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Kinks – Preservation Act 1 (Bonus Tracks)

Kinks – Preservation Act 1 (Bonus Tracks)
Released 16 November 1973 (Act 1)
Recorded March – July, 1973 (Act 1)
at Konk Studios, London
Genre Rock and roll
Length 46:54 (Act 1/1998 reissue)
Label RCA (original)
Velvel (1998 reissue)
Producer Ray Davies

Mp3 @320

Preservation: Act 1 and Preservation: Act 2 are rather strange 1973 concept albums released as separate albums in 1973 and 1974 by The Kinks. Originally the plan was to create a single rock opera, but the idea was scratched!

The Preservation albums were not well-received by critics and sold poorly (the first one peaking on the Billboard 200 at #177), though the live performances of the material were much better received.

Act 1 coverMany hardcore Kinks fans were alienated by Ray Davies’ melodramatic songwriting during the Preservation project era, resulting in albums that played more like the soundtracks to a piece of musical theatre than rock albums.

However, more recent reviews of Preservation: Act 1 have been more sympathetic to its ambitions. In particular, All Music’s Stephen Thomas Erlewine has declared “Sweet Lady Genevieve” to be the “real candidate for Davies’ forgotten masterpiece”.

The CD reissue of Preservation: Act 1 includes the single versions of “Preservation” and “One of the Survivors”, neither of which are available on the original vinyl release. The latter briefly charted on the Billboard Pop Singles chart peaking at #108.

Arriving in May, 1974, just six months after PRESERVATION ACT 1, the Kinks’ double-album PRESERVATION ACT 2 better represented the scope of Ray Davies’s aspirations to extend his creative talent to the arena of musical theater.

We have already posted Act 2.

Act 1 coverDespite the title’s similarity to that of the Kinks’ 1968 album THE VILLAGE GREEN PRESERVATION SOCIETY (which frequently turns up on “Greatest Albums Full Descriptionof All Time” surveys), the group’s 1973 rock opera PRESERVATION ACT 1 is not nearly as song-oriented as its predecessor.

As Record Collector editor Peter Doggett writes in his excellent liner notes to VelVel’s reissue of PRESERVATION ACT 1, VILLAGE GREEN was more of a concept album, creating a feel without using a narrative. Each of its songs was a miniature window into English villages’ fast-disappearing way of life.

With PRESERVATION ACT 1, Ray Davies took the basic idea behind VILLAGE GREEN and turned it into a larger-than-life production with a highly didactic narrative. It was clear that, this time around, Davies was not going to leave listeners any room to interpret his musical statements symbolically.

The result was a Kinks album like no other, a forum for Davies’s wildly creative imagination and his talent for storytelling. It left many Kinks fans hungry for its sequel, PRESERVATION ACT 2, which came out six months later.

The Kinks here are Dave Davies, Ray Davies (vocals, guitar); John Gosling (keyboards); John Dalton (bass guitar); Mick Avory (drums).

Additional personnel: Laurie Brown (flute, tenor saxophone, trumpet); Alan Holmes (clarinet, baritone saxophone); John Beecham (trombone, tuba); Pamela Travis, Krysia Kocjan, Sue Brown, Lewis Rich, Lee Pavey (background vocals).


Tracklisting and Details

  1. “Preservation”* – 3:37
  2. “Morning Song” – 2:00
  3. “Daylight” – 3:19
  4. “Sweet Lady Genevieve” – 3:26
  5. “There’s a Change in the Weather” – 2:59
  6. “Where Are They Now?” – 3:28
  7. “One of the Survivors” – 4:31
  8. “Cricket” – 2:56
  9. “Money & Corruption” / “I Am Your Man” – 6:01
  10. “Here Comes Flash” – 2:41
  11. “Sitting in the Midday Sun” – 3:47
  12. “Demolition” – 4:07
  13. “One of the Survivors”* – 4:07

The songs marked with a star are bonus tracks on CD reissues.

