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Mr. Shane Mac Gowan Esq

You shoulda seen him before he had his teeth fixed!

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January 28, 2009 Posted by | Shane MacGowan, The Pogues, _MUSIC, _PHOTOGRAPHY | Leave a comment

Pogues Discography

192 kbps mp3

Streams of Whiskey
If I Should Fall From Grace – (with God)
Boys From the County Hell
Young Ned of the Hill
Rain Street
Sayonara
Battle of Brisbane
Body of an American, The
Summer in Siam
Thosands Are Sailing
Sunnyside of the Street
Dirty Old Town
Sickbed of Cuchulainn, The
Yeah, Yeah, Yeah, Yeah, Yeah
Fiesta
Sally Mclennane

Code:
http://rapidshare.com/files/168011180/Pu.sow.zip

Mirror

http://rapidshare.com/files/181579537/TPSOW.Mr.Chinn.zip

Rum Sodomy & The Lash

256kbps mp3

1. “The Sick Bed of Cúchulainn” (MacGowan) – 2:59
2. “The Old Main Drag” (MacGowan) – 3:19
3. “Wild Cats of Kilkenny” (MacGowan/Finer) – 2:48
4. “I’m a Man You Don’t Meet Every Day” (Traditional) – 2:55
5. “A Pair of Brown Eyes” (MacGowan) – 4:54
6. “Sally MacLennane” (MacGowan) – 2:43
7. “Dirty Old Town” (MacColl) – 3:45
8. “Jesse James” (traditional) – 2:58
9. “Navigator” (Gaston) – 4:12
10. “Billy’s Bones” (MacGowan) – 2:02
11. “The Gentleman Soldier” (traditional) – 2:04
12. “And the Band Played Waltzing Matilda” (Bogle) – 8:10

Code:
http://rapidshare.com/files/168016141/Pu.rs.tl.zip

Red Roses For Me

128kbps mp3

1. “Transmetropolitan” (MacGowan)
2. “The Battle of Brisbane” (MacGowan)
3. “The Auld Triangle” (Brendan Behan)
4. “Waxie’s Dargle” (Traditional)
5. “Boys from the County Hell” (MacGowan)
6. “Sea Shanty” (MacGowan)
7. “Dark Streets of London” (MacGowan)
8. “Whiskey You’re the Devil” (Traditional)
9. “Streams of Whiskey” (MacGowan)
10. “Poor Paddy” (Traditional)
11. “Dingle Regatta” (Traditional)
12. “Greenland Whale Fisheries” (Traditional)
13. “Down in the Ground Where the Dead Men Go” (MacGowan)
14. “Kitty” (Traditional)

Code:
http://rapidshare.com/files/168019309/Pu.rrfm.zip

Expanded Version

1 Transmetropolitan
2 The Battle Of Brisbane
3 The Aud Triangle
4 Waxie’s Dargle
5 Boys From The County Hell
6 Sea Shanty
7 Dark Streets Of London
8 Streams Of Whiskey
9 Poor Paddy
10 Dingle Regatta
11 Greenland Whale Fisheries
12 Down In The Ground Where The Deadmen Go
13 Kitty
14 The Leaving Of Liverpool (Bonus Track)
15 Muirshin Durkin (Bonus Track)
16 Repeal Of The Licensing Laws (Bonus Track)
17 And The Band Played Waltzing Matilda (Bonus Track)
18 Whiskey You’re The Devil (Bonus Track)
19 The Wild Rover (Bonus Track)

