STUPID and Contagious

Our holiday home from stupidd.blogspot.com !

Inugami Expert – Suehiro Maruo


Interesting and well crafted manga here from Suehiro Maruo


**************
Download here!

**************

Big thanks to acetoeteno.blogspot



We do not host any files here. If this post contains a link to content hosted elsewhere, this is content found by a simple search on the worldwide freedom web. However, if for some valid reason, you object to a said content, or any content here, please let us know and we will remove the content in question.

Any content linked to here is only meant as a taster for the original work itself and is posted on the strict understanding that anyone who downloads the taster, deletes said content within 24 hours. We would assume that these fans will then buy the original work and we greatly encourage them to do so.

Mail us: stupidand@gmail.com

Home Art Babes Cartoons Dylan Editorial Music Videos Other

October 10, 2008 Posted by | Manga, OTHER_BOOK, _ART | Leave a comment

Mark Lewisohn – The Complete Beatles Chronicle

Mark Lewisohn – The Complete Beatles Chronicle
PDF | 368 pages | Publisher: Hamlyn (May 2000) | 26.2 MB | English | ISBN: 0600600335
A massive and wonderful chronicle of the Beatles’ days together, from Mark Lewisohn, the producer of the successful The Beatles: Recording Sessions.

This great tome exhaustively documents the group’s public and private lives from the early days until their breakup.

A must have for fab-four fans!

Here she be:

Big thanks to amadou


We do not host any files here. If this post contains a link to content hosted elsewhere, this is content found by a simple search on the worldwide freedom web. However, if for some valid reason, you object to a said content, or any content here, please let us know and we will remove the content in question.

Any content linked to here is only meant as a taster for the original work itself and is posted on the strict understanding that anyone who downloads the taster, deletes said content within 24 hours. We would assume that these fans will then buy the original work and we greatly encourage them to do so.

Mail us: stupidand@gmail.com

Home Art Babes Cartoons Dylan Editorial Music Videos Other

October 5, 2008 Posted by | OTHER_ARTICLE, OTHER_BOOK, The Beatles, _MUSIC | 1 Comment

John Lennon: The Life by Philip Norman – The Sunday Times review

https://i0.wp.com/www.stars-portraits.com/images/portraits/stars/j/john-lennon/john-lennon-by-Eli.jpg

Good review by Robert Sandall of the latest Lennon bio!

If anyone want to send me this book – John Lennon: The Life by Philip Norman – feel free!


John Lennon: The Life by Philip Norman – The Sunday Times review

A compulsive biography that uncovers the conflicts that made John Lennon a mess of insecurities


by Robert Sandall

from:http://entertainment.timesonline.co.uk

Unlike most rock stars — unlike most people — the life of John Lennon would probably have been a compulsive read whatever he’d achieved as an adult. From the moment he entered the world in 1940 during a German bombing raid on Liverpool, to the point at which he left it 40 years later, shot dead on his New York doorstep by a schizophrenic fan, Lennon was a lifelong stranger to normality.

Emotionally, he was a mess of insecurities. The son of a working-class merchant seaman with showbiz aspirations and a flighty middle-class woman in permanent denial of her genteel background, Lennon fervently believed that he had been, as a child, “never really wanted”. Scarred by a bizarre scene when his soon-to-be-absent father ordered him, at the age of six, to choose which of his separated parents he wanted to stay with, he ended up with neither following the intervention of his mother’s older sister, a strict and childless former nurse, aunt Mimi. Mimi’s motivation for taking John off to live with her and uncle George in the polite Liverpool suburb of Woolton was not maternal or conventionally affectionate: it was driven by her class-bound disapproval of what she regarded as the proletarian habits of John’s mum Julia, a free-spirited fan of pubs, banjo-playing and extramarital relationships.

Lennon’s affinity for his errant mother, whom he visited on a regular basis, extended way beyond her taste for popular music. In the course of his conversations with Lennon’s inner circle, Philip Norman heard several reports of an incident when John was 14 in which he accidentally touched his mother’s breast one afternoon while lying next to her on a bed. “I was wondering if I should do anything else,” Lennon later told a journalist from the Daily Express. “I always think I should have done it. Presumably she would have allowed it.”

Feelings of intimacy were, for this extra- ordinarily unlucky man, often a prelude to bereavement. When Lennon was 17, Julia was run over and killed by a speeding off- duty policeman, a tragedy that left him, he said, “in a blind rage for two years”. He had barely recovered from that when the Beatles’ first bassist Stu Sutcliffe — whom Lennon worshipped with a quasi-sexual intensity and to whom he wrote letters similar in length and tone, he claimed, to the ones he later sent Yoko — died sudd- enly of a brain haemorrhage. (Norman discounts the possibility that this was provoked by an earlier, drunken attack on Sutcliffe in which Lennon-allegedly kicked him in the head.)