1. Preservation stereo mix, recorded Oct 1974 at Konk Studios, Hornsey, London
2. Morning Song stereo mix, recorded May-Jul 1973 at Konk Studios, Hornsey, London
3. Daylight stereo mix, recorded May-Jul 1973 at Konk Studios, Hornsey, London
4. Sweet Lady Genevieve stereo mix, recorded Jul 1973 at Konk Studios, Hornsey, London
5. There’s A Change In The Weather stereo mix, recorded May-Jul 1973 at Konk Studios, Hornsey, London
6. Where Are They Now? stereo mix, recorded May-Jul 1973 at Konk Studios, Hornsey, London
7. One Of The Survivors stereo mix, recorded Mar 1973 at Konk Studios, Hornsey, London
8. Cricket stereo mix, recorded May-Jul 1973 at Konk Studios, Hornsey, London
9. Money & Corruption / I Am Your Man stereo mix (5:52), recorded May-Jul 1973 at Konk Studios, Hornsey, London
10. Here Comes Flash stereo mix, recorded May-Jul 1973 at Konk Studios, Hornsey, London
11. Sitting In The Midday Sun stereo mix, recorded May 1973 at Konk Studios, Hornsey, London
12. Demolition stereo mix, recorded May-Jul 1973 at Konk Studios, Hornsey, London
13. One Of The Survivors stereo mix, different mix and edit from album version, recorded Mar 1973 at Morgan Studios, Willesden, London

Big thanks to Mr Ghost



We do not host any files here. If this post contains a link to content hosted elsewhere, this is content found by a simple search on the worldwide freedom web. However, if for some valid reason, you object to a said content, or any content here, please let us know and we will remove the content in question.

Any content linked to here is only meant as a taster for the original work itself and is posted on the strict understanding that anyone who downloads the taster, deletes said content within 24 hours. We would assume that these fans will then buy the original work and we greatly encourage them to do so.

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October 24, 2008 Posted by | Music_Pop, The Kinks, _MUSIC | 1 Comment

Kinks – Preservation Act 2 (Bonus Tracks)

Kinks – Preservation Act 2 (Bonus Tracks)
Released May 8, 1974 (Act 2)
Recorded January – March 1974 (Act 2) at Konk Studios, London
Genre Rock and roll
Length 76:56 (Act 2/1998 reissue)
Label RCA (original)
Velvel (1998 reissue)
Producer Ray Davies

Mp3 @320

Preservation: Act 1 and Preservation: Act 2 are rather strange 1973 concept albums released as separate albums in 1973 and 1974 by The Kinks. Originally the plan was to create a single rock opera, but the idea was scratched!

The Preservation albums were not well-received by critics and sold poorly (the first one peaking on the Billboard 200 at #177), though the live performances of the material were much better received.

Act 1 coverMany hardcore Kinks fans were alienated by Ray Davies’ melodramatic songwriting during the Preservation project era, resulting in albums that played more like the soundtracks to a piece of musical theatre than rock albums.

However, more recent reviews of Preservation: Act 1 have been more sympathetic to its ambitions. In particular, All Music’s Stephen Thomas Erlewine has declared “Sweet Lady Genevieve” to be the “real candidate for Davies’ forgotten masterpiece”.

The CD reissue of Preservation: Act 1 includes the single versions of “Preservation” and “One of the Survivors”, neither of which are available on the original vinyl release. The latter briefly charted on the Billboard Pop Singles chart peaking at #108.

Arriving in May, 1974, just six months after PRESERVATION ACT 1, the Kinks’ double-album PRESERVATION ACT 2 better represented the scope of Ray Davies’s aspirations to extend his creative talent to the arena of musical theater.

It begins roughly where ACT 1 ended, with the formerly placid inhabitants of Davies’ mythical English country village taking up arms against the sleazy dictator Flash. While Flash represents animal desires given free reign, opposition leader Mr.Black takes advantage of citizens’ Puritan desires for good old law and order.

As the two demagogues circle each other, the masses quickly become pawns in a political morality play that has little actual political content and no morality to speak of, save for Davies’ obvious affection for everyday folks.

Musically, PRESERVATION ACT 2 closely follows the style Davies affected in ACT 1. The songs are tightly produced, with close harmonies, a liberal sprinkling of hooks, and a high level of drama. Davies has periodically threatened to turn the entire PRESERVATION into a Broadway show, and this album is a reminder of just how close it was to the time-honored Broadway style even when he first conceived it.