Code:
http://rapidshare.com/files/73956987/02tp_rrfm.rar

Peace and Love

128kbps mp3

1. “Gridlock” (J. Finer/A. Ranken)
2. “White City” (MacGowan)
3. “Young Ned Of The Hill” (T. Woods/Ron Kavana)
4. “Misty Morning, Albert Bridge” (J. Finer)
5. “Cotton Fields” (MacGowan)
6. “Blue Heaven” (P. Chevron/D. Hunt)
7. “Down All The Days” (MacGowan)
8. “USA” (MacGowan)
9. “Lorelei” (P. Chevron)
10. “Gartloney Rats” (T. Woods)
11. “Boat Train” (MacGowan)
12. “Tombstone” (J. Finer)
13. “Night Train to Lorca” (J. Finer)
14. “London You’re A Lady” (MacGowan)

Code:
http://rapidshare.com/files/168021737/Pu.PnL.zip

Hell’s Ditch

128kbps mp3

1. “Sunny Side of the Street” (MacGowan/Finer)
2. “Sayonara” (MacGowan)
3. “The Ghost of a Smile” (MacGowan)
4. “Hell’s Ditch” (MacGowan/Finer)
5. “Lorca’s Novena” (MacGowan)
6. “Summer in Siam” (MacGowan)
7. “Rain Street” (MacGowan)
8. “Rainbow Man” (Woods)
9. “The Wake of the Medusa” (Finer)
10. “The House of Gods” (MacGowan)
11. “5 Green Queens & Jean” (MacGowan/Finer)
12. “Maidrin Rua” (Traditional)
13. “Six to Go” (Woods)

Code:
http://rapidshare.com/files/168023909/Pu.h.s.d.zip

Pogue Mahone

128kbps mp3

1. “How Come” – 2:50
2. “Living in a World Without Her” – 3:20
3. “When the Ship Comes In” – 3:14
4. “Anniversary” – 4:06
5. “Amadie” – 1:53
6. “Love You ‘Till the End” – 4:32
7. “Bright Lights” – 2:37
8. “Oretown” – 3:50
9. “Point Mirabeau” – 3:31
10. “Tosspint” – 3:32
11. “Four O’Clock in the Morning” – 3:12
12. “Where that Love’s Been Gone” – 3:50
13. “The Sun and the Moon” – 3:22

Code:
http://rapidshare.com/files/168026325/Pu.mah.zip

Waitng for Herb

128kbps mp3

1. Tuesday Morning (Stacy)
2. “Smell of Petroleum” (Finer)
3. “Haunting” (Woods)
4. “Once Upon a Time” (Finer)
5. “Sitting on Top of the World” (Finer/Fearnley/Woods)
6. “Drunken Boat” (Fearnley)
7. “Big City” (Finer)
8. “Girl from the Wadi Hammamat” (Ranken/Finer)
9. “Modern World” (Hunt)
10. “Pachinko” (Finer)
11. “My Baby’s Gone” (Ranken)
12. “Small Hours” (Finer)

Code:
http://rapidshare.com/files/168030059/Pu.w4h.zip

If I Should Fall From Grace With God

128kbps mp3

1. “If I Should Fall from Grace with God” (Shane MacGowan)
2. “Turkish Song of the Damned” (MacGowan/Jem Finer)
3. “Bottle of Smoke” (MacGowan/Finer)
4. “Fairytale of New York” (MacGowan/Finer)
5. “Metropolis”
6. “Thousands Are Sailing” (Phil Chevron)
7. “Fiesta” (MacGowan/Finer)
8. “Medley: The Recruiting Sergeant/The Rocky Road to Dublin/The Galway Races” (Traditional)
9. “Streets of Sorrow/Birmingham Six” (MacGowan/Terry Woods)
10. “Lullaby of London” (MacGowan)
11. “Sit Down by the Fire” (MacGowan)
12. “The Broad Majestic Shannon” (MacGowan)
13. “Worms” (Traditional)

Code:
http://rapidshare.com/files/168032810/Pu.iisffg.zip
Code:
All files are Double-zipped with recovery record added
Code:
No Passwords

thans ketro !

the Ultimate Collection

All the Classic Pogues tracks on one album.