The fatal drugs overdose that did for his surrogate father figure, Brian Epstein, in 1967 hit him much harder than it did the rest of the Beatles. For one thing, Lennon blamed himself “for introducing Brian to pills”.

More to the point, he was devastated to lose the cultivated, sensitive soul he had once holidayed alone with in Spain and who, despite all the cruel jibes about Epstein’s being “a faggot and a Jew”, deeply touched the middle-class sensibility implanted by Mimi. When Epstein first checked into a London rehab centre to try to deal with his problem, Lennon sent him a huge floral bouquet with the message, “You know I love you . . . I really mean that. John.”

The loss of Epstein was a disaster which presaged the end of Lennon’s first marriage to the long-suffering Cynthia, as well as his creative relationship with the Beatles. It seems to have coincided with, if not contributed to, the falling-out with Paul McCartney, another close buddy for whom Lennon, Norman suggests, might have harboured some sexual feelings. He quotes Yoko remembering people in the Apple office referring to McCartney as “John’s princess”. But rather than outing his subject, in the stridently accusatory style of his previous biographer Albert Goldman, Norman is more wisely tuned to Lennon’s wayward intellectual curiosity. He attributes his gay moments to a commitment to “the principle that bohemians should try everything” and concludes that, where McCartney was concerned, Lennon had been “deterred by Paul’s immovable heterosexuality”.

Norman has written about Lennon twice before but he has uncovered much new mat-erial in his research for this impressive and highly readable book. One intriguing nugget concerns the revelation that the unidentified girl Lennon sings about “having” in Norwegian Wood was the German wife of the Beatles’ photographer Robert Freeman, with whom Lennon had a clandestine affair while the couple were living in the flat beneath his and Cynthia’s in South Kensington.

The fact that Norman has had the blessing and full co-operation of Yoko Ono means that he is not short of new things to say about the relationship which, according to popular writ, broke up the world’s favourite pop group. He argues convincingly that, far from being an opportunistic schemer, the high-born, wealthy Yoko was reluctant to take up with the Beatle she regarded as her social and artistic inferior, and whose crude sexual foreplay — employing the Beatles’ roadies to cart her off to a bed in a flat near the Abbey Road studio — she initially rejected.

The most interesting part of Lennon’s complicated life on which Norman sheds fresh light is the troubled relationship with his seaman father, Alfred. Usually seen as an absconding rascal, Alf emerges here as a stoic victim of the caprices of his serially unfaithful wife and volatile son. He tried to hang on to John, offering to take him to New Zealand after Julia walked out on their marriage; and when he finally re-established contact with his Beatle son, he seems not to have expected anything much in the way of help, despite being broke and virtually jobless. Like just about everybody else in John’s family and life, Alf was, in his way, a remarkable man. At 54, he successfully romanced a 19-year-old girl, whom he married and had two sons with. Shortly after this, in what was to be their final meeting, John unleashed the fury he had long nurtured for his hapless dad and threatened to have him killed. The statement a terrified Alf filed with a solicitor in the event of this threat being carried out is one of the most moving and scary pieces of Lennon’s sprawling legacy. It is greatly to Norman’s credit as a biographer that he does justice to all of it in a book whose 854 pages simply fly by.

Book available at the Sunday Times BooksFirst price of £22.50 (inc p&p) on 0870 165 8585


Mail us: stupidand@gmail.com

Home Art Babes Cartoons Dylan Editorial Music Videos Other

October 1, 2008 Posted by | John Lennon, OTHER_ARTICLE, OTHER_BOOK, _MUSIC | Leave a comment

Review: The Peel Sessions: A Story of Teenage Dreams and One Man’s Love of New Music

The late great John Peel, and his tireless championing of great music, will never be forgotten.

This work is a detailed record of Peel’s magnificent sessions, where any artist worth their salt laid down recordings for John’s show.

Feel free to send me a copy of this book anyone!!!

The Peel Sessions: A Story of Teenage Dreams and One Man’s Love of New Music
by Ken Garner
BBC Books
May 2008, 352 pages
by Kim Simpson

http://www.popmatters.com/

For the average Briton, radio personality John Peel needs no introduction. A fixture on BBC Radio One from 1967 until his death in 2004, Peel made a career out of championing new music as well as up-and-coming artists. Ever curious and never willing to marry himself to any one genre or fixed notion of pop music orthodoxy, his very restlessness, combined with his affable and avuncular on-air manner, is what endeared him to so many listeners, especially the young. His enthusiasm for lesser-known groups such as the Fall and the Wedding Present played no minor role in fueling these groups’ increasingly rabid cult followings for years on end, and entire pop music genres that would eventually shake the windows of Great Britain and beyond—such as punk and reggae—were to flourish first on Peel’s programs.