The Kinks here are Dave Davies, Ray Davies (vocals, guitar); John Gosling (keyboards); John Dalton (bass guitar); Mick Avory (drums).

Additional personnel: Laurie Brown (flute, tenor saxophone, trumpet); Alan Holmes (clarinet, baritone saxophone); John Beecham (trombone, tuba); Pamela Travis, Krysia Kocjan, Sue Brown, Lee Pavey, Chris Musk (background vocals).


Tracklisting and Details

  1. “Announcement” – 0:41
  2. “Introduction to Solution” – 2:43
  3. “When a Solution Comes” – 3:40
  4. “Money Talks” – 3:44
  5. “Announcement” – 0:55
  6. “Shepherds of the Nation” – 4:17
  7. “Scum of the Earth” – 2:45
  8. “Second-Hand Car Spiv” – 4:01
  9. “He’s Evil” – 4:25
  10. “Mirror of Love” – 3:26
  11. “Announcement” – 0:34
  12. “Nobody Gives” – 6:33
  13. “Oh Where Oh Where Is Love?” – 3:40
  14. “Flash’s Dream (The Final Elbow)” – 4:17
  15. “Flash’s Confession” – 4:06
  16. “Nothing Lasts Forever” – 3:42
  17. “Announcement” – 0:20
  18. “Artificial Man” – 5:30
  19. “Scrapheap City” – 3:16
  20. “Announcement” – 1:05
  21. “Salvation Road” – 3:20
  22. “Mirror of Love”* – 3:29
  23. “Slum Kids”* – 6:27

The songs marked with a star are bonus tracks on CD reissues.

1. Announcement stereo mix, recorded Jan-Mar 1974 at Konk Studios, Hornsey, London
2. Introduction To Solution stereo mix, recorded Jan-Mar 1974 at Konk Studios, Hornsey, London
3. When A Solution Comes stereo mix, recorded Jan-Mar 1974 at Konk Studios, Hornsey, London
4. Money Talks stereo mix, recorded Jan-Mar 1974 at Konk Studios, Hornsey, London
5. Announcement stereo mix, recorded Jan-Mar 1974 at Konk Studios, Hornsey, London
6. Shepherds Of The Nation stereo mix, recorded Jan-Mar 1974 at Konk Studios, Hornsey, London
7. Scum Of The Earth stereo mix, recorded Jan-Mar 1974 at Konk Studios, Hornsey, London
8. Second-Hand Car Spiv stereo mix, recorded Jan-Mar 1974 at Konk Studios, Hornsey, London
9. He’s Evil stereo mix, recorded Jan-Mar 1974 at Konk Studios, Hornsey, London
10. Mirror Of Love stereo mix, Ray Davies’ demo, recorded probably Dec 1973 at Konk Studios, Hornsey, London
11. Announcement stereo mix, recorded Jan-Mar 1974 at Konk Studios, Hornsey, London
12. Nobody Gives stereo mix, recorded Jan-Mar 1974 at Konk Studios, Hornsey, London
13. Oh Where Oh Where Is Love? stereo mix, recorded probably May-Jul 1973 at Konk Studios, Hornsey, London
14. Flash’s Dream (The Final Elbow) stereo mix, recorded Jan-Mar 1974 at Konk Studios, Hornsey, London
15. Flash’s Confession stereo mix, recorded Jan-Mar 1974 at Konk Studios, Hornsey, London
16. Nothing Lasts Forever stereo mix, recorded Jan-Mar 1974 at Konk Studios, Hornsey, London
17. Announcement stereo mix, recorded Jan-Mar 1974 at Konk Studios, Hornsey, London
18. Artificial Man stereo mix, recorded Jan-Mar 1974 at Konk Studios, Hornsey, London
19. Scrapheap City stereo mix, recorded Jan-Mar 1974 at Konk Studios, Hornsey, London
20. Announcement stereo mix, recorded Jan-Mar 1974 at Konk Studios, Hornsey, London
21. Salvation Road stereo mix, recorded probably May-Jul 1973 at Konk Studios, Hornsey, London
22. Mirror Of Love stereo mix, new recording with full band, US single mix (different from UK single mix), recorded 17-18 Jun, 1974 at Konk Studios, Hornsey, London
23. Slum Kids live, stereo mix, recorded Mar 1979 at (unknown venue)

Big thanks to Mr Ghost



We do not host any files here. If this post contains a link to content hosted elsewhere, this is content found by a simple search on the worldwide freedom web. However, if for some valid reason, you object to a said content, or any content here, please let us know and we will remove the content in question.

