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Unmissable Rockumentaries


Some classics in this list of Unmissable Rockumentaries from djbrittman.blogspot.com

Who the fuck needs to go to over-priced gigs where the band’s about a mile away, where there are drunk assholes spilling drinks on you, where the beer costs an arm and a leg and tastes like piss, where you have to punch some moron for pinching your girlfriend’s ass, and where the bathroom – if you can find it – is blanketed with an ocean of urine and other unmentionables!

Stay home and watch these instead!

The seminal, magnificent, timeless Don’t Look Back has got to be on top of any list of music documentaries!

Not far behind – though not listed here – would be the infamous banned Stones film “Cocksucker Blues“, covering the band’s 1972 tour of the States in support of their greatest album Exile on Main Street.

The Rolling Stones – Cocksucker Blues extract

Another fine film in this genre which would be in our top ten is the Nick Cave & the Bad Seeds documentary The Road to God Knows Where (1990), a gritty film which explores the mundane reality of being a band touring the States in a bus!

Nick Cave & the Bad Seeds – The Road to God Knows Where (1990)


from djbrittman.blogspot.com

18. Wattstax (1973)

“A soulful expression of the Black experience,” comments Richard Pryor in the first of many personal interludes on this disc. Shot at the Los Angeles Convention, the ’72 Wattstax Music Festival commemorated the seventh anniversary of the Watts Riots. Funk, Soul, Blues, Gospel, or R&B, the tickets were a buck and was the “African-American answer to Woodstock”. The Bar-Kays get my vote for “Best Band Wardrobe Ever.” Check it out to remind you that Blues is where Rock came from.

17. The Decline of Western Civilization Pt. II: The Metal Years (1988)

The second installment of director Penelope Spheeris rock-u-trilogy explores the glam-metal scene of Los Angeles in the mid 80s. We are talking teased hair, tight pants, jangly jewelry, and plenty of eye shadow. And that’s just the guys! This is an era of excess: sleazy chicks, monster riffs, and doped-up dudes. Watch this film for an interview with Ozzy where he’s cooking breakfast and actually speaking coherently.

16. D.O.A. (1980)

Chronicling the formative years of punk, this one is a bit hard to come by. Much like a shower is hard to come by for anyone in this film. Containing mostly footage of the Sex Pistols (their only North American tour before disbanding), this is a grimy, low-budget glimpse at the turning tide of the punk movement. And that low budget reality is the exact reason why it’s worth watching.

15. Heavy Metal in Baghdad (2008)

From VICE, this documentary follows Acrassicauda, an Iraqi heavy metal band in the middle of “the shit”. Homeboys had their practice space hit with a SCUD missile. These guys aren’t playing to get laid. They are playing to get out of the warzone. Then get laid. Watch this doc because it’s just an incredible story.

14. American Hardcore– 2006

The real stand out quality of American Hardcore is the photography. And the fact that a lot of the founding members of the movement are still breathing. The film takes you through the formative years of the Hardcore scene, interviewing big names like Rollins, Flea, and Moby as well as the obscure yet iconic likes of Keith Morris and Brian Baker. Watch it to get educated.

13. Funky Monks (1992)

The Red Hot Chili Peppers hole up in Houdini’s haunted mansion with the world’s biggest vegan, Rick Rubin, to record Blood, Sugar, Sex, Magik. A penetrating look into the lives of the guys who once wore socks on their dorks. This clip shows a drum take from the song Breaking The Girl. Not since Sanford & Son has playing with trash worked so well. See if to remind you that dudes like Rick Rubin are what make Rock possible.

12. Stop Making Sense (1984)

This live performance by the Talking Heads, directed by the late Jonathan Demme*, is a no-frills affair. You soon realize that without said “gimmicks”, the performance speaks for itself. It’s also more of a conceptual concert movie than a rockumentary. There are no lasers, smoke machines, or quick cuts to bare breasts (unfortunately). Check it out to remind you how utterly acceptable it was to be a weirdo in the 80’s.

*Jonathan Demme has recently come back from the dead. He is a zombie.

11. End Of The Century: The Story of The Ramones (2004)

This is the definitive DVD of punk band The Ramones. Set over 22 years, the mop-topped rockers go from playing two-minute songs at CBGB’s to being inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. This clip is of Dee Dee Ramone’s brief venture into hip-hop. Classic. Hey! Oh! Let’s Go! (-to-the-video-store-and-learn-about-the-shirt-I-just-bought). Watch it so when you see people with the shirt on, you can know the story.

10. Tom Petty and The Heartbreakers: Runnin’ Down a Dream (2007)

Tom Petty has always reminded me of Martina Navratilova. This 2-disc set covers early Petty, the history of the Heartbreakers, interviews with the likes of Stevie Nicks, Dave Grohl, and Rick Rubin, leading to their 30th anniversary concert in Gainesville. Culture yourself with this four-hour collection. Because nobody wants to hear about the four hours you spent playing Medal of Honor. Also worth watching so you can understand where your parents are coming from.

