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Detroit, The Car and Rock n’ Roll

[MuscleCarBabe_Pic02.jpg]


Mustang Sally, think you better slow your mustang down.
You been running all over the town now.
Oh! I guess I’ll have to put your flat feet on the ground.

– Mack Rice

Now you get off your Mustang Sally.
You ain’t goin’ nowhere.
You ain’t goin’ nowhere.

-Patti Smith

by Laura Barton
The Guardian
20 February 2009

If there’s one thing that unites the car and rock’n’roll, it is that dream of escape, that desire to be free of place and time and restraint.

There is something strangely harmonious in the way the death rattle of Detroit’s motor industry has dovetailed with the 50th anniversary of Motown records. Just as Hitsville USA embarks on a year of festivities, box-sets and all-star performances, General Motors and Chrysler are beseeching the US government to again rescue them from bankruptcy.

Since the beginning of the 20th century, Detroit has been fired by cars and music. As well as the Ford Mustang, the Chevrolet Camaro, the Pontiac Firebird, this city gave us Motown and revelled in garage rock, hip-hop, techno, blues, jazz, gospel. It gave us Hank Ballard and the Midnighters, Bill Haley, the MC5, Smokey Robinson, the Stooges, George Clinton, Madonna, Martha Reeves, Brendan Benson, the Supremes, Stevie Wonder, the White Stripes, Touch and Go records, J Dilla, Eminem, and Creem magazine.

The history of rock’n’roll is entwined with that of the automobile – from the very beginning, to paraphrase Mr Springsteen, it strapped its hands ‘cross the car’s engines. In the 1950s and 60s, in Detroit’s automotive heyday, many popular songs celebrated the cars rolling off the production lines, sometimes with comical effect – Hopped-Up Mustang, from 1964, for instance, was a Bill Romberger and Arlen Sanders composition that waxed lyrical about the Mustang’s “289 motor with a special Cobra kit”, the transistor ignition, power-pipe exhaust, eight carburettors and four-speed stick. And it was Mack Rice, a Michigan native, who wrote Mustang Sally, a song that gathered together all the delights of cars, speed, sex and youth, and conveyed the giddiness of that period in the city’s history.

Right now, in musical terms, the city is poised somewhere between Sufjan Stevens‘ Detroit Lift Up Your Weary Head (Restore! Rebuild! Reconsider!) and the White Stripes‘ The Big Three Killed My Baby. Stevens’ track appeared on his 2003 album, Greetings From Michigan, and is a tentative portrayal of the city, listing all that is good and bad about Detroit – industry, Pontiacs and Henry Ford, gun control, burning buildings and unemployment. The Stripes song hails from the band’s first album in 1999, and concerns itself with the fall of the labour unions of the 1960s; “the big three” refers to Ford, Chrysler and GM and there’s a nod, too, to Preston Tucker, architect of the Tucker Torpedo.

In 1959, Berry Gordy followed Henry Ford’s lead and founded Motown, adopting a conveyor belt approach to music production, and gave a voice to young black Americans, many of whom had arrived in the city looking for work in its factories. The Motown producers’ approach to composition is often described as “Keep it simple, stupid”, echoing Ford’s approach to cars: “Any colour, so long as it’s black.”

Iggy Pop once told me about the lingering effects of growing up there: “The Michigan stuff stays. Yeah. It’s way down in there. The auto industry was at its most optimistic when I was a kid, and the cars were beautiful, all aggressively optimistic, wildly voluptuous Corvettes … When I was eight, we were taken through the plants where they would press the body parts. There was just a whole vibe there, an atmosphere where mechanised things were good. Henry Ford had a dream, he wanted to create his own world.”

It made me think of a song by Patti Smith, another of Michigan’s adopted children, who wrote Piss Factory to record the monotony of working on a production line: “Now you get off your Mustang Sally/ You ain’t goin’ nowhere, you ain’t goin’ nowhere,” she drawled.

Because if there is one thing that truly unites the car and rock’n’roll, it is surely that dream of escape, that desire to be free of place and time and restraint. So what is Detroit, if not the city of dreams? As Joe Hunter of the Funk Brothers put it last month at the opening ceremony of the Motown celebrations: “God bless the dream,” he said. “God bless the dreamer. God bless the result.”

Mail us: stupidand@gmail.com

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February 25, 2009 Posted by | Iggy Pop, Patti Smith, _ARTICLE, _BABE, _MUSIC | Leave a comment

Television, Tom Verlaine, Richard Lloyd and Richard Hell Bootlegs and Rarities

https://i2.wp.com/www.bbc.co.uk/music/sevenages/assets/artists/television/gallery/1.jpg

One of the greatest groups of all! No question!

The great Tom Verlaine and the great Television.

Heroes of Post Punk. Heroes of modern music!

We fucking love em!

Any “greatest albums” list that doesn’t have the sublime Marquee Moon in the top ten, ain’t worth shit!

We posted loads more Television before. Here are some wonderful Television, Tom Verlaine, Richard Lloyd and Richard Hell bootlegs and rarities kindly sent to us by Dave Sez.

Cheers Dave!

https://i2.wp.com/farm1.static.flickr.com/164/347142543_dc0196a31d_o.jpg

The Neon Boys – That’s All I Know (Right Now) (1973)
http://www.mediafire.com/file/ei2ozzjijyk/NB_DEM.rar
or
http://rapidshare.com/files/125756056/1973_-_The_Neon_Boys_By_Zombieraid.rar.html
or
http://www.megaupload.com/?d=FEDCEAE7
or
http://www.zshare.net/download/52738172f605f925/
or
http://www.badongo.com/file/12485078

TELEVISION AND RICHARD HELL – Poor Circulation
rehearsal/demo and live recordings with Richard Hell, December 1973 to April 1975.
http://www.megaupload.com/fr/?d=EEX8FJBW
or
http://www.megaupload.com/?d=LTGNTOZB

TELEVISION – DOUBLE EXPOSURE/FAIRLAND/ENO DEMO (173mb, 320kps)
http://rapidshare.com/files/147705706/Television_1974-1975_demos.rar.html

PATTI SMITH AND TELEVISION LIVE AT CBGB’S NEW YORK, 17th April 1975
http://rapidshare.com/files/126664282/1975_-_Early_Gig_75_by_Zombieraid.rar.html

TELEVISION – Nights To Remember 1975 Live At Piccadilly Inn, Cleveland 25th-26th July 1975 (128 kps)
http://rapidshare.com/files/126687427/1975_-_Piccadilly_Inn_by_Zombieraid.rar.html

Television – Live at Mother’s, New York, NY (10/19/75)
http://rapidshare.com/files/144573112/Television_-_Live_at_Mother_s__New_York__NY__10-19-75_.rar

Richard Hell – 1976 – Another World/Blank Generation/You Gotta Lose 7” (Ork in US, Stiff in UK)
xxx
http://rapidshare.com/files/134668322/Richard_Hell_-_1976_-Another_World__Blank_Generation__You_Gotta_Lose_7__.rar.html

or
http://www.megaupload.com/?d=ELX0VD7Q

TELEVISION – Knockin’ on Heaven’s Doors – Live at CBGB’S 30th July 1976
http://rapidshare.com/files/125817399/1976_-_CBGB_by_Zombieraid.rar.html