Any content linked to here is only meant as a taster for the original work itself and is posted on the strict understanding that anyone who downloads the taster, deletes said content within 24 hours. We would assume that these fans will then buy the original work and we greatly encourage them to do so.

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October 24, 2008 Posted by | Music_Pop, The Kinks, _MUSIC | Leave a comment

Darjeeling Limited Soundtrack (2007)


Darjeeling Limited Soundtrack (2007)
Released September 25, 2007
Genre Film Score / Rock / Classical
Length 55:48
Label ABKCO
Producer Wes Anderson and Randall Poster

We do like Wes Anderson’s films! We’ve posted a lot of his OST and other stuff before – including the DVD for this filmHERE!

He’s a genius at placing music within his works.

And here once more is another quirky, disjointed, excellent soundtrack from a Wes Anderson film. A wonderfully eclectic album!

A lot of Indian music here …. unsurprisingly!

Most of the album features film score music composed by great Bengali filmmaker Satyajit Ray and other artists from the cinema of India. The works include “Charu’s Theme”, from Ray’s acclaimed 1964 film, Charulata.

The album also features three songs by The Kinks, “Powerman”, “Strangers” and “This Time Tomorrow”, all from the 1970 album Lola versus Powerman and the Moneygoround, Part One,

The album also features “Play With Fire” by The Rolling Stones. This is actually the first Wes Anderson soundtrack album to feature a song by The Rolling Stones – since, although Bottle Rocket, Rushmore, and The Royal Tenenbaums all featured Rolling Stones songs, contractual reasons prevented the songs from appearing on the soundtrack albums!

Warning! There is one vile Peter Sarstedt track here!

The film is the first of Anderson’s not to feature music by Devo’s Mark Mothersbaugh.

Tracklisting

1. “Where Do You Go To (My Lovely)” (Peter Sarstedt) – 4:38
2. “Title Music” (Vilayat Khan) – 2:25
* From Satyajit Ray’s Jalsaghar
3. “This Time Tomorrow” (The Kinks) – 3:25
4. “Title Music” (Satyajit Ray) – 1:25
* From Satyajit Ray’s Teen Kanya
5. “Title Music” (Jyotitindra Moitra) – 1:37
* From Merchant Ivory’s The Householder
* Performed by Jyotitindra Moitra and Ali Akbar Khan
6. “Ruku Room” (Satyajit Ray) – 0:49
* From Satayajit Ray’s Joi Baba Felunath
7. “Charu’s Theme” (Satyajit Ray) – 1:01
* From Ray’s 1964 film, Charulata
8. “Title Music” (Shankar Jaikishan) – 2:33
* From Merchant Ivory’s Bombay Talkie
9. “Montage” (Satyajit Ray) – 1:15
* From Nityananda Datta’s Baksa Badal
10. “Prayer” (Jodphur Sikh Temple Congregation) – 1:07
11. “Farewell to Earnest” (Jyotitindra Moitra) – 1:59
* From Merchant Ivory’s The Householder
12. “The Deserted Ballroom” (Satyajit Ray) – 0:46
* From Merchant Ivory’s Shakespeare Wallah
13. “Suite Bergamasque: 3. Clair de Lune” (Claude Debussy) – 4:57
* Performed by Alexis Weissenberg
14. “Typewriter Tip, Tip Tip” (Shankar Jaikishan) – 4:37
* From Merchant Ivory’s Bombay Talkie
15. “Memorial” (Narlai Village Troubador) – 1:26
16. “Strangers” (The Kinks) – 3:20
17. “Praise Him” (Udaipur Convent School Nuns) – 0:43
18. “Symphony No. 7 in A (Op. 92): Allegro Con Brio” (Ludwig van Beethoven) – 6:48
* Performed by Fritz Reiner and the Chicago Symphony Orchestra
19. “Play With Fire” (The Rolling Stones) – 2:15
20. “Arrival in Benaras” (Vilayat Khan) – 1:44
* From Merchant Ivory’s The Guru
21. “Powerman” (The Kinks) – 4:19
22. “Les Champs-Élysées” (Joe Dassin) – 2:39