For the average American, the Peel phenomenon requires some explanation. This is not only because his legend is so rooted in British pop music, but also because Americans have no real equivalent to understand him by. Quirks in British radio policy at the time Peel joined Radio One are partly responsible. The BBC was required by the Musicians’ Union and Phonographic Performances Limited (the UK’s RIAA) to supplement “needle time”—or the amount of records being played—with live bands or orchestras.

This created the happy situation for Peel, then, whereby he could bring promising bands into the BBC studios to record a handful of tracks which were usually recorded and mixed in no more than 24 hours’ time, and which were aired on his program in short order. Although Peel himself was almost never present during the actual tapings, these recordings are nonetheless commonly known as the “Peel Sessions”, hence that listing so many anglophiles have grown accustomed to seeing attached to deeper catalog entries of some of their favorite groups.

So although these were all tracked in-studio and not done strictly “live”, as you perhaps may have assumed, the Peel Sessions nonetheless have a reliably edgy quality thanks to: 1) The rush-rush nature of the event, and 2) the fact that many of the bands who recorded their sessions were either diamonds in the rough and/or very young and very hungry. Artists like the Smiths, the Cure, and Dave Edmunds, to name a few, go on record in Ken Garner’s new book, The Peel Sessions, declaring their own session results as true representations of what they were all about. (Judging from the self-contained mania that Peel Sessions collecting has become, many fans feel the same way.) The Peel imprimatur could change the fortunes of a lowly band with a mere demo cassette to its name overnight, and although the opportunity to record a session was hardly a guarantee for success (Go Hole, Mono Mono, or That Dog, anyone?), it was no less a badge of honor.

The Peel Sessions, then, by all means deserve their own treatment in book form, and UK radio historian Ken Garner has done a more than adequate job. It was Garner, after all, who wrote In Session Tonight, a 1992 history of all live music on Radio One. With The Peel Sessions, he’s able to zero in even closer on a man he has obvious affection for, and takes full advantage of his opportunity to make right any of the inevitable Peel-related mistakes or omissions he may have let slide in that previous Herculean effort. As for the text, it’s rife with wonderful anecdotes and sidebars regarding “classic” sessions, famous songs that were first heard in “session” form on Peel’s program (the Sex Pistols’ “God Save the Queen” and Led Zeppelin’s “Stairway to Heaven” are among these), listener reminiscences, and “One-Session Wonders”—memorable sessions by some of the many acts who barely made it past their big BBC moment.

Adding to the book’s formidable flip-through qualities are the incredible appendices, which provide a full sessionography including dates, musicians, instruments played, and songs recorded. If this sounds like something relatively easy for Garner to have thrown together, think again. During his Radio One tenure Peel presented over 2,000 artists who came in for over 4,000 sessions. If the BBC archives happened to be maintained carefully and consistently for 37 years and the “programmes-as-broadcast” sheets were not only accurate but also readily available, Garner’s task may have been nothing more than a migraine-inducing roundup. Because those idyllic conditions were certainly not at Garner’s disposal, the enormity of his accomplishment is all the more stunning. These appendices alone, in fact, which also include the complete “Festive Fifties”, Peel’s year-end tallies of tracks most popular with listeners, along with other features like the “Peelenium” (his yearly favorites of the entire 1900s), qualify The Peel Sessions as an instant inductee into the Rock Book Hall of Fame.

That being said, you may want to know one thing about this book before getting started: its subtitle, which reads “A Story of Teenage Dreams and One Man’s Love of New Music”, should actually be the decidedly less promo-friendly “A Story of Endless Boardroom Negotiations that Enabled One Man to Keep the Fall on the Radio”. It’s true that Peel presented many a teenage hopeful on air, had teenage dreams of his own, and loved the Undertones’ 1978 track “Teenage Kicks” (which was even played at his funeral). But you’d probably do better with Peel’s posthumous memoir, Margrave of the Marshes, if you happen to be looking for any straight up stories about teenage dreams.

This needs to be said because The Peel Sessions’ narrative concerns itself almost entirely with what Americans call “inside baseball”. It’s essentially a backroom overview of the sessions, examining Peel’s relationship with key producers such as Bernie Andrews and John Walters, the varying time slots, and the continuous battles that were necessary to keep even a popular show like Peel’s afloat. You’ll love this approach if you’re fascinated with radio history. Your eyes are guaranteed to glaze over, if not. But if you’re part of that latter category, don’t be dissuaded because you’ve always got those fabulous appendices in the back. And even Peel himself would agree that in the end, it’s the music that matters most.

