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Otis Redding – Pain In My Heart (1964/1991 )

Otis Redding – Pain In My Heart
Atlantic & Atco Remasters | 1964/1991 | R&B, Soul | 31:43 | Flac – EAC, Cue, Log | MP3 – CBR 320 kbps | 136 MB & 70 MB

Producer: Jim Stewart.
Reissue producer: Yves Beauvais.
Personnel: Otis Redding (vocals); Johnny Jenkins (guitar); Charles “Packy” Axton (tenor saxophone); Floyd Newman (baritone saxophone); Wayne Jackson (trumpet).
Booker T. & The MG’s: Booker T. Jones (piano, organ); Steve Cropper (guitar, piano); Donald “Duck” Dunn, Lewis Steinberg (bass); Al Jackson Jr (drums).

Recorded between 1962 and January 1964. Originally released on Atco (33-161).

Digitally remastered by Bill Inglot and Dan Hersch (DigiPrep).

After Otis Redding made his mark on the Top 100 pop charts with his Fall 1963 single “Pain In My Heart,” he released a debut album of the same name the following year that showed this Georgia soul singer to be no flash in the pan.

The bulk of PAIN is covers that either pay homage to influences like Sam Cooke (“You Send Me”) and Little Richard (“Lucille”) or ride on the coattails of recent hits by Don Gardner and Dee Dee Ford (“I Need Your Lovin’) and the Kingsmen (“Louie Louie”).

Although Redding’s interpretive skills were impressive, his early, self-penned material such as “These Arms Of Mine” and “That What My Heart Needs” were an even greater representation of his burgeoning talent. Apparently fans of soul agreed–both songs made the Top 30 on the R&B charts.

This album works on so many different levels, that it’s essential listening for at least three categories of buyer — fans of Otis Redding and Stax Records (natch), and more general soul listeners, and also anyone serious about their devotion to the work of the Rolling Stones and any other British invasion bands that covered American soul.

Pain In My Heart was practically a road map to Mick Jagger and any number of other would-be white soul shouters in the UK, not just on the title track but also numbers like the hard rocking “Hey Hey Baby”. For someone only 22 years old at the time of these sessions, and just two years past his first 45 rpm record, Redding exudes astonishing power, energy and boldness, though it’s all packaged with greater restraint than his subsequent records did.

This was the only LP that Redding recorded during the lifetime of his idol, Sam Cooke, and his version of “You Send Me” is the least stylized of any of his renditions of Cooke’s songs — later on, after Cooke’s death, he would throw more of himself into it. The very fact that he was covering Cooke’s soul classic shows an essential difference between Redding’s and Cooke’s early LPs; as Redding was on a soul label, no one tried to make him into a pop singer as that’d done at RCA with Cooke — thus, he was running on all cylinders right out of the starting gate, though he wouldn’t get really interesting or show his full depth until two albums later.

But even covering Rufus Thomas’s “The Dog”, Richard Berry’s “Louie Louie”, Little Richard’s “Lucille”, or Ben E. King’s “Stand By Me”, he’s already doing 70% of what we came to expect from Otis Redding in the years ahead — his writing, apart from “Security”, “These Arms Of Mine” and “That’s What My Heart Needs”, was still somewhat less than memorable, but this is still a first-rate debut and a must-own CD.

Tracks

01. Pain In My Heart 02:24
02. The Dog 02:36
03. Stand By Me 02:52
04. Hey Hey Baby 02:47
05. You Send Me 03:15
06. I Need Your Lovin’ 02:53
07. These Arms Of Mine 02:34
08. Louie Louie 02:07
09. Something Is Worrying Me 02:29
10. Security 02:37
11. That’s What My Heart Needs 02:41
12. Lucille 02:28

Big thanks to franklee



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October 13, 2008 Posted by | Music_Soul, Otis Redding, _MUSIC | Leave a comment

Otis Redding – Tell The Truth

Otis Redding – Tell The Truth
Atco, Rhino, WEA | 1970 | R&B | MP3 | CBR 320 kbps | 31:24 | 76 MB

Tell the Truth is a posthumously released Otis Redding album compiled from songs recorded in 1967.

When a major artist dies, labels can usually be counted on to release anything and everything the artist had in the can, regardless of quality. In the case of Otis Redding, most of the posthumous releases were of a very high quality. One example is Tell the Truth, which was recorded the year he died, 1967, and remained unreleased until 1970. Though it falls short of essential, Truth has a lot to excite the soul icon’s more devoted followers. Tracks like “I Got the Will,” “Snatch a Little Piece,” and “Demonstration” are pure Redding — frenzied, passionate, relentlessly gritty Memphis soul that makes no concessions to pop tastes or Northern soul. “Out of Sight” speaks volumes about him — while others would have been afraid to cover a song written and defined by James Brown, Redding confidently tackles the song with splendid results. Redding’s last major hit, “Dock of the Bay,” indicated that had he lived, he would have explored softer, Northern R&B sounds. But on this album (reissued on CD in the early ’90s), it was Memphis all the way. ~ AllMusic


This is not the posthumous masterpiece that Love Man was, that great album that was in the can when Otis died nearly three years ago. This is where the anthologists start reaching back into the vaults for the not-so-brilliant material that was left off earlier albums and songs that were beginning to get there for future albums.

That’s just by way of saying that if you have never heard an Otis Redding album before, this is not the first one to buy. But it’s unthinkable that you haven’t heard Otis before, and if you really heard Otis, you would have all the other albums anyway. And if you got all the other albums, then you are in luck, ’cause….