Here she be:

Darjeeling_Limited



We do not host any files here. If this post contains a link to content hosted elsewhere, this is content found by a simple search on the worldwide freedom web. However, if for some valid reason, you object to a said content, or any content here, please let us know and we will remove the content in question.

Any content linked to here is only meant as a taster for the original work itself and is posted on the strict understanding that anyone who downloads the taster, deletes said content within 24 hours. We would assume that these fans will then buy the original work and we greatly encourage them to do so.

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September 16, 2008 Posted by | Mark Mothersbaugh, Music_ClassicalModern, Music_ClassicRock, Music_OST, OTHER_CINEMA, Rolling Stones, Satyajit Ray, The Kinks, Various Artists, Wes Anderson, _MUSIC | Leave a comment

The Kinks: The Pye Box (10 CDs) FLAC (work in progress!)


The Kinks: The Pye Box (10 CDs) FLAC

(this is a work in progress!)

INDEX OF POSTED ALBUMS

  • Face To Face (stereo)
  • Something Else

Tubert is putting together the best sounding early Kinks collection available.

This is the first part thereof!

Thanks Tubert! May your first camel be a dromedary!

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The Kinks were an English pop/rock group formed in 1963, and categorised as a British Invasion band, along with the other members of the so-called Big Four (The Beatles, The Rolling Stones and The Who).

Despite being less commercially successful than these three contemporaries, mostly because of an untimely four-year ban from the United States in the mid-to-late 1960s, the Kinks are cited among them as one of the most important and influential rock bands of all time.

The band’s early hard-driving singles set a standard in the mid-1960s for rock & roll, while albums such as Face to Face,Something Else, The Kinks Are the Village Green Preservation Society, Arthur and Muswell Hillbillies are highly regarded by fans, critics, and peers, and are considered amongst the most influential recordings of the era.

The Kinks first gained prominence in 1964 with the classic single “You Really Got Me”, written by Ray Davies (it was their third single).

The group’s original line-up consisted of Ray Davies on lead vocals/rhythm guitar/keyboards, his brother Dave Davies on lead guitar/vocals, Pete Quaife on backing vocals/bass guitar, and Mick Avory on drums and percussion.

Following Quaife’s departure in 1969, the band centred around the three remaining original members and frequently changed bassists and keyboardists.

In 1984, friction between Dave Davies and Mick Avory resulted in the latter’s departure, leaving only the brothers from the original line-up.

With the loss of Ray’s best friend and longest serving member in the band beside them, the band managed to soldier on for another decade. However, the increasingly deteriorating relationship between the Davies brothers, and a string of unsuccessful records brought a break-up of the band in the mid-90s.

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Face To Face (stereo)
Sanctuary Records: 2005
Format: FLAC

Released 28 October 1966 / 7 December, 1966 (USA)
Recorded 23 October 1965 – 21 June 1966
Length 38:31
Label Pye Records (UK) / Reprise Records R-6228 (US)
Producer Shel Talmy

Reviews

    So lets start with “Face To Face”. Possibly the nastiest sounding Kinks album of all.

    The sibilance (for those of you in Rio Vista thats “Ss’s”) is totally out of bounds.

    Mono/Stereo/K2/Mini Lp, it doesn’t matter. The 16bit/44.1Khz CD format simply can’t handle the master tape.

    This leaves us with two options. The K2 version or this one.

    The K2 is pure mono. This one is quasi stereo.

    The mono/stereo mix isn’t the issue here. This one sounds more comfortable on my ears. You may disagree but below are FREE links to the one I like

    This box is the original Pye recordings with no bonus tracks.