Television – Live in Hartsdale, NY AUGUST 31 1977
http–rapidshare.com-files-93739868-Television_-_Live_in_Hartsdale__NY__8-31-77__Part_1.rar.html
http–rapidshare.com-files-93739867-Television_-_Live_in_Hartsdale__NY__8-31-77__Part_2.rar.html
http–rapidshare.com-files-100271125-Television_-_Live_in_Hartsdale__NY__8-31-77__Part_3.rar.html
http–rapidshare.com-files-100264758-Television_-_Live_in_Hartsdale__NY__8-31-77__Part_4.rar.html

TELEVISION LIVE AT THE OLD WALDORF SAN FRANCISCO 29th June 1978
192KPS:
http://www.megaupload.com/?d=DJMTUON9
or
http://rapidshare.com/files/114485410/dino1023.rar
p/w for rapidshare: sparkyibew

Television – Ticket That Exploded At The Earth Tavern in Portland, Oregon 2nd July 1978
89 mb @ 192
http://rapidshare.com/files/126201751/tv1978portland.rar

https://i1.wp.com/www.univie.ac.at/Anglistik/easyrider/data/pages/talking%20heads/bgr-14.jpg

Television – This Case Is Closed The First Farewell – Bottom Line, NYC 29th July 1978
FLAC version 568 mb:
http://rapidshare.com/files/132645327/Television780729FLAC_01.zip
http://rapidshare.com/files/132677461/Television780729FLAC_02.zip
http://rapidshare.com/files/132697175/Television780729FLAC_03.zip
Password is http://dexondaz.blogspot.com/

mp3 version 106 mb @ 192 kps:
http–www.megaupload.com-d=ROTOEBV5

TELEVISION: The Blow-Up (live 1978, various locations)
http://sharebee.com/074a40b5
http://sharebee.com/ff666118
pass = hangoverheartattack

Tom Verlaine – Live in Rouen, France 17th April 1987
http://rapidshare.com/files/143559776/Tom_Verlaine_-_Live_in_Rouen__France__4-17-87__Part_1.rar
http://rapidshare.com/files/143578123/Tom_Verlaine_-_Live_in_Rouen__France__4-17-87__Part_2.rar

Television – Live at the Academy NYC 1992 (2003 CD)
http://rapidshare.com/files/135087768/2003_-_Live_at_the_academy__1992__by_Zombieraid.rar.html

Richard Lloyd – Live at The Empty Bottle, Chicago, IL 22nd June 2001
http://rapidshare.com/files/143596550/Richard_Lloyd_-_Live_at_The_Empty_Bottle__Chicago__IL___6-22-01__Part_1.rar
http://rapidshare.com/files/144024751/Richard_Lloyd_-_Live_at_The_Empty_Bottle__Chicago__IL___6-22-01__Part_2.rar

Thanks to Dave Sez and to Zombieraid, Dexondaz of dexondaz.blogspot.com, Felipe of http://isksp.blogspot.com/ and GoMonkeyGo from http://thenewdisease.blogspot.com

NOTE:

We do not host any files here. If this post contains a link to content hosted elsewhere, this is content found by a simple search on the worldwide freedom web. However, if for some valid reason, you object to a said content, or any content here, please let us know and we will remove the content in question.

Any content linked to here is only meant as a taster for the original work itself and is posted on the strict understanding that anyone who downloads the taster, deletes said content within 24 hours. We would assume that these fans will then buy the original work and we greatly encourage them to do so.

February 23, 2009 Posted by | Music_Alternative, Music_PostRock, Patti Smith, Richard Hell, Richard Lloyd, Television, Tom Verlaine, _MUSIC | Leave a comment

Television, Tom Verlaine, Richard Lloyd and Richard Hell Bootlegs and Rarities

https://i2.wp.com/www.bbc.co.uk/music/sevenages/assets/artists/television/gallery/1.jpg

One of the greatest groups of all! No question!

The great Tom Verlaine and the great Television.

Heroes of Post Punk. Heroes of modern music!

We fucking love em!

Any “greatest albums” list that doesn’t have the sublime Marquee Moon in the top ten, ain’t worth shit!

We posted loads more Television before. Here are some wonderful Television, Tom Verlaine, Richard Lloyd and Richard Hell bootlegs and rarities kindly sent to us by Dave Sez.

Cheers Dave!

https://i2.wp.com/farm1.static.flickr.com/164/347142543_dc0196a31d_o.jpg

The Neon Boys – That’s All I Know (Right Now) (1973)
http://www.mediafire.com/file/ei2ozzjijyk/NB_DEM.rar
or
http://rapidshare.com/files/125756056/1973_-_The_Neon_Boys_By_Zombieraid.rar.html
or
http://www.megaupload.com/?d=FEDCEAE7
or
http://www.zshare.net/download/52738172f605f925/
or
http://www.badongo.com/file/12485078

TELEVISION AND RICHARD HELL – Poor Circulation
rehearsal/demo and live recordings with Richard Hell, December 1973 to April 1975.
http://www.megaupload.com/fr/?d=EEX8FJBW
or
http://www.megaupload.com/?d=LTGNTOZB

TELEVISION – DOUBLE EXPOSURE/FAIRLAND/ENO DEMO (173mb, 320kps)
http://rapidshare.com/files/147705706/Television_1974-1975_demos.rar.html

PATTI SMITH AND TELEVISION LIVE AT CBGB’S NEW YORK, 17th April 1975
http://rapidshare.com/files/126664282/1975_-_Early_Gig_75_by_Zombieraid.rar.html

TELEVISION – Nights To Remember 1975 Live At Piccadilly Inn, Cleveland 25th-26th July 1975 (128 kps)
http://rapidshare.com/files/126687427/1975_-_Piccadilly_Inn_by_Zombieraid.rar.html

Television – Live at Mother’s, New York, NY (10/19/75)
http://rapidshare.com/files/144573112/Television_-_Live_at_Mother_s__New_York__NY__10-19-75_.rar

Richard Hell – 1976 – Another World/Blank Generation/You Gotta Lose 7” (Ork in US, Stiff in UK)
xxx
http://rapidshare.com/files/134668322/Richard_Hell_-_1976_-Another_World__Blank_Generation__You_Gotta_Lose_7__.rar.html

or
http://www.megaupload.com/?d=ELX0VD7Q

TELEVISION – Knockin’ on Heaven’s Doors – Live at CBGB’S 30th July 1976
http://rapidshare.com/files/125817399/1976_-_CBGB_by_Zombieraid.rar.html

Television – Live in Hartsdale, NY AUGUST 31 1977
http–rapidshare.com-files-93739868-Television_-_Live_in_Hartsdale__NY__8-31-77__Part_1.rar.html
http–rapidshare.com-files-93739867-Television_-_Live_in_Hartsdale__NY__8-31-77__Part_2.rar.html
http–rapidshare.com-files-100271125-Television_-_Live_in_Hartsdale__NY__8-31-77__Part_3.rar.html
http–rapidshare.com-files-100264758-Television_-_Live_in_Hartsdale__NY__8-31-77__Part_4.rar.html