June 26, 2008 Posted by | John Peel, OTHER_ARTICLE, OTHER_BOOK, _MUSIC | Leave a comment

Suzanne J. Crawford & Dennis F. Kelley, "American Indian Religious Traditions: An Encyclopedia"

American Indian Religious Traditions

Suzanne J. Crawford & Dennis F. Kelley, “American Indian Religious Traditions: An Encyclopedia”
ABC-CLIO (2005) | 3 volume set | English | ISBN 1576075176 | 1340 pages | PDF | 6.41 MB

Fascinating stuff here about fascinating indigenous cultures of North America .

How is peyote used in Native American religious ceremonies? How do various tribes conduct the rites of birth, adolescence, marriage, and death? What is potlatch and why was its practice forbidden?

Readers will learn how religious tradition influences Native American social, political, and material culture and vice versa. This extensive work goes beyond similar surveys that focus only on anthropology and history and explores the religious practices, movements, institutions, key figures, ceremonial systems, and religious accoutrements indigenous to North America, from the precontact era to the present.

Taking a deep and informed look specifically at the religious and spiritual nature of Native Americans, the encyclopedia places traditions within their historical and theoretical context, examining their relevance within Native religious life and practice as well as within the academic study of religion.

Topics covered include key ideas and issues, religious and political leaders, primary ceremonies, mythic figures, and related cultural subjects, such as basketry, whaling, farming, and bison hunting, which have religious significance for Native peoples. Contributors include noted scholars of American Indian religious culture, including many who come from tribal traditions and can offer valuable insights and observations from their personal experience.

RapidShare
http://rapidshare.com/files/121103540/4m3ric4n_1ndi4n_RT.rar

FileFactory
http://www.filefactory.com/file/2dec93/

Big thanks to the original poster

Mail us: stupidand@gmail.com

Home Art Babes Cartoons Dylan Editorial Music Videos Other

June 11, 2008 Posted by | OTHER_BOOK, Religion, _OTHER | 2 Comments

Fergus Kerr, "After Aquinas: Versions of Thomism"

After Aquinas

Fergus Kerr, “After Aquinas: Versions of Thomism”
Blackwell Publishing (2002) | English | ISBN 0631213139 | 266 pages | PDF | 2.40 MB

Interesting book on the works of the great Tommy A.!

This guide to the most interesting work that has recently appeared on Aquinas reflects the recent revival of interest in his work.

Kerr brings together a range of views that hitherto have appeared in many different books, articles, and periodicals.

This ‘revisiting,’ in Kerr’s characteristically lambent prose, makes available in one volume for students all the material necessary for a rounded understanding of Aquinas.

In addition, Kerr’s text represents a major revisionist treatment of Thomism and its significance, combining useful exposition with original, creative thinking.

RapidShare
http://rapidshare.com/files/121166278/4f73r_4quin45.rar

FileFactory
http://www.filefactory.com/file/8aaa57/

Big thanks to the original poster

Mail us: stupidand@gmail.com

Home Art Babes Cartoons Dylan Editorial Music Videos Other

June 10, 2008 Posted by | OTHER_BOOK, OTHER_Philosophy, Thomas Aquinas, _OTHER | Leave a comment

Henry Ernest Dudeney “536 Puzzles & Curious Problems"

Henry Ernest Dudeney “536 Puzzles & Curious Problems”
Charles Scribner’s Sons | 1967 | ASIN: B000O8SXFM | 442 pages | Djvu | 3,8 MB
My usual curious problem is how to sneak home after visiting the go-go bar without getting clobbered in the noggin by my wife with a rolling pin !

Here are some more curious problems to while away the time with!

Big thanks to the original poster

Mail us: stupidand@gmail.com

Home Art Babes Cartoons Dylan Editorial Music Videos Other

June 10, 2008 Posted by | OTHER_BOOK, _OTHER | Leave a comment

John Leslie, "Immortality Defended"

Immortality Defended

John Leslie, “Immortality Defended”
Blackwell Publishing (2007) | English | ISBN 1405162031 | 111 pages | PDF | 1.83 MB

“I intend to live forever. So far, so good.”
-Stephen Wright

“I intend to live forever, or die trying.”
-Groucho Marx

I sometimes feel immortal. That’s usually after a pint of Jack Daniels though!

Immortality is a fascinating concept however, a futile hope embedded in the human heart.

Why does the cosmos exist? Could we be parts of an infinite or divine mind, as pantheists believe? If so, might we have afterlives?