    //upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/d/db/Face_To_Face.jpg/200px-Face_To_Face.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.Face to Face was released by The Kinks in 1966 on Reprise Records in the United States and Pye Records in the United Kingdom.

    A major artistic breakthrough for Kinks’ songwriter Ray Davies, the LP represents the first full flowering of Davies’ use of narrative, observation, and wry social commentary in his songs.

    It heralded The Kinks’ move away from the hard-driving rock and roll style of 1964-65, which had catapulted the group to international stardom.

    It was the first Kinks album consisting entirely of Ray Davies compositions, and was their first album recorded over several months, rather than in one concentrated session.

    Davies, who had suffered a nervous breakdown just prior to the major recording sessions for the album, seemed to be responding to the overwhelming pressures on him by escaping into stories of the bittersweet existence of ordinary suburban people, their failings, and frustrations.

    The new style of writing began gradually the previous year with compositions such as “A Well Respected Man” and “Dedicated Follower of Fashion”, and came to full fruition in May 1966 with the hit single “Sunny Afternoon”, which reached Number 1 in the UK. This song’s great popularity proved to Davies and the Kinks’ managers that the group could find success with this style of songwriting.

    The new album would follow this pattern, as would the group’s recorded output for the next five years. The 1966-1971 period inaugurated by this album would later be called Davies’ and the Kinks’ “golden age”. The album’s songs are rife with Davies’ sardonic wit, skewering the vapid Don Juan of “Dandy” (which became a hit for Herman’s Hermits) and the self-absorption and hypocrisy of the wealthy elite on “House in the Country” and “Most Exclusive Residence for Sale”.

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    Davies’ humanity is also on display in tracks such as “Rosie, Won’t You Please Come Home”, an unusual 1960s pop song that sided with the plight of parents against the cruelty of a rebellious child (a true harbinger of the Kinks’ growing affinity for unfashionable but timeless themes).

    Other highlights include “Sunny Afternoon”, the world-weary “Too Much on My Mind”, the foreboding “Rainy Day in June”, and the Eastern-tinged, enigmatic “Fancy”. Some rock historians have credited the album as arguably one of the first concept albums in rock/pop, with the loose common theme of social observation.

    In its original inception, Davies had attempted to bridge the songs together with sound effects, but was forced to revert to the more standard album format by Pye Records before the album’s release. Some of these effects remain, in “Party Line”, “Holiday in Waikiki”, “Rainy Day in June”, and other songs not included in the final album (“End of the Season”, “Big Black Smoke”).

    Contractual issues held up the release of the album for several months after final recording, and Davies was also in conflict with Pye over the final album cover art, whose psychedelic theme he later felt was inappropriate.

    Although one of the more important albums of its era, it is also probably the most dated of the Kinks’ major albums, especially in its production and mixing.

    The album was released in a particularly tumultuous year for the band, with personnel problems (bassist Pete Quaife was injured, resigned, and later rejoined the band), legal and contractual battles, and an ongoing hectic touring schedule. The album was critically well received, but did not sell particularly well at the time of its release (especially in the US), and was out of print for many years. Reissues since 1998 have included bonus tracks of songs released contemporaneously as singles (most notably “Dead End Street”) and two unreleased tracks.

    Tracklisting

    Side 1
    1. “Party Line” – 2:35
    2. “Rosy Won’t You Please Come Home” – 2:34
    3. “Dandy” – 2:12
    4. “Too Much on My Mind” – 2:28
    5. “Session Man” – 2:14
    6. “Rainy Day in June” – 3:10
    7. “A House in the Country” – 3:03
    Side 2
    1. “Holiday in Waikiki” – 2:52
    2. “Most Exclusive Residence for Sale” – 2:48
    3. “Fancy” – 2:30
    4. “Little Miss Queen of Darkness” – 3:16
    5. “You’re Lookin’ Fine” – 2:46
    6. “Sunny Afternoon” – 3:36
    7. “I’ll Remember” – 2:27

    Here she be:

    Part 1: http://www.megaupload.com/?d=K73YCJ6T
    Part 2: http://www.badongo.com/file/9197808
    Part 3: http://www.zshare.net/download/11528381a4b13083

    Something Else

    Released 15 September 1967
    Recorded
    November 1966 – July 1967
    Length
    36:32
    Label
    Pye NPL 18193 / Reprise Records
    Producer
    Shel Talmy, Ray Davies

    Reviews

    This is the stereo version. The mono/stereo debate will go on but not about *this* album. This is the one to own.