9. DIG! (2004)

This film compiles seven years of footage following two bands– The Brian Jonestown Massacre and The Dandy Warhols, as they attempt to take over the music industry. BJM front man Anton Newcombe is an egomaniacal, wacky-costume wearing, 80-instrument playing, band-sabotaging, audience-kicking train wreck – and a pleasure to watch. The Dandy Warhols’ front man Courtney Taylor wears makeup and must navigate the treacherous road of dealing with major record companies. Watch it to remind you just how crazy the music industry really is.

8. Instrument- 10 Years With The Band Fugazi (2001)

If you know punk and Hardcore, you know Fugazi. You also know that the most mainstream they have ever gotten is email forwards falsely reporting the death of lead singer Ian MacKaye. Watch this doc to see how dedicated these guys are, and for a scene where MacKaye calls a punch-happy kid an “Ice Cream Eating Motherfucker.” It’s something I call my friends at least once a week.

7. The Fearless Freaks (2005)

This disc covers the formation of Oklahoma psych-rockers The Flaming Lips. Maybe dropping all that acid wasn’t such a bad idea. Every band (except The Strokes) had shitty day jobs. In this clip, front man Wayne Coyne re-enacts being held up while working at Long John Silver’s. Heads up to Unsolved Mysteries: cast cute Vietnamese children for your re-enactments. Watch it because it will keep you from ever shooting heroin, or moving to Oklahoma City.

6. I Am Trying To Break Your Heart (2002)

Wilco records their fourth album, Yankee Hotel Foxtrot. Idiots at the record label deem it “not poppy” enough. Album is released for free online and later goes on to sell over 500,000 copies and have music critics creaming in their jeans. This is that story. Fred Armisen (SNL) is in it too. See it for the story.

5. The Last Waltz (1978)

Martin Scorsese helmed this enthralling look into the final performance of folk group, The Band. What they lack in coming up with cool band names (or is it the coolest band name?), they make up for with killer on-stage collaborations, including Joni Mitchell, Neil Young, Muddy Waters, Eric Clapton, Ringo Starr, and more. See it because it’s Martin Scorsese, and way better than the Oldguyapalloza that was his recent Shine A Light.

4. Some Kind of Monster (2004)

Originally made to chronicle the recording of Metallica’s St. Anger, this disc explores what happens when “metal group” meets “group therapy”. Drummer Lars Ulrich has a sit-down with former Metallica guitarist, Dave Mustaine and the “talk it out” (not metal). Guitarist Kirk Hammett is allowed to suggest a lyric. He comes up with, “my life-style is my death-style.” See it because it shows you the totally damaging effects that giant piles of money can have on your development into adulthood. And also, it’s just a great fucking movie— think Step Brother’s but for real.

3. The Devil and Daniel Johnston (2005)

Meet Daniel Johnston. He writes songs and records them on a crappy boom box. He does his own artwork and hands out these cassettes. He was institutionalized when he thought he was possessed by the devil and diagnosed with manic-depressive psychosis and his songs are incredible. His story is unbelievable, particularly the part about going flying with his pilot father, removing the keys from the ignition while airborne, and tossing them out the window. Guess what happened? I’ll give you a hit—it rhymes with ‘clane prash.’ See it to remind you of the overlap of genius and insanity.

2. Gimmie Shelter (1970)

I went to a Rolling Stones concert when I was in 9th grade. My friend’s dad took us. He knew all of the songs. I thought it was one of the lamest things ever. It wasn’t until college that I appreciated The Stones and realized that back in the day, they were just fucking awesome, and really set the stage for every band that followed. Watching Gimmie Shelter helped me reach this understanding. Watch it to see the result of one of the biggest fails in concert history: agreeing to let the Hells Angels run security. Lets just say things got ‘stabby.’

1. Don’t Look Back (1967)

Filmmaker D. A. Pennebaker is one of the most influential documentarians of all time. He established a style that is still used to this day. He avoided structured interviews and captured intimate moments using handheld camera work while maintaining a fly-on-the-wall presence. As commonplace as it is today, it was a big deal when he followed Bob Dylan around for his 1965 tour in England. Although it doesn’t have the flash of other docs on this list, it takes the number one spot for being THE original. Watch it to appreciate the genera just a little more.

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We do not host any files here. We do not upload music files. If this post contains a link to content hosted elsewhere, this is content found by a simple search on the worldwide freedom web. However, if for some valid reason, you object to a link – or any content here – please let us know and we will remove it.

Any content linked to here is only meant as a taster for the original work itself and is posted on the strict understanding that anyone who downloads the taster, deletes said content within 24 hours. We would assume that these fans will then buy the original work and we greatly encourage them to do so.

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February 13, 2009 Posted by | Rolling Stones, The Band, Tom Petty, _BOB DYLAN, _CINEMA, _MUSIC | 8 Comments

The Band – I Shall be Released (Concert footage from 1970 )

We’ve already written about Dylan’s classic I Shall be Released.

Here, the Band – the first act to officially release a version of this wonderful song – perform their version in some great concert footage from 1970.