In Immortality Defended, John Leslie, renowned philosopher of religion and cosmology, defends pantheism and three distinct ways in which we could be immortal.

Combining a creation story told by Plato with the ideas of Spinoza, this book tackles the fundamental questions posed by our very existence.

It explores ‘Einsteinian immortality‘ inside an eternally existing four-dimensional whole; the nature of an infinite mind which lives the lives of everybody; and, the possibility of an afterlife inside such a mind. Its arguments are drawn from contemporary science, and from philosophy from ancient Greece onwards.

This highly original work is accessible to anyone interested in science, philosophy, cosmology or theology, or to those who are just intrigued by the wonder of our being.

Here be forever;

RapidShare –
http://rapidshare.com/files/118113836/Imm0r74l7y_D3f3nd3d.rar

FileFactory –
http://www.filefactory.com/file/7b546c/

Thanks to the original poster

http://stupidd.blogspot.com/

Mail us: stupidand@gmail.com

May 28, 2008 Posted by | John Leslie, OTHER_BOOK, OTHER_Philosophy, Religion, _OTHER | Leave a comment

Thomas Hibbs, "Aquinas, Ethics, and Philosophy of Religion: Metaphysics and Practice" (Indiana Series in the Philosophy of Religion)

Aquinas, Ethics, and Philosophy of Religion

Thomas Hibbs, “Aquinas, Ethics, and Philosophy of Religion: Metaphysics and Practice” (Indiana Series in the Philosophy of Religion)
Indiana University Press (2007) | English | ISBN 0253348811 | 261 pages | PDF | 5.81 MB

In Aquinas, Ethics, and Philosophy of Religion, Thomas Hibbs recovers the notion of practice to develop a more descriptive account of human action and knowing, grounded in the venerable vocabulary of virtue and vice.

Drawing on Aquinas, who believed that all good works originate from virtue, Hibbs postulates how epistemology, ethics, metaphysics, and theology combine into a set of contemporary philosophical practices that remain open to metaphysics.

Hibbs brings Aquinas into conversation with analytic and Continental philosophy and suggests how a more nuanced appreciation of his thought enriches contemporary debates. This book offers readers a new appreciation of Aquinas and articulates a metaphysics integrally related to ethical practice.

Here’s Hibbs;

RapidShare
http://rapidshare.com/files/118115963/4quin45_37hic5_Phil0R3li.rar

FileFactory
http://www.filefactory.com/file/0ae8e4/

Thanks to the original poster

http://stupidd.blogspot.com/

Mail us: stupidand@gmail.com

May 28, 2008 Posted by | OTHER_BOOK, OTHER_Philosophy, _OTHER | Leave a comment

Thomas Hibbs, "Aquinas, Ethics, and Philosophy of Religion: Metaphysics and Practice" (Indiana Series in the Philosophy of Religion)

Aquinas, Ethics, and Philosophy of Religion

Thomas Hibbs, “Aquinas, Ethics, and Philosophy of Religion: Metaphysics and Practice” (Indiana Series in the Philosophy of Religion)
Indiana University Press (2007) | English | ISBN 0253348811 | 261 pages | PDF | 5.81 MB

In Aquinas, Ethics, and Philosophy of Religion, Thomas Hibbs recovers the notion of practice to develop a more descriptive account of human action and knowing, grounded in the venerable vocabulary of virtue and vice.

Drawing on Aquinas, who believed that all good works originate from virtue, Hibbs postulates how epistemology, ethics, metaphysics, and theology combine into a set of contemporary philosophical practices that remain open to metaphysics.

Hibbs brings Aquinas into conversation with analytic and Continental philosophy and suggests how a more nuanced appreciation of his thought enriches contemporary debates. This book offers readers a new appreciation of Aquinas and articulates a metaphysics integrally related to ethical practice.

Here’s Hibbs;

RapidShare
http://rapidshare.com/files/118115963/4quin45_37hic5_Phil0R3li.rar

FileFactory
http://www.filefactory.com/file/0ae8e4/

Thanks to the original poster

http://stupidd.blogspot.com/

Mail us: stupidand@gmail.com

May 28, 2008 Posted by | OTHER_BOOK, OTHER_Philosophy, _OTHER | Leave a comment

Robert S. Corrington, "A Semiotic Theory of Theology and Philosophy"

A Semiotic Theory of Theology and Philosophy

Robert S. Corrington, “A Semiotic Theory of Theology and Philosophy”

Cambridge University Press (2003) | English | eISBN 0511009704 | 285 pages | PDF | 4.12 MB

Not a light read, but a fascinating positing of new ways to think about theology and philosophy, taking off from the philosophies of the great Benedict de Spinoza .

