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Did Robert Johnson sell his soul to the Devil?

“I Went Down To The Crossroads…” – Did Robert Johnson sell his soul to the Devil?

Introduction to Robert Johnson

Robert Johnson (1911-1938) is a blues musician from Mississippi. He is known for playing some of the best blues ever, emulating the sound of two guitars with one.

He is often called the “Father of Modern Rock and Roll,” because his songs influenced many people, including Eric Clapton, Bob Dylan, Keith Richards and Muddy Waters.

Johnson was often scolded for not working enough in the field. He would spend most of his time in old juke houses, watching Son House religiously, and trying to learn everything about the guitar. When Son House would go out on breaks, young Robert would pick up the guitar and try to play. House would get a lot of complaints, as nobody liked Roberts playing. However, he was never discouraged.

Professional Career

Robert Johnson’s young wife died during child birth, so he packed up and left to play music up and down the Delta around 1930.

He left mysteriously for about a year. When he came back, his playing, songwriting, and singing were all extraordinarily improved.

He started traveling from town to town, playing for tips on street corners. He eventually got to record in San Antonio, Texas circa 1936. He recorded songs such as Come On In My Kitchen, Crossroad Blues, and Terraplane Blues. The latter became a regional hit, selling 5,000 copies. In 1937, he had another recording session in which he brought Sweet Home Chicago and Love in Vain, two of his most popular songs.

Johnson and the Devil

What happened to Johnson when he disappeared in 1931? He left as an average musician at best, but came back as a lean, mean, blues-singing machine. How could anyone gain such an incredible amount of skill in just a few months?

Well, several explanations have popped up. The most practical is he started taking lessons with Ike Zinnerman. However due to Johnson gaining such an incredible amount of skill in a short time, some have dismissed this. The other explanation is that Robert Johnson sold his soul to the devil.

Legend has it that while working on a rural farm in Mississippi, he still had a burning desire to become a great blues musician. He was instructed to take his guitar down to the crossroads in the dead of the night. There, a large black man (the Devil), will take his guitar, tune it, and play a few songs. He will then hand the guitar back, with the owner gaining mastery of the instrument. In return, the Devil would then own the players soul.

The legend has grown in time, but that is the core of it. Many variations of this tale have been told, including this actually happening at a graveyard. Johnson seems to have occasionally suggested that he did, in fact sell his soul. However, the myth may have grown from fellow blues musician Tommy Johnson, who repeatedly and publicly claimed he did sell his soul:

“If you want to learn how to make songs yourself, you take your guitar and you go to where the road crosses that way, where a crossroads is. Get there be sure to get there just a little ‘ fore 12 that night so you know you’ll be there. You have your guitar and be playing a piece there by yourself…A big black man will walk up there and take your guitar and he’ll tune it. And then he’ll play a piece and hand it back to you. That’s the way I learned to play anything I want.”

Evidence in His Songs

In Crossroad Blues, Robert sang:

“I went to the crossroads, fell down on my knees/I went to the crossroads, fell down on my knees/I asked the Lord above, have mercy, save poor Bob if you please/Uumb, standing at the crossroads I tried to flag a ride/Standing at the crossroads I tried to flag a ride/Ain’t nobody seem to know me, everybody pass me by.”

In Hell Hound On My Trail, he shows fear of the devil.

In Me and the Devil, he sang:

“Early this morning when you knocked upon my door/Early this morning, umb, when you knocked upon my door/And I said, ‘Hello, Satan, I believe it’s time to go,” before leading into “You may bury my body down by the highway side/You may bury my body, uumh, down by the highway side/So my old evil spirit can catch a Greyhound bus and ride.”

It is possible that he made the whole thing up as a publicity stunt, but he mentions the Devil in six of his songs, so it is hard to tell. Many people have tried it, but some say you have to honestly really want to sell your soul, not just say you do.

Aftermath

The effects of the myth are still relevant today. You see references or re-enactments of the crossroads scene everywhere in pop culture. It was even documented in the film Crossroads.

Robert Johnson is a great musician, and the folklore behind him just adds to his popularity.

Did he really do it, though? Did he really disappear, sell his soul to the Devil, and gain super-natural musical prowess? Or did he just learn really fast? For now, no-one will ever know. Sometimes it is fun to believe something like this could happen. Either way, it makes a good story. For those that believe in the supernatural, this seems a lot more possible than others. Johnson died at a young age, maybe the Devil was behind it all.


from classicrockencyclopedia.blogspot

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March 3, 2009 Posted by | Music_Blues, Robert Johnson, _ARTICLE, _MUSIC | 2 Comments

Me and the Devil Blues: The Unreal Life of Robert Johnson Vol. 1 (Del Rey) by Akira Hiramoto

Very interesting one this!

A manga comic book exploring the fascinating life of the enigmatic Blues God, Robert Johnson!

Yap! Manga! Really!

We want this Mr Publisher! Send us a copy now!!

https://i2.wp.com/www.basugasubakuhatsu.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2008/07/me-and-the-devil-blues-1.jpg

johnson1.jpg Me and the Devil Blues: The Unreal Life of Robert Johnson Vol. 1 (Del Rey)

This dark and fantastic manga explores the life of Robert Johnson, the Depression-era musician who (supposedly) sold his soul to the Devil to become the greatest Blues player who ever lived.


526 pgs. B&W; $19.95

(W / A: Akira Hiramoto)


by Elizabeth Schweitzer

Friday, 14 November 2008

In 1929 life was hard for everyone, but even more so for the poor blacks who lived in the Mississippi Delta. Robert Johnson is one of them, a soon-to-be father trying desperately to make out a life for himself and his wife.

Unfortunately for RJ, as he’s known, he has a small addiction problem—the Blues. He sneaks away every night to the juke, plinking away on his guitar, aspiring to be one of the best but only coming out a laughingstock. The Blues are his only shot at a way out of Mississippi, and he’s willing to do almost anything to make his dream come true, even if that means taking his battered old guitar to the crossroads at midnight. Legend has it if a man does that, the Devil will appear, take your instrument, play it and hand it back.

The cover to Me and the Devil Blues by Akira Hiramoto. Click for a larger image.You’d walk away an expert bluesman … but you’d have also just sold your soul. Which is exactly what Johnson did. But he soon learns that playing with hellfire will get you burned, as his talents get him into a whirlwind of trouble. Irate plantation owners, gangsters, and a lynch-crazy town are soon all after the bluesman, who has even bigger worries when his playing had starts acting extremely strange.

Hiramoto’s dark and fantastic manga Me and the Devil Blues re-imagines the life of famed blues musician Robert Johnson like nothing I’ve read before. Every detail is so stunningly laid out, every nuance and bead of sweat so expertly placed you wonder if Johnson’s story might just be the real thing. From his bleak and barren wooden flat in the Mississippi plantation to the dusty and strictly dry Prohibition town, Hiramoto lavishly draws everything on oversized pages leaving no line carelessly drawn. And just when you’re starting to think, “oh I wonder if he is going to encounter this”…it happens.

The cover to Me and the Devil Blues by Akira Hiramoto. Click for a larger image.I suspect a preponderance of research went into Me and the Devil Blues, not just because of the story itself, but also with the clarity of artwork and dialogue as well. The characters speak with a Southern twang or Delta dialect so easily it’s a marvel to think this was originally written in Japanese at all.