The Band recorded “I Shall Be Released” on their debut album, Music from Big Pink (1968), with Richard Manuel singing lead vocals, and Rick Danko and Levon Helm harmonizing in the chorus.

With a rough sound, seemingly chaotic arrangements, and a distinctive blend of country, rock, folk, classical, R&B, and soul, Music From Big Pink is generally considered one of the best albums by the Band. It would turn out to be a very influential album on generations of musicians.

NOTE:

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Any content linked to here is only meant as a taster for the original work itself and is posted on the strict understanding that anyone who downloads the taster, deletes said content within 24 hours. We would assume that these fans will then buy the original work and we greatly encourage them to do so.

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January 30, 2009 Posted by | The Band, _BOB DYLAN, _MUSIC, _VIDEO | Leave a comment

Bob Dylan & Elvis Costello : I Shall Be Released (with Chrissie Hynde & Carole King)

I see my light come shining from the west unto the east

A fascinating ensemble – including Bob Dylan, Elvis Costello, Chrissie Hynde and Carole King belt out Bob’s classic I Shall Be Released in the Brixton Academy, London on 31 March 1995. Great sound – pity though that the guy with the camera had just drunk a full bottle of Jack Daniels !



“I Shall Be Released” is a Bob Dylan classic
written in Spring 1967 in a period of frenetic creativity with the Band in the basement of their house in Woodstock.

Dylan recorded two primary versions, the first being the original Basement Tapes recording, captured in 1967 and released on the Bootleg Series 1-3 in 1991.

As Dylan recovered from injuries sustained in a motorcycle accident in July 1966, he summoned the Band – then known as the Hawks – and began to record both new compositions and traditional material with them. In a period of frantic creativity, Dylan and the Band recorded countless tracks in Spring 1967 in the basement of Big Pink, a house shared by three of the members of the Band.

In a matter of months, Dylan would record at least thirty new compositions with the Hawks, including some of the most celebrated songs of his career: “I Shall Be Released,” “This Wheel’s On Fire,” “Quinn the Eskimo (The Mighty Quinn),” “Million Dollar Bash,” “Tears of Rage,” “You Ain’t Goin’ Nowhere,” “Going To Acapulco,” “I’m Not There (1956),” “All You Have To Do Is Dream,” “Apple Suckling Tree” and others.



This material became the holy grail of Dylan bootlegs and was widely circulated amongst Dylan fans. No official material was then released though.

Some 24 of these tracks eventually saw official light of day in The Basement Tapes album by Bob Dylan and The Band, released in 1975 by Columbia Records.



By 1971, Dylan had gone into recluse mode, exhausted from the strains of public expectation and being the “voice of his generation”, along with trying to protect his young family from media and fan hounding.

Thus, as he was unlikely to release any new material for an extended period of time, CBS Records president Clive Davis proposed issuing a double LP compilation of older material.

Dylan agreed, suggesting that the package include a full side of unreleased tracks from his archives.

After submitting a set of excerpts from the Basement Tapes, which Davis found unsatisfactory, Dylan returned to the studio in September 1971 to recut several Basement songs, with Happy Traum providing backup. “I Shall Be Released” was one such track.

The Band recorded “I Shall Be Released” on their debut album, Music from Big Pink (1968), with Richard Manuel singing lead vocals, and Rick Danko and Levon Helm harmonizing in the chorus.

With a rough sound, seemingly chaotic arrangements, and a distinctive blend of country, rock, folk, classical, R&B, and soul, Music From Big Pink is generally considered one of the best albums by the Band, along with their 1969 second album The Band.

The album follows the band’s backing of Bob Dylan on his 1966 tour (as The Hawks) and time spent at a shared house in upstate New York recording what would become The Basement Tapes, also with Dylan.

The initial critical reception of the album was generally positive, though sales were slim; Al Kooper’s rave review of the LP in Rolling Stone helped draw public attention to it. The fact that Bob Dylan had composed three of the songs also helped to increase sales.



The basement recording sessions laid the foundation both for the approach of Dylan’s acclaimed 1967 album John Wesley Harding – the LP which marked Dylan’s return to acoustic music and traditional roots, after three albums of electric rock music – and for the Band finding their own voice on 1968’s Music from Big Pink.

The new Dylan style, a critically-acclaimed departure from the surrealist rock and roll he had recently pioneered on his milestone trio of albums from 1965 and 1966, was as much of a shock to his fans as were those records to his earlier folk audience.

Both the Basement tracks and Music From Big Pink would greatly influence the turn, by many contemporary popular musicians, away from the psychedelic music that reached its height in 1967, toward an embrace of country-influenced folk styles.

A legendary performance of the song was performed near the end of The Band’s farewell concert, The Last Waltz, in which all the night’s performers (with the exception of Muddy Waters) plus Ringo Starr and Ronnie Wood graced the same stage.



art by zewlean

Bob Dylan – I Shall Be Released

They say ev’rything can be replaced,

Yet ev’ry distance is not near.

So I remember ev’ry face

Of ev’ry man who put me here.

I see my light come shining

From the west unto the east.

Any day now, any day now,

I shall be released.