I would warn you that I do not attribute to nature either beauty or deformity, order or confusion. Only in relation to our imagination can things be called beautiful or ugly, well-ordered or confused.

– Benedict de Spinoza

The concern of this work is with developing an alternative to standard categories in theology and philosophy, especially in terms of how they deal with nature.

Avoiding the polemics of much contemporary reflection on nature, it shows how we are connected to nature through the unconscious and its unique way of reading and processing signs.

Spinoza‘s key distinction between natura naturans and natura naturata serves as the governing framework for the treatise.

Suggestions are made for a post-Christian way of understanding religion.

Robert S. Corrington’s work represents the first sustained attempt to bring together the fields of semiotics, depth-psychology, pragmaticism, and a post-Monotheistic theology of nature.

Its focus is on how signification functions in human and non-human orders of infinite nature. Our connection with the infinite is described in detail, especially as it relates to the use of sign systems.

Here be philosophy;

RapidShare
http://rapidshare.com/files/118187296/53mi07c_7h30ry_7h30Phil0.rar

FileFactory
http://www.filefactory.com/file/2b5d87/

Thanks to the original poster

http://stupidd.blogspot.com/

Mail us: stupidand@gmail.com

May 28, 2008 Posted by | OTHER_BOOK, OTHER_Philosophy, Religion, _OTHER | Leave a comment

Douglas A. Phillips, "Southeast Asia (Modern World Cultures)"

Douglas A. Phillips, “Southeast Asia (Modern World Cultures)”
Chelsea House Publications | Pages: 129 | 2005-07-30 | ISBN: 0791081494 | 2 MB

A fascinating read exploring the very complex culture of wonderful SE Asia – where can be found some of the greatest places in all the world. And I’m not just talking about Pattaya !!

Fuck, I wish I was in SE Asia now!

Thanks to the original poster

http://stupidd.blogspot.com/

Mail us: stupidand@gmail.com

May 28, 2008 Posted by | Asia, OTHER_BOOK, _OTHER | Leave a comment

Douglas A. Phillips, "Southeast Asia (Modern World Cultures)"

Douglas A. Phillips, “Southeast Asia (Modern World Cultures)”
Chelsea House Publications | Pages: 129 | 2005-07-30 | ISBN: 0791081494 | 2 MB

A fascinating read exploring the very complex culture of wonderful SE Asia – where can be found some of the greatest places in all the world. And I’m not just talking about Pattaya !!

Fuck, I wish I was in SE Asia now!

Thanks to the original poster

http://stupidd.blogspot.com/

Mail us: stupidand@gmail.com

May 28, 2008 Posted by | Asia, OTHER_BOOK, _OTHER | Leave a comment

Alcohol (Drugs: the Straight Facts)

Alcohol (Drugs: the Straight Facts) (US$30)
Stationary Office | Pages: 112 | 2003-03 | ISBN: 0791072592 | 12 MB

This one’s a very interesting read.

Especially if you’re Irish.

Especially if you’re Irish and me!

It’s quite scary.

Based on my protracted excess consumption – ever since I was a baby really, cos my mother had some physiological defect whereby, instead of milk, her breast yielded delicious Jameson whisky – I should be dead years ago.

Maybe I am dead! I strangely find that lately I can walk right through solid objects. People also sprint away in blind panic whenever they see me crying “ghost!”. I’m sure they’re talking about that piece of shit movie from the eighties.

Fuck, I need a drink real fucking bad!

Mum!! Mum!!! Come here fast!!!

Alcohol surrounds us. It is so much a part of our daily lives that we may not even notice how frequently we are exposed to it directly or indirectly. Beer commercials interrupt our favorite television programs; advertisements for wine pop up in the magazines we read. Billboards promoting a particular brand of liquor are plastered around our sports stadiums.

In some states, beer and wine are sold in grocery stores and 24-hour convenience markets next to snacks and soft drinks. Alcohol plays an important role in many celebrations. Champagne is used to toast a bride and groom at their wedding.Family parties may feature beer and wine. New Year’s Eve parties offer the opportunity to mark the end of one year and the beginning of another with a drink in your hand.

Downllll … hic Downloo hic Downloadhic hic


http://rapidshare.com/files/117927372/AlcoholDStFacts.rar

or

http://www.megaupload.com/?d=TB6RJ5V3

Thanks to the original poster

http://stupidd.blogspot.com/

Mail us: stupidand@gmail.com

May 27, 2008 Posted by | Alcohol, Beer, OTHER_BOOK, _OTHER | Leave a comment

Alcohol (Drugs: the Straight Facts)

Alcohol (Drugs: the Straight Facts) (US$30)
Stationary Office | Pages: 112 | 2003-03 | ISBN: 0791072592 | 12 MB

This one’s a very interesting read.

