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The Hold Steady – Live performance podcast for KEXP

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The Hold Steady – Live performance podcast for KEXP
Live at CMJ – 16 October 2007

From the KEXP Press Release;


Craig Finn seems to be the real deal! All those stories he tells about bar fights and stumbling across the streets of New York City apparently really did happen and if you are lucky enough to hear the band, he will share all those manic moments with you.
Accompanied by band mates Bobby Drake (drums) Tad Kubler (lead guitarist), Franz Nicolay (keyboards, accordion, harmonica), Galen Polivka (bass guitar) the band have produced several critically acclaimed albums, the first of which, Almost Killed Me coined them as being next in line to the New York indie dynasty back in 2004.

Their second album, Separation Sunday was released on May 3rd, 2005, and slapped listeners with the classic rock and roll battle between music and religion. Finn stretched himself to new levels of rugged debauchery and downright delicious music madness in pure punk form.

Check out their performance of 16 October, broadcast from the Gibson showroom in NYC.

Here she be;

http://rapidshare.com/files/70…..odcast.mp3

Mail us: stupidand@gmail.com

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June 24, 2008 Posted by | Music_Alternative, The Hold Steady, _MUSIC | Leave a comment

The Hold Steady-Sequestered In Memphis- Promo CDS -2008

The Hold Steady-Sequestered In Memphis- Promo CDS -2008

Artist: The Hold Steady
Title: Sequestered In Memphis
Label: Rough Trade
Genre: Rock
Bitrate: 239kbit av.
Time: 00:03:18
Size: 5.92 mb
Rip Date: 2008-06-01
Str Date: 2008-06-07

1. Sequestered In Memphis (Radio Edit) 3:18

Here she be;

http://rapidshare.com/files/11…..08-DV8.rar

Big thanks to the original poster

Mail us: stupidand@gmail.com

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June 24, 2008 Posted by | Music_Alternative, The Hold Steady, _MUSIC | Leave a comment

The Hold Steady – Live at Fingerprints (2007 EP)

The Hold Steady – Live at Fingerprints (2007 EP)

Tracklisting

1. Cattle and the Creeping Things
2. Chips Ahoy
3. You Make Him Like You
4. Citrus
5. You Gotta Dance With Who You Came to The Dance With

Here she be;

http://paylesssofts.net/?x196627817

Big thanks to TheIndieConnection

June 24, 2008 Posted by | Music_Alternative, The Hold Steady, _MUSIC | Leave a comment

The Hold Steady: Stay Positive (2008)

The Hold Steady: Stay Positive (2008)
“One thing I can say is that [Craig Finn] continues to blow my mind. And I’m saying that as a big a fan of his as anybody.”

– Tad Kubler
https://i0.wp.com/artbrutorguk.site.securepod.com/images/uploads/hold-steady.jpg

Stay Positive is The Hold Steady’s fourth studio album. It expected to be released on July 15, 2008 in the United States, and will be the band’s second recording for Vagrant Records.

A song bearing the same title had been played live during the band’s tour with Art Brut, and is the eighth track on the album.

The vinyl edition, a double LP, will contain a bonus track called “Ask Her For Some Adderall”.

On 14th May, The Music Magazine featured a track-by-track preview of the new album.

On May 19th the first single off the album, Sequestered in Memphis, was released by the band, on their myspace.

http://myspace.com/theholdsteady

https://i0.wp.com/depts.washington.edu/kexp/blog/wp-content/uploads/2006/12/The%20Hold%20Steady-CBGB.jpg

Hey alright! Craig Finn has started doing more singing and less chatting over music. Finally a Hold Steady album I can get behind. Probably the best album Springsteen has put out in a while.

– Stafford

https://i1.wp.com/farm1.static.flickr.com/225/495182914_30e19f139a.jpg

Earlier this week, Craig Finn and Packers/sausage aficionado Tad Kubler of the Hold Steady were in upstate New York. When we rang them up, they were “driving around,” as Finn tells it, and “kind of scouting some stuff for artwork ideas.”

Artwork for the fourth Hold Steady album! That’s right – after months of being hunkered down in the studio, growing their beards, the thing is finally in the can. All that needs to be done now is the mastering, sequencing, and, of course, artwork.

Pop the bottle of your choosing: this is reason for celebration.