They say ev’ry man needs protection,

They say ev’ry man must fall.

Yet I swear I see my reflection

Some place so high above this wall.

I see my light come shining

From the west unto the east.

Any day now, any day now,

I shall be released.

Standing next to me in this lonely crowd,

Is a man who swears he’s not to blame.

All day long I hear him shout so loud,

Crying out that he was framed.

I see my light come shining

From the west unto the east.

Any day now, any day now,

I shall be released.


thanks Elston1969

NOTE:



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Any content linked to here is only meant as a taster for the original work itself and is posted on the strict understanding that anyone who downloads the taster, deletes said content within 24 hours. We would assume that these fans will then buy the original work and we greatly encourage them to do so.

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January 30, 2009 Posted by | Carole King, Chrissie Hynde, Elvis Costello, The Band, _BOB DYLAN, _MUSIC, _POETRY, _VIDEO | Leave a comment

Bob Dylan – Highway 61 Revisited

[highway+61+logo+song.bmp]

We’ll just put some bleachers out in the sun and have it on Highway 61


Track -Highway 61 Revisited
Album – Highway 61 Revisited
Released – August 30, 1965
Recorded – Columbia Studios, New York, June 15, 1965 – August 4, 1965
Genre – Rock, Folk rock
Length – 3:30
Label -Columbia
Writer -Bob Dylan
Producer -Bob Johnston

“Highway 61 Revisited” is the title track of Bob Dylan’s classic 1965 album Highway 61 Revisited

The track was also released as the B-side to the single “Can You Please Crawl Out Your Window?” later the same year.

by Pam Morrison

A little geography lesson first! Pay attention down there in the back!

U.S. Route 61 is the official designation for a United States highway that runs 1,400 miles (2,300 km) from New Orleans, Louisiana, to the city of Wyoming, Minnesota.

The highway’s northern terminus in Wyoming, Minnesota, is at an intersection with Interstate 35.

Prior to 1991, the highway extended north through Duluth, Minnesota to the United States-Canada border near Grand Portage, Minnesota.

Its southern terminus in New Orleans is at an intersection with U.S. Highway 90 (Tulane Avenue at South Broad Street), in front of the Orleans Parish Criminal Court.

The route was an important north-south connection in the days before the interstate highway system. Many southerners traveled north along Highway 61 to go to St. Louis.

Highway 61 ran through Duluth, Minnesota, where Bob grew up in the 1940s and 1950s, all the way down to New Orleans, Louisiana.

It was a major transit route out of the Deep South particularly for African Americans travelling north to Chicago, St Louis and Memphis, following the Mississippi River valley for most of its 1400 miles.

Many of the great Blues artists of the twentieth century – purveyors of what became known as Delta Blues and Chicago Blues – took that long trip along Highway 61 !

It was a route away from small-town life. Like the route the teenage Dylan would take from Duluth to finally get to the the big city.

It represented a metaphor for escape. For freedom.

by fabiansuave

The song has five stanzas. In each stanza, someone describes an unusual problem that is ultimately resolved on Highway 61.

In Verse 1, God tells Abraham to “kill me a son”. God wants the killing done on Highway 61. Rather interestingly, we’ve learned that Abraham is also the name of Dylan’s own father!

Verse 2 describes a poor chap called Sam, who is beyond the helping of the welfare department. He is told to go down Highway 61.

In the third verse, one “Mack the Finger” has this rather cryptic problem: “I got forty red white and blue shoe strings / And a thousand telephones that don’t ring”. “Louis the King” solves the problem with Highway 61.

Verse 4 is the seemingly incestuous tale of the “second mother” and the “seventh son”, both on Highway 61.

The fifth and final verse is the story of a bored gambler, trying “to create the next world war”. His promoter tells him to “put some bleachers out in the sun / And have it on Highway 61”. There is an evident political undertone in this absurd tale.

There is a pause in each verse while Dylan waits for some event in the story to finish; in the third verse, for example, the pause occurs while Louie the King attempts to resolve the shoestring-and-telephones problem. This gap in the singing is filled with Al Kooper’s imitation police siren sound effect.

The song has most famously been covered by Johnny Winter on his second album, Second Winter. Johnny has made Highway 61 Revisited a live standard of his, perhaps most notably performed at the 30th Anniversary Celebration concert, recorded in October, 1992 at Madison Square Garden in recognition of Bob Dylan’s 30 years as a recording artist.

The song was also been covered well by PJ Harvey on her excellent 1992 album, Rid of Me.

Dylan hero Johnny Cash recorded Highway 61 Revisited for the soundtrack to the 2003 film The Hunted. The song was also featured briefly in the Johnny Cash biopic Walk The Line.

In 2007 Karen O of the Yeah Yeah Yeahs contributed vocals to a fine punked up version of the song for the I’m Not There movie soundtrack.

Unfortunately though, there is also a version out there by the awful Billy Joel! Oh, the horror! I believe this is the welcoming song Satan plays to new arrivals in hell !

In 2004 the magazine Rolling Stone ranked Highway 61 Revisited as number 364 in their 500 Greatest Songs of All Time!