The interaction between the characters, especially portraying the hierarchy between different classes of people and the tension Johnson faces whenever he crosses paths with whites, is also expertly shown; not so heavy-handed as to be dismissible or clichéd, but woven so well into the dialogue that reading becomes a window into the Depression-era South.

As for the artwork, Hiramoto has a sort of soft realism, where elements of manga style can be seen, but the realistic rendering lends authority to the story. As I read, I swore that I was as hot and tired as Johnson toiling beneath the scorching Mississippi sun; that I could smell the smoke and bitter whiskey of the juke; that the chalky dust of a dying town burned my nose as well. Hiramoto’s shading and tones set the mood of Devil Blues throughout, and his liberal use of full pages emphasized the dramatic nature of the manga as well as made for easy reading.

Even though Devil Blues went for a whopping 526 pages, I was stunned when it ended in a cliff-hanger, and only then realized that this was volume one. This manga is a fantastic read, with a gripping story, outstanding artwork, and wonderful writing. It made me want to know more about Robert Johnson; whether he ever did claim to sell his soul to the Devil and what his music sounds like. I would definitely recommend it. This book is for music lovers, for horror lovers, for anyone who likes a good story, and for those who have the Blues or just want to have a taste of them. Just be sure to hang on to your soul.




November 20, 2008 Posted by | Music_Blues, Robert Johnson, _LITERATURE, _MANGA, _MUSIC | Leave a comment

Eric Clapton Discography (45 CD lossless)

Eric Clapton Discography
Rock, Blues | 45 CD | 1965-2006 | Flac | 23 GB | RS; text file with links

All thanks to olelele for this stupendous collection!

Eric Patrick Clapton, CBE (born 30 March 1945), is an English blues-rock guitarist, singer, songwriter and composer. He is “probably most famous for his mastery of the Stratocaster guitar”.

He was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame as a member of The Yardbirds, of Cream, and as a solo performer. Often viewed by critics and fans alike as one of the greatest guitarists of all time, Clapton was ranked fourth in Rolling Stone Magazine’s list of the “100 Greatest Guitarists of All Time” and #53 on their list of the Immortals: 100 Greatest Artists of All Time.

Although Clapton’s musical style has varied throughout his career, it has remained rooted in the blues. Despite this focus he is credited as an innovator in a wide variety of genres, including blues-rock (with John Mayall & the Bluesbreakers and The Yardbirds) and psychedelic rock (with Cream). Clapton’s chart success was also not limited to the blues, with chart-toppers in Delta blues (Me and Mr. Johnson), pop (“Change the World”) and reggae (Bob Marley’s “I Shot the Sheriff”). One of his most successful recordings was the hit love song “Layla”, which he played with the band Derek and the Dominos.

D I S C O G R A P H Y
1964: Sonny Boy Williamson and The Yardbirds
Tracks:

1) Bye Bye Bird 2) Mister Downchild 3) 23 Hours Too Long
4)Out On The Water Coast 5) Baby Don’t Worry 6) Pontiac Blues
7)Take It Easy Baby 8)I Don’t Care No More 9)Do The Weston

1965: For Your Love (Yardbirds)
Tracks:

1) For Your Love 2) I’m Not Talking 3) Putty (In Your Hands)
4) I Ain’t Got You 5) Got To Hurry 6) I Ain’t Done Wrong 7) I Wish You Would
8) A Certain Girl 9) Sweet Music 10) Good Morning Little Schoolgirl 11) My Girl Sloopy

1965: Having A Rave Up (Yardbirds)
Tracks:

1) Mr You’re A Better Man Than I 2) Evil Hearted You 3) I’m A Man
4) Still I’m Sad 5) Heart Full Of Soul 6) Train Kept A-Rollin’ 7) Smokestack Lightning
8) Respectable 9) I’m A Man 10) Here ‘Tis.

1966: With Eric Clapton (John Mayall’s Bluesbreakers)
Tracks:

1) All Your Love 2) Hideaway 3) Little Girl 4) Another Man
5) Double Crossin’ Time 6) What’d I Say 7) Key To Love 8) Parchman Farm
9) Have You Heard 10) Ramblin’ On My Mind 11) Steppin’ Out 12) It Ain’t Right.

1966: Fresh Cream (Cream)
Tracks:

1) I Feel Free 2) N. S. U. 3) Sleepy Time Time 4) Dreaming 5) Sweet Wine
6) Spoonful 7) Cat’s Squirrel 8) Four Until Late
9) Rollin’ And Tumblin’ 10) I’m So Glad 11) Toad

1967: Disraeli Gears (Cream)
Tracks:

1) Strange Brew 2) Sunshine Of Your Love 3) World Of Pain
4) Dance The Night Away 5) Blue Condition 6) Tales Of Brave Ulysses
7) Swlabr 8) We’re Going Wrong 9) Outside Woman Blues
10) Take It Back 11) Mother’s Lament.

1968: Wheels Of Fire (Cream)
Tracks:

1) White Room 2) Sitting On Top Of The World 3) Passing The Time
4) As You Said 5) Pressed Rat And Warthog 6) Politician 7)
Those Were The Days 8) Born Under A Bad Sign 9) Deserted Cities Of The Heart
10) Crossroads 11) Spoonful 12) Traintime 13) Toad.

1969: Goodbye Cream (Cream)
Tracks:

1) I’m So Glad 2) Politician 3) Sitting On Top Of The World 4) Badge
5) Doing That Scrapyard Thing 6) What A Bringdown 7) Anyone For Tennis.

1969: Blind Faith (Blind Faith)
Tracks:

1) Had To Cry Today 2) Can’t Find My Way Home 3) Well All Right
4) Presence Of The Lord 5) Sea Of Joy 6) Do What You Like.

1970: On Tour With Eric Clapton (Delaney & Bonnie & Friends)
Tracks:

1)Things Get Better 2)Poor Elijah 3)Only You Know and I Know
4)I Don’t Want to Discuss It 5)That’s What My Man Is For
6)Where There’s a Will There’s a Way
7)Comin’ Home 8)Little Richard Medley

1970: Live Cream (Cream)
Tracks:

1) N. S. U. 2) Sleepy Time Time 3) Sweet Wine 4) Rollin’ And Tumblin’ 5) Lawdy Mama.

1972: Live Cream Volume II (Cream)
Tracks:

1) Deserted Cities Of The Heart 2) White Room 3) Politician
4) Tales Of Brave Ulysses 5) Sunshine Of Your Love 6) Steppin’ Out.

1970: Eric Clapton
Tracks:

1) Slunky 2) Bad Boy 3) Lonesome And A Long Way From Home
4) After Midnight 5) Easy Now 6) Blues Power 7) Bottle Of Red Wine
8) Lovin’ You Lovin’ Me 9) I’ve Told You For The Last Time
10) Don’t Know Why 11) Let It Rain.

1970: Layla And Other Assorted Love Songs (Derek and the Dominos)
Tracks:

1) I Looked Away 2) Bell Bottom Blues 3) Keep On Growing
4) Nobody Knows You When You’re Down And Out 5) I Am Yours 6) Anyday
7) Key To The Highway 8) Tell The Truth 9) Why Does Love Got To Be So Sad?
10) Have You Ever Loved A Woman 11) Little Wing
12) It’s Too Late 13) Layla 14) Thorn Tree In The Garden.