    //upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/2/2d/Somethingelse.jpg/200px-Somethingelse.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.Something Else by the Kinks, often referred to as just Something Else, was released in December 1967. It is generally considered one of the strongest in their catalogue, although it lacks the thematic integration of the albums that preceded and followed it.

    The album marks the final involvement of American producer Shel Talmy in the Kinks’ 1960s studio recordings; henceforth Ray Davies would assume recording production credits. Many of the recordings feature the keyboard work of session player, Nicky Hopkins, and the ethereal backing vocals of Ray Davies’ wife, Rasa.

    Songs on the album composed by Ray Davies followed his affinity for strongly English-inspired subject matter, including the stately, harpsichord-laden “Two Sisters”, the lazy shuffle of “End of the Season”, the sardonic and hilarious “David Watts” and the other standout tracks “Death of a Clown” (co-written and sung by lead guitarist Dave Davies) and “Afternoon Tea.” The album is capped by the otherworldly beauty of the wonderful single “Waterloo Sunset“, considered by many to be the career apogee of Davies’ songwriting.

    The songs on the album were recorded over a transitional phase of Davies’ songwriting career, between the fall of 1966 and the summer of 1967. During this time he and the Kinks had cut back on touring and had begun recording and stockpiling songs for his as-yet poorly defined “village green” project.

    Also, following the great commercial and personal success of the “Waterloo Sunset” single in May 1967, Davies became less focused on hits and more intent on exploring his own songwriting interests. In fact, the album title may come from Davies’ appeal to the Kinks’ management in the summer of 1967 that he wanted to do “something else” besides writing hit singles.

    The album is unusual in the Kinks’ catalogue from this period for the inclusion of three songs composed by guitarist Dave Davies, including the solo hit single “Death of a Clown.” Based on the unexpected success of the song, the younger Davies began exploring a solo career. The followup singles did not meet with the same success and, by mid-1969, his solo ambitions would be set aside for a decade.

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    The album sold poorly in the UK, in part because it competed with budget-priced compilation albums of early Kinks hits from 1964-1966. Also, singles-oriented Pye Records released “Waterloo Sunset” and “Death of A Clown” many months before the album itself, effectively dulling the enthusiasm of record buyers for the LP.

    The lack of success also reflected the changes occurring in pop music at the time, as well as The Kinks’ rapid movement towards unfashionable song themes, a trend which culminated in the subsequent album, The Kinks are the Village Green Preservation Society. They would score one more big UK hit single shortly after the release of Something Else with “Autumn Almanac” then would not have a big hit again until “Lola” in 1970.

    Something Else also sold poorly in the US upon release in January 1968, as did its predecessor, Face to Face. These albums had strong British themes; more importantly, the group was still the subject of a ban on live and television performances in the US. Critical opinions at the time of the album’s release were very positive (especially those of the nascent underground rock press, such as the publication Crawdaddy) and today it is ranked among the band’s best albums.

    In 2003, the album was ranked number 288 on Rolling Stone magazine’s list of the 500 greatest albums of all time.

    Tracklisting

    Side 1

    1. “David Watts” – 2:32

    2. “Death of a Clown” – 3:04 (Ray Davies/Dave Davies)

    3. “Two Sisters” – 2:01

    4. “No Return” – 2:03

    5. “Harry Rag” – 2:16

    6. “Tin Soldier Man” – 2:49

    7. “Situation Vacant” – 3:16

    Side 2

    8. “Love Me Till the Sun Shines” – 3:16 (Dave Davies)

    9. “Lazy Old Sun” – 2:48

    10. “Afternoon Tea” – 3:27

    11. “Funny Face” – 2:17 (Dave Davies)

    12. “End of the Season” – 2:57

    13. “Waterloo Sunset” – 3:15

    May 6, 2008 Posted by | Music_ClassicRock, Music_Pop, The Kinks, _MUSIC | Leave a comment