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The Byrds & Bob Dylan and pals – "He Was A Friend Of Mine"

An excellent and rare find this!

An all-star performance from the Roy Orbison tribute gig on 2/24/1990 – the evening performance.


Dylan seems to be a tad lost though with the keys and notes! He never was a great actor!

Thanks to poster mcd220 who says;

Watch Crosby give Bob the chords. 🙂

Hey! I didn’t write this man!!

ALSO; check out the Vox “Series 90” amplifier!!

John Jorgenson on Mandolin. 🙂

Enjoy.

Join The Byrds Yahoo! group: http://launch.groups.yahoo.com/group/…

NOTE:

We do not host any files here. If this post contains a link to content hosted elsewhere, this is content found by a simple search on the worldwide freedom web. However, if for some valid reason, you object to a said content, or any content here, please let us know and we will remove the content in question.

Any content linked to here is only meant as a taster for the original work itself and is posted on the strict understanding that anyone who downloads the taster, deletes said content within 24 hours. We would assume that these fans will then buy the original work and we greatly encourage them to do so.

November 5, 2008 Posted by | Chris Hillman, David Crosby, John Jorgenson, Music_ClassicRock, Roy Orbison, The Byrds, _BOB DYLAN, _MUSIC, _VIDEO | Leave a comment

Easy Rider – OST [1969]

https://i1.wp.com/s60.radikal.ru/i168/0807/02/cd3ee7e82728.jpg



Easy Rider – OST [1969]

Released August 1969

Genre Soundtrack

Length 37:38

Label Dunhill

Producer Steve Barri, Steve Blauner

mp3 – 320kbs – 94.5mb – covers

Billy: We did it, man. We did it, we did it. We’re rich, man. We’re retirin’ in Florida now, mister.

Wyatt: You know Billy, we blew it.

https://i2.wp.com/upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/f/f5/EasyRider_08.jpg/800px-EasyRider_08.jpg

Here’s the wonderful OST for the ground-breaking film Easy Rider …. a movie radical in its production, direction and primarily its themes, and one which changed the movie business.

This is a seminal soundtrack from the perspective of using pre-existing songs and matching these to the individual scenes! It was a little unusual too in the high level of chart success it attained, peaking at #6 on the Billboard album charts in September 69.

The OST contains a number of very decent individual songs that meshed magnificently with the images in the movie and with the athmosphere and themes it was trying to portray.

An interesting Dylan cover too by Roger McGuinn and half a Dylan original!!

https://i1.wp.com/upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/0/05/EasyRider_10.jpg/800px-EasyRider_10.jpg
Both The Band and Crosby, Stills, & Nash (CSN) were considered for the soundtrack. However, during editing, Dennis Hopper decided to use various music from his own record collection. When CSN viewed a rough cut of the film, they assured Hopper that they could not do any better than he already had!

Bob Dylan was asked to contribute music, but was reluctant to use his own recording of “It’s Alright, Ma (I’m Only Bleeding)”, so a version performed by Byrds frontman Roger McGuinn was used instead. Also, instead of writing an entirely new song for the film, Dylan simply wrote out the first verse of “Ballad of Easy Rider” and apparently told the filmmakers, “Give this to McGuinn, he’ll know what to do with it.” McGuinn completed the song and performed it in the film.

The songs on the soundtrack album are sequenced in the same order as they appear in the film, with the following differences:

  • “The Weight,” as originally recorded by The Band for their 1968 debut album Music From Big Pink, was used in the film but could not be licensed for the soundtrack. To deal with this, ABC-Dunhill commissioned Smith, who recorded for the label at the time, to record a cover version of the song for the soundtrack album.
  • Two songs used in the film, Little Eva’s “Let’s Turkey Trot” and The Electric Flag’s “Flash, Bang, Pow,” were omitted from the soundtrack album.
There was a remastered version of this with some different tracks released a few years back. If anyone’s got that, please do let us know! Thanks friends!