[hi+61+ILL_BE_ON_MY_WAY_by_jacchi.jpg]
by_jacchi


Oh God said to Abraham, “Kill me a son”

Abe says, “Man, you must be puttin’ me on”
God say, “No.” Abe say, “What?”
God say, “You can do what you want Abe, but
The next time you see me comin’ you better run”
Well Abe says, “Where do you want this killin’ done?”
God says, “Out on Highway 61.”

Well Georgia Sam he had a bloody nose
Welfare Department they wouldn’t give him no clothes
He asked poor Howard where can I go
Howard said there’s only one place I know
Sam said tell me quick man I got to run
Ol’ Howard just pointed with his gun
And said that way down on Highway 61.

Well Mack the Finger said to Louie the King
I got forty red white and blue shoe strings
And a thousand telephones that don’t ring
Do you know where I can get rid of these things
And Louie the King said let me think for a minute son
And he said yes I think it can be easily done
Just take everything down to Highway 61.

Now the fifth daughter on the twelfth night
Told the first father that things weren’t right
My complexion she said is much too white
He said come here and step into the light, he says hmm you’re right
Let me tell the second mother this has been done
But the second mother was with the seventh son
And they were both out on Highway 61.

Now the rovin’ gambler he was very bored
He was tryin’ to create a next world war
He found a promoter who nearly fell off the floor
He said I never engaged in this kind of thing before
But yes I think it can be very easily done
We’ll just put some bleachers out in the sun
And have it on Highway 61

Bob Dylan & The Band – Highway 61 Revisited – Aug 1969

Bob Dylan & The Band with a great performance of Highway 61 Revisited at the famous Isle of Wight Festival on 31 Aug 1969!

From: 5thdayofMay

Bob Dylan – Highway 61 Revisited – Portland, 1999

From: Osbil

Here’s a great unreleased version of the track from the H61 Sessions

HERE’S A LINK WE FOUND FOR THIS VIA A SIMPLE SEARCH ON THE WEB. WE DID NOT UPLOAD THIS FILE NOR DO WE KNOW WHO DID!

Sessions – Highway61Revisited.mp3

Big thanks to the original poster

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We do not host any files here. If this post contains a link to content hosted elsewhere, this is content found by a simple search on the worldwide freedom web. However, if for some valid reason, you object to a said content, or any content here, please let us know and we will remove the content in question.

Any content linked to here is only meant as a taster for the original work itself and is posted on the strict understanding that anyone who downloads the taster, deletes said content within 24 hours. We would assume that these fans will then buy the original work and we greatly encourage them to do so.

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November 18, 2008 Posted by | Music_ClassicRock, The Band, _BOB DYLAN, _CARTOON, _MUSIC, _PHOTOGRAPHY, _POETRY, _VIDEO | Leave a comment

The Band – The Last Waltz (Box Set)

The Band - The Last Waltz
The Band – The Last Waltz (Box Set)
Capitol Records | 1978 | Rock | MP3 | VBR, avg 238 kbps | 04:06:22 | 470 MB

The fully expanded version of the Band’s farewell swansong from 1976, of course, memorably captured on celluloid by Scorcese and with star guests ranging from Dylan to Young to Van to, well anybody who was anybody in the music world then -including Paul Butterfield, Eric Clapton, Neil Diamond, Ronnie Hawkins, Dr. John, Joni Mitchell, Ringo Starr, Muddy Waters, Ronnie Wood etc.

And best of all, here we get 17 tracks omitted from the official Capitol release!


Review by Bill Glahn

This review first appeared in the November ’95 Live! Music Review, a monthly publication providing quality reviews of the latest bootleg releases and more. Reproduced with permission from the author. See also Jonathan Katz’ article on the different versions of the Last Waltz.

A complete soundboard or film source is used for this elaborate four-CD set presenting The Band’s farewell show from Thanksgiving Day 1976 at the Winterland in San Francisco.

The concert was filmed by Martin Scorsese and a three-LP soundtrack was released with some songs eliminated and the sequence of performances shuffled around to give a better flow.

The Complete Last Waltz collects all the omitted tracks and is sequenced exactly as the concert was played.

The CDs packaging is just as exquisite as the original event. The four discs are contained in a book binder cover housing the CD “envelopes” as well as a copy of the Last Waltz guest welcome card. Also included are 36 pages of photos, liner notes, song and personnel listings, discographies and the like. Each binder is numbered and only 3,000 sets were pressed.

The recording is a solid one. It’s an unmixed soundboard, so even the released tracks have a slightly different flavour to them.

Some portions contain a “hum” indicating that this might be from film footage but it doesn’t intrude too badly.

The Complete Last Waltz is for those of you who just couldn’t be satisfied with a chopped version of The Band’s last show.

Here are the 17 tracks omitted from the official Capitol release:

    1. This Wheel’s on Fire
    Co-written with Dylan and found on Music From Big Pink, this version gets a deluxe orchestra and horn arrangement by Allen Toussaint.

