musicruinedmylife motherfos!

God, I’m glad I’m not me.

Bob Dylan


The Ship Confused

by Jeff Nielsen (musicruinedmylife)

Recently, I told my father (a retired seventy-something philosophy professor and disavowed leftist) that I’d gone to see a Bob Dylan concert. He asked, “So are his songs about Iraq and Afghanistan now?”

In a knee-jerk response, I said, “Bob Dylan hasn’t written a protest song since 1964.”

Glib and a bit suspect. (“Au contraire, mon frere,” someone will comment, “what about “George Jackson”, “Hurricane” and …uh…“TV Talkin’ Song”?”) However, it is true that his Dylan, the old black and white, finger-pointin’ Dylan of ’63-’64, turned out to be just a fleeting facet of the man.

Everyone* has their own Dylan. Dylanologists (and, of course, Todd Haynes) have over the years, delineated these variegated Dylan archetypes (traditionalist, protest singer, rocker, country crooner, gypsy, Christian, hack, old cowboy etc.) which everyone is free to warp into their own one and only Dylan. Witness the depths that Jann Wenner of Rolling Stone and Sean Curnyn at Right Wing Bob will plumb to twist Dylan’s every twitch into a signal of allegiance to their own political vision. (As Joan Baez, in No Direction Home, informs those who ask if Bob will come and join their cause. “He never comes, you moron. When are you gonna get it?”)

My own Dylans are a hopeless mish-mash. At the age of ten “Gotta Serve Somebody” played alongside “You Don’t Bring me Flowers Anymore” and “I Will Survive” on my cheap transistor radio. At eleven, a cassette of Greatest Hits smeared together the earliest Dylans for an awkward pre-adolescent. Following a plunge into fundamentalist Christianity, I bought a used LP of Saved and topped it off with the, then-current, Knocked out Loaded. That duo – a gospel album and a hodgepodge – cooled me on Dylan for years. But, much later, I came back, and devoured his entire catalog – finding the wheat even in the chaff-ridden albums. I concluded that with each Dylan being rewarding (even if some are much less so) that picking a single favourite is an affront to the man’s work.

However, pushes turning to shoves, that stark, earnest, tune-pilfering Dylan of the early sixties is damn compelling for me. This is the Dylan of my father (a man who has ignored Bob for forty-some years yet can still recite whole verses of “The Times They Are A-Changin’”).

One crucial favourite of this era is “When the Ship Comes In” from The Times They-Are-A-Changin’. This hard-charging battle anthem seems to be about civil right but is in fact all about personal indignation. Joan Baez says after Bob, in all his scruffiness, was turned away from a hotel he wrote the song in a fury. It’s a short jump from the belligerence of this song’s, “Then they’ll raise their hands/Sayin’ we’ll meet all your demands/But we’ll shout from the bow your days are numbered” to “Positively 4th Street’s”, “You got a lotta nerve/To say you got a helping hand to lend/You just want to be on/The side that’s winning”. That anger, open or hidden, is one of the many constants in all of Dylan’s guises.

In the end, each of the facets are of a piece; there is no Dylan but Dylan.


“There was a time in my life when I fervently wanted to be Bob Dylan. Then I realized that practically everyone else in the world wanted to be Bob Dylan, too, and that even if we all got our wish, being Bob Dylan would be so common that it would be completely meaningless to be Bob Dylan even for the actual original Bob Dylan and the world would end up exactly the same as it was before.”

Frank Portman, King Dork


* Hemispheric bias duly noted.


Here for your listening pleasure, possibly, are twenty two different versions of “When the Ship Comes In.”

Bob Dylan

In 1963 at Carnegie Hall Dylan gave one of those the rambling introductions (“There are crueller Goliaths…”) that would later get him in trouble and then tore into the song, throwing a punk snarl into the consonants. Video (March on Washington) here.

The Hillmen

The phoniness that oozes from the living corpse named David Crosby may taint the Byrds for some but Chris Hillman, on the other hand, has a history including once leading this sterling bluegrass band (alongside future country star Vern Gosdin) who in 1964 effortlessly thrust the song back to another time and geography.

Arlo Guthrie

This live version from 1994 , with Pete Seeger (supposedly), feels laboured as Arlo’s Dylanesque voice (which he possess for very good reason) clashes with an inflated lite-rock arrangement.Video here

The Silkie

Underwhelming vocals and half-hearted accompaniment on this 1965 version of the song make this band sound like a wa-a-a-y too polite version of the (already pretty damn polite) Seekers. Video here

Billy Bragg

Bragg’s recent version of the song gives it a slightly mournful take, akin to Dylan’s later-period sad readings of “The Times They-are-a Changin’”, which is a shame as the world could use a clanging solo-electric guitar version like Bragg did for that damn “Times….” song.

Clancy Brothers with Tommy Makem

That hammy introduction (“You never thought you’d hear Dylan with an Irish accent did you?”) for this version of the song from 1992’s 30th Anniversary Concert reminds us that the Clancy’s are actors who bring a broad, theatrical feel to the song, perhaps bringing the song back to it’s roots in the song “Pirate Jenny” from Bertolt Brecht’s Three Penny Opera. Video here.

Carl Marcus Franklin

In his 2007 film, I’m Not There, director Todd Haynes cast Franklin to portray Dylan as a pre-teen African American named Woody and the young actor digs into the song’s gospel elements .Video here

Coal Porters

While this band, led by former Long Ryder and author Sid Griffin (who did justice to the Clash’s “Something About England on the Sandanista Project – previously) may not have created the lost Byrds version they aspire to this 2001 version still stands as a fitting tribute to Chris Hillman’s take on the song.