<img alt=”Image:



Tracklisting

1. “The Pusher” (Hoyt Axton) – 5:49

* Steppenwolf – Steppenwolf (1968)

2. “Born to Be Wild” (Mars Bonfire) – 3:37

* Steppenwolf – Steppenwolf (1968)

3. “The Weight” (Robbie Robertson) – 4:34

* Smith (1969)

4. “Wasn’t Born to Follow” (Carole King/Gerry Goffin) – 2:03

* The Byrds – The Notorious Byrd Brothers (1968)

5. ” If You Want to Be a Bird (Bird Song)” (Antonia Duren) – 2:35

* The Holy Modal Rounders – The Moray Eels Eat the Holy Modal Rounders (1969)

6. “Don’t Bogart Me” (Elliot Ingber/Larry Wagner) – 3:05

* Fraternity of Man – Fraternity of Man (1968)

7. “If 6 Was 9” (Jimi Hendrix) – 5:35

* The Jimi Hendrix Experience – Axis: Bold as Love (1967)

8. “Kyrie Eleison/Mardi Gras” (When the Saints) (Traditional, arranged by David Axelrod) – 4:00

* The Electric Prunes – Mass in F Minor (1968)

9. “It’s Alright, Ma (I’m Only Bleeding)” (Bob Dylan) – 3:39

* Roger McGuinn (1969)

10. “Ballad of Easy Rider” (Roger McGuinn/Bob Dylan) – 2:14

* Roger McGuinn (1969)



Here she be:

ezyRIDER

thanks to joe le taxi

We do not host any files here. If this post contains a link to content hosted elsewhere, this is content found by a simple search on the worldwide freedom web. However, if for some valid reason, you object to a said content, or any content here, please let us know and we will remove the content in question.

Any content linked to here is only meant as a taster for the original work itself and is posted on the strict understanding that anyone who downloads the taster, deletes said content within 24 hours. We would assume that these fans will then buy the original work and we greatly encourage them to do so.

Mail us: stupidand@gmail.com



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September 27, 2008 Posted by | Jimi Hendrix, Music_OST, Roger McGuinn, The Byrds, _BOB DYLAN, _MUSIC | 9 Comments

The Byrds – (Untitled) / (Unissued) [Legacy Edition]

//ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/61TgzQXaCcL._AA240_.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.The Byrds – (Untitled) / (Unissued) [Legacy Edition]
1970/2000 | EAC-FLAC/CUE/LOG | HQ Artwork | 813 MB

Released September 16, 1970
Recorded Live disc: February–March 1970
Studio disc: May 26–June 11, 1970
Length 71:26
Label Columbia/Legacy
Producer Terry Melcher

This is the Remastered + Expanded reissue of the classic Byrds Double LP originally released in 1970. The 2000 Re-Release was a Double CD on Legacy Recordings.

(Untitled) / (Unissued) marks the last change to the band’s line-up, with John York being asked to leave in September 1969, just preceding the release of Ballad of Easy Rider, so that Skip Battin could take his place.

The first LP includes concert material (the first official release of any live Byrds recordings), culminating in a sixteen-minute rendition of 1966’s “Eight Miles High” that was popular on progressive rock radio. The second disc is a new studio effort, consisting mostly of new original songs by McGuinn and Battin, produced by Terry Melcher. Also featured were songs by Lead Belly (“Take a Whiff on Me”) and Lowell George of Little Feat (“Truck Stop Girl”, featuring a vocal by Clarence White).

The album was a success, reaching number 40 in the United States during a chart stay of twenty-one weeks and number 11 in the United Kingdom, where it was bolstered by the surprise Top 20 hit “Chestnut Mare”. Although contemporary reviews were not enthusiastic, Untitled is generally considered today to be The Byrds’ best latter-day recording. It is also the only double-LP released by the Byrds during the band’s active lifespan, and thus is the group’s longest album by far; in fact, the studio LP on its own (at thirty-eight minutes) is longer than any other Byrds album – despite containing fewer tracks (nine) than any other Byrds album.