“It’s probably going to be called Stay Positive,” Finn says, adding “we can say tentatively. There’s a song called “Stay Positive” we’ve been playing live, and it was just something that’s been kind of hanging around in my head a long time. I would say it’s safe to say that’s the name of the record.”

For a band as prolific as the Hold Steady–they’ll have four LPs in five years once Stay Positive is released– tunes tends go from the page to the stage and then the studio in rapid succession, but some of the Stay Positive jams have been kicking around for a while now. “[Keyboardist] Franz [Nicolay] kind of got his laptop set up to do some hotel room demos over in Europe last summer, and we started throwing down ideas through that, and just kind of collected songs. And then when we got off the road from the tour we did with Art Brut, that ended at Thanksgiving, there was kind of a huge push right there when things were coming together. You know, sometimes you get in the creative mode, and you start using the other side of your brain and things happen quickly, there’s a warm up period and then things start firing in all cylinders.”

Recorded at a handful of New York-area locales over the last few months, the record is the band’s second with Boys and Girls in America producer John Agnello. As Kubler says, the combination of the seasoned touring band’s tightness and Agnello’s deft hand behind the boards created a very fluid studio situation. “I would compare it to a basketball team that plays well together, that can get into that kind of rhythm. You can read people’s next move and it allows you to kind of move together as more of a fluid unit or a machine, like a Swiss watch or something like that.” He laughs, noting, “though I’m not sure I should describe our band as having quite that precision.”

Though both Finn and Kubler are quick to point out that it “still sounds like a Hold Steady record”, there’s talk of opening up the sonic palette a bit on Stay Positive. Finn adds “there’s certainly horns and strings, which I guess we had before, but there’s also a mandolin, a harpsichord.” Kubler notes the band’s growing comfort with the studio setting, particularly with Agnello at the helm. “In terms of fidelity or stereo range, I think John took a little different approach in the way we mixed it in terms of just using some hard pans and doing some things different, rather than just a compressed guitar rock record.”

One can’t talk to Craig Finn without asking him about words themselves; specifically the ones he’ll spit all over Stay Positive. When asked if there was any kind of overarching theme to the tunes on the new disc, he hesitated a bit. “I think the songs relate to each other in a way,” adding “I’m not sure I want to talk about that quite yet.” I figured maybe Kubler would give up the goods. “Well, he’s sitting right next to me, so you’re not going to get anything out of me!” Dammit. Let’s assume alcohol is involved. Maybe parties, too.

Kubler did offer this: “One thing I can say is that the guy continues to blow my mind. And I’m saying that as a big a fan of his as anybody.” Awww. “You rehearse, rehearse, rehearse and you go in and do takes, and takes, and takes, and different tracks of the songs, and then as that comes together, some of the funnest parts of being in the studio are getting to listen to Craig go in and start to do the vocals and hear the story unfold. It’s a really exciting part for us– I think I speak for everyone in the band– when we’re recording.”

It’s been said before, but what the hell: it’s quite clear these guys just love making music. They’ll even tell you themselves. “It isn’t always just this huge bloodletting process that you sometimes hear other artists talk about in terms of songwriting.” Kubler said of making Hold Steady records. “We do it because we enjoy it.”

-Pitchfork

https://i0.wp.com/www.bwog.net/uploads/hold_steady.jpg


Tracklisting

  1. Constructive Summer
  2. Sequestered in Memphis
  3. One for the Cutters
  4. Navy Sheets
  5. Lord, I’m Discouraged
  6. Yeah Sapphire
  7. Both Crosses
  8. Stay Positive
  9. Magazines
  10. Joke About Jamaica
  11. Slapped Actress

https://i0.wp.com/aestheticnoise.com/Images/HoldSteady.jpg

Here’s positivity mofos!