Track listing:

Track 1: Rainy Night In Soho
Track 2: Sally MacLennane
Track 3: Irish Rover – Pogues & Dubliners
Track 4: Dirty Old Town
Track 5: Fairytale Of New York – Pogues & Kirsty MacColl
Track 6: Streams Of Whiskey
Track 7: If I Should Fall From Grace With God
Track 8: Fiesta
Track 9: Body Of An American
Track 10: Misty Morning Albert Bridge
Track 11: Repeal Of The Licensing Laws
Track 12: Boys From The County Hell
Track 13: Sunnyside Of The Street
Track 14: Pair Of Brown Eyes
Track 15: Summer In Siam
Track 16: Sickbed Of Cuchulainn
Track 17: London Girl
Track 18: Tuesday Morning
Track 19: White City
Track 20: Hell’s Ditch
Track 21: Young Ned Of The Hill
Track 22: Thousands Are Sailing

http://rapidshare.com/files/123633271/The_Pogues_-_Ultimate_Collection.rar

January 25, 2009 Posted by | The Pogues | Leave a comment

Nick Cave – Rainy Night in Soho

There’s a light I hold before me and you’re the measure of my dreams


Nick Cave does a fine version of one of Shane MacGowan‘s many great songs, the sublime Rainy Night in Soho.

A song, in the best songwriting traditions, imbued with beautiful poetry and a sumptuous melody. A timeless classic.

This video comes from an episode of the top BBC Music Show “Later with Jools Holland” back in 1992.


Cave of course is a huge fan of Shane’s work and they have recorded together a few times.

“Rainy Night in Soho” was recorded by Cave for the What a Wonderful World EP released in December 1992 on Mute Records.

On this EP, MacGowan also performed a Cave song, “Lucy” .

Both Shane and Nick, rather surreally, duetted on the classic Louis Armstrong hit “What a Wonderful World”!!

“Rainy Night in Soho” was originally included on the Elvis Costello produced Poguetry in Motion EP, by The Pogues which was their first single to make the UK Top 40.

A different version can be found on an expanded edition of the group’s seminal 1985 release, Rum, Sodomy and the Lash.

The song is a huge fan favourite and is commonly performed at Pogues concerts and has been included in their recent setlists since their reformation in 2001.

The song has been included on every Greatest Hits album the band has released, and is the first track on their 2001 disc, Ultimate Collection.

Many artists have covered this great song. most recently, a rather good version appeared on Damien Dempsey‘s fine 2008 album, The Rocky Road, a collection of traditional ballads.


art by RedFraction

Rainy Night in Soho

I’ve been loving you a long time
Down all the years, down all the days
And I’ve cried for all your troubles
Smiled at your funny little ways
We watched our friends grow up together
And we saw them as they fell
Some of them fell into Heaven
Some of them fell into Hell

I took shelter from a shower
And I stepped into your arms
On a rainy night in Soho
The wind was whistling all its charms
I sang you all my sorrows
You told me all your joys
Whatever happened to that old song
To all those little girls and boys

Now the song is nearly over
We may never find out what it means
But there’s a light I hold before me
And you’re the measure of my dreams
The measure of my dreams

Sometimes I wake up in the morning
The gingerlady by my bed
Covered in a cloak of silence
I hear you in my head
I’m not singing for the future
I’m not dreaming of the past
I’m not talking of the fist time
I never think about the last

Now the song is nearly over
We may never find out what it means
Still there’s a light I hold before me
You’re the measure of my dreams
The measure of my dreams


Shane MacGowan (1991)


NOTE:

We do not host any files here. If this post contains a link to content hosted elsewhere, this is content found by a simple search on the worldwide freedom web. However, if for some valid reason, you object to a said content, or any content here, please let us know and we will remove the content in question.

Any content linked to here is only meant as a taster for the original work itself and is posted on the strict understanding that anyone who downloads the taster, deletes said content within 24 hours. We would assume that these fans will then buy the original work and we greatly encourage them to do so.