TELEVISION LIVE AT THE OLD WALDORF SAN FRANCISCO 29th June 1978
192KPS:
http://www.megaupload.com/?d=DJMTUON9
or
http://rapidshare.com/files/114485410/dino1023.rar
p/w for rapidshare: sparkyibew

Television – Ticket That Exploded At The Earth Tavern in Portland, Oregon 2nd July 1978
89 mb @ 192
http://rapidshare.com/files/126201751/tv1978portland.rar

https://i1.wp.com/www.univie.ac.at/Anglistik/easyrider/data/pages/talking%20heads/bgr-14.jpg

Television – This Case Is Closed The First Farewell – Bottom Line, NYC 29th July 1978
FLAC version 568 mb:
http://rapidshare.com/files/132645327/Television780729FLAC_01.zip
http://rapidshare.com/files/132677461/Television780729FLAC_02.zip
http://rapidshare.com/files/132697175/Television780729FLAC_03.zip
Password is http://dexondaz.blogspot.com/

mp3 version 106 mb @ 192 kps:
http–www.megaupload.com-d=ROTOEBV5

TELEVISION: The Blow-Up (live 1978, various locations)
http://sharebee.com/074a40b5
http://sharebee.com/ff666118
pass = hangoverheartattack

Tom Verlaine – Live in Rouen, France 17th April 1987
http://rapidshare.com/files/143559776/Tom_Verlaine_-_Live_in_Rouen__France__4-17-87__Part_1.rar
http://rapidshare.com/files/143578123/Tom_Verlaine_-_Live_in_Rouen__France__4-17-87__Part_2.rar

Television – Live at the Academy NYC 1992 (2003 CD)
http://rapidshare.com/files/135087768/2003_-_Live_at_the_academy__1992__by_Zombieraid.rar.html

Richard Lloyd – Live at The Empty Bottle, Chicago, IL 22nd June 2001
http://rapidshare.com/files/143596550/Richard_Lloyd_-_Live_at_The_Empty_Bottle__Chicago__IL___6-22-01__Part_1.rar
http://rapidshare.com/files/144024751/Richard_Lloyd_-_Live_at_The_Empty_Bottle__Chicago__IL___6-22-01__Part_2.rar

And a really up-to-date new post – thanks to Claudius and Dave Sez. Yap a live audience recording (at 128 kbps but good sound) of Television live in 2007 (without Richard Lloyd):

http://clearwaterahead.blogspot.com/2008/10/television-summerstage-06162007.html

Thanks to Dave Sez and to Zombieraid, Dexondaz of dexondaz.blogspot.com, Felipe of http://isksp.blogspot.com/ and GoMonkeyGo from http://thenewdisease.blogspot.com

NOTE:

We do not host any files here. If this post contains a link to content hosted elsewhere, this is content found by a simple search on the worldwide freedom web. However, if for some valid reason, you object to a said content, or any content here, please let us know and we will remove the content in question.

Any content linked to here is only meant as a taster for the original work itself and is posted on the strict understanding that anyone who downloads the taster, deletes said content within 24 hours. We would assume that these fans will then buy the original work and we greatly encourage them to do so.

February 23, 2009 Posted by | Music_Alternative, Music_PostRock, Patti Smith, Richard Hell, Richard Lloyd, Television, Tom Verlaine, _MUSIC | Leave a comment

Patti Smith – Land


Life is filled with holes,
Johnny’s laying there

//fc49.deviantart.com/fs20/f/2007/251/6/4/patti_smith_by_tnorland.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

by tnorland

The Patti Smith Group perform “Land” – from her seminal debut album “Horses” – live on 3rd October 1976.

What a fucking song. What a performance! C’mon everyone … go Rimbaud, go Rimbaud, go Rimbaud ….

//fc45.deviantart.com/fs14/f/2007/107/f/e/Horses_by_david_plus_1.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

by david-plus-1

Land:

Horses / Land of a Thousand Dances / La Mer (de)

The boy was in the hallway drinking a glass of tea
From the other end of the hallway a rhythm was generating
Another boy was sliding up the hallway
He merged perfectly with the hallway,
He merged perfectly, the mirror in the hallway

The boy looked at Johnny, Johnny wanted to run,
but the movie kept moving as planned
The boy took Johnny, he pushed him against the locker,
He drove it in, he drove it home, he drove it deep in Johnny
The boy disappeared, Johnny fell on his knees,
started crashing his head against the locker,
started crashing his head against the locker,
started laughing hysterically

When suddenly Johnny gets the feeling he’s being surrounded by
horses, horses, horses, horses
coming in in all directions
white shining silver studs with their nose in flames,
He saw horses, horses, horses, horses, horses, horses, horses, horses.
Do you know how to pony like bony maroney
Do you know how to twist, well it goes like this, it goes like this
Baby mash potato, do the alligator, do the alligator
And you twist the twister like your baby sister
I want your baby sister, give me your baby sister, dig your baby sister
Rise up on her knees, do the sweet pea, do the sweet pee pee,
Roll down on her back, got to lose control, got to lose control,
Got to lose control and then you take control,
Then you’re rolled down on your back and you like it like that,
Like it like that, like it like that, like it like that,
Then you do the watusi, yeah do the watusi

Life is filled with holes, Johnny’s laying there, his sperm coffin
Angel looks down at him and says, “Oh, pretty boy,
Can’t you show me nothing but surrender ?”
Johnny gets up, takes off his leather jacket,
Taped to his chest there’s the answer,
You got pen knives and jack knives and
Switchblades preferred, switchblades preferred
Then he cries, then he screams, saying
Life is full of pain, I’m cruisin’ through my brain
And I fill my nose with snow and go Rimbaud,
Go Rimbaud, go Rimbaud,
And go Johnny go, and do the watusi, oh do the watusi

There’s a little place, a place called space
It’s a pretty little place, it’s across the tracks,
Across the tracks and the name of the place is you like it like that,
You like it like that, you like it like that, you like it like that,
And the name of the band is the
Twistelettes, Twistelettes, Twistelettes, Twistelettes,
Twistelettes, Twistelettes, Twistelettes, Twistelettes

Baby calm down, better calm down,
In the night, in the eye of the forest
There’s a mare black and shining with yellow hair,
I put my fingers through her silken hair and found a stair,
I didn’t waste time, I just walked right up and saw that
up there — there is a sea
up there — there is a sea
up there — there is a sea
the sea’s the possibility
There is no land but the land

(up there is just a sea of possibilities)
There is no sea but the sea
(up there is a wall of possibilities)
There is no keeper but the key
(up there there are several walls of possibilities)
Except for one who seizes possibilities, one who seizes possibilities.
(up there)
I seize the first possibility, is the sea around me
I was standing there with my legs spread like a sailor
(in a sea of possibilities) I felt his hand on my knee
(on the screen)
And I looked at Johnny and handed him a branch of cold flame
(in the heart of man)
The waves were coming in like Arabian stallions
Gradually lapping into sea horses
He picked up the blade and he pressed it against his smooth throat
(the spoon)
And let it deep in
(the veins)
Dip in to the sea, to the sea of possibilities
It started hardening
Dip in to the sea, to the sea of possibilities
It started hardening in my hand
And I felt the arrows of desire