NEW LINKS – 22 JUNE 08

http://rapidshare.com/files/118006493/hsSP.zip

OR

http://rapidshare.com/files/118057530/HS_SP.zip


OLD LINKS (PROB DEAD NOW!)

http://www.sendspace.com/file/ledaug

OR

http://rapidshare.com/files/116868155/HS-SP.rar

Thanks to the original posters

Mail us: stupidand@gmail.com

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May 23, 2008 Posted by | Music_Alternative, The Hold Steady, _MUSIC | 3 Comments

The Hold Steady – Boys And Girls In America (2CD Special Edition 2007)

https://i2.wp.com/bigpicture.typepad.com/comments/images/2007/10/04/boys_and_girls_in_america.jpg

The Hold Steady –
Boys And Girls In America (2CD Special Edition 2007)

Boys and Girls in America is an album by The Hold Steady released 1n October 2006 by Vagrant Records. The title refers to a line in Jack Kerouac’s 1957 novel On the Road, as is made explicit in the opening line of “Stuck Between Stations”: “There are nights when I think Sal Paradise was right: Boys and Girls in America have such a sad time together.”

On August 18, 2006 the first single “Chips Ahoy!” was released as a free download from music site Pitchfork Media. On September 29, 2006 a Flash-based stream of the album was made publicly available on Vagrant Records’ website. The second single, “Stuck Between Stations” began to appear on college radio station playlists in November, 2006.

Backing vocals for the track “Chillout Tent” are provided by Soul Asylum’s Dave Pirner and The Reputation’s Elizabeth Elmore. Dana Kletter (ex-Blackgirls, Dear Enemy, and Hole’s Live Through This) contributed backing vocals to several tracks including “Chips Ahoy!,” “You Can Make Him Like You,” and “First Night”.

https://i2.wp.com/bigpicture.typepad.com/comments/images/2007/10/04/boys_and_girls_in_america.jpg This Special Edition Release from October 2007 of the acclaimed album ‘Boys & Girls In America’, contains the 8 track bonus disc ‘Live @ Fingerprints’ featuring two songs not available on any other album.

Here’s the album’s gushing review in Pitchfork.

http://www.pitchforkmedia.com/article/record_review/38888-boys-and-girls-in-america

The Hold Steady -Boys and Girls in America [Vagrant; 2006]

Rating: 9.4

When Pitchfork finally received a full-art copy of Boys and Girls in America, it came with a Hold Steady coaster, a wink at the received logic that Craig Finn and his cohorts are members of “America’s #1 bar band.” That’s an ill-fitting tag for a couple of reasons; first, because the vast majority of the bars in the U.S. feature DJs and jukeboxes not bands– let alone ones as unique and powerful as the Hold Steady.

Second, and more importantly: Although the characters in the Hold Steady’s beery tales are big drinkers, you can’t imagine many of them bellied up to a bar. That sort of drinking– introspective, sometimes done alone, indoors– is the antithesis of the imbibing in Hold Steady songs. These characters are drinking at apartment parties, at festivals, in fields, in cars. In “Stuck Between Stations”, the protagonist and his friends “drink from [a] purse”; “Massive Night” has the boys “feeling good about their liquor run”; and in “Party Pit” the female character is “gonna walk around and drink some more.” They’re not reflective or nostalgic, and when frequent Finn heroine Holly is contemplating the past, it’s with regret she can no longer get as high as she used to.

https://i1.wp.com/www.theholdsteady.com/uploaded_images/IMG_0633-791346.JPGSo it’s no wonder that critical darlings the Hold Steady aren’t exactly indie rock heroes. Marginalized to that world almost by default– radio and video are, for the most part, unkind to new rock bands not targeted at high-schoolers– the Hold Steady craft classic rock-indebted music that would sound better sandwiched between Born to Run and Back in Black than Illinois and Tigermilk. In other words, the more likely you are to use music as a social lubricant than as a social balm, the more likely you are to enjoy the Hold Steady.

And if you dislike this band, you wouldn’t be alone. After years of making detail-heavy music with both Lifter Puller and now the Hold Steady, Craig Finn enjoyed a critical breakthrough last year with the divisive Separation Sunday— a loosely conceptual album based around a trio of characters named Charlemagne, Gideon, and Holly– which wowed critics with its back-alley poetry and willingness to reach the cheap seats, but left many listeners cold over Finn’s gruff sing-speak vocals and his band’s tendency towards licks rather than grooves.

https://i2.wp.com/bigpicture.typepad.com/comments/images/2007/10/04/boys_and_girls_in_america.jpg On Boys and Girls, some things have changed that will make the band more palatable to doubters yet could disappoint Separation Sunday fans: Finn sings more than speaks, and his lyrics have a big-picture approach, allowing listeners to fill details of their own lives into the songs rather than be required to commit fully to those of his characters. Putting less emphasis on lyrical detail than in the past, Finn claims in opener “Stuck Between Stations”, a paean to poet and suicide-victim John Berryman, that “words won’t save your life”; later, on “First Night”, he writes that “words alone can never save us.” It’s the difference between working more in character, creating a low-rent version of street and suburban life, and creating songs that, as Pitchfork’s Stephen Deusner observed, “Finn’s characters might want to listen to.”