    2. The W.S. Walcott Medicine Show
    From Stage Fright, Toussaint also arranges the horns to give this a better effect.

    3. Georgia on My Mind MPEG3-file (4.8 MB)
    No one can draw on their own personal sadness when singing a melancholy number better than Richard Manuel. The omission of this track from the official release is unpardonable.

    4. King Harvest
    Another favourite sadly left off The Last Waltz.

    5. Rag Mama Rag
    Dixieland seems to be the theme here. This is a radical departure from the studio version with Howard Johnson leading a horn section of clarinets and tubas with a good measure of honky tonk piano thrown in for good measure. Listed with Robbie Robertson as singer, but it sure sounds like Levon Helm to me.

    6. Caledonia
    Not many realise that this number is a Louis Jordan cover. Muddy Waters gets the call to do the lead vocal. Paul Butterfield adds some great harp playing to this version but isn’t listed.

    7. All Our Past Times
    Eric Clapton entered the proceedings with this number from his No Reason To Cry album and splits the lead vocal with Rick Danko.

    8. Four Strong Winds
    Neil Young covers this Ian Tyson song. It’s more interesting than “Helpless” which made the official album.

    9. Shadows & Light
    Joni Mitchell may be a great songwriter but she’s not a terribly strong performer. Left off the album with good reason.

    10. Furry Sings the Blues
    Joni Mitchell again.

    11. Acadian Driftwood
    A strong version with help from Neil Young and Joni Mitchell.

    12. Chest Fever
    Although this track was always a concert highlight, it just doesn’t work here. The heavy focus on horns instead of Robertson’s guitar takes all the guts out of it. The Band also seems uncomfortable with the arrangement. With these factors and its 12-min length, I can understand why it was excluded.

    13. Hazel
    Bob Dylan gives a simplistic reading of this cut from Planet Waves.

    14. I Shall Be Released
    Dylan and Richard Manuel share the vocals.

    15. Instrumental Jam #1
    This 12-min jam starts off with a drum duel between Ringo and Levon Helm before turning into a boogie-style guitar showcase with Ron Wood, Clapton, Young, Stephen Stills and Robertson.

    16. Instrumental Jam #2 AU file (292K)
    This is a slow blues featuring Garth Hudson’s keyboards and lasting over 17 mins.

    17. Don’t Do It
    The closing song of the show and an unforgivable exclusion from the official release for that reason alone. A set meant to close out a band’s career should have contained their final notes.

The Complete Last Waltz is a pricey affair but with such a large dose of worthwhile unreleased material, it is well worth the investment to those with more than a passing appreciation for The Band.


Wikipedia:

The Last Waltz was a concert by the Canadian-American rock group, The Band, held on Thanksgiving Day, November 25, 1976, at Winterland Ballroom in San Francisco. Billed as a “farewell” performance after 16 years of touring, the concert saw The Band joined by more than a dozen special guests, including Paul Butterfield, Eric Clapton, Neil Diamond, Bob Dylan, Ronnie Hawkins, Dr. John, Joni Mitchell, Van Morrison, Ringo Starr, Muddy Waters, Ronnie Wood and Neil Young.

The event was filmed by director Martin Scorsese and made into a documentary of the same name, released in 1978. The film features concert performances, scenes shot on a studio soundstage and interviews by Scorsese with members of The Band. A triple-LP soundtrack recording was issued in 1978. The film was released on DVD in 2002 as was a four-CD box set of the concert and related studio recordings.

The Last Waltz is hailed as one of the greatest concert films ever made.

Origins

The idea for a farewell concert came about early in 1976 after Richard Manuel was seriously injured in a boating accident. Robbie Robertson then began giving thought to leaving the road, envisioning The Band becoming a studio-only band, similar to The Beatles’ decision to stop playing live shows in 1966.

Though the other band members did not agree with Robertson’s decision, the concert was set at Bill Graham’s Winterland Ballroom, where The Band had made its debut as a group in 1969.Originally, The Band was to perform on its own, but then the notion of inviting Ronnie Hawkins and Bob Dylan was hatched and the guest list grew to include other performers.

The Band

The Band in 1968, left to right: Richard Manuel, Garth Hudson, Levon Helm, Robbie Robertson, and Rick Danko (photo by Elliot Landy)
The Band was a Canadian-American rock group, active from 1967 to 1976 and again from 1983 to 1999. It mainly consisted of Canadians Robbie Robertson (guitar, piano); Richard Manuel (piano, harmonica, drums, saxophone, organ); Garth Hudson (organ, piano, clavinet, accordion, synthesizer, saxophone); Rick Danko (bass guitar, violin, trombone), and an American Levon Helm (drums, mandolin, guitar, bass guitar).

The members of the Band first worked together as The Hawks, the backing band of rockabilly singer Ronnie Hawkins from 1959 until 1963; they were also known as Levon and the Hawks. (In about 1966, they released a single on Ware Records under the name the Canadian Squires). Afterwards, Bob Dylan recruited the group for his 1965-1966 world tour. They also joined him on the informal recordings that later became The Basement Tapes.