Hugues Aufray

Le Jour où le Bateau Viendra is a translation by French, (“French from France” as a good Franch-Canadian would specify) singer and Dylan pal, Aufray who gives the song a more heroic but still faithful read.

Idlewild

Idlewild go all sad n’ piano here for a version that will (for a lucky few) recall singer Roddy Woomble’s stunning solo album, My Secret is my Silence (which might better Idlewild’s tense but melodic sophomore 2000 album 1,000 Broken Windows from which this song is a b-side.)

Lionsong

It’s 1979 – the Clash have unleashed London Calling, Daniel Amos are preparing to break Christian rock free of the Eagles grasp with Horrendous Disc and somewhere there still existed this freeze-dried Mighty-Wind Christian folk band (not-to-be-missed album available here) full of banjo and church-choir break-it-down sections.

Mark Haines and Tom Leighton

In 2002 this East Coast Canadian folk duo did a fine accordion and tin whistle take on the song which has clearly become a Celtic standard thanks to the Clancy Brothers.

Totta & Wiehe

Totta Näslund, a veteran Swedish rocker, died of liver cancer in 2005 just before finishing an album of Dylan songs including this one of When the Ship Comes In (apparently a Euro-Dylan favourite) translated to Swedish (as När Vårt Skepp Slår Til) with Mikael Wiehe.

Peter, Paul, Mary

This trio was always disparaged for sanitizing Dylan (didn’t the Byrds do that too?) and this bouncy, yet sincere 1965 cover will not change anyone’s views on a group who are as static as Dylan is mercurial. Video here

The Pogues

Hampered a bit by trying so hard to sound like their earlier selves, this Shane McGownless-less, but Joe Strummer-fortified (previously), version of the Pogues circa 1996 do get the closest to doing a punk rock version of this song (albeit with heavy tin whistle).

Steve Gibbons

Okay.

Next.

The Hollies

Not only did the Hollies do a Dylan covers album as late as 1968 (it’s wretchedness causing Graham Nash to quit and inflict Crosby, Stills and Nash upon an unsuspecting world) but the syrupy arrangement here makes the Slkie sound like the Stooges. Video here

Roky Erickson (13the Floor Elevators.)

Like many Roky semi-bootlegs, this rough demo of uncertain date sounds like someone paid a derelict a mickey to sing into an old boombox. Yet, in his madness, Roky gets an apocalyptic death grip on the song that both Brecht and the Dylan of ’64 would understand.

Bruce T. Holmes

Ineffectually nice.

Barry McGuire and Terry Talbot

Y’know, Barry gets a lot of grief for Green, Green, Eve of Destruction and a batch of tepid Christian folk albums (including this one from 1995) but that gritty voice is a biting instrument that can give strength to even his, almost invariably, weak material.

The Golden Gate Strings

Their web-site says, “Come and hear the Golden Gate Strings and see how this exciting ensemble can add incomparable elegance Muzak to receptions, fundraisers, weddings and corporate events.

Bob Dylan (with Ron Wood and Keith Richards)

Here, in all its shambolic glory is the Live Aid version from 1985 with the rambling, heretical, introduction that kept Dylan on the outs with the cultural cognoscenti for a decade. In all fairness, Bob Geldof had it coming, as does anyone else who thinks that Dylan meet will meet their expectations. Video here.


If you truly believe you can withstand twenty-two versions in a row of the same song here is the compilation in its entirety (for preview purposes only to be deleted from your computer in 24 hours etc. etc.)



The Black Freighter panel above is from the Watchmen graphic novel from Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons –
the first chapter of which is titled “At Midnight, All the Agents…” after the line in “Desolation Row” plus chapter
ten is called “Two Riders Were Approaching” after the final line of “All Along the Watchtower”.

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October 7, 2008 Posted by | Billy Bragg, Music_Folk, The Pogues, _BOB DYLAN, _MUSIC, _POETRY | Leave a comment

VA – Rogue’s Gallery – Pirate Ballads, Sea Songs, and Chanteys

VA – Rogue’s Gallery – Pirate Ballads, Sea Songs, and Chanteys
2006 | FLAC | 865 MB

Avast now me mateys …. Oooooohhhh Yarrrrr! ….

I be likin this, so I be! …… Oooooohhhh Yarrrrr!……

As powerful as the Cat o’ nine tails and as wonderful as Fiddlers Green ! Yarrrrr!

Last night, when I be loaded to the Gunwales with glorious cheap sweet Jamaican grog and delectatin meself inside an army of glorious cheap sweet Jamaican wenches – who be costin me a pretty cache o’ pieces o’ eight I be tellin ya – I be hearin some lovely melodies a wiltin across the stench filled air! ….. Oooooohhhh Yarrrrr!……

A great collection, aye surely me hearties …. Oooooohhhh Yarrrrr!……and a very eclectic one too I be tellin ya ….. Oooooohhhh Yarrrrr! ……

Ahem … sorry, I get demented betimes …..Oooooohhhh Yarrrrrr ……

Some amazing sea songs sung by artists we love such as Nick Cave, Lou Reed, Antony, Stan Ridgway, Mary Margaret O’Hara, Martin Carthy, Kate McGarrigle and David Thomas etc.