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January 23, 2009 Posted by | Nick Cave, Shane MacGowan, The Pogues, _MUSIC, _VIDEO | Leave a comment

Nick Cave & Kylie Minogue & The Pogues – Death is not the End

A very interesting star studded cover of Bob Dylan’s great “Death is not the End”, originally from his much maligned, but actually decent 1988 LP Down in the Groove.

‘Death Is Not The End’ was covered by Nick Cave – an artist who has always been heavily influenced by Bob Dylan – with the Bad Seeds in 1996 on the Murder Ballads LP.

The Cave version featured several vocalists, such as Anita Lane, Kylie Minogue, PJ Harvey, and Shane McGowan, including Nick Cave himself and Bad Seeds drummer Thomas Wydler and guitarist Blixa Bargeld.

They each sing a verse – strangely the only song the only song on Murder Ballads where an actual death does not occur!



art by 666Glass666

Death is not the End

When you’re sad and when you’re lonely and you haven’t got a friend
Just remember that death is not the end
And all that you’ve held sacred, falls down and does not mend
Just remember that death is not the end
Not the end, not the end
Just remember that death is not the end

When you’re standing at the crossroads that you cannot comprehend
Just remember that death is not the end
And all your dreams have vanished and you don’t know what’s up the bend
Just remember that death is not the end
Not the end, not the end
Just remember that death is not the end

When the storm clouds gather ’round you, and heavy rains descend
Just remember that death is not the end
And there’s no one there to comfort you, with a helpin’ hand to lend
Just remember that death is not the end
Not the end, not the end
Just remember that death is not the end

Oh, the tree of life is growing
Where the spirit never dies
And the bright light of salvation shines
In dark and empty skies

When the cities are on fire with the burning flesh of men
Just remember that death is not the end
And you search in vain to find just one law abiding citizen
Just remember that death is not the end
Not the end, not the end
Just remember that death is not the end

– Bob Dylan, 1988


NOTE:

We do not host any files here. If this post contains a link to content hosted elsewhere, this is content found by a simple search on the worldwide freedom web. However, if for some valid reason, you object to a said content, or any content here, please let us know and we will remove the content in question.

Any content linked to here is only meant as a taster for the original work itself and is posted on the strict understanding that anyone who downloads the taster, deletes said content within 24 hours. We would assume that these fans will then buy the original work and we greatly encourage them to do so.

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January 23, 2009 Posted by | Blixa Bargeld, Kylie Minogue, Nick Cave, Shane MacGowan, The Bad Seeds, The Pogues, Thomas Wydler, _BOB DYLAN, _MUSIC, _VIDEO | Leave a comment

Bob Dylan, Bertolt Brecht and "When the Ship Comes In"

Album cover

Album The Times They Are a-Changin’
Released January 13, 1964
Recorded October 23, 1963
Genre Folk
Length 3:18
Label Columbia
Writer Bob Dylan
Producer Tom Wilson

The “Folky” created the classic “When the Ship Comes In” back in 1963 for his third studio album The Times They Are a-Changin’, released in 1964.

Joan Baez stated in the documentary film No Direction Home that “When the Ship Comes In” was, to a great extent inspired by an actual event when a hotel clerk that refused to give the young Dylan a room due to his “unwashed” appearance – of course, Dylan was not a superstar, or even famous outside of the folk movement back in 63!

The song then grew into a sprawling epic allegory, about vanquishing the oppressive “powers that be”.

It soon became a folk classic, a standard that was covered by a slew of famous artists within the folk movement, and some artists without.