1970: Live At The Fillmore
Tracks:
CD I:
1) Got To Get Better In A Little While 2) Why Does Love Got To Be So Sad
3) Key To The Highway 4) Blues Power
5) Have You Ever Loved A Woman 6) Bottle Of Red Wine

Tracks CD II: 1) Tell The Truth 2) Nobody Knows You When You’re Down And Out
3) Roll It Over 4) Presence Of The Lord 5) Little Wing 6) Let It Rain 7) Crossroad

[i1973: Rainbow Concert
Tracks:

1) Layla 2) Badge 3) Blues Power 4) Roll It Over 5) Little Wing
6) Bottle Of Red Wine 7) After Midnight 8) Bell Bottom Blues
9) Presence Of The Lord 10) Tell The Truth 11) Pearly Queen
12) Key To The Highway 13) Let It Rain 14) Crossroads.

1974: 461 Ocean Boulevard
Tracks:

1) Motherless Children 2) Willie And The Hand Jive
3) Get Ready 4) I Shot The Sheriff 5) I Can’t Hold Out 6) Please Be With Me
7) Let It Grow 8) Steady Rollin’ Man 9) Mainline Florida 10) Give Me Strength.

1975: There’s One In Every Crowd
Tracks:

1) We’ve Been Told (Jesus Coming Soon) 2) Swing Low Sweet Chariot
3) Little Rachel 4) Don’t Blame Me 5) The Sky Is Crying
6) Singin’ The Blues 7) Better Make It Through Today
8) Pretty Blue Eyes 9) High 10) Opposites.

1975: E. C. Was Here
Tracks:

1) Have You Ever Loved A Woman 2) Presence Of The Lord 3) Drifting Blues
4) Can’t Find My Way Home 5) Rambling On My Mind
6) Further On Up The Road.

1976: No Reason To Cry
Tracks:

1) Beautiful Thing 2) Carnival 3) Sign Language 4) County Jail Blues
5) All Our Past Times 6) Hello Old Friend 7) Double Trouble
8) Innocent Times 9) Hungry 10) Black Summer Rain 11) Last Night.

1977: Slowhand
Tracks:

1) Cocaine 2) Wonderful Tonight 3) Lay Down Sally 4) Next Time You See Her
5) We’re All The Way 6) The Core 7) May You Never
8) Mean Old Frisco 9) Peaches And Diesel.

1978: Backless
Tracks:

1) Walk Out In The Rain 2) Watch Out For Lucy 3) I’ll Make Love To You Anytime
4) Roll It 5) Tell Me That You Love Me 6) If I Don’t Be There By Morning
7) Early In The Morning 8) Promises 9) Golden Ring 10) Tulsa Time.

1980: Just One Night
Tracks:

CD I
1) Tulsa Time 2) Early In The Morning 3) Lay Down Sally 4) Wonderful Tonight
5) If I Don’t Be There By Morning 6) Worried Life Blues
7) All Our Past Times 8) After Midnight
CD II:
1) Double Trouble 2) Setting Me Up 3) Blues Power
4) Rambling On My Mind 5) Cocaine 6) Further On Up The Road.

1981: Another Ticket
Tracks:

1) Something Special 2) Black Rose 3) Blow Wind Blow 4) Another Ticket
5) I Can’t Stand It 6) Hold Me Lord 7) Floating Bridge
8) Catch Me If You Can 9) Rita Mae.

1983: Money And Cigarettes
Tracks:

1) Everybody Oughta Make A Change 2) The Shape You’re In 3) Ain’t Going Down
4) I’ve Got A Rock ‘N’ Roll Heart 5) Man Overboard 6) Pretty Girl
7) Man In Love 8) Crosscut Saw 9) Slow Down Linda 10) Crazy Country Hop.

1985: Behind The Sun
Tracks:

1) She’s Waiting 2) See What Love Can Do 3) Same Old Blues 4) Knock On Wood
5) Something’s Happening 6) Forever Man 7) It All Depends 8) Tangled In Love
9) Never Make You Cry 10) Just Like A Prisoner 11) Behind The Sun.

1986: August
Tracks:

1) It’s In The Way That You Use It 2) Run 3) Tearing Us Apart 4) Bad Influence
5) Walk Away 6) Hung Up On Your Love 7) Take A Chance 8) Hold On
9) Miss You 10) Holy Mother 11) Behind The Mask 12) Grand Illusion.

1988: Crossroads 1
1989: Journeyman
Tracks:

1) Pretending 2) Anything For Your Love 3) Bad Love 4) Running On Faith
5) Hard Times 6) Hound Dog 7) No Alibis 8) Run So Far
9) Old Love 10) Breaking Point 11) Lead Me On 12) Before You Accuse Me.

1991: Rush
Tracks:

1) New Recruit 2) Tracks And Lines 3) Realization 4) Kristen And Jim
5) Preludin Fugue 6) Cold Turkey 7) Will Gaines 8) Help Me Up
9) Don’t Know Which Way To Go 10) Tears In Heaven.

1991: Back Home
1991: 24 Nights
Tracks:

CD I
1) Badge 2) Running On Faith 3) White Room 4) Sunshine Of Your Love
5) Watch Yourself 6) Have You Ever Loved A Woman
7) Worried Life Blues 8) Voodoo Man
CD II
1) Pretending 2) Bad Love 3) Old Love 4) Wonderful Tonight
5) Bell Bottom Blues 6) Hard Times 7) Edge Of Darkness.

1992: Unplugged
Tracks:

1) Signe 2) Before You Accuse Me 3) Hey Hey 4) Tears In Heaven
5) Lonely Stranger 6) Nobody Knows You When You’re Down And Out
7) Layla 8) Running On Faith 9) Walkin’ Blues 10) Alberta
11) San Francisco Bay Blues 12) Malted Milk 13) Old Love 14) Rollin’ And Tumblin’.


1994: From The Cradle
Tracks:

1) Blues Before Sunrise 2) Third Degree 3) Reconsider Baby
4) Hoochie Coochie Man 5) Five Long Years 6) I’m Tore Down
7) How Long Blues 8) Goin’ Away Baby 9) Blues Leave Me Alone
10) Sinner’s Prayer 11) Motherless Child 12) It Hurts Me Too
13) Someday After A While 14) Standin’ Round Crying
15) Driftin’ 16) Groaning The Blues.

1995: The Cream Of Clapton
Tracks:

1)After Midnight 2)Badge 3)Bell Bottom Blues 4)Blues Power 5)Cocaine
6)Cross Road Blues (Crossroads) 7)Hello Old 8)Friend 9)I Can’t Stand It
10)I Feel Free 11)I Shot The Sheriff 12)Knockin’ On Heaven’s Door
13)Layla 14)Let It Grow 15)Let It Rain 16)Presence Of The Lord
17)Promises 18)Sunshine Of Your Love 19)White Room 20)Wonderful Tonight

1996: Crossroads 2
Tracks:

CD I:
1) Walkin’ Down The Road 2) Have You Ever Loved A Woman
3) Willie And The Hand Jive/Get Ready 4) Can’t Find My Way Home
5) Driftin’ Blues/Rambling On My Mind 6) Presence Of The Lord
7) Rambling On My Mind/Have You Ever Loved A Woman 8) Little Wing
9) The Sky Is Crying/Have You Ever Loved A Woman/Rambling On My Mind
CD II:
1) Layla 2) Further On Up The Road 3) I Shot The Sheriff 4) Badge
5) Driftin’ Blues 6) Eyesight To The Blind/Why Does Love Got To Be So Sad?
CD III:
1) Tell The Truth 2) Knockin’ On Heaven’s Door 3) Stormy Monday
4) Lay Down Sally 5) The Core 6) We’re All The Way 7) Cocaine
8) Goin’ Down Slow/Rambling On My Mind 9) Mean Old Frisco
CD IV:
1) Loving You Is Sweeter Than Ever 2) Worried Life Blues 3) Tulsa Time
4) Early In The Morning 5) Wonderful Tonight 6) Kind Hearted Woman
7) Double Trouble 8) Crossroads 9) To Make Somebody Happy
10) Cryin’ 11) Water On The Ground.