Bono – that scurvy dog sure be one annoyin tosser Yarrrrr! ….. and his pal Gavin Friday ex of the Virgin Prunes are on here too!

There’s a group on here called The Old Prunes …. have the Virgin Prunes reformed?

There’s also some performances from the mysterious Jack Shit! Could this be one Johnny Depp?!!

Some unusual performers here too such as John C. Reilly – a great actor but one who lately seems to be appearing in way too many moronic “comedies” with assholes like Will Ferrell and Adam Sandler – and (one time) radical genius cartoonist Ralph Steadman!

Be warned, however, that included here is that vile Sting (that scurvy dog sure be one sickenin muzak tosser Yarrrrr!) and one of those awful Corrs (I be wantin to go a pokin with that diddly-iddle lass but not a listenin to her banshee muzak! Yarrrrr!) !!

….. All thanks be to the gods of the scurvy oceans for ye ould DELETE button! Yarrrrr!

A whopping 43 tracks in all (well, 41 after I be a deletin the Sting and the Corr, Yarrr!) …. I be likin this, so I be!

Ahoy! Get downloadin’ now me hearties!! Oooooohhhh Yarrrrrr !!!!

[Marina_0966.jpg]

Are ye gonna be a scoffin that glorious grog all day Mr Stupid or will ye be a raisin me wet sails! Yarrrr!

Johnny Depp and director Gore Verbinski hatched the idea for Rogue’s Gallery while filming “Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man’s Chest”–that idea being to cast genteel rock superstars like Bono, Lou Reed, Bryan Ferry, Andre Corr, and Sting to reinterpret gritty seafaring standards for an exhaustive 43-track double-disc set produced by Hal Wilner.

Throw in a bunch of credible folk stars (Loudon Wainwright III, Richard Thompson), their offspring (Rufus, Teddy) and a string of other curious characters (Jarvis Cocker, Antony) and what results is one of the strangest compilations in recent memory, if not exactly the most historically authentic or, well, digestible. Nick Cave embraces the role just a little too hard on “Fire Down Below,” while Ferry can’t help but sound like he’s singing for the cast of “The Love Boat,” but cut through the chaff and there is some real bootie here: Bono’s “Dying Sailor to His Shipmates,” Jolie Holland’s “The Grey Funnel Line” and “Boney” by a mysterious tramp called Jack Shit, which must be some kind of anagram* for Johnny Depp.


-Aidin Vaziri

* Anagram? Buy yourself a fucking dictionary Aidin! …. Methinks thoust been imbibin too much of ye glorious grog!! Y’arrrrr!!

[PinUp1b.jpg]

Is that a big pistol in yer pocket Mr Stupid or are ye very happy to be a seein me? Yarrrrr !

Rogue’s Gallery: Pirate Ballads, Sea Songs and Chanteys is a compilation album of sea shanties performed by a wide array of artists, ranging from Sting to Bryan Ferry, representing a variety of genres. The artists cover a large number of diverse songs of the sea, at times adding elements traditionally attributed to other types of music. The majority of the pop performers had not been known to be familiar with the sea shanty as a separate genre, though Sting, who contributed two tracks to the project, had had prior knowledge of and contact with them. Several well-known names from the folk world, where these songs have long been staples, also make appearances, including Richard Thompson, Martin Carthy and James Cooke.

While the marketing insanity for Pirates of the Caribbean II continues to echo in the
popular mindset, this whopping yet seemingly near-underground document — born from the minds of the film’s director, Gore Verbinski, his pal Johnny Depp, and Anti-Epitaph label boss (and Verbinski buddy) Brett Gurewitz — may end up as a lasting contribution to the populace at large without them even knowing it. Surely it lends its own weighty blend of blood, sweat, and tears to the folkloric literature of sea shanties and pirate songs, though cranks like Alan Lomax and John Jacob Niles are certainly turning over in their graves if they have any extraterrestrial knowledge of its existence. Rogue’s Gallery: Pirate Ballads, Sea Songs, and Chanteys, produced by Hal Willner, has gathered up the usual outrageous, inspired, ambitious, sometimes ridiculously grouped musicians to record folksongs of the sea, from the call-and-response grunting and occasionally obscene work songs sung by men from the old seas who worked the riggings in rhythm, to pirates who needed (much as modern-day rappers) to boast of their exploits. Willner gathered together some 75 songs and went to Seattle to hang with Bill Frisell to discuss the project. Frisell gathered the Akron Family, Wayne Horvitz, and Eyvind Kang to be a kind of house band there, and netted a slew of songs from the likes of Robin Holcomb (whose reading of “Dead Horse” is one of the most beautiful and haunting things here); the notorious Baby Gramps (whose version of “Cape Cod Girls” starts everything off with a harrumph), and a slew of others. He later went to Los Angeles, New York, London, Dublin, and god knows where else, finding roots musicians to be an ad hoc house band. In London, Warren Ellis of Dirty Three and Bad Seeds fame and Kate St. John formed a unit with some other folks, and in L.A. it was Jack Shit and friends. But this is the back of the story, actually.