Dubbed “The Band” by their record company (a name derived from how they were referred to during their tenure with Dylan), the group left Saugerties, New York to begin recording their own material. They recorded two of the most acclaimed albums of the late 1960s; their 1968 debut Music from Big Pink (featuring the single “The Weight”) and 1969’s The Band. They broke up in 1976, but reformed in 1983 without founding guitarist Robbie Robertson.

Although the Band was always more popular with music journalists and fellow musicians than with the general public, they have remained an admired and influential group. They have been inducted into the Canadian Music Hall of Fame and the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. In 2004, Rolling Stone ranked them #50 on their list of the 100 Greatest Artists of All Time.[/color]

Tracklisting

Disc 1


01 – Theme From The Last Waltz
02 – Up On Cripple Creek
03 – The Shape I’m In
04 – It Makes No Difference
05 – Who Do You Love (With Ronnie Hawkins)
06 – Life Is A Carnival
07 – Such A Night (With Dr John)
08 – The Weight
09 – Down South In New Orleans (With Bobby Charles)
10 – This Wheel’s On Fire
11 – Mystery Train (With Paul Butterfield)
12 – Caldonia (With Muddy Waters)
13 – Mannish Boy (With Muddy Waters)
14 – Stage Fright

Disc 2

01 – Rag Mama Rag
02 – All Our Past Times (With Eric Clapton)
03 – Further On Up The Road (With Eric Clapton)
04 – Ophelia
05 – Helpless (With Neil Young)
06 – Four Strong Winds (With Neil Young)
07 – Coyote (With Joni Mitchell)
08 – Shadows And Light (With Joni Mitchell)
09 – Furry Sings The Blues (With Joni Mitchell)
10 – Arcadian Driftwood
11 – Dry Your Eyes (With Neil Diamond)
12 – The W.S. Walcott Medicine Show
13 – Tura Lura Lural (That’s An Irish Lullaby) (With Van Morrison)
14 – Caravan (With Van Morrison)

Disc 3

01 – The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down
02 – The Genetic Method
03 – Baby Let Me Follow You Down (With Bob Dylan)
04 – Hazel (With Bob Dylan)
05 – I Don’t Believe You (With Bob Dylan)
06 – Forever Young (With Bob Dylan)
07 – Baby Let Me Follow You Down Reprise (With Bob Dylan)
08 – I Shall Be Released
09 – Jam #1
10 – Jam #2
11 – Don’t Do It
12 – Greensleeves

Disc 4

01 – The Well
02 – Evangeline (With Emmylou Harris)
03 – Out Of The Blue
04 – The Weight (With The Staples)
05 – The Last Waltz Refrain
06 – Theme From The Last Waltz
07 – King Harvest Has Surely Come
08 – Tura Lura Lural (Rehearsal With Van Morrison)
09 – Caravan (Rehearsal With Van Morrison)
10 – Such A Night (Rehearsal With Dr John)
11 – Rag Mama Rag (Studio Ideas)
12 – Mad Waltz (Studio Ideas)
13 – The Last Waltz Refrain (Studio Ideas Instrumental Version)
14 – The Last Waltz Theme (Studio Ideas Sketch)


Links:

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June 10, 2008 Posted by | Music_ClassicRock, The Band, _BOB DYLAN, _MUSIC | 1 Comment

Bob Dylan & The Band – Before The Flood (Live)

Bob Dylan & The Band

Bob Dylan & The Band – Before The Flood (Live)
Label: Asylum | 1974 | Rock | MP3 | CBR 224 kbps | 01:32:15 | 166 MB

Label: Asylum, Columbia
Released: 20 June, 1974
Total Time: 01:32:15
Size: 165 MB (incl. 10% Recovery record)

“At its best, this is the craziest and strongest rock and roll ever recorded”

Before the tour even began, a live album release was already planned; a substantial number of the performances were professionally recorded.

When it came time to compile the album, most of these recordings were taken from the final three shows at the Los Angeles Forum in Inglewood, California.

After the tour ended, Rob Fraboni and Phil Ramone were both recruited to edit and mix the multitrack recordings so gained, drawing also on shows from New York City, Seattle, and Oakland.

The title of the album is thought to be taken from a novel (Farn Mabul) by Yiddish writer Sholem Asch; Dylan had a personal relationship with Moses Asch, son of Sholem and founder of Folkways Records. Another theory in regards to the album’s title is that the live album was released before the inevitable flood of bootlegs could surface, and saturate the underground market!!

A double album released on Dylan’s then-label, Asylum Records, it was a source of contention for The Band, who at the time were struggling to gather enough material to fulfill their contract with Capitol Records.

Before the Flood was a modest commercial success, reaching #3 in the U.S. and #8 in the UK.

Reviews for Before the Flood were generally positive as critical consensus was strong enough to place it at #6 in The Village Voice’s Pazz & Jop Critics Poll for 1974.