Especially if you’re Irish.

Especially if you’re Irish and me!

It’s quite scary.

Based on my protracted excess consumption – ever since I was a baby really, cos my mother had some physiological defect whereby, instead of milk, her breast yielded delicious Jameson whisky – I should be dead years ago.

Maybe I am dead! I strangely find that lately I can walk right through solid objects. People also sprint away in blind panic whenever they see me crying “ghost!”. I’m sure they’re talking about that piece of shit movie from the eighties.

Fuck, I need a drink real fucking bad!

Mum!! Mum!!! Come here fast!!!

Alcohol surrounds us. It is so much a part of our daily lives that we may not even notice how frequently we are exposed to it directly or indirectly. Beer commercials interrupt our favorite television programs; advertisements for wine pop up in the magazines we read. Billboards promoting a particular brand of liquor are plastered around our sports stadiums.

In some states, beer and wine are sold in grocery stores and 24-hour convenience markets next to snacks and soft drinks. Alcohol plays an important role in many celebrations. Champagne is used to toast a bride and groom at their wedding.Family parties may feature beer and wine. New Year’s Eve parties offer the opportunity to mark the end of one year and the beginning of another with a drink in your hand.

Downllll … hic Downloo hic Downloadhic hic


http://rapidshare.com/files/117927372/AlcoholDStFacts.rar

or

http://www.megaupload.com/?d=TB6RJ5V3

Thanks to the original poster

http://stupidd.blogspot.com/

Mail us: stupidand@gmail.com

May 27, 2008 Posted by | Alcohol, Beer, OTHER_BOOK, _OTHER | Leave a comment

The Dalai Lama – Stages of Meditation


Stages of Meditation
Snow Lion Publications | Pages: 210 | 2003-09-25 | ISBN: 1559391979 | 2 MB

The Dalai Lama explains the principles of meditation in a practice-oriented format especially suited for Westerners.

This one was a huge hit in China!

CHINA, GET THE FUCK OUT OF TIBET NOW!

Here’s the main man

May 27, 2008 Posted by | OTHER_BOOK, OTHER_Philosophy, Religion, The Dalai Lama, _OTHER | Leave a comment

The Dalai Lama – Stages of Meditation


Stages of Meditation
Snow Lion Publications | Pages: 210 | 2003-09-25 | ISBN: 1559391979 | 2 MB

The Dalai Lama explains the principles of meditation in a practice-oriented format especially suited for Westerners.

This one was a huge hit in China!

CHINA, GET THE FUCK OUT OF TIBET NOW!

Here’s the main man

May 27, 2008 Posted by | OTHER_BOOK, OTHER_Philosophy, Religion, The Dalai Lama, _OTHER | Leave a comment

The Ezra Pound Encyclopedia


https://i0.wp.com/epc.buffalo.edu/authors/pound/pound.gif

The Ezra Pound Encyclopedia
Greenwood Press | 2005-04-30 | ISBN: 0313304483 | 368 pages | PDF | 1,9 MB
ANCIENT MUSIC

Winter is icummen in,
Lhude sing Goddamm.
Raineth drop and staineth slop,
And how the wind doth ramm!
Sing: Goddamm.

Skiddeth bus and sloppeth us,
An ague hath my ham.
Freezeth river, turneth liver,
Damn you, sing: Goddamm.

Goddamm, Goddamm, ’tis why I am, Goddamm,
So ‘gainst the winter’s balm.

Sing goddamm, damm, sing Goddamm.
Sing goddamm, sing goddamm, DAMM.


Pound, along with Charles Bukowski, Raymond Carver and TS Eliot (and maybe even Bob Dylan), were the finest American poets of the last century.

If all you know about Ezra is from a name-check in a Dylan song, here’s a chance to expand your knowledge.

If you’ve never heard of Ezra, Seems like that lobotomy operation worked real well!

This encyclopedia is a concise yet very comprehensive guide to Pound’s life and writings.

Included are more than 250 alphabetically arranged entries on Pound’s acquaintances, publications, and interests, including: Olivia Rossetti Agresti Arabic History Catholic Anthology Chinese Literature Dance Des Imagistes Hilda Doolittle Thomas Stearns Eliot Fascist Quarterly Robert Frost Homage to Sextus Propertius James Joyce ….. And many many others!

The entries are written by roughly 100 expert contributors and cite works for further reading.

In addition, the encyclopedia closes with a selected, general bibliography.

Enjoy this great book!