Dylan’s main inspiration for this song is said to be Pirate Jenny (1928) by Bertolt Brecht & Kurt Weill, both thematically and in lines such as;

You gentlemen can wipe off that smile off your face
Cause every building in town is a flat one
This whole frickin’ place will be down to the ground
Only this cheap hotel standing up safe and sound

Inspiration was also likely gleamed from My Ship (1941), written by Kurt Weill & Ira Gershwin wherein are found lines such as;

My ship’s aglow with a million pearls
And rubies fill each bin
The sun sits high in a sapphire sky
When my ship comes in

In Dylan’s magnificent 2004 memoir, “Chronicles: Volume One,” – a must have not only for Dylan fans, not only for music fans and not only for fans of great literature! – there is a fascinating section exploring how Bob Dylan went from being an ingenue unable to write or structure an original song, to being – in an incredibly short timeframe – someone with an almost preternatural expertise in the art of songwriting.

https://i0.wp.com/upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/a/ae/Bob_Dylan_Chronicles,_Volume_1.jpgBob writes about how he took certain great songs from artists he worshiped and tried to break them down into kernel parts, so that he might attain some understanding of how their creators created them.

Among the slew of such artists he worshiped, as set out in “Chronicles”, prominent therein is Bertolt Brecht, who Bob writes had an enormous impact on his development as an artist.

As if describing a conversion on the road to Damascus, Dylan recalls in great detail “Brecht on Brecht,” a musical revue he saw in the Village in ’63. He only happened upon the show by chance while waiting for his girlfriend, , who was on the production staff.

“My little shack in the universe was about to expand into some glorious cathedral, at least in songwriting terms,” he writes, describing his reaction to the music. “They were like folk songs in nature, but unlike folk songs, too, because they were sophisticated.”

Bob was struck in particular by “Pirate Jenny” from “The Threepenny Opera.” This bracing song, with music by Kurt Weill, tells the story, from the point of view of a maid, of an ominous black ship coming into town.

https://i2.wp.com/upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/f/f0/Bob_Dylan_in_November_1963.jpg“Each phrase comes at you from a 10-foot drop, scuttles across the road and then another comes like a punch on the chin,” Bob writes in “Chronicles.”

“This piece left you flat on your back and it demanded to be taken seriously. It lingered. Woody had never written a song like that,” he says, referring to his folk hero Woody Guthrie. “It wasn’t a protest or topical song and there was no love for people in it.”

After seeing the show, he writes, he painstakingly took apart the song’s structure, lyrics and melody to figure out what made it work.

“It was the form, the free verse association, the structure and disregard for the known certainty of melodic patterns to make it seriously matter, give it its cutting edge. It also has the ideal chorus for the lyrics. I wanted to figure out how to manipulate and control this particular structure and form.”

He continues, “I could see that the type of songs I was leaning towards singing didn’t exist and I began playing with the form, trying to grasp it — trying to make a song that transcended the information in it, the character and plot.”

So, “totally influenced by ‘Pirate Jenny,’ ” Bob says he began experimenting with his own songwriting!


Oh the time will come up
When the winds will stop
And the breeze will cease to be breathin’.
Like the stillness in the wind
‘Fore the hurricane begins,
The hour when the ship comes in.

Oh the seas will split
And the ship will hit
And the sands on the shoreline will be shaking.
Then the tide will sound
And the wind will pound
And the morning will be breaking.

Oh the fishes will laugh
As they swim out of the path
And the seagulls they’ll be smiling.
And the rocks on the sand
Will proudly stand,
The hour that the ship comes in.

And the words that are used
For to get the ship confused
Will not be understood as they’re spoken.
For the chains of the sea
Will have busted in the night
And will be buried at the bottom of the ocean.

A song will lift
As the mainsail shifts
And the boat drifts on to the shoreline.
And the sun will respect
Every face on the deck,
The hour that the ship comes in.

Then the sands will roll
Out a carpet of gold
For your weary toes to be a-touchin’.
And the ship’s wise men
Will remind you once again
That the whole wide world is watchin’.

Oh the foes will rise
With the sleep still in their eyes
And they’ll jerk from their beds and think they’re dreamin’.
But they’ll pinch themselves and squeal
And know that it’s for real,
The hour when the ship comes in.