I put my hand inside his cranium, oh we had such a brainiac-amour
But no more, no more, I gotta move from my mind to the area

(go Rimbaud go Rimbaud go Rimbaud)
And go Johnny go and do the watusi,
Yeah do the watusi, do the watusi …
Shined open coiled snakes white and shiny twirling and encircling
Our lives are now entwined, we will fall yes we’re together twining
Your nerves, your mane of the black shining horse
And my fingers all entwined through the air,
I could feel it, it was the hair going through my fingers,
(I feel it I feel it I feel it I feel it)
The hairs were like wires going through my body
I I that’s how I
that’s how I
I died
(at that Tower of Babel they knew what they were after)
(they knew what they were after)
[Everything on the current] moved up
I tried to stop it, but it was too warm, too unbelievably smooth,
Like playing in the sea, in the sea of possibility, the possibility
Was a blade, a shiny blade, I hold the key to the sea of possibilities
There’s no land but the land

looked at my hands, and there’s a red stream
that went streaming through the sands like fingers,
like arteries, like fingers

(how much fits between the eyes of a horse?)
He lay, pressing it against his throat (your eyes)
He opened his throat (your eyes)
His vocal chords started shooting like (of a horse) mad pituitary glands
The scream he made (and my heart) was so high (my heart) pitched that nobody heard,
No one heard that cry,
No one heard (Johnny) the butterfly flapping in his throat,
(His fingers)
Nobody heard, he was on that bed, it was like a sea of jelly,
And so he seized the first
(his vocal chords shot up)
(possibility)
(like mad pituitary glands)
It was a black tube, he felt himself disintegrate
(there is nothing happening at all)
and go inside the black tube, so when he looked out into the steep
saw this sweet young thing (Fender one)
Humping on the parking meter, leaning on the parking meter

In the sheets
there was a man
dancing around
to the simple
Rock & roll
song

The Patti Smith Group – “Land”
3rd October 1976

November 17, 2008 Posted by | Patti Smith, _ART, _PHOTOGRAPHY, _POETRY, _VIDEO | 1 Comment

Patti Smith Legs

https://i1.wp.com/fc70.deviantart.com/fs28/i/2008/107/a/e/Patti_Smith__by_Wohooo3.jpg

Lovely work from Wohooo3

Mail us: stupidand@gmail.com

Home Art Babes Cartoons Dylan Editorial Music Videos Other

November 17, 2008 Posted by | Patti Smith, _ART, _PHOTOGRAPHY | Leave a comment

The life and deaths of Patti Smith

From rock icon to hippy pacifist, at 61 Patti Smith is the music industry’s most enduring female icon. In an extraordinarily intimate interview she talks to Amy Raphael about growing up, motherhood and the bereavements that have overshadowed her life

by Amy Raphael,
guardian.co.uk
http://www.guardian.co.uk

I find Patti Smith in the polished marble lobby of a ritzy hotel in Paris. She is beyond incongruous. It’s not the skinny jeans pushed into brown cowboy boots, the paper-thin, black V-neck T-shirt or the well-cut black jacket with its row of buttons on the cuffs. Nor is it much to do with the pitch-black sunglasses. It’s the way the staff are gliding around the hotel so efficiently while Patti Smith moves so slowly, shoulders hunched, hair falling over her face. She looks utterly lost, utterly bereft. She is about to make her way to a downstairs bar to find coffee when a brisk woman says it’s out of bounds. In return, Smith asks sharply why she can’t go anywhere in the hotel today.

We return to the lobby, find a seat in the dark corner of another bar. I am more than a little nervous. Here’s the woman who arguably made the first punk-rock record with ‘Piss Factory’ way back in 1974. Who witnessed the birth of rock’n’roll in America and then became a rock star herself with the release of Horses in 1975. Who always thought of herself not as a punk but as a poet, painter and photographer. Who was influenced by Bob Dylan and Mick Jagger and who has, by now, influenced three generations of musicians. Who, while her male musical peers burned out or faded away, is as vital at 61 as when she was a skinny, stylish, intense girl from New Jersey. And who is now more hippie pacifist than angry young woman.

Still, I’m not expecting our conversation to open with, ‘sorry, sorry, sorry’. She is apologising for her grumpiness with the brisk woman. For feeling as though she’s had the energy sucked out of her. She orders black coffee with hot water, removes her sunglasses and reveals eyes that are virtually glued together. It’s oppressive outside and she is feeling it, with a headache that is threatening to intensify into a migraine. She flew in from New York the day before and was up till 5am, but she doesn’t mind jet lag. ‘I just couldn’t sleep,’ she explains in a slow, East Coast drawl. ‘I’m sorry. It’s the pressure in my head. Anyway … I guess it’s a combination of things. Stress about the American election and … sorry. I’ve got to stop talking for a minute.’

We sit in silence, drinking coffee. It feels oddly OK. ‘I’ve just had a kind of rough week. So. You must think I’m a mess.’ She looks sideways at me and there’s a small smile. ‘I’m not normally like this.’ She replaces the sunglasses, moves her head slightly, winces. ‘This last period of time started for me on 16 August this year. I always note that date because it’s the anniversary of Elvis Presley’s death. I woke up at home in New York feeling extremely agitated. I thought it was maybe the moon, because it was very full, heavy and bright. Then we got torrential rain and the street caved into my cellar. It wasn’t just a drag – it was quite scary. So, I actually escaped here to Paris.’

Smith releases a long sigh. I ask gently if we should perhaps talk later. There’s a barely perceptible shake of her head. ‘No. No. Right now, I’m having an episode. I think it will go away. In the process of all the rain and this big moon, one of my closest friends died. A woman my age. We’d been friends since we were 20 years old. She’d been ill for a long time. She just suddenly died. The reason I’m telling you this … I’m feeling exactly like I was that day in August. It’s probably some kind of cycle. The flooding and the mud. My friend. This whole atmosphere of submersion, death. I just took off.’ This time, the silence is heavy.

Patti Smith knows what grief feels like. She has lost more lovers and friends than is fair. In 1989, her former lover and close friend Robert Mapplethorpe died of an Aids-related illness. The American photographer shot the iconic image of Smith on the front cover of Horses, in a man’s white shirt, black ribbon tie, black jacket flung over her shoulder, studied nonchalance unable to disguise a kind of casual yet untouchable sexuality. In late 1994, her husband, Fred ‘Sonic’ Smith, once a guitarist in pre-punk rockers MC5, died of a heart attack, leaving her with two young children. Less than a month later, her brother Todd, to whom she was extremely close, died suddenly. Both her parents recently passed away. And now her oldest female friend.

I ask if such a loss allows previous grief to flood her mind. ‘It reminds me … but she’s the first female. I’ve lost lots of men in my life, besides my mother, which is a whole different loss. It’s the first time I’ve had a female friend die since I was a child. It’s quite different. I don’t know why. Maybe because I’m older; suddenly a friend my age is gone. And she didn’t die of drugs or lifestyle.’