FileFactory

Easy-Share

MegaUpload

Thanks to the original poster

http://stupidd.blogspot.com/

Mail us: stupidand@gmail.com

May 21, 2008 Posted by | Ezra Pound, OTHER_BOOK, _OTHER, _POETRY | Leave a comment

Excerpt ‘A Freewheelin’ Time’ – By Suze Rotolo / Bob Dylan is an elephant … apparently!

The Rotolo “let’s leverage my short time with Bob Dylan to the nth degree and make loads of cash from it” book is here!

I believe Suze actually wrote all the songs from The Freewheelin Bob Dylan! (well, she seems to think she did anyway!)

She surprisingly says “(Bob) became an elephant in the room of my life. I am private by nature, and my instinct was to protect my privacy, and consequently his.

Erm … what? Why then is she releasing this, exploiting the short relationship they had when Dylan was just a kid, and blowing that relationship’s privacy to smithereens?

Bob is an elephant? I always thought he was a small guy?

Is she talking about Bob’s little Bobby?!

http://tkfiles.storage.live.com/y1prukeJkeT1zoTpW9C22kVCNt3_YPtGBsPZ-XhkAKgBGwNkiDeZqGACL-TRhjBsmXwFAKD1GLWaC4


From http://www.nytimes.com/

Excerpt ‘A Freewheelin’ Time’

By Suze Rotolo

Published: May 11, 2008


//graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2008/05/11/arts/11decu-3-190.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.I met Bob Dylan in 1961 when I was seventeen years old and he was twenty. This book is a memoir of my life as it intertwined with his during the formative years of the 1960s.

I’ve always had trouble talking or reminiscing about the 1960s because of my place close to Dylan, the mover and shaper of the culture of that era. The kind of adulation and scrutiny he received made that conversation awkward for me. He became an elephant in the room of my life. I am private by nature, and my instinct was to protect my privacy, and consequently his.

I was writing a bit before we met—poems, little stories, observations—and I kept at it while I was with him. The writings served the same purpose as the sketchbooks I kept—except that these were verbal drawings:

Memory
It isn’t you baby, it’s me and my ghost and your holy ghost.
There is a saying about one’s past catching up
with them
mine not only did that, it overran the present. So tomorrow when the future takes hold
I’ll be sitting in the background with the Surrealists.

Though I no longer remember what triggered those thoughts, recorded in January 1963, reading them in the present gives me an eerie feeling of prescience. In so many ways my past with Bob Dylan has always been a presence, a parallel life alongside my own, no matter where I am, who I’m with, or what I am doing.

Dylan’s public, his fans and followers, create him in their own image. They expect him to be who they interpret him to be. The very mention of his name invokes his myth and unleashes an insurmountable amount of minutiae about the meaning of every word he ever uttered, wrote, or sang.

As Bob Dylan’s fame grew so far out of bounds, I felt I had secrets to keep. Though I kept my silence, I didn’t relish being the custodian of such things. Time passes and the weight of secrets dissipates. Articles are written and biographies are churned out that trigger memories only because they are often far from the reality I knew. They tend to be lackluster yet fascinating in their fantasy. I acknowledge that memory is a fickle beast. Fragments of stories stride in and out; some leave traces, while others do not. Secrets remain. Their traces go deep, and with all due respect I keep them with my own. The only claim I make for writing a memoir of that time is that it may not be factual, but it is true.

May 12, 2008 Posted by | OTHER_ARTICLE, OTHER_BOOK, Suze Rotolo, _BOB DYLAN, _OTHER | Leave a comment

Peter Dews “The Idea of Evil"

Peter Dews “The Idea of Evil”
Wiley-Blackwell | 2007-12-04 | ISBN: 1405117044 | 264 pages | PDF | 1,5 Mb
In the context of near daily horrific news-stories from all corners of the earth, and most recently the Austrian incest horrors, this is a very timely book by philosopher Peter Dews.

Dews explores the idea of evil, one of the most problematic terms in the contemporary moral vocabulary.

He surveys the intellectual debate on the nature of evil over the past two hundred years and engages with a broad range of discourses and thinkers, from Kant and the German Idealists, via Schopenhauer and Nietzsche, to Levinas and Adorno.

Dews suggests that the concept of moral evil touches on a neuralgic point in western culture and rgues that, despite the widespread abuse and political manipulation of the term ‘evil’, we cannot do without it.

Here be evil!
Thanks to the original poster

http://stupidd.blogspot.com/

Mail us: stupidand@gmail.com

May 4, 2008 Posted by | OTHER_BOOK, OTHER_Philosophy, Peter Dews, _OTHER | Leave a comment