1998: Pilgrim
Tracks:

1) My Father’s Eyes 2) River Of Tears 3) Pilgrim 4) Broken Hearted
5) One Chance 6) Circus 7) Going Down Slow 8) Fall Like Rain
9) Born In Time 10) Sick And Tired 11) Needs His Woman 12) She’s Gone
13) You Were There 14) Inside Of Me.

1998: From Yardbirds To Bluesbreakers
Tracks:

1)Chocker 2)I wish you would 3)Snake drive 4)For your love
5)Draggin’ my tail 6)A certain girl 7)Freight loader
8)Got to hurry 9)West coast idea

1999: Blues (Includes Bonus Disc Of Jams)

2000: Riding With The King (B.B.King)
Tracks:

1) Riding With The King 2) Ten Long Years 3) Key To The Highway
4) Marry You 5) Three O’Clock Blues 6) Help The Poor 7) I Wanna Be
8) Worried Life Blues 9) Days Of Old 10) When My Heart Beats Like A Hammer
11) Hold On I’m Coming 12) Come Rain Or Come Shine.

2001: Reptile
Tracks:

1) Reptile 2) Got You On My Mind 3) Travelin’ Light 4) Believe In Life
5) Come Back Baby 6) Broken Down 7) Find Myself
8) I Ain’t Gonna Stand For It 9) I Want A Little Girl 10) Second Nature
11) Don’t Let Me Be Lonely Tonight 12) Modern Girl
13) Superman Inside 14) Son And Sylvia.

2002: One More Car One More Rider

Tracks:
CD I
1)Key To The Highway 2)Reptile 3)Got You On My Mind 4)Tears In Heaven
5)Bell Bottom Blues 6)Change The World 7)My Father’s Eyes
8)River Of Tears 9)Goin’ Down Slow 10)She’s Gone
CD II
1)I Want a Little Girl 2)Badge 3)Hoochie Coochie Man
4)Have You Ever Loved a Woman 5)Cocaine
6)Wonderful Tonight 7)Layla 8)Sunshine of Your Love
9)Over the Rainbow

2004: Me & Mr Johnson
Tracks:

1)When You Got a Good Friend 2)Little Queen of Spades 3)They’re Red Hot
4)Me and the Devil Blues 5)Traveling Riverside Blues 6)Last Fair Deal Gone
7)Stop Breakin’ Down Blues 8)Milkcow’s Calf Blues 9)Kind Hearted Woman Blues
10)Come on in My Kitchen 11)If I Had Possession Over Judgement Day
12)Love in Vain 13)32-20 Blues 14)Hellhound on My Trail

2005: Royal Albert Hall (Cream)
Tracks:

CD I
1) I’m So Glad 2) Spoonful 3) Outside Woman Blues 4) Pressed Rat & Warthog
5) Sleepy Time Time 6) N.S.U. 7) Badge 8) Politician 9) Sweet Wine
10) Rollin’ And Tumblin’ 11) Stormy Monday 12) Deserted Cities Of The Heart
CD II
1) Born Under A Bad Sign 2) We’re Going Wrong 3) Crossroads
4) White Room 5) Toad 6) Sunshine Of Your Love 7) Sleepy Time Time

2006: The Road To Escondido (J.J. Cale)
Tracks:

1)Danger 2)Heads in Georgia 3)Missing Person
4)When This War is Over 5)Sporting Life Blues 6)Dead End Road
7)It’s Easy 8)Hard to Thrill 9)Anyway the Wind Blows10)Three Little Girls
11)Don’t Cry Sister12)Last Will and Testament
13)Who am I Telling You? 14)Ride the River

2007: Complete Clapton

Eric Clapton – Clapton The Autobiography (Audiobook)

Big thanks to olelele

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October 11, 2008 Posted by | BB King, Blind Faith, Bluesbreakers, Cream, Derek and the Dominos, Eric Clapton, JJ Cale, John Mayall, Music_Blues, Music_ClassicRock, Robert Johnson, Sonny Boy Williamson, Yardbirds, _MUSIC | 1 Comment

Robert Johnson – The Legendary Blues Singer (FLAC /mp3)

Robert Johnson - The Legendary Blues Singer

Robert Johnson – The Legendary Blues Singer
FLAC (97 MB) | MP3 320 KBp/s (65 MB) | 32 min
Genre: Blues

The most legendary figure in all music, let alone the blues.

Every track here is a stone cold classic!

Tracklisting

01 – Kindhearted woman blues
02 – Sweet home Chicago
03 – Terraplane blues
04 – Phonograph blues
05 – Cross road blues
06 – Preaching blues (up jumped the Devil)
07 – I’m a steady rollin’ man
08 – Little queen of spades
09 – Drunken hearted man
10 – Me and the Devil blues
11 – Stop breakin’ down blues
12 – Love in vain

Download

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June 10, 2008 Posted by | Music_Blues, Robert Johnson, _MUSIC | Leave a comment

The Robert Johnson Notebooks

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His lyrics, which are commonly considered as only context to his music, are actually rich, tightly wrought poems worthy of intense literary examination.

This is an excellent micro-site established by the University of Virginia devoted to literary analysis of the works of the legendary Robert Johnson.

A Johnson fan could spend swathes of time in here!

The site contains background material for the course titled Mississippi in Story and Songs, at the University of Virginia.

Some snippets of Johnson’s greatness;

Traveling Riverside Blues

Cross Road Blues

http://xroads.virginia.edu/%7EMUSIC/blues/rjhome3.html

The Robert Johnson notebooks

Robert Johnson

On November 23, 1936, Robert Johnson recorded his songs for the first time in San Antonio,Texas. This first of two sessions was unceremoniously squeezed between W.Lee O’Daniel & His Hillbilly Boys the day before, and Hermanas Barazacon guitarras the day after. Yet out of this modest recording session,after which Robert Johnson collected his money and disappeared again into the wilds of the Mississippi Delta, came a powerful and unique sound which forever changed music in America.

The vitality of Robert Johnson’s music has been reaffirmed by the many remakes of his songs,from such diverse artists as Lee Roy Parnell to Eric Clapton to the Red Hot Chili Peppers.Moreover, his music influenced artists such as Muddy Waters, who in turn advanced the birth of rock’n’roll. But it is not just Johnson’s incredible guitar playing or fantastically expressive singing which deserves homage. His lyrics, which are commonly considered as only context to his music, are actually rich, tightly wrought poems worthy of intense literary examination.