Here’s another. Otis was so good, so great a singer, a composer and an arranger, that everything he touched after he established his own identity (leaving the Little Richard thing early on) is suffused with his innate dynamism, warmth and love.

The MGs were at their best when fronted by Otis Redding. This record is more of that: the Stax-Volt sound like you haven’t been hearing it recently. Listening to this combination in new songs brings home again how good they are: they move like a Super-8 Creedence Clearwater on something like “Wholesale Love.” The arrangements on this record are characterized by the contrasts and blends of the Memphis rhythm section with some unusually pop/commercial horn lines, not usually associated with straight RB. Otis was always reaching out.

Otis does versions of big hits by the other two Macon natives, James Brown and Little Richard; “Out of Sight” and “Slippin’ and Slidin’.” Although I think Otis was the best singer out of that Georgia burg, these versions aren’t the proof.

The best stuff is Otis’ own: “I Got The Will” is a beauty. None among the rest are fully realized, but all of them are demonstrations of how great Otis really was.

RollingStone

Tracklisting

1. Demonstration
2. Tell the Truth
3. Out of Sight
4. Give Away None of My Love
5. Wholesale Love
6. I Got the Will
7. Johnny’s Heartbreak
8. Kitty a Little Piece
9. Slippin’ and Slidin’
10. The Match Game
11. A Little Time
12. Swingin’ on a String

Big thanks to franklee



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Any content linked to here is only meant as a taster for the original work itself and is posted on the strict understanding that anyone who downloads the taster, deletes said content within 24 hours. We would assume that these fans will then buy the original work and we greatly encourage them to do so.

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October 13, 2008 Posted by | Music_Soul, Otis Redding, _MUSIC | 2 Comments

Otis Blue: Otis Redding Sings Soul [Collector’s Edition] [Original Recording Remastered] (April 2008)

Otis Blue: Otis Redding Sings Soul
Collector’s Edition – Original Recording Remastered
– April, 2008

Otis Redding was a singer of such commanding stature that to this day he embodies the essence of soul music in its purist form.

– from the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame s website page on Redding’s 1989 induction

Though Otis Redding’s career was cut tragically short by a plane crash,his legacy and recordings are inestimably large. Intense, raw and emotional, his sound defines golden era Southern soul.

Redding’s third album, OTIS BLUE: OTIS REDDING SINGS SOUL, is considered his first LP masterpiece, and it ranks #74 on Rolling Stone list of the 500 Greatest Albums Of All Time.

The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, noting that it was recorded in a single 24-hour period in 1965, calls it, a virtual soul-music primer.

The original album features a trio of songs by Sam Cooke, Redding’s idol, who had passed away shortly before OTIS BLUE was made. It also features his version of Respect a song he wrote, but that was an Aretha signature, his great cover of (I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction and other classic tracks.

https://i1.wp.com/msnbcmedia2.msn.com/j/msnbc/Components/Photo_StoryLevel/071210/071210_otisRedding_hmed4p.hmedium.jpg

In its deluxe COLLECTOR’S EDITION, this landmark work is presented in both mono and stereo versions, along with rare and previously unreleased bonus gems.

On the original album, highlights include three classic Sam Cooke covers Shake, A Change Is Gonna Come, and Wonderful World. Also Redding’s dramatic take on the Stones (I Can t Get No) Satisfaction, and his beautiful rendition of the Smokey Robinson classic My Girl. Plus, the Cooke-penned originals Ole Man Trouble and Respect.

On this special edition, Disc One presents the original mono album. Bonus material includes six alternates and singles including previously unreleased mono mixes of stereo album versions of I’ve Been Loving You For Too Long, Ole Man Trouble, and Respect.

It also features six classic songs recorded Live at The Whisky A Go Go in Los Angeles in April1966, including Satisfaction and Respect.

Disc Two presents the original stereo album. An alternate 1967 version of Respect is featured as a bonus track.

Otis Redding – I’ve Been Loving You Too Long
(Live footage Monterey)

Tracklisting

Disc: 1

1. Ole Man Trouble
2. Respect
3. Change Gonna Come
4. Down In The Valley
5. I’ve Been Loving You Too Long
6. Shake
7. My Girl
8. Wonderful World
9. Rock Me Baby
10. Satisfaction
11. You Don’t Miss Your Water
12. I’ve Been Loving You Too Long (Mono Mix Of Stereo Album Version)
13. I’m Depending On You (B-side)
14. Respect (Mono Mix Of Stereo Album Version)
15. Ole Man Trouble (Mono Mix Of Stereo Album Version)
16. Any Ole Way (B-side)
17. Shake (Live, 1967-Stereo Mix Of Single Version)
18. Ole Man Trouble
19. Respect
20. I’ve Been Loving You Too Long
21. Satisfaction
22. I’m Depending On You
23. Any Ole Way

Disc: 2

1. Ole Man Trouble
2. Respect
3. Change Gonna Come
4. Down In The Valley
5. I’ve Been Loving You Too Long
6. Shake
7. My Girl
8. Wonderful World
9. Rock Me Baby
10. Satisfaction
11. You Don’t Miss Your Water
12. Respect (1968 Version)
13. I’ve Been Loving You Too Long
14. My Girl
15. Shake
16. Satisfaction
17. Respect

Thanks to AoA!

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May 20, 2008 Posted by | Music_Soul, Otis Redding, _MUSIC | 1 Comment