One way in which Finn does this is by ratcheting up the force and power of the music, layering guitar and trebly keys and multiple hooks on top of one another like a mid-1970s E Street Band or an E-boosted Happy Mondays. It’s rock’n’roll before it was ashamed to do either, and unlike on past efforts, lyrics can sometimes be summed up by lines that approximate the effect of a chorus, even if they’re presented more like a thesis statement: “I’ve had kisses that make Judas seem sincere,” “When they kiss they spit white noise,” the aforementioned “Gonna walk around and drink some more.”

The lack of specificity also means Finn is acknowledging the universality of his themes, which– although he’s still mostly writing about the Twin Cities– reflect the experiences of kids across the country. Whereas Finn’s spiritual predecessors, Bruce Springsteen and Jack Kerouac (whose On the Road lends the album its title), romanticized the open road and the possibility of escape, his characters travel not to start again or get away but as a diversion, as on “Chillout Tent”, in which a pair of kids so desperate for something big to happen in their otherwise humdrum lives– he on his “first day off in forever, man” and she on a break from her studies– awkwardly try to squeeze as much decadence as possible into a single afternoon.

https://i2.wp.com/bigpicture.typepad.com/comments/images/2007/10/04/boys_and_girls_in_america.jpg Finn is less a 21st century Springsteen than he is an American Jarvis Cocker; he’s the poet laureate for the U.S.’s have-nots in much the same way the Pulp singer was for the UK’s common people in the 1990s. Unlike Cocker, however, Finn doesn’t write angrily, perhaps a telling indication that the stereotypically British self-loathing is equitable to the “colossal expectations” and lack of discipline of the boys and girls in America. Just as one wouldn’t imagine Cocker writing escapist fantasies such as “Chillout Tent”, nor would Finn pen something as bitter as “I Spy”.

In a sense, however, this album, thematically, is as self-aware as Cocker’s work at his height of fame– the ambitious, zeitgeist-grabbing Different Class and hangover album This Is Hardcore. But rather than moan about too many nights on the tiles, Finn channels his diminishing energy into characters older and younger than himself: His epitaph for Berryman (“he was drunk and exhausted but he was critically acclaimed and respected”) and Holly’s laments over stoner burnout in “First Night” could both be read as autobiographical.

They could also be seen as a lament for the type of music Finn’s making, the straightforward arena rock that, these days, often settles for critical acclaim and respect rather than connecting with lots and lots of people. For all of Finn’s holding his lyrics at arm’s length here, he remains one of the best writers in rock, demonstrating grit and spunk and wit and intelligence in each track. Unlike many of those who’ve translated big, arena-ready guitars into arena-sized audiences, Finn doesn’t resort to confidently sung platitudes like “It’s a beautiful day!”, “Look at the stars/ See how they shine for you,” or “I’m not OK.” He not only has a commanding, rousing voice but he also says something worth hearing, displaying gifts for both scope and depth that are all too rare in contemporary rock– indie or mainstream.

-Scott Plagenhoef, October, 2006

Tracklisting

CD ONE

01) Stuck Between Stations
02) Chips Ahoy
03) Hot Soft Light
04) Same Kooks
05) First Night
06) Party Pit
07) You Can Make Him Like You
08) Massive Nights
09) Citrus
10) Chill Out
11) South Town Girls

CD TWO (Live @ Fingerprints)

1) Cattle And The Creeping Things
2) Your Little Hoodrat Friend
3) Chips Ahoy
4) Modesto’s Not That Sweet
5) First Night
6) You Can Make Him Like You
7) Citrus
8) You Gotta Dance With Who You Came To The Dance With

https://i1.wp.com/www.vagrant.com/holdsteady_retail/splash.jpg

This great album can be had here;

rapidshare

January 8, 2008 Posted by | Music_Alternative, The Hold Steady, _MUSIC | Leave a comment

The Hold Steady – Boys And Girls In America (2CD Special Edition 2007)

https://i2.wp.com/bigpicture.typepad.com/comments/images/2007/10/04/boys_and_girls_in_america.jpg

The Hold Steady –
Boys And Girls In America (2CD Special Edition 2007)

Boys and Girls in America is an album by The Hold Steady released 1n October 2006 by Vagrant Records. The title refers to a line in Jack Kerouac’s 1957 novel On the Road, as is made explicit in the opening line of “Stuck Between Stations”: “There are nights when I think Sal Paradise was right: Boys and Girls in America have such a sad time together.”

