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El Greco – Paintings

El Greco – Paintings
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Some amazing works from the great master known as El Greco.

One of the real founding fathers of modernism. An artist centuries ahead of his time and enormously influential on an array of magnificent painters – such as one of our favourites, Paul Cezanne.

We were lucky enough to catch a special extensive exhibition of El Greco’s works in Madrid’s Prado a few years ago. Truly sublime.

El Greco (1541 – April 7, 1614) was a painter, sculptor, and architect of the Spanish Renaissance. “El Greco” (The Greek) was a nickname, a reference to his Greek origin, and the artist normally signed his paintings with his full birth name in Greek letters, Δομήνικος Θεοτοκόπουλος (Doménikos Theotokópoulos).

El Greco was born in Crete, which was at that time part of the Republic of Venice, and the centre of Post-Byzantine art. He trained and became a master within that tradition before travelling at age 26 to Venice, as other Greek artists had done.

In 1570 he moved to Rome, where he opened a workshop and executed a series of works.

During his stay in Italy, El Greco enriched his style with elements of Mannerism and of the Venetian Renaissance.

In 1577 he moved to Toledo, Spain, where he lived and worked until his death. In Toledo, El Greco received several major commissions and produced his best known paintings.

El Greco’s dramatic and expressionistic style was met with puzzlement by his contemporaries but found appreciation in the 20th century.

El Greco is regarded as a precursor of both Expressionism and Cubism, while his personality and works were a source of inspiration for poets and writers such as Rainer Maria Rilke and Nikos Kazantzakis.

El Greco has been characterized by modern scholars as an artist so individual that he belongs to no conventional school.

He is best known for tortuously elongated figures and often fantastic or phantasmagorical pigmentation, marrying Byzantine traditions with those of Western painting.

More here: El_Greco

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December 15, 2008 Posted by | El Greco, Greece, Paul Cézanne, _ART | Leave a comment

The genius Paul Cézanne

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Born: 19 January 1839
Aix-en-Provence, France
Died: 22 October 1906 (aged 67)
Aix-en-Provence, France
Nationality: French
Movement: Post-Impressionism
Famous Works: Mont St Victoire series, Rideau, Cruchon et Compotier, 1893-94, Forest (painting), 1902-04

One of the key founders of modernism and a huge influence on Cubism and later art movements, we’ve long loved the majestic works of Paul Cézanne and have been lucky enough to see his great paintings in numerous galleries across Europe and the States!

Cézanne took a great leap forward from the prevailing style of the day, the rather vapid “Impressionism”, to create his own idiosyncratic and innovative style.

He was an enormous influence on artists such as Picasso, Braque, Gris but, like many geniuses, he never received the renown and merit he deserved, while alive.
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Plain by Mount Sainte-Victoire. 1882-85. Oil on canvas. The Pushkin Museum of Fine Art, Moscow, Russia

Paul Cézanne was born into a family of Italian origin in Cesana Forinese in Southern France.

Paul Cézanne. Self-Portrait.

His father had established a felt hat business in Aix-en-Provence and later became a banker. In 1859 he bought a country house on the outskirts of Aix, the Jas de Bouffan, which was to be frequently represented in Cézanne’s paintings.

Between 1852 and 1859 Paul Cézanne studied at the Collège Bourbon and it was there that he formed a friendship with Emile Zola, with whom he shared an interest in literature.

In 1856 Cézanne began to attend the evening drawing courses of Joseph-Marc Gibert at the Aix Museum.

From 1859 to 1861 he studied law at Aix, entered his father’s bank. By April 1861 his father had finally yielded to Cézanne’s desire to make a career in art and allowed him to go to Paris to study at the Académie Suisse. In Paris Cézanne frequented the Louvre, met Pissarro and Guillaumin and, later on, Monet, Sisley, Bazille and Renoir.

In September of the same year he was refused admission to the Ecole des Beaux-Arts and went back to Aix, to the great relief of his father, who offered him a position in his bank.

However,in November 1862 Paul Cézanne went back to Paris and took up painting again.