The singers include everybody from pop blowhards like Sting and Bono, who do respectable jobs (well, not Bono: he blows it big-time on “A Dying Sailor to His Shipmates” because he can’t help himself), to wildmen like David Thomas (of Pere Ubu) and Nick Cave; from modern-day darlings like Lucinda Williams and Rufus Wainwright (who sings with his mom, Kate McGarrigle while his cranky old dad Loudon Wainwright III makes an appearance for two cuts); to strange adventurers like Mark Anthony Thompson, Jarvis Cocker, and Bob Neuwirth; from bona fide rock eccentrics like Antony, Jolie Holland, Bryan Ferry, Van Dyke Parks, Stan Ridgway, and Gavin Friday (in Ireland anyway) to rock legends (Ferry fits here, too) like Lou Reed); to indie rock songwriting iconoclasts Joseph Arthur and Ed Harcourt; bona fide recluses like Mary Margaret O’Hara; true traditionalists like John C. Reilly, Martin Carthy and family (Eliza Carthy on her own, too), and Richard and Teddy Thompson. Oh yeah, and one true counterculture icon: Ralph Steadman!

https://i2.wp.com/img.photobucket.com/albums/v347/Valeron/MySpace2/HotPirateBabe1.jpg

There’s a whale load of 43 cuts spread out over two discs in a handsome package. It’s bound to lose money unless some uptight Amerikanskis get adventurous real quick and buy it to put on their iPods to play on their sailboats and yachts, or if NPR does a feature on it for the yups (that would make both Ishmael and Captain Ahab proud). There are many standouts here, but those that really shake up the decks are Eliza Carthy’s “Rolling Sea,” Bryan Ferry’s two contributions — the entirely creepy “The Cruel Ship’s Captain,” and his duet with Antony “Lowlands Low” — Nick Cave’s “Pinery Boy” and his hilariously evil “Fire Down Below,” Gavin Friday’s “Baltimore Whores,” Richard Thompson’s reverential and lonesome “Mingualy Boat Song,” Martin Carthy and family’s “Hog-Eye Man,” O’Hara’s stirring “The Cry of Man,” Cocker’s wondrously cannibalistic “A Drop of Nelson’s Blood,” and Mark Anthony Thompson’s hunted “Haul Away Joe.” This doesn’t mean there are other things here that will appeal to the masses, or even to the few. Let’s face it, Baby Gramps, as great as he is, is only gonna make a few hearts (those that are diseased, most likely, or warped, most surely) flutter. Williams is good, but Parks is better, and Joseph Arthur can be downright scary when he wants to be: remember Tom Waits’ contribution to another Willner project, Stay Awake: Interpretations of Vintage Disney Films? There you have it.

There is something here for most, and something to piss off everyone else. The real deal is this: by bringing up these old relics — some of which took considerable research to find — Willner has done a service to folk culture by presenting it in such an oddball, loose, and fun way to the masses. Perhaps that rarefied world of folk culture fascists (who will remain unnamed here) may take umbrage, but consider those who will actually get turned on by this music and research the old songs themselves. Certainly that may be a choice few; for the rest, there is untold knowledge to be gained for random conversation, filling in the “personal weird stuff” file in their brains, and perhaps, if urbane enough, may spark a discussion for a moment or so until the next really “big” thing distracts them. Any way you hoist it, Rogue’s Gallery: Pirate Ballads, Sea Songs, and Chanteys is a treasure trove of the beautiful, the weird, the arcane, and the dangerous right out there on the record store shelves for anyone with a few dollars to spare to be awed or amused by.


[Miko.jpg]

Oh Ya Ya. Yarrrrr !
Ya Ya. Yarrrrr ! Yarrrrrrrrrrrrr !


Tracklisting

Disc: 1

1. Cape Cod Girls – Baby Gramps
2. Mingulay Boat Song – Richard Thompson
3. My Son John – John C. Reilly
4. Fire Down Below – Nick Cave
5. Turkish Revelry – Loudon Wainwright III
6. Bully In The Alley – The Old Prunes
7. The Cruel Ship’s Captain – Bryan Ferry
8. Dead Horse – Robin Holcomb
9. Spansih Ladies – Bill Frisell
10. High Barbary – Joseph Arthur
11. Haul Away Joe – Mark Anthony Thompson
12. Dan Dan – David Thomas
13. Blood Red Roses – Sting
14. Sally Brown – Teddy Thompson
15. Lowlands Away – Rufus Wainwright & Kate McGarrigle
16. Baltimore Whores – Gavin Friday
17. Rolling Sea – Eliza McCarthy
18. Haul On The Bowline – Bob Neuwirth
19. Dying Sailor to His Shipmates – Bono
20. Bonnie Portmore – Lucinda Williams
21. The Mermaid – Martin Carthy & the UK Group
22. Shenandoah – Richard Greene & Jack Shit
23. The Cry Of Man – Mary Margaret O’Hara

Disc: 2

1. Boney – Jack Shit
2. Good Ship Venus – Loudon Wainwright III
3. Long Time Ago -White Magic
4. Pinery Boy – Nick Cave
5. Lowlands Low – Bryan Ferry w/Antony
6. One Spring Morning – Akron/Family
7. Hog Eye Man – Martin Carthy & Family
8. The Fiddler/A Drop Of Nelson’s Blood – Ricky Jay & Richard Greene
9. Caroline and Her Young Sailor Bold – Andrea Corr
10. Fathom The Bowl – John C. Reilly
11. Drunken Sailor – Dave Thomas
12. Farewell Nancy – Ed Harcourt
13. Hanging Johnny – Stan Ridgway
14. Old Man of The Sea – Baby Gramps
15. Greenland Whale Fisheries – Van Dyke Parks
16. Shallow Brown – Sting
17. The Grey Funnel Line – Jolie Holland
18. A Drop of Nelson’s Blood – Jarvis Cocker
19. Leave Her Johnny – Lou Reed
20. Little Boy Billy – Ralph Steadman

[PinUp3.jpg]
Here she be me hearties! Yarrrr …

Format:

Flac (Compression Level 8)

Links:

[rapidshare.com/200 MB Splits]

http://secured.in/download-285745-c4e75a4a.html

RSDF:

http://secured.in/download-285750-f6ff246a.html

No Password

IF YOU HAVE PROBLEMS GETTING THE LINKS FROM SECURED.IN – CHECK IF A POP-UP IS BLOCKED!!!