The album’s title actually came about by accident. The group’s original intention was to call the release something more grandiose, referencing their commercial and artistic “rebirth”: Phoenix, or The Byrds’ First Album. They had yet to make up their minds when the label pressed them for a title; producer Terry Melcher carelessly filled out a a form requesting the album’s title with the placeholder “(untitled)”, and jackets were promptly pressed with that on them, including the parentheses. ”

Tracklisting


CD 1:

01. Lover of the Bayou
02. Positively 4th Street
03. Nashville West
04. So You Want to Be a Rock ’n’ Roll Star
05. Mr. Tambourine Man
06. Mr. Spaceman
07. Eight Miles High
08. Chestnut Mare
09. Truck Stop Girl
10. All the Things
11. Yesterday’s Train
12. Hungry Planet
13. Just a Season
14. Take a Whiff on Me
15. You All Look Alike
16. Welcome Back Home

CD 2:

01. All the Things (alternative Studio-Version)
02. Yesterday’s Train (alternative Studio-Version)
03. Lover of the Bayou (Studio-Version)
04. Kathleen’s Song
05. White’s Lightning, Pt. 2
06. Willin’
07. You Ain’t Goin’ Nowhere (Live)
08. Old Blue (Live)
09. It’s Alright Ma (I’m Only Bleeding) (Live)
10. Ballad of Easy Rider (Live)
11. My Back Pages (Live)
12. Take a Whiff on Me (Live)
13. Jesus Is Just Alright (Live)
14. This Wheel’s on Fire/Amazing Grace (Live)

//ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/61TgzQXaCcL._AA240_.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.
Download

Passwort: finest-hq-audio

Thanks to the original poster

Banzai !

March 16, 2008 Posted by | Music_ClassicRock, The Byrds, _MUSIC | 4 Comments

The Byrds – (Untitled) / (Unissued) [Legacy Edition]

The image “https://i1.wp.com/ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/61TgzQXaCcL._AA240_.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.The Byrds – (Untitled) / (Unissued) [Legacy Edition]
1970/2000 | EAC-FLAC/CUE/LOG | HQ Artwork | 813 MB

Released September 16, 1970
Recorded Live disc: February–March 1970
Studio disc: May 26–June 11, 1970
Length 71:26
Label Columbia/Legacy
Producer Terry Melcher

This is the Remastered + Expanded reissue of the classic Byrds Double LP originally released in 1970. The 2000 Re-Release was a Double CD on Legacy Recordings.

(Untitled) / (Unissued) marks the last change to the band’s line-up, with John York being asked to leave in September 1969, just preceding the release of Ballad of Easy Rider, so that Skip Battin could take his place.

The first LP includes concert material (the first official release of any live Byrds recordings), culminating in a sixteen-minute rendition of 1966’s “Eight Miles High” that was popular on progressive rock radio. The second disc is a new studio effort, consisting mostly of new original songs by McGuinn and Battin, produced by Terry Melcher. Also featured were songs by Lead Belly (“Take a Whiff on Me”) and Lowell George of Little Feat (“Truck Stop Girl”, featuring a vocal by Clarence White).

The album was a success, reaching number 40 in the United States during a chart stay of twenty-one weeks and number 11 in the United Kingdom, where it was bolstered by the surprise Top 20 hit “Chestnut Mare”. Although contemporary reviews were not enthusiastic, Untitled is generally considered today to be The Byrds’ best latter-day recording. It is also the only double-LP released by the Byrds during the band’s active lifespan, and thus is the group’s longest album by far; in fact, the studio LP on its own (at thirty-eight minutes) is longer than any other Byrds album – despite containing fewer tracks (nine) than any other Byrds album.

The album’s title actually came about by accident. The group’s original intention was to call the release something more grandiose, referencing their commercial and artistic “rebirth”: Phoenix, or The Byrds’ First Album. They had yet to make up their minds when the label pressed them for a title; producer Terry Melcher carelessly filled out a a form requesting the album’s title with the placeholder “(untitled)”, and jackets were promptly pressed with that on them, including the parentheses. ”

Tracklisting


CD 1:

01. Lover of the Bayou
02. Positively 4th Street
03. Nashville West
04. So You Want to Be a Rock ’n’ Roll Star
05. Mr. Tambourine Man
06. Mr. Spaceman
07. Eight Miles High
08. Chestnut Mare
09. Truck Stop Girl
10. All the Things
11. Yesterday’s Train
12. Hungry Planet
13. Just a Season
14. Take a Whiff on Me
15. You All Look Alike
16. Welcome Back Home

CD 2:

01. All the Things (alternative Studio-Version)
02. Yesterday’s Train (alternative Studio-Version)
03. Lover of the Bayou (Studio-Version)
04. Kathleen’s Song
05. White’s Lightning, Pt. 2
06. Willin’
07. You Ain’t Goin’ Nowhere (Live)
08. Old Blue (Live)
09. It’s Alright Ma (I’m Only Bleeding) (Live)
10. Ballad of Easy Rider (Live)
11. My Back Pages (Live)
12. Take a Whiff on Me (Live)
13. Jesus Is Just Alright (Live)
14. This Wheel’s on Fire/Amazing Grace (Live)

The image “https://i1.wp.com/ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/61TgzQXaCcL._AA240_.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.
Download

Passwort: finest-hq-audio

Thanks to the original poster

Banzai !

March 16, 2008 Posted by | Music_ClassicRock, The Byrds, _MUSIC | Leave a comment

The Byrds – (Untitled) / (Unissued) [Legacy Edition]

The image “https://i1.wp.com/ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/61TgzQXaCcL._AA240_.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.The Byrds – (Untitled) / (Unissued) [Legacy Edition]
1970/2000 | EAC-FLAC/CUE/LOG | HQ Artwork | 813 MB

Released September 16, 1970
Recorded Live disc: February–March 1970
Studio disc: May 26–June 11, 1970
Length 71:26
Label Columbia/Legacy
Producer Terry Melcher

This is the Remastered + Expanded reissue of the classic Byrds Double LP originally released in 1970. The 2000 Re-Release was a Double CD on Legacy Recordings.

(Untitled) / (Unissued) marks the last change to the band’s line-up, with John York being asked to leave in September 1969, just preceding the release of Ballad of Easy Rider, so that Skip Battin could take his place.

The first LP includes concert material (the first official release of any live Byrds recordings), culminating in a sixteen-minute rendition of 1966’s “Eight Miles High” that was popular on progressive rock radio. The second disc is a new studio effort, consisting mostly of new original songs by McGuinn and Battin, produced by Terry Melcher. Also featured were songs by Lead Belly (“Take a Whiff on Me”) and Lowell George of Little Feat (“Truck Stop Girl”, featuring a vocal by Clarence White).

The album was a success, reaching number 40 in the United States during a chart stay of twenty-one weeks and number 11 in the United Kingdom, where it was bolstered by the surprise Top 20 hit “Chestnut Mare”. Although contemporary reviews were not enthusiastic, Untitled is generally considered today to be The Byrds’ best latter-day recording. It is also the only double-LP released by the Byrds during the band’s active lifespan, and thus is the group’s longest album by far; in fact, the studio LP on its own (at thirty-eight minutes) is longer than any other Byrds album – despite containing fewer tracks (nine) than any other Byrds album.

The album’s title actually came about by accident. The group’s original intention was to call the release something more grandiose, referencing their commercial and artistic “rebirth”: Phoenix, or The Byrds’ First Album. They had yet to make up their minds when the label pressed them for a title; producer Terry Melcher carelessly filled out a a form requesting the album’s title with the placeholder “(untitled)”, and jackets were promptly pressed with that on them, including the parentheses. ”

Tracklisting


CD 1:

01. Lover of the Bayou
02. Positively 4th Street
03. Nashville West
04. So You Want to Be a Rock ’n’ Roll Star
05. Mr. Tambourine Man
06. Mr. Spaceman
07. Eight Miles High
08. Chestnut Mare
09. Truck Stop Girl
10. All the Things
11. Yesterday’s Train
12. Hungry Planet
13. Just a Season
14. Take a Whiff on Me
15. You All Look Alike
16. Welcome Back Home

CD 2:

01. All the Things (alternative Studio-Version)
02. Yesterday’s Train (alternative Studio-Version)
03. Lover of the Bayou (Studio-Version)
04. Kathleen’s Song
05. White’s Lightning, Pt. 2
06. Willin’
07. You Ain’t Goin’ Nowhere (Live)
08. Old Blue (Live)
09. It’s Alright Ma (I’m Only Bleeding) (Live)
10. Ballad of Easy Rider (Live)
11. My Back Pages (Live)
12. Take a Whiff on Me (Live)
13. Jesus Is Just Alright (Live)
14. This Wheel’s on Fire/Amazing Grace (Live)

The image “https://i1.wp.com/ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/61TgzQXaCcL._AA240_.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.
Download

Passwort: finest-hq-audio

Thanks to the original poster

Banzai !

March 16, 2008 Posted by | Music_ClassicRock, The Byrds, _MUSIC | Leave a comment

The Byrds – 18 Classics Remastered (1990)


The Byrds – 18 Classics Remastered (1990)
MP3 ~ 320Kbps ~ 54m:35s ~ RS.com ~ 65mb + 63mb ~ Covers included

Although they only attained the huge success of the Beatles, Rolling Stones, and the Beach Boys for a short time in the mid-’60s, time has judged the Byrds to be nearly as influential as those groups in the long run.

They were not solely responsible for devising folk-rock, but they were certainly as responsible than any other single act for melding the innovations and energy of the British Invasion with the best lyrical and musical elements of contemporary folk music. They also played a vital role in pioneering psychedelic rock and country-rock, the unifying element being their angelic harmonies and restless eclecticism.

Often described in their early days as a hybrid of Dylan and the Beatles, the Byrds in turn influenced Dylan and the Beatles almost as much as Bob and the Fab Four had influenced the Byrds. The Byrds’ innovations have echoed nearly as strongly through subsequent generations, in the work of Tom Petty, R.E.M., and innumerable alternative bands of the post-punk era that feature those jangling guitars and dense harmonies.

http://cache.eb.com/eb/image?id=22992&rendTypeId=4The first long-haired American group to compete with the British Invasion bands visually as well as musically, the Byrds were soon anointed as the American counterpart to the Beatles by the press, legions of fans, and George Harrison himself. Their 1965 debut LP, Mr. Tambourine Man, was a fabulous album that mixed stellar interpretations of Dylan and Pete Seeger tunes with strong, more romantic and pop-based originals, usually written by Gene Clark in the band’s early days.

A few months later, their version of Seeger’s “Turn! Turn! Turn!” became another number-one hit and instant classic, featuring more great chiming guitar lines and ethereal, interweaving harmonies. While their second LP (Turn! Turn! Turn!) wasn’t as strong as their debut full-length, the band continued to move forward at a dizzying pace. In early 1966, the “Eight Miles High” single heralded the birth of psychedelia, with its drug-like (intentionally or otherwise) lyrical imagery, rumbling bass line, and a frenzied McGuinn guitar solo that took its inspiration from John Coltrane and Indian music.

The 12-string electric guitar may never recover. As long as there are baby boomers roaming the earth, its airy jangle will signify psychedelic innocence and optimism refracted through the peculiar light of mid-’60s Los Angeles. With Roger McGuinn leading, the Byrds kicked off American rock history with a merger of Bob Dylan’s words and the Beatles’ melodic energy. The results are here: “Mr. Tambourine Man,” “The Bells of Rhymney,” and “Eight Miles High” still jump off the airwaves. The midpoint between Dylan and the Beatles is a one-of-a-kind place, where optimism and innocence still sound smart.