The lights are turned up and the empty bar suddenly becomes busy. ‘Let’s see where we can go,’ says Smith. She suggests her ‘small and messy’ hotel room and we head for the lift. From behind a pillar someone tries to get her attention. ‘Hey, Patti! It’s David!’ And there’s the American film director David Lynch, with a smart black suit and a magnificent silver quiff, beaming. ‘How you doing, Patti?’ She smiles. ‘I’ve got a hell of a headache. It’s nice to see you. You look terrific.’ He is excited about the series of concerts she will be giving, starting the following night at one of the oldest churches in Paris, Saint-Germain-des-Prés. ‘It’s cool. I’ll see you there, Patti. Rock on.’

Smith’s room is dark. She opens the curtains a little, pulls her boots off and lies on the bed, head propped up on three pillows. Around the room are piles of novels and biographies, Moleskine notebooks in different sizes, her beloved old Polaroid camera. It reminds me of the simple but cluttered white room in which she is often filmed during Patti Smith: Dream of Life, a beautiful, engaging new documentary which was over a decade in the making. The white room was not, it turns out, just a makeshift studio for the film. It is in fact where Smith spends most of her time in her New York house, reading and writing, with her two Abyssinian cats for company. ‘I live up there in that room. My son [Jackson, 26] has left home but my daughter [Jesse, 21] pretty much dominates the place.’

Dream of Life, whose title was taken from the album Smith made with her late husband in 1988, which in turn was taken from a Shelley poem, is emphatically not an A-Z of Patti Smith. Given that she is known for being intensely private, it was never going to be laden with gossip about a lost weekend with actor Sam Shepard at the Chelsea Hotel in New York in the early Seventies (though we do get to see Smith and Shepard playing guitar together in the white room and gently flirting with one another) or offer revealing tales about hanging out with William Burroughs and Allen Ginsberg. And there’s only the briefest glimpse of her old friend Bob Dylan in the corner of the screen, shot when Smith went on tour with him the year after the deaths of her husband and brother. I ask about their enduring friendship as she lies, eyes shut, on the hotel bed. ‘Bob and I know who each other is,’ she offers, simply. ‘And I am grateful for all I have gotten from him, from afar and in close proximity.’

That Smith agreed to be filmed at all is a surprise; that the process went on for 11 years is initially baffling. Yet she is clearly loyal to those she decides to trust, and would-be director Steven Sebring won her confidence early on. They first met in 1995, when Smith was looking for a photographer to shoot a new session with her. At that time, she had virtually dropped out of the music business and had been living with her husband and kids in Detroit since the late 1980s. ‘My husband had died and I had to support my kids. I couldn’t live the way we’d lived for 16 years – on the outskirts of Detroit, on a canal, rather simply. I’m not from there. I don’t drive. So I came back east to be closer to my family. Like I say, I was obliged to get a job. I had to work again.’

With a new record to sell, Smith had to do press. ‘It was strange. Everyone wanted to talk about Robert dying, then my husband and my brother. It wasn’t easy. And to have so much attention around oneself … I hadn’t had that in a long time and I don’t especially crave it. Even now, I’m conscious that had I not lost my husband, my life would have taken a very different trajectory.’ But everything had changed. And with no Mapplethorpe around, she needed a new photographer. ‘By that point, I’d befriended [REM’s] Michael Stipe, who’s a very sensitive family person. I called him up and asked if he knew of a photographer who wasn’t rock’n’roll oriented, who’d be sensitive to my kids, and he suggested Steven.’

Smith had always turned down biographical film projects but when Sebring said he was experimenting with a 16mm movie camera and asked if he could film her, she finally agreed. ‘All he wanted was to discover. He had no plan or design. I put a lot in at the end of the film, because by then Steven had become like a brother to me. The film doesn’t necessarily reflect my aesthetic but I like it and I’m glad to have it because it has the only footage of my parents.’

There are some lovely, resolutely unsentimental scenes documenting one of Smith’s last visits to her parents’ house. She stands with her father in the back garden, stroking Sheba the dog [‘she’s getting grey, like me,’ says Smith] and talking about the trees. ‘The scene where I’m in the backyard with my father … it was right before my father died, so it means a lot to have his beautiful voice, his sense of humanity, on film. He hated rock’n’roll but he loved that I made somewhat of a name for myself. I don’t think he liked any of my songs, except “People Have the Power”. My mother loved rock’n’roll. The more raucous, the better. There was lots of music in our house. The radio was great in the Fifties and Sixties. We had the whole evolution of rock’n’roll on the radio.’

I wonder what kind of child Patti Smith was. She has said in the past that she wasn’t born to be a spectator. Born in Chicago on 30 December 1946, the first child of Grant (a factory worker) and Beverley (a waitress), the family moved to Philadelphia in the early Fifties where her brother, Todd, and her sister, Linda, were born. When Smith was nine, they moved again, this time to ‘a very rural place in New Jersey where there was zero culture’. However, she got lucky with a music teacher who inspired her love of Maria Callas.

She sounds like a very particular kind of child. ‘A lot of children don’t have a developed aesthetic. I did. I made early choices in life, even about cloth; I liked flannel and not polyester. My father’s mother was from Liverpool and she had this very beautiful English china. I only wanted to drink my cocoa out of my grandmother’s cup and saucer. My mother was like, “What are your plans in life? Are you going to marry a duke?”‘

Young Smith certainly had plans. By 1969, she had left behind the world that had inspired ‘Piss Factory’ and was living in the Chelsea Hotel with Robert Mapplethorpe. Here she ran into Jimi Hendrix, Jean-Luc Godard, Janis Joplin, Arthur Miller, William Burroughs, Allen Ginsberg. And, in the lift one day, Muhammad Ali. ‘He radiated love and a sense of humour. I was awestruck by the reality of his magnetism and innate energy. I also got the sense that he was self-effacing.’

I start to say that she was immersed in a very male world right from the start. She jumps in before I finish. ‘That I chose to embrace?’ She walked straight into it, the alpha-male world of rock’n’roll. How did it feel? ‘Well, I felt alien my whole life but I didn’t feel alien because of my gender. Other people made me aware of my gender. Like if you’re performing poetry in a bar and guys are yelling, “Go back to the kitchen!” That kinda makes you aware there’s a gender issue.’

She sits up a little. Her eyes are bright. ‘The issue of gender was never my biggest concern; my biggest concern was doing good work. When the feminist movement really got going, I wasn’t an active part of it because I was more concerned with my own mental pursuits. I didn’t want to be confined to any kind of movement. I think these movements are extremely important, but I look forward to the time when they aren’t needed. When we can all just be who we are.’

Has she never labelled herself? ‘Never. I was a very awkward girl. Awkward teenager. A tomboy. I loved Peter Pan. I never related much to classic female things. When I was growing up, the big thing was teasing your hair and making your eyes look like Elizabeth Taylor in Cleopatra. Looking like one of the Ronettes. And it just wasn’t interesting to me. I loved books; I read my childhood away. I was more interested in my interior world. On the other hand, I loved Ava Gardner. Jeanne Moreau. Joan Baez. Edith Piaf. And, in terms of rock’n’roll, after hearing Grace Slick as a teenager, anything seemed possible.’