During his so called “dark” or “romantic” period (1862-70) Paul Cézanne often visited Paris; he met with Edouard Manet and the future Impressionists, and tried to be accepted at the Salon.

The Franco-Prussian War drove him to L’Estaque near Marseilles. Paul Cézanne’s “Impressionist” period (1873-79) is connected with his staying at Pontoise and Auvers-sur-Oise in 1872, 1873, 1874, 1877 and 1881; he worked with Pissarro and exhibited with the Impressionists in 1874 and in 1877.

The canvases produced at L’Estaque (1880-83) and at Gardanne (1885-88) are usually referred to Paul Cézanne’s “constructive” period.

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Six Women Bathing. c. 1874/75. Oil on canvas. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, USA.
In 1886 after his father’s death, Cézanne married Hortense Fiquet, with whom he had a secret liaison since 1870. She is said to look after the finished canvases, which Cézanne never took care to keep and abandoned as soon as he completed the painting. The same year Cézanne quarelled with Zola over the novel “L’Oeuvre”, in which the central figure, an unsuccessful and unbalanced painter, was identified with Cézanne!

In 1887, after a long break, Cézanne participated in the exhibition of Les XX at Brussels. Towards the beginning of Paul Cézanne’s “synthetic” period (1890-1906) the younger generations of artists started to take an interest in him.

His first one-man show was held in the Vollard Gallery in 1895. During these years the artist seldom visited Paris – his longest stays there took place in 1895, 1899 and 1904 – and produced many versions of canvases depicting Mount Sainte-Victoire, smokers, card-players and bathers, and painted still lifes and portraits.

By 1901 Cézanne had achieved recognition in the art world. He often met with young artists who admired his work – Denis, Bonnard and Vuillard. In 1901 Denis painted Hommage à Cézanne.

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L’Estaque. c. 1882-1885. Oil on canvas. Musée d’Orsay, Paris, France.
The future Fauvist Charles Camoin sought his advice, and in 1904 he was visited by Emile Bernard, an artist of the Pont-Aven school, with whom Cézanne corresponded extensively, expounding his views on art.

In 1904 his paintings were shown for the first time at the Autumn Salon in Paris; and a year after his death, in 1907, a retrospective exhibition of his works was held there.

After Cézanne died in 1906, his paintings were exhibited in Paris in a large scale museum-like retrospective in September 1907. The 1907 Cézanne retrospective at the Salon d’Automne greatly impacted the direction that the avant-garde in Paris took, lending credence to his position as one of the most influential artists of the 19th century and to the advent of Cubism.

Cézanne’s explorations of geometric simplification and optical phenomena inspired Picasso, Braque, Gris, and others to experiment with ever more complex multiple views of the same subject, and, eventually, to the fracturing of form.

Cézanne thus sparked one of the most revolutionary areas of artistic enquiry of the 20th Century, one which was to affect profoundly the development of modern art.

Loads of great Cezanne prints and infos can be had at the excellent abcgallery


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The Railway Cutting. c. 1870. Oil on canvas. Neue Pinakothek, Munich, Germany.