Tracks:

01 Mr. Tambourine Man 2:19
02 I’ll Feel A Whole Lot Better 2:33
03 The Bells Of Rhymney 3:32
04 Turn! Turn! Turn! 3:55
05 All I Really Want To Do 2:04
06 Chimes Of Freedom 3:52
07 Eight Miles High 3:37
08 Mr. Spaceman 2:12
09 5D 2:37
10 So You Want To Be A Rock ‘N’ Roll Star 2:06
11 My Back Pages 3:09
12 Jesus Is Just Alright 2:12
13 Chestnut Mare 5:07
14 I Trust 3:20
15 Lady Friend 2:38
16 Lay Lady Lay 3:18
17 Ballad Of Easy Rider 2:04
18 Glory, Glory 4:00

Downloads ~ RS.com:
Password = NigMae.net

Thanks to the original poster

February 6, 2008 Posted by | Music_ClassicRock, The Byrds, _MUSIC | Leave a comment

The Byrds – 18 Classics Remastered (1990)


The Byrds – 18 Classics Remastered (1990)
MP3 ~ 320Kbps ~ 54m:35s ~ RS.com ~ 65mb + 63mb ~ Covers included

Although they only attained the huge success of the Beatles, Rolling Stones, and the Beach Boys for a short time in the mid-’60s, time has judged the Byrds to be nearly as influential as those groups in the long run.

They were not solely responsible for devising folk-rock, but they were certainly as responsible than any other single act for melding the innovations and energy of the British Invasion with the best lyrical and musical elements of contemporary folk music. They also played a vital role in pioneering psychedelic rock and country-rock, the unifying element being their angelic harmonies and restless eclecticism.

Often described in their early days as a hybrid of Dylan and the Beatles, the Byrds in turn influenced Dylan and the Beatles almost as much as Bob and the Fab Four had influenced the Byrds. The Byrds’ innovations have echoed nearly as strongly through subsequent generations, in the work of Tom Petty, R.E.M., and innumerable alternative bands of the post-punk era that feature those jangling guitars and dense harmonies.

http://cache.eb.com/eb/image?id=22992&rendTypeId=4The first long-haired American group to compete with the British Invasion bands visually as well as musically, the Byrds were soon anointed as the American counterpart to the Beatles by the press, legions of fans, and George Harrison himself. Their 1965 debut LP, Mr. Tambourine Man, was a fabulous album that mixed stellar interpretations of Dylan and Pete Seeger tunes with strong, more romantic and pop-based originals, usually written by Gene Clark in the band’s early days.

A few months later, their version of Seeger’s “Turn! Turn! Turn!” became another number-one hit and instant classic, featuring more great chiming guitar lines and ethereal, interweaving harmonies. While their second LP (Turn! Turn! Turn!) wasn’t as strong as their debut full-length, the band continued to move forward at a dizzying pace. In early 1966, the “Eight Miles High” single heralded the birth of psychedelia, with its drug-like (intentionally or otherwise) lyrical imagery, rumbling bass line, and a frenzied McGuinn guitar solo that took its inspiration from John Coltrane and Indian music.

The 12-string electric guitar may never recover. As long as there are baby boomers roaming the earth, its airy jangle will signify psychedelic innocence and optimism refracted through the peculiar light of mid-’60s Los Angeles. With Roger McGuinn leading, the Byrds kicked off American rock history with a merger of Bob Dylan’s words and the Beatles’ melodic energy. The results are here: “Mr. Tambourine Man,” “The Bells of Rhymney,” and “Eight Miles High” still jump off the airwaves. The midpoint between Dylan and the Beatles is a one-of-a-kind place, where optimism and innocence still sound smart.

Tracks:

01 Mr. Tambourine Man 2:19
02 I’ll Feel A Whole Lot Better 2:33
03 The Bells Of Rhymney 3:32
04 Turn! Turn! Turn! 3:55
05 All I Really Want To Do 2:04
06 Chimes Of Freedom 3:52
07 Eight Miles High 3:37
08 Mr. Spaceman 2:12
09 5D 2:37
10 So You Want To Be A Rock ‘N’ Roll Star 2:06
11 My Back Pages 3:09
12 Jesus Is Just Alright 2:12
13 Chestnut Mare 5:07
14 I Trust 3:20
15 Lady Friend 2:38
16 Lay Lady Lay 3:18
17 Ballad Of Easy Rider 2:04
18 Glory, Glory 4:00

Downloads ~ RS.com:
Password = NigMae.net

Thanks to the original poster

February 6, 2008 Posted by | Music_ClassicRock, The Byrds, _MUSIC | Leave a comment