This is the objective of Victor Cabas’ ENTC 385 class, Mississippi in Story and Songs, at the University of Virginia. Mr. Cabas created the class “as an excuse to teach Robert Johnson,” and the class’s papers which come out of a period of listening to and recording observations in a literary notebook on Johnson’s songs are often the best that he gets for the entire session. The students analyze Johnson’s songs for devices such as alliteration, assonance, metaphor,simile, and even scan a stanza to get a feeling for each song’s unique meter.

This web site is designed to be not just a resource for material on Robert Johnson, for there are several of those on the WWW already. Instead, this site highlights the power of Robert Johnson’s words which are still resonant in contemporary America.

Robert Johnson Biography

https://i2.wp.com/content.answers.com/main/content/wp/en/8/8a/RobertJohson.jpgRobert Johnson was born on May 8, 1911 to Julia Major Dodds and Noah Johnson in Hazelhurst, Mississippi. Until his late adolescence, his name was Robert Spencer after his stepfather, who had to change his name from Dodds to Spencer when he ran from Mississipi after a personal vandetta with the Marchetti Brothers (Lavere 7). Johnson took the name of his natural father as a teenager, even though he had not met him.

Music was a long-time interest for Johnson, and his first instruments were the Jew’s harp and the harmonica. Before he became seriously involved with the guitar, he married Virginia Travis in February 1929, and the young couple soon became expectant parents. But tragedy struck when Virginia, only sixteen years old, died in childbirth in 1930.

Around June of 1930, blues musician Son House came to Mississippi. His music deeply affected Johnson, for it was the “rawest, most direct pure emotion Robert had ever heard, and he followed House and [Willie] Brown wherever they went” (Lavere 11). But Johnson did not appear to be gifted with a musician’s talent for guitar, as Son House asserts, ” Such another racket you never heard! It’d make people mad, you know. They’d come out and say, “Why don’t y’all go in there and get that guitar from that boy!” (Cobb 289).

Unhappy and unwilling to be caught in the sharecropper’s world of backbreaking work with little reward, Johnson left the regular scene around Robinsonville, Mississippi and went to Hazelhurst, MS. There he played at the “jook joints of the road gangs and lumber camps,” and found a “kind and loving woman more than ten years his senior” named Calletta “Callie” Craft (Lavere 11). The couple was married in May 1931, but they kept the marriage a secret.

This time in Southern Mississippi was very important for Johnson, because his musical talent came to fruition. When he returned to Robunsonville, Son House and Willie Brown were astounded by his development (Lavere 13). Rumors began about Johnson trading his soul to the devil in exchange for the guitar expertise. His career took off.

In performance, Johnson played his own songs as well as those of other bluesmen and generally popular music by performers such as Bing Crosby. When he made up his mind to record, in 1936, he approached H. C. Speirs, a white record store owner in Jackson, MS. Speirs sent him to Ernie Oertle, an ARC scout. Oertle and Johnson went to San Antonio late in November 1936, where, in 5 days, he recorded Kindhearted Woman Blues, I Believe I’ll Dust My Broom, Sweet Home Chicago, Rambling On My Mind, When You Got a Good Friend, Come On In My Kitchen, Terraplane Blues, Phonograph Blues, 32-20 Blues, They’re Red Hot, Dead Shrimp Blues, Cross Road Blues, Walking Blues, Last Fair Deal Gone Down, Preaching Blues (Up Jumped the Devil), and If I Had Possession Over Judgment Day. When he was done, he returned home to Mississippi.

Johnson returned to recording in June of 1937, this time in Dallas. He did two takes each of Hellhound On My Trail, Little Queen of Spades, Malted Milk, Drunken Hearted Man, Me and the Devil Blues, Stop Breakin’ Down Blues, Traveling Riverside Blues, and Honeymoon Blues, and three takes of Milkcow’s Calf Blues, and four takes of Love in Vain.

During the next year, Johnson traveled to such places as St. Louis, Memphis, and back home to the Delta. On Saturday night, August 13, 1938 at a jook joint named Three Forks, Johnson played his last gig. Of the many rumors concerning Johnson’s death in 1938 (stabbing, poison, the devil catching up with him), poisoning is the most prevalent and most substantiated. His death certificate was found in 1968, verifying his death in Greenwood, Mississippi. He is buried at a small church in Morgan City, MS, which is near Greenwood. It was soon after Johnson’s death, but before the news was wide-spread, that John Hammond began looking for Johnson to perform at Carnegie Hall in a “From Spirituals to Swing” concert.

In 1990, Columbia reissued Johnson’s recordings in their Roots ‘n’ Blues series. Johnson was featured on a U.S. Post Office stamp in 1994. Johnson’s songs have been recorded by artists as diverse as Lee Roy Parnell and the Red Hot Chili Peppers. Johnson’s poetry is currently being taught at the University level, in particular, Victor Cabas’ “Mississippi in Story and Song” at the University of Virginia.


The Songs

April 22, 2008 Posted by | Music_Blues, Robert Johnson, _MUSIC, _POETRY | Leave a comment

Robert Johnson : Trick the Devil – Austin Tx

Players hope to get Robert Johnson show right, down to the strum

Play explores the life behind the legendary blues guitarist

http://www.austin360.com/arts/

https://i1.wp.com/www.cascadeblues.org/Legends/RobertJohnson/RobertJohnson.jpgIt’s hard portraying a guitar hero in a guitar town.Just ask Aaron Alexander. The energetic 20-something Austin actor admits to plenty of anxiety about playing the legendary blues guitarist in “Robert Johnson: Trick the Devil,” the critically acclaimed off-Broadway play by Bill Harris that opens today at the Rollins Studio Theatre at the Long Center for a two-week run. The play, a joint project of ProArts Collective and Austin Community College, examines the last days of Johnson’s short, mysterious life.

“I don’t play guitar,” Alexander says as he gets ready for a recent rehearsal. “I don’t actually have to play the guitar in this show. But I do have to hold it, strum it and make it a part of my character.”

He pauses. Then inhales quickly, his voice rising a pitch. “And do you know how scary it is to try do that in a town where everybody knows everything about the guitar or plays the guitar?”

Alexander doesn’t have a wealth of historical reference to build his character on. Neither do any scholars.

Johnson — whom Eric Clapton called “the most important blues musician who ever lived” — was born in poverty in 1911 in Hazelhurst, Miss. He spent his life as an itinerant blues musician traveling the Delta, playing small honky-tonks and on the street. Johnson recorded only 29 songs, in two recording sessions — the first in 1936 in San Antonio, the second in 1937 in Dallas. He died in 1938, reportedly poisoned, though the details of his death are disputed. His legacy wasn’t widely known until musicians and scholars in the 1960s began to resurrect his story and record his music.

“I’ve got the only two known photographs of Johnson on my iPod,” Alexander says, flashing the pair of grainy black-and-white images, one taken in a photo booth, the other a more formal portrait with Johnson in pinstripe suit. “It’s hard to know just who this man was.”

What is not disputed is that Johnson displayed an uncommon combination of singing, guitar skills and songwriting ability that has influenced generations of musicians. Eric Clapton, Bob Dylan, Jimi Hendrix, the Rolling Stones — all have proclaimed Johnson a progenitor of rock ‘n’ roll.

But musical legacy aside, there’s always been speculation on how Johnson went from harmonica-playing wing man to guitar genius seemingly overnight. The favorite myth? Johnson went down to the crossroads and sold his soul to the devil.