She says that she hasn’t changed much, though the world has changed around her. ‘You could chart me from five. I’m very similar. I’ve just learnt things. I’m a mother.’ A good one? She pauses. ‘I love my kids. I do the best I can. I was able to be a better mother when their father was alive. Perhaps sometimes I was a little strict … but I have really great kids. They are both really good people. And they’re not assholes.’ She laughs. ‘As human beings, I find them interesting and they teach me a lot. I don’t drive, I don’t use a cell phone. But my kids have taught me how to use a computer. They have helped to shepherd me into the 21st century because this is not my century.’

Apparently exhausted by the very notion of this strange new world, she sinks back into the bed. ‘It’s not my time but I’m certainly happy to be alive. There’s always something to look forward to. I don’t watch TV, I don’t even own one, but I’m always looking for a new book or film. My sister loves Charlotte Brontë. We are like the Brontë sisters in our own way. For almost a decade, we’ve had this plan to go to Charlotte Brontë country wearing matching brown, boiled wool dresses. We’re going to get nice steamer coats, the brown dresses, our notebooks and cameras and go visit the moors. And there are so many graves to visit, too.’

Smith is drawn to the resting places of the creative dead and often plans her concerts around graveyard visits. She recently took a job in Moscow so she could see Mikhail Bulgakov’s grave; she is in a ‘Bulgakov period’ right now and had read The Master and Margarita five times in as many months. She has played gigs at Charleston, the Bloomsbury Group’s country home, just to feel closer to her beloved Virginia Woolf. She visited – and considered moving to – Brighton after reading Graham Greene’s Brighton Rock

We have talked for over three hours. I can’t remember why I felt nervous. She invites me to the soundcheck at Eglise Saint-Germain-des-Prés that evening (an empty dark church with candles flickering while Patti Smith sings ‘Because the Night’ in her beautiful, resonant voice) and we have tea at midnight in her hotel. The next night, she plays at the church as part of the city’s Nuit Blanche, a free all-night cultural event.

This is the first church she visited in Europe when she was 21. Travelling with her sister Linda, she wanted to see Picasso’s Portrait of Dora Maar in the church’s garden. She was too shy to go into the church itself. And now, 40 years on, she is back. There are thousands of people, young and older, milling around in front of the church. With her son on guitar and daughter on piano, Smith starts performing just after 9.30pm and, with half-hour breaks, keeps going till 5am. There are still people waiting to see her as the sun comes up. It’s an astonishing evening. People are sitting in the aisles, oblivious to the cold stone floor.

She dedicates a cover of Neil Young’s ‘Helpless’ to her children’s father. She does a spine-tingling ‘Ghost Dance’ and a rousing ‘People Have the Power’. During one of the breaks, David Lynch appears in the sparse dressing room. He takes a blurry digital photo of Smith and she takes a blurry Polaroid of him. They swap addresses. He is excited about ‘People Have the Power’, thinks Barack Obama should use it in his campaign.

Around 1am, American actor Michael Pitt and his girlfriend show up. They are in a band and will perform onstage with the Smith family even though they’ve never met before. Patti Smith, who has long since left drugs and drink behind, pours herself a glass of red wine and takes a sip. She’s not sure how it will go with Pitt and his girlfriend, but she’s willing to give it a go. ‘There’s no such thing as a mistake, just a creative approach. That’s how I get through life.’ She grins and, for a moment, I see the girl on the front of Horses. And then she’s back on stage, this woman who was never born to be a spectator.

• Patti Smith: Dream of Life is out on 5 December

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November 17, 2008 Posted by | Patti Smith, _ARTICLE, _MUSIC, _OTHER | Leave a comment

The Celibate Rifles – Dancing Barefoot EP (1988)

The Celibate Rifles – Dancing Barefoot EP
May, 1988

Hot Records

A fine E.P. from a great Oz cult band, Sydney-based Celibate Rifles – purveyors of classic punk/ garage rock!

she is benediction
she is addicted to thee
she is the root connection
she is connecting with he

here I go and I don’t know why
I fell so ceaselessly
could it be he’s taking over me…

I’m dancing barefoot
heading for a spin
some strange music draws me in
makes me come on like some heroine

she is sublimation
she is the essence of thee
she is concentrating on
he, who is chosen by she

here I go and I don’t know why
I spin so ceaselessly,
could it be he’s taking over me…

she is re-creation
she, intoxicated by thee
she has the slow sensation that
he is levitating with she …

here I go and I don’t know why,
I spin so ceaselessly,
’til I lose my sense of gravity…

(oh god I fell for you …)

the plot of our life sweats in the dark like a face
the mystery of childbirth, of childhood itself
grave visitations
what is it that calls to us?
why must we pray screaming?
why must not death be redefined?
we shut our eyes we stretch out our arms
and whirl on a pane of glass
an asphyxiation a fix on anything the line of life the limb of a tree
the hands of he and the promise that she is blessed among women.

(oh god I fell for you …)

https://i1.wp.com/upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/c/cb/Dancing_Barefoot_-_Patti_Smith_Group.jpg
Yes, that’s Patti Smith‘s sublime Dancing Barefoot from her Wave LP back in 1979 !

A great cover by the Rifles with three good original tracks also !

Lovely cover artwork on this EP too, for good measure!

The Rifles first formed in 1979 and released their first album Sideroxylon in May 1983 on the Hot Records label.

This EP was their last release for the Hot Records.

The band has toured both America and Europe extensively, releasing a total of fourteen studio albums!

Some Rifles links:

Dancing Barefoot (Live) – The Celibate Rifles

The Celibate Rifles perform Dancing Barefoot live on Australian TV back in 1988 !


Tracklisting

1 Dancing Barefoot
2 Jesus on T.V. (Live)
3 The More Things Change (Alternative Version)
4 Junk


Here she be!

Dancing Barefoot (1988)

Big thanks to feelinkindafroggy



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September 20, 2008 Posted by | Music_Alternative, Music_ClassicRock, music_Garage, Patti Smith, The Celibate Rifles, _MUSIC, _POETRY, _VIDEO | Leave a comment

Patti Smith – Twelve (2007)

Patti Smith – Twelve (2007)
Mp3 / 83,59 mb

Patti interprets – sometimes radically – a dozen songs of very varied genre, and indeed, quality (all the way from Dylan downwards!)!

A mixed bag indeed. We get Nirvana’s most famous song and REM’s worst!

And is that really “Everybody Wants To Rule The World”? Fucking hell! Really? Yap, alas, it is!

This one was released April 17, 2007 on Columbia Records and debuted on the Billboard 200 at number 60, with 11,000 copies sold in its first week.

A promotional EP entitled Two More was also released, featuring two tracks that are not on the album: “Perfect Day” by Lou Reed and “Here I Dreamt I Was an Architect” by The Decemberists.