A Modern Olympia. c. 1869-70. Oil on canvas. Private collection.
Paul Alexis Reading to Emile Zola. c. 1869-70. Oil on canvas. Museu de Arte de Sao Paolo Assis Chateaubriand, Sao Paolo, Brazil. More.
Still Life with Kettle. c. 1869. Oil on canvas. Musée d’Orsay, Paris, France.
The Black Clock. c. 1870. Oil on canvas. Private collection.
The Railway Cutting. c. 1870. Oil on canvas. Neue Pinakothek, Munich, Germany.
Le Festin (The Banquet). c. 1870. Oil on canvas. Private collection.
Pastoral (Idyll). c. 1870. Oil on canvas. Musée d’Orsay, Paris, France.
The Strangled Woman. 1872. Oil on canvas. Musée d’Orsay, Paris, France.
Village Road, Auvers. c.1872-73. Oil on canvas. Musée d’Orsay, Paris, France.
Green Apples. c. 1873. Oil on canvas. Musée d’Orsay, Paris, France.
The Hanged Man’s House. 1873. Oil on canvas. Musée d’Orsay, Paris, France.
Dr. Gachet’s House at Auvers. c. 1873. Oil on canvas. Musée d’Orsay, Paris, France.
Crossroad of the Rue Remy, Auvers. c. 1873. Oil on canvas. Musée d’Orsay, Paris, France.
A Modern Olympia. c. 1873. Oil on canvas. Musée d’Orsay, Paris, France.
House of Père Lacroix. 1873. Oil on canvas. The National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC, USA.
Flowers in a Blue Vase. c. 1873-75. Oil on canvas. The Hermitage, St. Petersburg, Russia.
Self-Portrait with a Casquette. 1873-75. Oil on canvas. The Hermitage, St. Petersburg, Russia.
Self-Portrait. c. 1873-1876. Oil on canvas. Musée d’Orsay, Paris, France.
A Lunch on Grass. c. 1873-75. Oil on canvas. Musée de l’Orangerie, Paris, France.
View of Auvers. c. 1874. Oil on canvas. Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA.
Six Women Bathing. c. 1874/75. Oil on canvas. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, USA.
Dahlias. c. 1875. Oil on canvas. Musée d’Orsay, Paris, France.
Temptation of St. Anthony. c. 1875. Oil on canvas. Musée d’Orsay, Paris, France.
The Bathers Resting. 1875-76. Oil on canvas. Barnes Foundation, Lincoln University, Philadelphia, PA, USA.
Five Bathers. c. 1875-77. Oil on canvas. Musée d’Orsay, Paris, France.
Three Bathers. c. 1875-77. Oil on canvas. Musée d’Orsay, Paris, France.
Interior with Two Women and a Child. 1875-77. Oil on canvas. The Pushkin Museum of Fine Art, Moscow, Russia.
Road at Pontoise. 1875-77. Oil on canvas. The Pushkin Museum of Fine Art, Moscow, Russia.
Jas de Bouffan, the Pool (Jas de Bouffan, le bassin). c. 1876. Oil on canvas. Collection of Otto Krebs, Holzdorf. Now in the Hermitage, St. Petersburg, Russia.
Vase of Flowers. c. 1876. Oil on canvas. The National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC, USA.


Paul Cézanne at Artprice. To look at auction records, find Cézanne’s works in upcoming auctions, check price levels and indexes for his works, read his biography and view his signature, access the Artprice database.

Lots of other interesting Cezanne resources;

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September 15, 2008 Posted by | Paul Cézanne, _ART | Leave a comment

Bob Dylan – New video for “Dreamin’ of You”

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Dreamin of you, is all that I do

but it’s driving me insane


Bob Dylan recently released the great track “Dreamin’ of You” as a taster for his impending LP, “Tell Tale Signs: The Bootleg Series Vol. 8.

We’ve already posted the track and written about it HERE!

The brand new Video for “Dreamin’ of You” has just been made available too via Amazon! And we have it below! It’s a slightly truncated version of the audio track, at 3mins 33 secs.

The promo stars the wonderful Harry Dean Stanton, a fave of ours who has appeared in countless movies down the years, including some great cult movies we love such as “Rumblefish”, “Paris Texas” and “Repo Man”, to mention just a few!

Click here for a great interview with Harry Dean Stanton.

Here, for an official bootleg by Dylan, Harry plays a bootlegger bootlegging Dylan !!

I think that’s called post-modernism or some fucking thing! The director must have heard of Magritte or Borges somewhere!

Some things just last longer than you thought they would



“Dreamin’ of You” was an outtake from the Lanois produced Time Out Of Mind.

Interestingly, although this track was not included on the LP, many of the lyrics therein were used across a few different songs on Time Out Of Mind.

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This consistency of thematic preoccupations, within which is constant refinement and subtle change, is a phenomenon common amongst great painters and other artists – the magnificent Paul Cézanne painting his beloved Mont Sainte-Victoire repeatedly, comes to mind immediately!