“Harris’ play really is an attempt to give form to Johnson as a person,” director Marcus McQuirter of Austin Community College says. “There is so much mythology about Johnson we sometimes forget to consider him as just a man trying to live his life.”

“Trick the Devil” is the first ACC/ProArts collaboration to be staged in the Long Center’s new Rollins theater. Last year, the organizations’ joint production of “Funnyhouse of a Negro” received multiple nominations from the Austin Critics Table and netted a Best Director Award for McQuirter. “Trick the Devil” is a beneficiary of the Long Center’s “Boost” program, which waives theater rental fees for selected groups. “I heard such wonderful things about their production of ‘Funnyhouse for a Negro’; we were excited to know (this collaboration) wanted to use the Rollins,” says Tammie Ward, programming director for the Long Center.

McQuirter is excited about debuting in the Rollins. But like Alexander, he’s quick to admit he has a case of nerves when it comes to presenting a play about the so-called godfather of rock ‘n’ roll in the Live Music Capital of the World. “Did we get a guitar with the same number of frets as the one Johnson used?” he says. “You know someone in Austin is going to know that kind of thing.”

That’s probably true — Austin is a guitar town, after all.

April 22, 2008 Posted by | Music_Blues, OTHER_ARTICLE, Robert Johnson, _MUSIC, _OTHER | Leave a comment

Is This The Real Robert Johnson?

The thing about Robert Johnson was that he only existed on his records. He was pure legend.

Interesting piece about the king of Blues, from the great Uncut!

http://www.uncut.co.uk/music/robert_johnson/

The image “https://i1.wp.com/www.uncut.co.uk/media/images/robertjohnson2170107_W.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

Is This The Real Robert Johnson?


Uncut has found an ebay seller that purports to have found a third photograph of famous Delta bluesman Robert Leroy Johnson.

The listing by SDPhan in San Diego, California claims to have found the photograph whilst “at the swap meet digging through a photo album of old south delta type photos.”

Johnson’s history is infamously obscure, hardly anything certain is known about him apart from the fact that he recorded 29 songs and that he died young.

In his introduction to Alan Greenberg’s film script ‘Love In Vain: A Vision Of Robert Johnson,’ Martin Scorsese says, “The thing about Robert Johnson was that he only existed on his records. He was pure legend.”

There are only two known verified photographs of the musician, but this third one does bear some resemblance.

The seller has set the starting bid on the photograph at $795,000.00 but if it turns out to be genuine – it’s surely priceless.

We’ve looked closely at the existing pictures (one of which is pictured above on the left) and this new one (above, right) – without his fingers in view it becomes more tricky – but his right ear is very similar.

Also the first and alleged third picture both have the higher right eyebrow, dimple on chin and similar nose…

What do you think? Is this Robert Johnson?

April 2, 2008 Posted by | Music_Blues, Robert Johnson, _ARTICLE, _MUSIC, _OTHER | Leave a comment

Is This The Real Robert Johnson?

The thing about Robert Johnson was that he only existed on his records. He was pure legend.

Interesting piece about the king of Blues, from the great Uncut!

http://www.uncut.co.uk/music/robert_johnson/

//www.uncut.co.uk/media/images/robertjohnson2170107_W.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

Is This The Real Robert Johnson?


Uncut has found an ebay seller that purports to have found a third photograph of famous Delta bluesman Robert Leroy Johnson.

The listing by SDPhan in San Diego, California claims to have found the photograph whilst “at the swap meet digging through a photo album of old south delta type photos.”

Johnson’s history is infamously obscure, hardly anything certain is known about him apart from the fact that he recorded 29 songs and that he died young.

In his introduction to Alan Greenberg’s film script ‘Love In Vain: A Vision Of Robert Johnson,’ Martin Scorsese says, “The thing about Robert Johnson was that he only existed on his records. He was pure legend.”

There are only two known verified photographs of the musician, but this third one does bear some resemblance.

The seller has set the starting bid on the photograph at $795,000.00 but if it turns out to be genuine – it’s surely priceless.

We’ve looked closely at the existing pictures (one of which is pictured above on the left) and this new one (above, right) – without his fingers in view it becomes more tricky – but his right ear is very similar.

Also the first and alleged third picture both have the higher right eyebrow, dimple on chin and similar nose…

What do you think? Is this Robert Johnson?

April 2, 2008 Posted by | Music_Blues, OTHER_ARTICLE, Robert Johnson, _MUSIC, _OTHER | Leave a comment

Robert Johnson – The Complete Recordings (1990) 2CDs

Robert Johnson – The Complete Recordings (1990) 2CDs
MP3 | 160Kbps | RS.com | 63mb + 60mb | Front Covers

This two-CD box contains all 41 recordings Johnson made, including 12 alternate takes, and each cut remains a classic.

This set’s release in 1990 caused quite a stir, selling more than 500,000 copies, and, on the basis of endorsements from Eric Clapton and Keith Richards, introduced a great number of rock fans to Delta blues.

Amazingly, Johnson built his enormous legacy on the strength of just two recording sessions: the first session, in November of 1936, produced among others “I Believe I’ll Dust My Broom,” “Sweet Home Chicago,” “Cross Road Blues,” and “Walkin’ Blues,” making it perhaps the most influential single session in blues history.

“Robert Johnson to me was the most important blues musician that ever lived.”

– Eric Clapton

The irony of Robert Johnson’s superstar status is hard to miss. He was almost completely ignored by the music-buying public of his day, even in the market his records were aimed at. Yet in the present day, he’s practically the only country blues artist most people know about.

On one level, this is because of relentless championing by other blues artists, not least Eric Clapton. On another level, Johnson’s fame rests on the fact that he was able to write, or more properly pull together from his various mentors and influences, his songs and make them complete unto themselves. His songs have made an impact, and have been covered time and again by countless artists. That counts for something.

https://i2.wp.com/artfiles.art.com/images/-/Robert-Johnson---King-of-The-Delta-Blues-Poster-C10002428.jpegPart of who Robert Johnson was as a singer and songwriter is obscured by his legend, which has been retold so often it borders on cliche. But even after the hype has been dismissed, this box set shows Johnson as a powerful, innovative, soulful blues man, a great performer and a great songwriter (in the context of blues songwriting) with his own unique sound.

Johnson, like all musicians, was himself not without his influences. However, the interesting thing was that he managed to transform his influences and personalize them into his own vision of the blues, a blues that was one of the first steps away from country blues toward city blues – a vision that would eventually become Chicago blues.

It has been fashionable in blues circles to put Robert Johnson down recently, and to gripe about how Johnson’s influences should be as well known as he is. This is a valid point. However, Johnson became an influence himself, and as such, he still deserves a good deal of respect. This box set, which contains every recording he is known for, is a just tribute to a brilliant singer, songwriter and performer.

The remastering is surprisingly good, considering the sources. Johnson’s voice and guitar playing come through vividly and illustrate his wealth of talent. The only possible drawback to this box set, for the casual listener, is the number of alternate takes included.

They show that Johnson was an adept performer, because a lot of the alternates are similar to the “released” versions. This showed that he was no closet bluesman or flash-in-the-pan, but was adept at entertaining an audience. And to this day his guitar playing is astonishingly fluid and innovative. However, the repetitiveness of the alternate takes can become trying to people who are not students of the blues, and for the casual listener a single-disc set would probably be sufficient.