Tracklisting

1 “Are You Experienced?” – Jimi Hendrix 4:46
2 “Everybody Wants to Rule the World” – Roland Orzabal, Ian Stanley, Chris Hughes (Tears for Fears) 4:07
3 “Helpless” – Neil Young (Crosby, Stills, Nash, & Young) 4:02
4 “Gimme Shelter” – Jagger/Richards (The Rolling Stones) 5:00
5 “Within You Without You” – George Harrison (The Beatles) 4:51
6 “White Rabbit” Grace Slick – (Jefferson Airplane) 3:54
7 “Changing of the Guards” – Bob Dylan 5:47
8 “The Boy in the Bubble” – Paul Simon, Forere Motloheloa 4:30
9 “Soul Kitchen” – Jim Morrison, Robby Krieger, Ray Manzarek, John Densmore (The Doors) 3:45
10 “Smells Like Teen Spirit” – Kurt Cobain, Dave Grohl, Krist Novoselic (Nirvana) 6:31
11 “Midnight Rider” – Gregg Allman, Robert Payne (The Allman Brothers Band) 4:02
12 “Pastime Paradise” – Stevie Wonder 5:26
13 “Everybody Hurts” (bonus) – Bill Berry, Peter Buck, Mike Mills, Michael Stipe (R.E.M.) 6:17

Here be Patti;

http://rapidshare.com/files/77360014/pstwelve.rar

Pass: http://www.warezdark.com

Mirror:

http://odsiebie.com/pokaz/197480—9a0e.html

If Pass; dzidek1030

Big thanks to the original posters

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July 9, 2008 Posted by | Music_Alternative, Patti Smith, _MUSIC | Leave a comment

Patti Smith and Kevin Shields – The Coral Sea (07/2008)

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Patti Smith and Kevin Shields – The Coral Sea
July 2008
On two magical nights – June 22, 2005 and September 12, 2006 – punk godmother Patti Smith and My Bloody Valentine head honcho Kevin Shields took the stage together at London’s Queen Elizabeth Hall.

Their collaboration was called the Coral Sea, and took both its name and inspiration from Smith’s 1996 book The Coral Sea.

The book and the performance served as tributes to the legendary late artist Robert Mapplethorpe, who was Smith’s close friend and the man who took the iconic photograph that appears on the cover of Smith’s seminal 1975 debut album Horses.

Fortunately for those of us who couldn’t make those shows, Smith and Shields have put together a double-disc set chronicling the two performances. The Coral Sea will be released on July 11 on PASK, a new imprint run by Smith and Shields.

The live album has no tracklist; it consists of Smith’s spoken word performance accompanied by Shields on “guitars and effects,” according to a press release.

Although Cat Power appeared at the 2005 performance, she is not featured on the album.

No word on whether or not the duo will take the stage together ever again, but both of them have plenty going on in their own rights. Shields has that MBV reunion and that ATP thing to attend to. Smith is the subject of the new documentary Dream of Life, has an art exhibition on view at Fondation Cartier in Paris, collaborated with Patrick Wolf, and wrote a song for the new Augusten Burroughs book.

http://popdose.com/listening-b…..ea/ wrote:

The artist Robert Mapplethorpe died from complications of AIDS in 1989. According to his great friend, Patti Smith, “His mortal suffering was so profound that I wept through much of his illness. After his death, I wanted to give him something other than tears, so I wrote The Coral Sea.” Her epic poem was published in book form in 1996.

Smith attempted public readings of the piece, but found that she was unable to sustain a reading of the entire thing. It wasn’t until she teamed up with Kevin Shields (My Bloody Valentine) for a pair of concerts at Queen Elizabeth Hall, London in 2005 and 2006 that the true nature of her amazing achievement revealed itself.

The Coral Sea, a two-disc set released on the artists’ own PASK label, is a record of those two monumental performances. The concerts featured Smith reading her work, accompanied by Shields on guitars and effects. It is unlike anything that I have ever heard.

Art, not nature moved him
Nature, he had boasted, was meant to be redesigned
Opened and folded like a fan

The poem tells the story of Mapplethorpe, referred to variously as the sleeper, the traveller, or simply, ‘M’, as he makes his heroic journey to the next world. In this case the voyage will take him to the Solomon Islands so that he might see the Southern Cross, which his beloved uncle had described to him, before he dies. He journeys aboard a ship through uncharted waters, experiencing the stages of death, from pain and defiance, to revelation and acceptance.

Smith could not have chosen a more compatible foil for this work than Kevin Shields. His work here is as majestic and awe-inspiring as the poem itself. Smith’s recitation is not a reading, but a performance, and a brilliant one at that. From mournful to full of fury in the blink of an eye, it is perfectly paced, and perfectly set within the frame that Shields has lovingly created for it. The two performances presented here are different enough to each command your attention. The second is somewhat shorter, and Shields work is somehow more of a single piece, as if carved out of a great block of granite.

There is no point in presenting you with a track to listen to. This is a work that insists on being listened to from start to finish in one sitting. If you don’t have the hour to simply listen, put if off for a time when you do. This album is not for dancing, or for driving, or for dusting. It is for listening with all of the attention that you can muster. It is hypnotic and harrowing, and you cannot help but fall under its spell.

There is no use trying to compare this to any music album of this, or any other year. I will say without reservation that from an artistic point of view, it is the most worthy accomplishment that I have experienced in a very long while.

Here be Pat & Kev:

http://link-protector.com/539805/
http://link-protector.com/539806/

Big thanks to the original poster

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July 9, 2008 Posted by | Kevin Shields, Music_Alternative, Music_Experimental, My Bloody Valentine, Patti Smith, _MUSIC | Leave a comment

Patti Smith and Kevin Shields’ Coral Sea Coming to CD

MP3: Patti Smith: Gimme Shelter (Rolling Stones cover) [from the Twelve LP]

Patti Smith and Kevin Shields’ Coral Sea Coming to CD (from Pitchfork)

On two magical nights – June 22, 2005 and September 12, 2006 – punk godmother Patti Smith and My Bloody Valentine genius Kevin Shields took the stage together at London’s Queen Elizabeth Hall. Their collaboration was called the Coral Sea, and took both its name and inspiration from Smith’s 1996 book The Coral Sea. The book and the performance served as tributes to the legendary late artist Robert Mapplethorpe, who was Smith’s close friend. (He took the iconic photograph that appears on the cover of Smith’s 1975 debut album Horses.)

Fortunately for those of us who couldn’t make those shows, Smith and Shields have put together a double-disc set chronicling the two performances. The Coral Sea will be released on July 11 on PASK, a new imprint run by Smith and Shields.

The live album has no tracklist; it consists of Smith’s spoken word performance accompanied by Shields on “guitars and effects,” according to a press release. Although Cat Power appeared at the 2005 performance, she is not featured on the album.

The stage at one of the Coral Sea performances, featuring an image of Mapplethorpe

No word on whether or not the duo will take the stage together ever again, but both of them have plenty going on in their own rights. Shields has that whole reunion thing and that ATP thing to attend to. Smith is the subject of the new documentary Dream of Life, has an art exhibition on view at Fondation Cartier in Paris, collaborated with Patrick Wolf, and wrote a song for the new Augusten Burroughs book.