Then they’ll raise their hands,
Sayin’ we’ll meet all your demands,
But we’ll shout from the bow your days are numbered.
And like Pharaoh’s tribe,
They’ll be drownded in the tide,
And like Goliath, they’ll be conquered.


Bob Dylan
Copyright ©1963; renewed 1991 Special Rider Music


There’s an interesting piece on the origins of this song, which talks about Pirate Jenny (1928) by Bertolt Brecht & Kurt Weill, and My Ship (1941), music by Kurt Weill and lyrics by Ira Gershwin, amongst others; allalongthewatchtower.dk/phorum/read as well including as a nice piece fromm Jason Zinoman, a few snippets of which we’ve borrowed above!

https://i2.wp.com/www.gmcreations.com/catalog/images/Ship%20Comes%20In.jpg

There’s a nice piece below about this great song from Jeff Nielsen at musicruinedmylife – a very fine blog!

musicruinedmylife? What a coincidence! Music ruined my life too! Well, music and alcohol. Actually, music and alcohol and drugs. Well, more accurately, music and nasty alcohol and nastier women!

Ahem … sorry …. A nice piece on Dylan, the protest song and some twenty two different versions of the classic “When the Ship Comes In“!

Great work mate!

Here’s the piece below …. Check out more stuff like this at musicruinedmylife motherfos!

God, I’m glad I’m not me.

Bob Dylan


The Ship Confused

by Jeff Nielsen (musicruinedmylife)

Recently, I told my father (a retired seventy-something philosophy professor and disavowed leftist) that I’d gone to see a Bob Dylan concert. He asked, “So are his songs about Iraq and Afghanistan now?”

In a knee-jerk response, I said, “Bob Dylan hasn’t written a protest song since 1964.”

Glib and a bit suspect. (“Au contraire, mon frere,” someone will comment, “what about “George Jackson”, “Hurricane” and …uh…“TV Talkin’ Song”?”) However, it is true that his Dylan, the old black and white, finger-pointin’ Dylan of ’63-’64, turned out to be just a fleeting facet of the man.

Everyone* has their own Dylan. Dylanologists (and, of course, Todd Haynes) have over the years, delineated these variegated Dylan archetypes (traditionalist, protest singer, rocker, country crooner, gypsy, Christian, hack, old cowboy etc.) which everyone is free to warp into their own one and only Dylan. Witness the depths that Jann Wenner of Rolling Stone and Sean Curnyn at Right Wing Bob will plumb to twist Dylan’s every twitch into a signal of allegiance to their own political vision. (As Joan Baez, in No Direction Home, informs those who ask if Bob will come and join their cause. “He never comes, you moron. When are you gonna get it?”)

My own Dylans are a hopeless mish-mash. At the age of ten “Gotta Serve Somebody” played alongside “You Don’t Bring me Flowers Anymore” and “I Will Survive” on my cheap transistor radio. At eleven, a cassette of Greatest Hits smeared together the earliest Dylans for an awkward pre-adolescent. Following a plunge into fundamentalist Christianity, I bought a used LP of Saved and topped it off with the, then-current, Knocked out Loaded. That duo – a gospel album and a hodgepodge – cooled me on Dylan for years. But, much later, I came back, and devoured his entire catalog – finding the wheat even in the chaff-ridden albums. I concluded that with each Dylan being rewarding (even if some are much less so) that picking a single favourite is an affront to the man’s work.

However, pushes turning to shoves, that stark, earnest, tune-pilfering Dylan of the early sixties is damn compelling for me. This is the Dylan of my father (a man who has ignored Bob for forty-some years yet can still recite whole verses of “The Times They Are A-Changin’”).