Also you have to enable javascript – check if you have the “no-script” add-on for firefox enabled!

Big thanks to ceart-bootlegs



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October 7, 2008 Posted by | Antony, Bono, Bryan Ferry, David Thomas, Gavin Friday, Johnny Depp, Lou Reed, Music_Folk, Nick Cave, Stan Ridgway, _BABE, _MUSIC | Leave a comment

Richie Havens x 2 – Richard P Havens and Collection

Two great LPs from the legendary Richard Havens!

https://i0.wp.com/www.dailyherald.com/special/philippines/images/photos/phil.angeles_24ne101104mw.jpg
Fatfuckfrankie adds;

I guess he’s also been known as Dick Havens.

Not to be confused with the gonzo porn movie of the same name I’m now making in Manila!!

There are some amazing Dick Havens in Manila!



Richie Havens- Collection @ 320

1. Woman
2. What’s Going On
3. Younger Men Grow Older
4. What About Me
5. There’s A Hole In The Future
6. Fire And Rain
7. It Could Be The First Day
8. Minstrel From Gault
9. Tightrope
10. Open Our Eyes
11. Prayer
12. Missing Train
13. I Started A Joke
14. Teach Your Children
15. San Francisco Bay Blues
16. High Flying Bird
17. Here Comes The Sun

Here be Richie:

COLLECTION

RICHARD P HAVENS @ 320

1. Stop Pulling and Pushing Me
2. For Haven’s Sake
3. Strawberry Fields Forever
4. What More Can I Say John
5. I Pity the Poor Immigrant
6. Lady Madonna
7. Priests
8. Indian Rope Man
9. Cautiously
10. Just Above My Hobby Horse’s Head
11. She’s Leaving Home
12. Putting Out the Vibration and Hoping It Comes Home
13. Parable of Ramon
14. With a Little Help from My Friends
15. Wear Your Love Like Heaven
16. Run Shaker Life/Do You Feel Good

Here be Richie:

RICHIE HAVENS


Big thanks to shakthecat



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October 1, 2008 Posted by | Music_Blues, Music_Folk, Richie Havens, _MUSIC | Leave a comment

Leonard Cohen – Field Commander Cohen (2001)

Album : Field Commander Cohen
Artist : Leonard Cohen
Release Date : 2001
Lable : Columbia
Number of Discs : 1
Total time : 01:02:52
Total size : 115 MB
Mp3 @ 256 Kbit/s
Total time: 63:08

Songs recorded live at the Hammersmith Odeon, London, on December 4,5,6, 1979; and at the Dome Theatre, Brighton, on December 15, 1979.

Sony Music Entertainment Inc Cat # CK66210


just some grateful, faithful woman’s favourite singing millionaire,
the patron saint of envy and the grocer of despair



Another great Lenny live collection! Twelve amazing tracks here beautifully performed!!

This documents the Field Commander Cohen Tour of 1979 and the songs were recorded live at the Hammersmith Odeon, London, on 4, 5, and December 6, 1979 and at the Dome Theatre, Brighton, on December 15, 1979.

Lenny said this was his best tour ever!

Accompanying Cohen was the great jazz band Passenger from Austin, Texas, consisting of members Steve Meador on drums, Roscoe Beck on bass, Mitch Watkins on guitar, Bill Ginn on keyboards and Paul Ostermayer on sax and flute.

Other tour members included violinist Raffi Hakopian, oudist John Bilezikjian, and wonderful singers Jennifer Warnes and Sharon Robinson.

A sense of fun (well, by Lenny’s standards anyway!) pervades the album, taking its lead from the hilarious title track.

Just look at the amazing tracklist! Add that to the amazing performers and perfect performances and you’ve got something pretty fucking special!!

This LP’s a real pleasure to listen to!

Leonard Cohen recorded his last studio album–The Future–in 1992, so Columbia Records can perhaps be forgiven for continuing to mine the master tapes of his old live performances. The songs here are collected from two 1979 concerts at London’s Hammersmith Odeon and Brighton’s Dome Theatre.

At that time, Cohen was touring in the wake of his Phil Spector-produced Death of a Ladies’ Man album and was, to judge by the performances collected here, in fine form. His voice had not quite plummeted to the crockery-rattling depths captured on I’m Your Man (indeed, on “Memories”, he positively yelps), and the backing band, including Jennifer Warnes on backing vocals, is terrific throughout. The songs, of course, are impeccable, including “Lover Lover Lover,” “Bird on the Wire,” “So Long, Marianne,” and “Hey, That’s No Way to Say Goodbye.”

–Andrew Mueller
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Field Commander Cohen, he was our most important spy:
wounded in the line of duty;
parachuting acid into diplomatic cocktail parties;
urging Fidel Castro to abandon fields and castles;
leave it all, and like a man,
came back to nothing special
such as waiting rooms and ticket lines,
silver bullet suicides,
and messianic ocean tides,
and racial roller-coaster rides,
and other forms of boredom advertised as poetry.