“At its best, this is the craziest and strongest rock and roll ever recorded,” wrote critic Robert Christgau in one of the more generous reviews. “All analogous live albums fall flat. The Rolling Stones are mechanical dolls by comparison, the Faces merely sloppy, the Dead positively quiet. The MC5 achieved something similar by ignoring musicianship altogether, but while the Band sounds undisciplined, threatening to destroy their headlong momentum by throwing out one foot or elbow too many, they never abandon their enormous technical ability.

In this they follow the boss. When he sounded thin on Planet Waves, so did they. Now his voice settles in at a rich bellow, running over his old songs like a truck.

I agree that a few of them will never walk again, but I treasure the sacrilege; Uncle Bob purveying to the sports arena masses. We may never even know whether this is a masterpiece.”

Christgau graded the album an A!

More Info: http://www.bobdylan.com/


Tracklisting

Disc 1

01 – Most Likely You Go Your Way (And I’ll Go Mine)
02 – Lay Lady Lay
03 – Rainy Day Women #12 And 35
04 – Knockin’ On Heaven’s Door
05 – It Ain’t Me, Babe
06 – Ballad Of A Thin Man
07 – Up On Cripple Creek
08 – I Shall Be Released
09 – Endless Highway
10 – The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down
11 – Stage Fright

Disc 2

01 – Don’t Think Twice, It’s All Right
02 – Just Like A Woman
03 – It’s Alright, Ma (I’m Only Bleeding)
04 – The Shape I’m In
05 – When You Awake
06 – The Weight
07 – All Along The Watchtower
08 – Highway 61 Revisited
09 – Like A Rolling Stone
10 – Blowin’ In The Wind

Liner Notes:

Bob Dylan — Guitar, Harmonica, Piano, Vocals

THE BAND
Robbie Robertson — Electric Guitar, Vocals
Garth Hudson — Clavinette
Levon Helm — Drums, Vocals
Richard Manuel — Piano, Electric Piano, Drums, Organ, Vocals
Rick Danko — Bass, Vocals

Phil Ramone/Rob Fraboni — Recording Engineers
Rob Fraboni/Nat Jeffrey — Mixing Engineers
Village Recorders — Mixing
Kendun Recorders — Mastering
Barry Feinstein — Photography, Design

Recorded Live In Concert

Big thanks to the original poster

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June 5, 2008 Posted by | Music_ClassicRock, The Band, _BOB DYLAN, _MUSIC | Leave a comment

I’m Your Teenage Prayer – Bob Dylan and The Band

https://i2.wp.com/parasitemort.joueb.com/images/crybaby.jpg

This is a real classic! Great fun! Not a bad song either! And like a blonde teenage hotty, probably knocked up in three minutes!!

This is also for those ignorant assholes who claim that Dylan is only a depressing po-faced mofo! If any of these morons deigned to listen, they would know that many of Bob’s many great songs are loaded with great dark humour!

Thanks to John Spettell who uploaded this great piece.

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Bob and the boys recorded this in response to Gloria Mann‘s 1955 hit “Teenage Prayer” (also famously recorded by Gale Storm in 1956) in which she sings “he is the answer to a teenage prayer.”


This was one of the legion of tracks famously recorded in the summer of 1967 in the basement of Big Pink in West Saugerties NY.


Bob and the lads are having some real fun here!

By the end of the song the boys are cracking each other up … and must have been feeling no pain.

Incidentally, “The Teenage Prayers,” an idie-Americana group from Brooklyn, took their name from this song.

-John Spettell

Take a look at me baby
(Just take a look at me baby)
I’m your teenage prayer
(You know I’m your teenage prayer baby)
Take a look at me baby
(Take a look over here baby)
I’m your teenage prayer
(I’m your teenage hair)
When it’s cloudy all the time
All you gotta do is say you’re mine girl
(Ohhh — )
I’ll come runnin’ to you anywhere
(Ohhh-ohhh-ohhh-ohhh)
Ah yeah oh you know I will
Take a look at me baby
I’m your teenage prehhhhhhhhh-ehhhhhhh

There’s something ineffable about the little exhalation at the end there — the little ahhh — and about Robbie Robertson’s repeated ad-lib, “I’m your teenage hair.” Dylan laughs every time he says it: what could be sillier, more senseless, more innocent than that? Yet that’s the whole of adolescent sex, and it could fit on a high school ring: I am your teenage hair.

The secret hidden in that perfect absurdity is as follows — what turns into sleaze as we age remains the stuff of discovery for kids: the first thrill, the breathless grope, the life-changing experience.

Meet me at the border late tonight, Dylan will say six years and a lifetime later to complete that circuit and consummate that come-on. But he’s older now. He’s been to Durango. He’s crossed the borderline of sleaze more than once, and the enticements are altogether darker, richer, more complicated than they were back in the basement.

-Devin McKinney (http://popwithashotgun.blogspot.com)


Personnel:

Bob Dylan – acoustic 12-string guitar, vocals
Rick Danko – bass, harmony vocals
Garth Hudson – organ, recording engineer
Richard Manuel – drums, harmony vocals, vocal asides
Robbie Robertson – electric guitar

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June 2, 2008 Posted by | Music_ClassicRock, The Band, _BOB DYLAN, _MUSIC, _VIDEO | 2 Comments