This box set, is, and remains, a worthy overview of a talent that received its due far too late. I would advise the listener not to be put off by people who would place Johnson’s influences over him, but to listen to Johnson on his own merits.

https://i1.wp.com/www.robertjohnsonbluesfoundation.org/images/rj_circle_lg.jpg

Robert Johnson & The Rolling Stones

Rolling Stones fans will be aware that a slew of songs on this recording have been covered by Mick and the boys, across various official releases, live shows, boots etc

1/7. When You Got A Good Friend – Dallas June 24, 1972 Rehearsal

1/10. Come On In My Kitchen – 1st Verse Sung by Mick Jagger in the movie “Performance”

1/14. 32-20 Blues – Dallas June 24, 1972 Rehearsal & – Keith Richards rehearsal Cabo San Lucas, December 18, 1983

2/6. Hellhound On My Trail – “Steel Wheels” Rehearsal, Air Studios Monserrat Carribean, March 29 – May 5, 1989

2/12. Me And The Devil Blues – 1st Verse Sung by Mick Jagger in the movie “Performance”

2/14. Stop Breakin’ Down Blues – “Exile On Main St.”

2/18. Love In Vain – “Let It Bleed”, “Get Yer Ya-Ya’s Out!”, & “Stripped”

Love In Vain was recorded by the Stones in sessions that took place between March 24-27, 1969 at Olympic Studios, in England. The song was released on December 5, 1969 on the “Let It Bleed” album and played live prior to the studio record release during the 1969 US Tour. It is a brilliant adaptation of Robert Johnson’s original.

The Stones release of the song precedes the Columbia release of additional Johnson sides that came out on the LP “King Of The Delta Blues Singers Vol. II”. Johnson originally recorded the song at The Blue Bonnet Hotel in San Antonio, Texas, in 1936. There are two takes of the Johnson song in existence.


Tracklisting


Disc 1:

1 Kindhearted Woman Blues (Take 1) 2:49
2 Kindhearted Woman Blues (Take 2) 2:28
3 I Believe I’ll Dust My Broom 2:57
4 Sweet Home Chicago 2:56
5 Rambling On My Mind (Take 1) 2:50
6 Rambling On My Mind (Take 2) 2:20
7 When You Got A Good Friend (Take 1) 2:36
8 When You Got A Good Friend (Take 2) 2:50
9 Come On In My Kitchen (Take 1) 2:49
10 Come On In My Kitchen (Take 2) 2:42
11 Terraplane Blues 2:58
12 Phonograph Blues (Take 1) 2:38
13 Phonograph Blues (Take 2) 2:31
14 32-20 Blues 2:47
15 They’re Red Hot 2:56
16 Dead Shrimp Blues 2:29
17 Cross Road Blues (Take 1) 2:37
18 Cross Road Blues (Take 2) 2:27
19 Walking Blues 2:27
20 Last Fair Deal Gone Down 2:37

Disc 2:

1 Preaching Blues (Up Jumped The Devil) 2:48
2 If I Had Possession Over Judgement Day 2:33
3 Stones In My Passway 2:26
4 I’m A Steady Rollin’ Man 2:34
5 From Four Till Late 2:22
6 Hellhound On My Trail 2:34
7 Little Queen Of Spades (Take 1) 2:10
8 Little Queen Of Spades (Take 2) 2:16
9 Malted Milk 2:20
10 Drunken Hearted Man (Take 1) 2:25
11 Drunken Hearted Man (Take 2) 2:25
12 Me And The Devil Blues (Take 1) 2:33
13 Me And The Devil Blues (Take 2) 2:30
14 Stop Breakin’ Down Blues (Take 1) 2:15
15 Stop Breakin’ Down Blues (Take 2) 2:20
16 Traveling Riverside Blues 2:44
17 Honeymoon Blues 2:15
18 Love In Vain (Take 1) 2:23
19 Love In Vain (Take 4) 2:15
20 Milkcow’s Calf Blues (Take 2) 2:15

Here be Bobby
RS.com:

File 1
File 2

thanks ostndr

The image “https://i0.wp.com/myimg.info/thumbs/opt0447042001205737261x.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

March 20, 2008 Posted by | Music_Blues, Robert Johnson, _MUSIC | Leave a comment

Robert Johnson – The Complete Recordings (1990) 2CDs

Robert Johnson – The Complete Recordings (1990) 2CDs
MP3 | 160Kbps | RS.com | 63mb + 60mb | Front Covers

This two-CD box contains all 41 recordings Johnson made, including 12 alternate takes, and each cut remains a classic.

This set’s release in 1990 caused quite a stir, selling more than 500,000 copies, and, on the basis of endorsements from Eric Clapton and Keith Richards, introduced a great number of rock fans to Delta blues.

Amazingly, Johnson built his enormous legacy on the strength of just two recording sessions: the first session, in November of 1936, produced among others “I Believe I’ll Dust My Broom,” “Sweet Home Chicago,” “Cross Road Blues,” and “Walkin’ Blues,” making it perhaps the most influential single session in blues history.

“Robert Johnson to me was the most important blues musician that ever lived.”

– Eric Clapton

The irony of Robert Johnson’s superstar status is hard to miss. He was almost completely ignored by the music-buying public of his day, even in the market his records were aimed at. Yet in the present day, he’s practically the only country blues artist most people know about.

On one level, this is because of relentless championing by other blues artists, not least Eric Clapton. On another level, Johnson’s fame rests on the fact that he was able to write, or more properly pull together from his various mentors and influences, his songs and make them complete unto themselves. His songs have made an impact, and have been covered time and again by countless artists. That counts for something.

https://i2.wp.com/artfiles.art.com/images/-/Robert-Johnson---King-of-The-Delta-Blues-Poster-C10002428.jpegPart of who Robert Johnson was as a singer and songwriter is obscured by his legend, which has been retold so often it borders on cliche. But even after the hype has been dismissed, this box set shows Johnson as a powerful, innovative, soulful blues man, a great performer and a great songwriter (in the context of blues songwriting) with his own unique sound.

Johnson, like all musicians, was himself not without his influences. However, the interesting thing was that he managed to transform his influences and personalize them into his own vision of the blues, a blues that was one of the first steps away from country blues toward city blues – a vision that would eventually become Chicago blues.

It has been fashionable in blues circles to put Robert Johnson down recently, and to gripe about how Johnson’s influences should be as well known as he is. This is a valid point. However, Johnson became an influence himself, and as such, he still deserves a good deal of respect. This box set, which contains every recording he is known for, is a just tribute to a brilliant singer, songwriter and performer.

The remastering is surprisingly good, considering the sources. Johnson’s voice and guitar playing come through vividly and illustrate his wealth of talent. The only possible drawback to this box set, for the casual listener, is the number of alternate takes included.

They show that Johnson was an adept performer, because a lot of the alternates are similar to the “released” versions. This showed that he was no closet bluesman or flash-in-the-pan, but was adept at entertaining an audience. And to this day his guitar playing is astonishingly fluid and innovative. However, the repetitiveness of the alternate takes can become trying to people who are not students of the blues, and for the casual listener a single-disc set would probably be sufficient.