On August 18, 2006 the first single “Chips Ahoy!” was released as a free download from music site Pitchfork Media. On September 29, 2006 a Flash-based stream of the album was made publicly available on Vagrant Records’ website. The second single, “Stuck Between Stations” began to appear on college radio station playlists in November, 2006.

Backing vocals for the track “Chillout Tent” are provided by Soul Asylum’s Dave Pirner and The Reputation’s Elizabeth Elmore. Dana Kletter (ex-Blackgirls, Dear Enemy, and Hole’s Live Through This) contributed backing vocals to several tracks including “Chips Ahoy!,” “You Can Make Him Like You,” and “First Night”.

https://i2.wp.com/bigpicture.typepad.com/comments/images/2007/10/04/boys_and_girls_in_america.jpg This Special Edition Release from October 2007 of the acclaimed album ‘Boys & Girls In America’, contains the 8 track bonus disc ‘Live @ Fingerprints’ featuring two songs not available on any other album.

Here’s the album’s gushing review in Pitchfork.

http://www.pitchforkmedia.com/article/record_review/38888-boys-and-girls-in-america

The Hold Steady -Boys and Girls in America [Vagrant; 2006]

Rating: 9.4

When Pitchfork finally received a full-art copy of Boys and Girls in America, it came with a Hold Steady coaster, a wink at the received logic that Craig Finn and his cohorts are members of “America’s #1 bar band.” That’s an ill-fitting tag for a couple of reasons; first, because the vast majority of the bars in the U.S. feature DJs and jukeboxes not bands– let alone ones as unique and powerful as the Hold Steady.

Second, and more importantly: Although the characters in the Hold Steady’s beery tales are big drinkers, you can’t imagine many of them bellied up to a bar. That sort of drinking– introspective, sometimes done alone, indoors– is the antithesis of the imbibing in Hold Steady songs. These characters are drinking at apartment parties, at festivals, in fields, in cars. In “Stuck Between Stations”, the protagonist and his friends “drink from [a] purse”; “Massive Night” has the boys “feeling good about their liquor run”; and in “Party Pit” the female character is “gonna walk around and drink some more.” They’re not reflective or nostalgic, and when frequent Finn heroine Holly is contemplating the past, it’s with regret she can no longer get as high as she used to.

https://i1.wp.com/www.theholdsteady.com/uploaded_images/IMG_0633-791346.JPGSo it’s no wonder that critical darlings the Hold Steady aren’t exactly indie rock heroes. Marginalized to that world almost by default– radio and video are, for the most part, unkind to new rock bands not targeted at high-schoolers– the Hold Steady craft classic rock-indebted music that would sound better sandwiched between Born to Run and Back in Black than Illinois and Tigermilk. In other words, the more likely you are to use music as a social lubricant than as a social balm, the more likely you are to enjoy the Hold Steady.

And if you dislike this band, you wouldn’t be alone. After years of making detail-heavy music with both Lifter Puller and now the Hold Steady, Craig Finn enjoyed a critical breakthrough last year with the divisive Separation Sunday— a loosely conceptual album based around a trio of characters named Charlemagne, Gideon, and Holly– which wowed critics with its back-alley poetry and willingness to reach the cheap seats, but left many listeners cold over Finn’s gruff sing-speak vocals and his band’s tendency towards licks rather than grooves.

https://i2.wp.com/bigpicture.typepad.com/comments/images/2007/10/04/boys_and_girls_in_america.jpg On Boys and Girls, some things have changed that will make the band more palatable to doubters yet could disappoint Separation Sunday fans: Finn sings more than speaks, and his lyrics have a big-picture approach, allowing listeners to fill details of their own lives into the songs rather than be required to commit fully to those of his characters. Putting less emphasis on lyrical detail than in the past, Finn claims in opener “Stuck Between Stations”, a paean to poet and suicide-victim John Berryman, that “words won’t save your life”; later, on “First Night”, he writes that “words alone can never save us.” It’s the difference between working more in character, creating a low-rent version of street and suburban life, and creating songs that, as Pitchfork’s Stephen Deusner observed, “Finn’s characters might want to listen to.”