I know you need your sleep now.
I know your life’s been hard,
But many men are falling,
where you promised to stand guard.

I never asked but I heard that you cast your lot along with the poor;
that you be this and nothing more
than just some grateful, faithful woman’s favourite singing millionaire,
the patron saint of envy and the grocer of despair,
working for the Yankee dollar.
Drinkin´ rum and Coca-Cola. Go down Point Koomahnah.
Both mother and daughter. Working for the Yankee dollar.

I know you need your sleep now.
I know your life’s been hard,
But many men are falling,
where you promised to stand guard.

Lover, come and lie with me, if my lover is who you really are.
And be your sweetest self a while, until I ask for more, my child.
Then let the other selves be rung; let them manifest and come,
`til love is pierced and love is hung
and every taste is on the tongue,
and every kind of freedom done, then
oh my love, oh my love, oh my love

//tn3-2.deviantart.com/fs24/300W/i/2008/008/6/1/Matt_in_a_zoot_suit_by_Inebny.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

Tracklisting

1. “Field Commander Cohen” – 4:25
2. “The Window” – 5:51
* violin solo by Raffi Hakopian
3. “The Smokey Life” – 5:34
* duet with Jennifer Warnes
4. “The Gypsy’s Wife” – 5:20
* violin solo by Raffi Hakopian
5. “Lover Lover Lover” – 6:31
* includes two long oud solos by John Bilezikjian
6. “Hey, That’s No Way to Say Goodbye” – 4:04
* violin solo by Raffi Hakopian
7. “The Stranger Song” – 4:55
8. “The Guests” – 6:05
* violin solo by Raffi Hakopian
9. “Memories” – (Cohen, Phil Spector) 4:38
* sax solo by Paul Ostermayer
10. “Why Don’t You Try” – 3:43
* duet with Sharon Robinson, solo by Paul Ostermayer
11. “Bird on the Wire” – 5:10
* guitar solo by Mitch Watkins
12. “So Long, Marianne” – 6:44

* Written by Leonard Cohen, except where noted.

HINT: careful of space!


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September 25, 2008 Posted by | Canon, Leonard Cohen, Music_ClassicSong, Music_Folk, _MUSIC | Leave a comment

Leonard Cohen – New Skin for the Old Ceremony (1974)



Album : New Skin for the Old Ceremony
Artist : Leonard Cohen
Release Date : 1995
Original Release Date : 1974
Lable : Sony
Number of Discs : 1
Total time : 00:37:06
Total size : 51,1 MB
@ 192 Kbit/s mp3


Those were the reasons and that was New York,
we were running for the money and the flesh.


A neglected Lenny classic from 1974. Eleven amazing tracks here. Beautiful timeless songs!

This was Cohen’s fourth studio album and here he seems to evolve away from the rawer sound of his earlier albums, with violas, mandolins, banjos, guitars, percussion and other instruments giving the album a more orchestrated – but nevertheless spare – sound.

In concert, a prolonged “I Tried to Leave You” has often been used to introduce Lenny’s band. The 14-minute rendition from the 1985 Montreux Jazz Festival even featured extra lines given to the backup singers.

“Who by Fire” explicitly relates to Cohen’s Jewish roots, echoing the words of the Unetanneh Tokef prayer and sung as a duet with Janis Ian (also Jewish; her birth name was Janis Eddy Fink).

“Who by Fire” was covered by great Brit indie band The House of Love on I’m Your Fan. It was also covered by British experimental band Coil, on their landmark album Horse Rotorvator, featuring Marc Almond on lead vocals.

“Leaving Green Sleeves” is a reworking of the 15th-century folk song “Greensleeves”. Cohen retains the chord progression and the words of the first two verses, but changes the melody and takes the latter verses in a different direction than the original.

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The original cover art for New Skin for the Old Ceremony was an image from the alchemical text Rosarium philosophorum. The two winged and crowned beings in sexual embrace, caused his U.S. record label, Columbia Records to print one early edition of the album minus the image substituting instead a photo of Cohen!

The image originally came to public attention in C.G.Jung’s essay, The Psychology of The Transference (2nd ed.1966) where it is held by Jung to depict the union of psychic opposites in the consciousness of the enlightened saint. The sexual embrace as a symbol for this condition of psychic unity is also found frequently in Tibetan thangkas (sacred paintings).

Of course this LP contains one of Lenny’s best – certainly best known – songs, “Chelsea Hotel #2“!

There was an earlier version of this track called Chelsea Hotel #1“!

This however was only performed live and we already posted this fascinating earlier version on a great Lenny boot from Tel Aviv in 72.

“Chelsea Hotel #2” refers to a sexual encounter in the Chelsea Hotel, probably New York City’s most famous Bohemian hostelry.

But who was giving head on the unmade bed??

For some years, when performing this song live, Cohen would tell a story that made it clear that the person he was singing about was Janis Joplin. In a 1994 broadcast on the BBC, Cohen described that as “an indiscretion for which I’m very sorry, and if there is some way of apologising to the ghost, I want to apologise now, for having committed that indiscretion.”

Lloyd Cole covered the song on the Cohen tribute album I’m Your Fan, and Rufus Wainwright performed the song at the 2006 live tribute, Leonard Cohen: I’m Your Man. Regina Spektor has also covered the song in live performances.