The light in this place is really bad

Like being in the bottom of a stream

Any minute now,

I’m expecting to wake up from a dream


Miss so much, the softest touch

Like the babe of some child

Who neither wept nor smiled

I’m hiding my faith in the rain

I’ve been dreamin’ of you

That’s all I do

And it’s driving me insane



Somewhere dawn is breaking

Light is streaking across the floor

Church bells are ringing

I wonder who they’re ringing for

Travel under any star

You’ll see me wherever you are



The shadowy past is so vague and so vast,

I’m sleeping in the palace of pain

I’ve been dreamin’ of you

That’s all I do

But it’s driving me insane



Maybe they’ll get me, maybe they won’t

But whatever, it won’t be tonight

I wish your hand was in mine right now,

We could go where the moon is white



For years they had me locked in a cage,

Then they threw me onto the stage

Some things just last longer than you thought they would

And they never ever explain

I’m dreamin’ of you

That’s all I do

And it’s driving me insane



Well I eat when I’m hungry

Drink when I’m dry

Live my life on the square

Even if the flesh falls off my face

It won’t matter as long as you’re there



Feel like a ghost in love

Underneath the heavens above

Feel further away then I ever did before

Feel further than I can take

Dreamin’ of you, that’s all I do,

But it’s driving me insane



Everything in the way is so shabby today

In queer and unusual form

Spirals of golden haze here in there in a blaze

Like beams of light in a star.

Maybe you’re here or maybe you weren’t

Maybe you touched somebody and got burned

The silent sun has got me on the run

Burning a hole in my brain

I’m dreamin’ of you,

That’s all I do

But it’s driving me insane.

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Who knew Harry Dean Stanton was such a Bob Dylan freak? Tuesday, Amazon.com premiered a video starring Stanton for a new Dylan song, “Dreamin’ of You,” from the troubadour’s forthcoming “Tell Tale Signs: The Bootleg Series Vol. 8.”

The video features Stanton – who you may remember from “Cool Hand Luke” as well as such B-movieclassics as “Repo Man” and “Escape from New York” – as a lonely-but-dedicated Dylan bootlegger. Stanton travels dusty highways and byways going from show to show and returning home to lovingly prepare his wares. It’s basically a 3-minute commercial for “Tell Tale Signs” and not much to watch, but the song’s a keeper.

“Dreamin’ of You,” an outtake from the 1997 Daniel Lanois-produced “Time Out of Mind” sessions, is a haunting and simple tune typical of Dylan’s work with Lanois. But it’s got a surprisingly catchy hook on top of some unexpected jagged electric guitar and jazzy upright bass.

The song’s a first sneak peek at the Oct. 7 compilation album that gathers 27 rarities from the past two decades of Dylan’s career. Mostly made up of unreleased recordings and alternate versions of studio sessions from “Oh, Mercy” to “Modern Times,” the two-disc set also contains a couple of rare live tracks.

For fanatics that share Stanton’s love, “Tell Tale Signs: The Bootleg Series Vol. 8” also will be released in a deluxe edition including a third disc with 13 more songs, a 150-page photo book of Dylan’s singles from around the world and a 7-inch vinyl single. For your sake, let’s just hope your obsession doesn’t mirror the sort of bleak isolation Stanton portrays.

by jgottlieb@bostonherald.com

Sean O’Hagan

The Observer,

Sunday August 10 2008

From the forthcoming The Bootleg Series Volume 8: Telltale Signs, a slice of lowdown swamp-funk that didn’t make it onto Love & Theft. ‘Dreamin’ of You’ finds Dylan harbouring dark thoughts of death and desire. ‘Even if the flesh falls off my face,’ he croaks, ‘it won’t matter if you’re there.’ Like most recent Dylan songs, the tone is one of whispered urgency, the sound of a man who knows time is running out.

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September 15, 2008 Posted by | Harry Dean Stanton, Music_ClassicRock, Paul Cézanne, _ART, _BOB DYLAN, _MUSIC, _POETRY, _VIDEO | 1 Comment