One way in which Finn does this is by ratcheting up the force and power of the music, layering guitar and trebly keys and multiple hooks on top of one another like a mid-1970s E Street Band or an E-boosted Happy Mondays. It’s rock’n’roll before it was ashamed to do either, and unlike on past efforts, lyrics can sometimes be summed up by lines that approximate the effect of a chorus, even if they’re presented more like a thesis statement: “I’ve had kisses that make Judas seem sincere,” “When they kiss they spit white noise,” the aforementioned “Gonna walk around and drink some more.”

The lack of specificity also means Finn is acknowledging the universality of his themes, which– although he’s still mostly writing about the Twin Cities– reflect the experiences of kids across the country. Whereas Finn’s spiritual predecessors, Bruce Springsteen and Jack Kerouac (whose On the Road lends the album its title), romanticized the open road and the possibility of escape, his characters travel not to start again or get away but as a diversion, as on “Chillout Tent”, in which a pair of kids so desperate for something big to happen in their otherwise humdrum lives– he on his “first day off in forever, man” and she on a break from her studies– awkwardly try to squeeze as much decadence as possible into a single afternoon.

https://i2.wp.com/bigpicture.typepad.com/comments/images/2007/10/04/boys_and_girls_in_america.jpg Finn is less a 21st century Springsteen than he is an American Jarvis Cocker; he’s the poet laureate for the U.S.’s have-nots in much the same way the Pulp singer was for the UK’s common people in the 1990s. Unlike Cocker, however, Finn doesn’t write angrily, perhaps a telling indication that the stereotypically British self-loathing is equitable to the “colossal expectations” and lack of discipline of the boys and girls in America. Just as one wouldn’t imagine Cocker writing escapist fantasies such as “Chillout Tent”, nor would Finn pen something as bitter as “I Spy”.

In a sense, however, this album, thematically, is as self-aware as Cocker’s work at his height of fame– the ambitious, zeitgeist-grabbing Different Class and hangover album This Is Hardcore. But rather than moan about too many nights on the tiles, Finn channels his diminishing energy into characters older and younger than himself: His epitaph for Berryman (“he was drunk and exhausted but he was critically acclaimed and respected”) and Holly’s laments over stoner burnout in “First Night” could both be read as autobiographical.

They could also be seen as a lament for the type of music Finn’s making, the straightforward arena rock that, these days, often settles for critical acclaim and respect rather than connecting with lots and lots of people. For all of Finn’s holding his lyrics at arm’s length here, he remains one of the best writers in rock, demonstrating grit and spunk and wit and intelligence in each track. Unlike many of those who’ve translated big, arena-ready guitars into arena-sized audiences, Finn doesn’t resort to confidently sung platitudes like “It’s a beautiful day!”, “Look at the stars/ See how they shine for you,” or “I’m not OK.” He not only has a commanding, rousing voice but he also says something worth hearing, displaying gifts for both scope and depth that are all too rare in contemporary rock– indie or mainstream.

-Scott Plagenhoef, October, 2006

Tracklisting

CD ONE

01) Stuck Between Stations
02) Chips Ahoy
03) Hot Soft Light
04) Same Kooks
05) First Night
06) Party Pit
07) You Can Make Him Like You
08) Massive Nights
09) Citrus
10) Chill Out
11) South Town Girls

CD TWO (Live @ Fingerprints)

1) Cattle And The Creeping Things
2) Your Little Hoodrat Friend
3) Chips Ahoy
4) Modesto’s Not That Sweet
5) First Night
6) You Can Make Him Like You
7) Citrus
8) You Gotta Dance With Who You Came To The Dance With

https://i1.wp.com/www.vagrant.com/holdsteady_retail/splash.jpg

This great album can be had here;

rapidshare

January 8, 2008 Posted by | Music_Alternative, The Hold Steady, _MUSIC | Leave a comment