Cohen’s former bandleader and guitarist Ron Cornelius says he co-wrote “Chelsea Hotel #2” with Cohen during an eight-hour airplane trip. Cornelius is listed as co-writer in the BMI database but not with the U.S. Copyright Office or on any Cohen record (until the release of the Leonard Cohen: I’m Your Man soundtrack in July 2006).

According to Cornelius, the song was re-copyrighted as #2 in order to leave him out of the credits. He hired a music attorney and was paid $8,500 for not pursuing the case. Following the discussion about Cornelius’s claims, Cohen and Cornelius met in March 2006 after twenty years. “His memory is better than mine. From now on, let it be known we wrote Chelsea Hotel together”, Cohen wrote to Leonard Cohen Forum.

https://i1.wp.com/www.headpress.com/Images/Products/1900486245%20Chelsea%20Hotel.jpg

I remember you
well in the Chelsea Hotel,
you were talking so brave and so sweet,
giving me head on the unmade bed,
while the limousines wait in the street.
Those were the reasons and that was New York,
we were running for the money and the flesh.
And that was called love for the workers in song
probably still is for those of them left.

Ah but you got away, didn’t you babe,
you just turned your back on the crowd,
you got away, I never once heard you say,
I need you, I don’t need you,
I need you, I don’t need you
and all of that jiving around.

I remember you well in the Chelsea Hotel
you were famous, your heart was a legend.
You told me again you preferred handsome men
but for me you would make an exception.
And clenching your fist for the ones like us
who are oppressed by the figures of beauty,
you fixed yourself, you said, “Well never mind,
we are ugly but we have the music.”

And then you got away, didn’t you babe…

I don’t mean to suggest that I loved you the best,
I can’t keep track of each fallen robin.
I remember you well in the Chelsea Hotel,
that’s all, I don’t even think of you that often.

Tracklisting

1 .”Is This What You Wanted” – 4:13
2.”Chelsea Hotel #2″ (words: Cohen, music: Cohen/Ron Cornelius) – 3:06
3.”Lover Lover Lover” – 3:19
4. “Field Commander Cohen” – 3:59
5. “Why Don’t You Try” – 3:50
6.”There Is a War” – 2:59
7. “A Singer Must Die” – 3:17
8. “I Tried to Leave You” – 2:40
9.”Who by Fire” – 2:33
10. “Take This Longing” – 4:06
11. “Leaving Green Sleeves” (trad./Cohen) – 2:38

HINT: careful of space!


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September 25, 2008 Posted by | Canon, Leonard Cohen, Music_ClassicSong, Music_Folk, _MUSIC | Leave a comment

Leonard Cohen – Live Songs (1973)

Album : Live Songs
Artist : Leonard Cohen
Release Date : 2001
Original Release Date : 1973
Lable : Columbia Europe
Number of Discs : 1
Total time : 00:49:08
Total size : 112 MB
@ 320 Kbit/s mp3

I am dirty as a glass roof in a train station
I feel like an empty cast iron exhibition


A great Lenny live LP. This 1973 album is comprised of live recordings made in 1970 and 1972 in London, Brussels, Paris, Berlin, Isle Of Wight and Tennessee.

Cohen’s fourth album was released during the three-year silence between Songs of Love and Hate and New Skin for the Old Ceremony.

Live Songs is a live album, or, more accurately -and as the title suggests – a compilation of live recordings, performed mostly in Europe in 1970 and 1972. Cohen is backed by an excellent country-influenced group, which includes guitarist/ fiddler Charlie Daniels and vocalist “Jennifer Warren”, who would soon become famous as Jennifer Warnes who, amongst other things (some good solo stuff and some succesful stuff too – especially the “Up Where We Belong” movie tie-in single with Joe Cocker) became a renowned interpreter of Lenny’s songs.

The album consists mostly of reinterpretations (often with additional or significantly altered lyrics) of songs from Cohen’s second album, Songs From a Room.

For example, “Nancy” is a version of “Seems So Long Ago, Nancy”, and “Improvisation” is an extended instrumental guitar trio version of the vamp from “You Know Who I Am”, which is also featured.

Strangely, neither Songs of Leonard Cohen nor Songs of Love and Hate (which itself had featured a live track, “Let’s Sing Another Song, Boys”, culled from the same tour as the 1970 recordings here) are represented.

The other tracks are a cover of the folk standard “Passing Through”, and two new compositions: “Please Don’t Pass Me By (A Disgrace)” (a thirteen-minute singalong recorded in 1970) and “Minute Prologue”.

At the beginning of a Paris, France performance of “Bird on the Wire”, Cohen recites the first verse of a French translation of the song’s lyric.

A “bonus” track, the sublime “Queen Victoria”, was recorded by Cohen alone in his Tennessee hotel room in 1972. This was later covered wonderfully by the great John Cale!

Lenny must have had a thing for weird stoic right-wing German-Brit bitches! Guess he must’ve later loved Maggie Thatcher!
https://i0.wp.com/www.cathedralcatholic.org/academics/homework/johnson/Queen_Victoria_.jpg


Queen Victoria,
My father and all his tobacco loved you,
I love you too in all your forms,
the slim unlovely virgin floating among German beards,
the mean governess of the huge pink maps,
the solitary mourner of a prince.

Queen Victoria,
I am cold and rainy,
I am dirty as a glass roof in a train station,
I feel like an empty cast iron exhibition,
I want ornaments on everything,
because my love, she gone with other boys.