One crucial favourite of this era is “When the Ship Comes In” from The Times They-Are-A-Changin’. This hard-charging battle anthem seems to be about civil right but is in fact all about personal indignation. Joan Baez says after Bob, in all his scruffiness, was turned away from a hotel he wrote the song in a fury. It’s a short jump from the belligerence of this song’s, “Then they’ll raise their hands/Sayin’ we’ll meet all your demands/But we’ll shout from the bow your days are numbered” to “Positively 4th Street’s”, “You got a lotta nerve/To say you got a helping hand to lend/You just want to be on/The side that’s winning”. That anger, open or hidden, is one of the many constants in all of Dylan’s guises.

In the end, each of the facets are of a piece; there is no Dylan but Dylan.


“There was a time in my life when I fervently wanted to be Bob Dylan. Then I realized that practically everyone else in the world wanted to be Bob Dylan, too, and that even if we all got our wish, being Bob Dylan would be so common that it would be completely meaningless to be Bob Dylan even for the actual original Bob Dylan and the world would end up exactly the same as it was before.”

Frank Portman, King Dork


* Hemispheric bias duly noted.


Here for your listening pleasure, possibly, are twenty two different versions of “When the Ship Comes In.”

Bob Dylan

In 1963 at Carnegie Hall Dylan gave one of those the rambling introductions (“There are crueller Goliaths…”) that would later get him in trouble and then tore into the song, throwing a punk snarl into the consonants. Video (March on Washington) here.

The Hillmen

The phoniness that oozes from the living corpse named David Crosby may taint the Byrds for some but Chris Hillman, on the other hand, has a history including once leading this sterling bluegrass band (alongside future country star Vern Gosdin) who in 1964 effortlessly thrust the song back to another time and geography.

Arlo Guthrie

This live version from 1994 , with Pete Seeger (supposedly), feels laboured as Arlo’s Dylanesque voice (which he possess for very good reason) clashes with an inflated lite-rock arrangement.Video here

The Silkie

Underwhelming vocals and half-hearted accompaniment on this 1965 version of the song make this band sound like a wa-a-a-y too polite version of the (already pretty damn polite) Seekers. Video here

Billy Bragg

Bragg’s recent version of the song gives it a slightly mournful take, akin to Dylan’s later-period sad readings of “The Times They-are-a Changin’”, which is a shame as the world could use a clanging solo-electric guitar version like Bragg did for that damn “Times….” song.

Clancy Brothers with Tommy Makem

That hammy introduction (“You never thought you’d hear Dylan with an Irish accent did you?”) for this version of the song from 1992’s 30th Anniversary Concert reminds us that the Clancy’s are actors who bring a broad, theatrical feel to the song, perhaps bringing the song back to it’s roots in the song “Pirate Jenny” from Bertolt Brecht’s Three Penny Opera. Video here.

Carl Marcus Franklin

In his 2007 film, I’m Not There, director Todd Haynes cast Franklin to portray Dylan as a pre-teen African American named Woody and the young actor digs into the song’s gospel elements .Video here

Coal Porters

While this band, led by former Long Ryder and author Sid Griffin (who did justice to the Clash’s “Something About England on the Sandanista Project – previously) may not have created the lost Byrds version they aspire to this 2001 version still stands as a fitting tribute to Chris Hillman’s take on the song.

Hugues Aufray

Le Jour où le Bateau Viendra is a translation by French, (“French from France” as a good Franch-Canadian would specify) singer and Dylan pal, Aufray who gives the song a more heroic but still faithful read.

Idlewild

Idlewild go all sad n’ piano here for a version that will (for a lucky few) recall singer Roddy Woomble’s stunning solo album, My Secret is my Silence (which might better Idlewild’s tense but melodic sophomore 2000 album 1,000 Broken Windows from which this song is a b-side.)

Lionsong

It’s 1979 – the Clash have unleashed London Calling, Daniel Amos are preparing to break Christian rock free of the Eagles grasp with Horrendous Disc and somewhere there still existed this freeze-dried Mighty-Wind Christian folk band (not-to-be-missed album available here) full of banjo and church-choir break-it-down sections.