April 28, 2008 Posted by | Kevin Shields, Music_Alternative, My Bloody Valentine, Patti Smith, Rolling Stones, _MUSIC, _VIDEO | 2 Comments

Patti Smith with Bob Dylan – Paths That Cross (1995)

http://www.postmodern.com/~fi/pattipics/images/pathscross.jpg

Patti Smith – Paths That Cross (1995)



Recorded live with Bob Dylan during the paradise lost tour in New York, Boston, Bethlehem, PA Philadelphia during December 1995.

A F Wilson notes that several cuts in this set are not from the Paradise Lost tour (i.e. not with Dylan) but were recorded in Philadelphia (living arts theater) on November 25, 1995

https://i0.wp.com/www.brooklynvegan.com/img/music/dylanpatti.jpg

Tracks

CD — 1

1. Intro
2. Piss Factory
3. Somalia
4. Dancing Barefoot
5. Dylans Dog
6. Dark Eyes
7. Southern Cross
8. Black Peter
9. Not Fade Away
10. Ghost Dance
11. Because the Night
12. Paths That Cross
13. People Have the Power
14. Farewell Reel
15. Jacksons Song
16. About a Boy

https://i0.wp.com/www.kevchino.com/graffix/bandphotos/patti-smith_bp.jpg

CD — 2
1. Piss Factory
2. Horses
3. Wicked Messanger
4. About a Boy
5. Poetry- Dancing Barefoot
6. Because the Night
7. Ghost Dance
8. Southern Cross
9. Mortal Shoes
10. Poem
11. Rock’n’ Roll Nigger
12. Not Fade Away
13. Farewell Reel
14. Dark Eyes

thaqnks nagiants40!



Banzai !!

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January 8, 2008 Posted by | Music_Alternative, Music_ClassicRock, Patti Smith, _BOB DYLAN, _MUSIC | Leave a comment

Patti Smith with Bob Dylan – Paths That Cross (1995)

https://i0.wp.com/www.postmodern.com/~fi/pattipics/images/pathscross.jpg

Patti Smith – Paths That Cross (1995)



Recorded live with Bob Dylan during the paradise lost tour in New York, Boston, Bethlehem, PA Philadelphia during December 1995.

A F Wilson notes that several cuts in this set are not from the Paradise Lost tour (i.e. not with Dylan) but were recorded in Philadelphia (living arts theater) on November 25, 1995

Tracks

CD — 1

1. Intro
2. Piss Factory
3. Somalia
4. Dancing Barefoot
5. Dylans Dog
6. Dark Eyes
7. Southern Cross
8. Black Peter
9. Not Fade Away
10. Ghost Dance
11. Because the Night
12. Paths That Cross
13. People Have the Power
14. Farewell Reel
15. Jacksons Song
16. About a Boy

CD — 2
1. Piss Factory
2. Horses
3. Wicked Messenger
4. About a Boy
5. Poetry- Dancing Barefoot
6. Because the Night
7. Ghost Dance
8. Southern Cross
9. Mortal Shoes
10. Poem
11. Rock’n’ Roll Nigger
12. Not Fade Away
13. Farewell Reel
14. Dark Eyes

January 8, 2008 Posted by | Music_Alternative, Music_ClassicRock, Patti Smith, _BOB DYLAN, _MUSIC | Leave a comment

Patti Smith with Bob Dylan – Paths That Cross (1995)

http://www.postmodern.com/~fi/pattipics/images/pathscross.jpg

Patti Smith – Paths That Cross (1995)



Recorded live with Bob Dylan during the paradise lost tour in New York, Boston, Bethlehem, PA Philadelphia during December 1995.

A F Wilson notes that several cuts in this set are not from the Paradise Lost tour (i.e. not with Dylan) but were recorded in Philadelphia (living arts theater) on November 25, 1995

https://i0.wp.com/www.brooklynvegan.com/img/music/dylanpatti.jpg

Tracks

CD — 1

1. Intro
2. Piss Factory
3. Somalia
4. Dancing Barefoot
5. Dylans Dog
6. Dark Eyes
7. Southern Cross
8. Black Peter
9. Not Fade Away
10. Ghost Dance
11. Because the Night
12. Paths That Cross
13. People Have the Power
14. Farewell Reel
15. Jacksons Song
16. About a Boy

https://i0.wp.com/www.kevchino.com/graffix/bandphotos/patti-smith_bp.jpg

CD — 2
1. Piss Factory
2. Horses
3. Wicked Messanger
4. About a Boy
5. Poetry- Dancing Barefoot
6. Because the Night
7. Ghost Dance
8. Southern Cross
9. Mortal Shoes
10. Poem
11. Rock’n’ Roll Nigger
12. Not Fade Away
13. Farewell Reel
14. Dark Eyes

thaqnks nagiants40!



Banzai !!

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January 8, 2008 Posted by | Music_Alternative, Music_ClassicRock, Patti Smith, _BOB DYLAN, _MUSIC | Leave a comment

Patti Smith Presents Bob Dylan’s Life Story – And It’s Free!

Bob Dylan

Hear ye! Hear ye! Hear ye!

A free series of official Bob Dylan podcasts presented by Patti Smith has been made available by Sony!! Hurrah!!

A series of short casts are being posted telling chronologically the astonishing story of Dylan’s career.

It is anticipated that the series will eventually run to about 20 episodes, forming a composite two hour documentary.

The tenth episode, which was posted most recently, took the story up to the late ’70s and the beginning of the ‘born again’ period.

With Smith acting as the presenter and linkwoman, each includes Dylan recordings and historic interview snippets with the man himself plus contributions from a range of acclaimed musicians such as Roger McGuinn and Garth Hudson as well as renowned critical commentators including Greil Marcus.

All are legally downloadable as MP3 files from:

http://blogs.legacyrecordings.com/podcast/category/bob-dylan

Banzai!

January 2, 2008 Posted by | Music_ClassicRock, Patti Smith, _BOB DYLAN, _MUSIC | Leave a comment

Patti Smith Presents Bob Dylan’s Life Story – And It’s Free!

Bob Dylan

Hear ye! Hear ye! Hear ye!

A free series of official Bob Dylan podcasts presented by Patti Smith has been made available by Sony!! Hurrah!!

A series of short casts are being posted telling chronologically the astonishing story of Dylan’s career.

It is anticipated that the series will eventually run to about 20 episodes, forming a composite two hour documentary.

The tenth episode, which was posted most recently, took the story up to the late ’70s and the beginning of the ‘born again’ period.

With Smith acting as the presenter and linkwoman, each includes Dylan recordings and historic interview snippets with the man himself plus contributions from a range of acclaimed musicians such as Roger McGuinn and Garth Hudson as well as renowned critical commentators including Greil Marcus.

All are legally downloadable as MP3 files from:

http://blogs.legacyrecordings.com/podcast/category/bob-dylan

Banzai!

January 2, 2008 Posted by | Music_ClassicRock, Patti Smith, _BOB DYLAN, _MUSIC | Leave a comment