Queen Victoria,
do you have a punishment under the white lace,
will you be short with her, make her read those little Bibles,
will you spank her with a mechanical corset.
I want her pure as power, I want her skin slightly musty with petticoats
will you wash the easy bidet out of her head?

Queen Victoria,
I’m not much nourished by modern love,
will you come into my life
with your sorrow and your black carriages,
And your perfect
memories.

Queen Victoria,
the Twentieth Century belongs to you and me.
Let us be two severe giants not less lonely for our partnership,
who discoloured test tubes in the halls of Science,
who turned up unwelcome at every World’s Fair,
heavy with proverb and correction
confusing the star-dazed tourists
with our incomparable sense of loss.

Tracklisting

1. Minute Prologue
2. Passing Through
3. You Know Who I Am
4. Bird on the Wire
5. Nancy
6. Improvisation
7. Song of Isaac
8. Please Don’t Pass Me By
9. Tonight Will Be Fine
10. Queen Victoria

HINT: careful of space


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September 25, 2008 Posted by | Canon, Leonard Cohen, Music_ClassicSong, Music_Folk, _MUSIC | Leave a comment

Leonard Cohen – Songs of Love and Hate (1971)

Album : Songs of Love and Hate
Artist : Leonard Cohen
Release Date : 1995
Original Release Date : 1971
Lable : Sony
Number of Discs : 1
Total time : 00:44:18
Total size : 101 MB
@ 320 Kbit/s mp3

You’re living for nothing now,
I hope you’re keeping some kind of record.


Lenny’s greatest album, the classic Love and Hate from 1971. One of the greatest albums of all time!

Eight seminal tracks here. Beautiful timeless songs! Pure poetry.

This was mainly recorded in Columbia Studios, Nashville, from September 22 to 26, 1970. “Sing Another Song, Boys” was recorded at the Isle of Wight Festival on August 30, 1970. Further recording took place at Trident Studios in London. The album reached #145 on the Billboard list, but was his most commercially successful album in many other parts of the world, reaching #4 in the UK and #8 in Australia.

This is a sort of concept album – using the best meaning of that term! As it was originally designed to be listened to on vinyl record, there is a “hate” side and a “love” side, rather than necessarily being just sides 1 and 2!

Interestingly too, each song seems to have a corresponding counterpart! For example, “Avalanche” and “Love Calls You by Your Name” are stylistically very similar, with familiar structures to each other. The same holds true for all the other songs (“Joan of Arc” to “Last Year’s Man”, “Diamonds in the Mine” to “Sing Another Song, Boys”).


The back cover of the album bears the lines:

They locked up a man
Who wanted to rule the world
The fools
They locked up the wrong man

This LP was ranked 74 on Pitchfork Media’s list of the 100 best albums of the 1970s. Only 74? Fuck off!

The songs are raw and emotive and often frankly personal – especially the wonderful “Famous Blue Raincoat” which tells of a kind of complex “Jules et Jim” threesome involving a chick called Jane, and which ends with the great line “Sincerely, L. Cohen”.

“Famous Blue Raincoat” has been covered numerous times, most notably by Jennifer Warnes, who had earlier toured as a back-up singer for Cohen, on her 1987 tribute album to Cohen, Famous Blue Raincoat. It has also been covered by Tori Amos on the Leonard Cohen tribute album Tower of Song.

by Michelle?


It’s four in the morning, the end of December
I’m writing you now just to see if you’re better
New York is cold, but I like where I’m living
There’s music on Clinton Street all through the evening.

I hear that you’re building your little house deep in the desert
You’re living for nothing now, I hope you’re keeping some kind of record.

Yes, and Jane came by with a lock of your hair
She said that you gave it to her
That night that you planned to go clear
Did you ever go clear?

Ah, the last time we saw you you looked so much older
Your famous blue raincoat was torn at the shoulder
You’d been to the station to meet every train
And you came home without Lili Marlene

And you treated my woman to a flake of your life
And when she came back she was nobody’s wife.

Well I see you there with the rose in your teeth
One more thin gypsy thief
Well I see Jane’s awake —

She sends her regards.

And what can I tell you my brother, my killer
What can I possibly say?
I guess that I miss you, I guess I forgive you
I’m glad you stood in my way.

If you ever come by here, for Jane or for me
Your enemy is sleeping, and his woman is free.

Yes, and thanks, for the trouble you took from her eyes
I thought it was there for good so I never tried.

And Jane came by with a lock of your hair
She said that you gave it to her
That night that you planned to go clear —

Sincerely, L. Cohen


Tracklisting

1. Avalanche
2. Last Year’s Man
3. Dress Rehearsal Rag
4. Diamonds In The Mine
5. Love Calls You By Your Name
6. Famous Blue Raincoat
7. Sing Another Song, Boys
8. Joan Of Arc


We do not host any files here. If this post contains a link to content hosted elsewhere, this is content found by a simple search on the worldwide freedom web. However, if for some valid reason, you object to a said content, or any content here, please let us know and we will remove the content in question.

Any content linked to here is only meant as a taster for the original work itself and is posted on the strict understanding that anyone who downloads the taster, deletes said content within 24 hours. We would assume that these fans will then buy the original work and we greatly encourage them to do so.

Mail us: stupidand@gmail.com

Home Art Babes Cartoons Dylan Editorial Music Videos Other

September 25, 2008 Posted by | Canon, Leonard Cohen, Music_ClassicSong, Music_Folk, _MUSIC | Leave a comment