This box set, is, and remains, a worthy overview of a talent that received its due far too late. I would advise the listener not to be put off by people who would place Johnson’s influences over him, but to listen to Johnson on his own merits.

https://i1.wp.com/www.robertjohnsonbluesfoundation.org/images/rj_circle_lg.jpg

Robert Johnson & The Rolling Stones

Rolling Stones fans will be aware that a slew of songs on this recording have been covered by Mick and the boys, across various official releases, live shows, boots etc

1/7. When You Got A Good Friend – Dallas June 24, 1972 Rehearsal

1/10. Come On In My Kitchen – 1st Verse Sung by Mick Jagger in the movie “Performance”

1/14. 32-20 Blues – Dallas June 24, 1972 Rehearsal & – Keith Richards rehearsal Cabo San Lucas, December 18, 1983

2/6. Hellhound On My Trail – “Steel Wheels” Rehearsal, Air Studios Monserrat Carribean, March 29 – May 5, 1989

2/12. Me And The Devil Blues – 1st Verse Sung by Mick Jagger in the movie “Performance”

2/14. Stop Breakin’ Down Blues – “Exile On Main St.”

2/18. Love In Vain – “Let It Bleed”, “Get Yer Ya-Ya’s Out!”, & “Stripped”

Love In Vain was recorded by the Stones in sessions that took place between March 24-27, 1969 at Olympic Studios, in England. The song was released on December 5, 1969 on the “Let It Bleed” album and played live prior to the studio record release during the 1969 US Tour. It is a brilliant adaptation of Robert Johnson’s original.

The Stones release of the song precedes the Columbia release of additional Johnson sides that came out on the LP “King Of The Delta Blues Singers Vol. II”. Johnson originally recorded the song at The Blue Bonnet Hotel in San Antonio, Texas, in 1936. There are two takes of the Johnson song in existence.


Tracklisting


Disc 1:

1 Kindhearted Woman Blues (Take 1) 2:49
2 Kindhearted Woman Blues (Take 2) 2:28
3 I Believe I’ll Dust My Broom 2:57
4 Sweet Home Chicago 2:56
5 Rambling On My Mind (Take 1) 2:50
6 Rambling On My Mind (Take 2) 2:20
7 When You Got A Good Friend (Take 1) 2:36
8 When You Got A Good Friend (Take 2) 2:50
9 Come On In My Kitchen (Take 1) 2:49
10 Come On In My Kitchen (Take 2) 2:42
11 Terraplane Blues 2:58
12 Phonograph Blues (Take 1) 2:38
13 Phonograph Blues (Take 2) 2:31
14 32-20 Blues 2:47
15 They’re Red Hot 2:56
16 Dead Shrimp Blues 2:29
17 Cross Road Blues (Take 1) 2:37
18 Cross Road Blues (Take 2) 2:27
19 Walking Blues 2:27
20 Last Fair Deal Gone Down 2:37

Disc 2:

1 Preaching Blues (Up Jumped The Devil) 2:48
2 If I Had Possession Over Judgement Day 2:33
3 Stones In My Passway 2:26
4 I’m A Steady Rollin’ Man 2:34
5 From Four Till Late 2:22
6 Hellhound On My Trail 2:34
7 Little Queen Of Spades (Take 1) 2:10
8 Little Queen Of Spades (Take 2) 2:16
9 Malted Milk 2:20
10 Drunken Hearted Man (Take 1) 2:25
11 Drunken Hearted Man (Take 2) 2:25
12 Me And The Devil Blues (Take 1) 2:33
13 Me And The Devil Blues (Take 2) 2:30
14 Stop Breakin’ Down Blues (Take 1) 2:15
15 Stop Breakin’ Down Blues (Take 2) 2:20
16 Traveling Riverside Blues 2:44
17 Honeymoon Blues 2:15
18 Love In Vain (Take 1) 2:23
19 Love In Vain (Take 4) 2:15
20 Milkcow’s Calf Blues (Take 2) 2:15

Here be Bobby
RS.com:

File 1
File 2

thanks ostndr

//myimg.info/thumbs/opt0447042001205737261x.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

March 20, 2008 Posted by | Music_Blues, Robert Johnson, _MUSIC | 1 Comment

Hellhound On My Trail – Songs Of Robert Johnson (V.A) (2000)

Hellhound OnMy Trail – Songs Of Robert Johnson (V.A) (2000)

An interesting anthology celebrating the music of the great Robert Johnson.

Hellhound on My Trail collects versions of the master’s songs by such latter-day luminaries as Clarence “Gatemouth” Brown, Robert Lockwood Jr., and Joe Louis Walker, along with such relative newcomers as Alvin “Youngblood” Hart and Susan Tedeschi.

While few would argue that any of these are definitive versions, there are some nice additions to the Johnson cover canon.

Tracklisting

1. Crossroads (The Crossroad Blues) – Taj Mahal

2. Traveling Riverside Blues – David ‘Honeyboy’ Edwards

3. If I Had Possession Over Judgement Day – Chris Thomas King

5. Me And The Devil Blues – Eric Gales

6. Walkin’ Blues – Keith Brown

7. When You Got A Good Friend – Chris Thomas King

8. Kindhearted Woman Blues – Pinetop Perkins

9. Dust My Broom – Joe Louis Walker

10. Come On In My Kitchen – Chris Thomas King

11. Stones In My Passway – Lucky Peterson

12. Walking Blues – Susan Tedeschi

13. Hellhound On My Trail – James Cotton

14. Stop Breakin’ Down Blues – Carl Weathersby

15. Sweet Home Chicago – Pinetop Perkins

16. Milkcow’s Calf Blues – Robert Palmer


Here be Bobby J (kinda!)

http://www.shareonall.com/HOMT_zorc.rar

PW : vVv

Banzai !

March 16, 2008 Posted by | Music_Blues, Robert Johnson, Various_Artists, _MUSIC | 3 Comments

Hellhound On My Trail – Songs Of Robert Johnson (V.A) (2000)

Hellhound OnMy Trail – Songs Of Robert Johnson (V.A) (2000)

An interesting anthology celebrating the music of the great Robert Johnson.

Hellhound on My Trail collects versions of the master’s songs by such latter-day luminaries as Clarence “Gatemouth” Brown, Robert Lockwood Jr., and Joe Louis Walker, along with such relative newcomers as Alvin “Youngblood” Hart and Susan Tedeschi.

While few would argue that any of these are definitive versions, there are some nice additions to the Johnson cover canon.

Tracklisting

1. Crossroads (The Crossroad Blues) – Taj Mahal

2. Traveling Riverside Blues – David ‘Honeyboy’ Edwards

3. If I Had Possession Over Judgement Day – Chris Thomas King

5. Me And The Devil Blues – Eric Gales

6. Walkin’ Blues – Keith Brown

7. When You Got A Good Friend – Chris Thomas King

8. Kindhearted Woman Blues – Pinetop Perkins

9. Dust My Broom – Joe Louis Walker

10. Come On In My Kitchen – Chris Thomas King

11. Stones In My Passway – Lucky Peterson

12. Walking Blues – Susan Tedeschi

13. Hellhound On My Trail – James Cotton

14. Stop Breakin’ Down Blues – Carl Weathersby

15. Sweet Home Chicago – Pinetop Perkins

16. Milkcow’s Calf Blues – Robert Palmer

link dead
 

 

March 16, 2008 Posted by | Music_Blues, Robert Johnson, Various Artists, _MUSIC | Leave a comment