Mark Haines and Tom Leighton

In 2002 this East Coast Canadian folk duo did a fine accordion and tin whistle take on the song which has clearly become a Celtic standard thanks to the Clancy Brothers.

Totta & Wiehe

Totta Näslund, a veteran Swedish rocker, died of liver cancer in 2005 just before finishing an album of Dylan songs including this one of When the Ship Comes In (apparently a Euro-Dylan favourite) translated to Swedish (as När Vårt Skepp Slår Til) with Mikael Wiehe.

Peter, Paul, Mary

This trio was always disparaged for sanitizing Dylan (didn’t the Byrds do that too?) and this bouncy, yet sincere 1965 cover will not change anyone’s views on a group who are as static as Dylan is mercurial. Video here

The Pogues

Hampered a bit by trying so hard to sound like their earlier selves, this Shane McGownless-less, but Joe Strummer-fortified (previously), version of the Pogues circa 1996 do get the closest to doing a punk rock version of this song (albeit with heavy tin whistle).

Steve Gibbons

Okay.

Next.

The Hollies

Not only did the Hollies do a Dylan covers album as late as 1968 (it’s wretchedness causing Graham Nash to quit and inflict Crosby, Stills and Nash upon an unsuspecting world) but the syrupy arrangement here makes the Slkie sound like the Stooges. Video here

Roky Erickson (13the Floor Elevators.)

Like many Roky semi-bootlegs, this rough demo of uncertain date sounds like someone paid a derelict a mickey to sing into an old boombox. Yet, in his madness, Roky gets an apocalyptic death grip on the song that both Brecht and the Dylan of ’64 would understand.

Bruce T. Holmes

Ineffectually nice.

Barry McGuire and Terry Talbot

Y’know, Barry gets a lot of grief for Green, Green, Eve of Destruction and a batch of tepid Christian folk albums (including this one from 1995) but that gritty voice is a biting instrument that can give strength to even his, almost invariably, weak material.

The Golden Gate Strings

Their web-site says, “Come and hear the Golden Gate Strings and see how this exciting ensemble can add incomparable elegance Muzak to receptions, fundraisers, weddings and corporate events.

Bob Dylan (with Ron Wood and Keith Richards)

Here, in all its shambolic glory is the Live Aid version from 1985 with the rambling, heretical, introduction that kept Dylan on the outs with the cultural cognoscenti for a decade. In all fairness, Bob Geldof had it coming, as does anyone else who thinks that Dylan meet will meet their expectations. Video here.


If you truly believe you can withstand twenty-two versions in a row of the same song here is the compilation in its entirety (for preview purposes only to be deleted from your computer in 24 hours etc. etc.)



The Black Freighter panel above is from the Watchmen graphic novel from Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons –
the first chapter of which is titled “At Midnight, All the Agents…” after the line in “Desolation Row” plus chapter
ten is called “Two Riders Were Approaching” after the final line of “All Along the Watchtower”.

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October 7, 2008 Posted by | Billy Bragg, Music_Folk, The Pogues, _BOB DYLAN, _MUSIC, _POETRY | Leave a comment

Christy Moore & Shane MacGowan – Spancil Hill


I dreamt I stooped and kissed her as in the days of yore

Irish trad giant Christy Moore and a young looking Shane MacGowan rattle out this traditional classic – the beautiful lament Spancil Hill – on Irish TV (Ireland’s Late Late Show with Gay Byrne).

I remember seeing this on its first live broadcast! I was only about 6 years old then, of course!

Last night as I lay dreaming of pleasant days gone by
My mind being bent on rambling to Ireland I did fly
I stepped on board a vision and I followed with the wind
and I shortly came to anchor at the cross near Spancill Hill

T’was on the 23rd June, the day before the fair
When lreland’s sons and daughters and friends assembled there
The young ,the old, the brave, the bold came their duty to fulfil
At the parish church at Cloone , a mile from Spancill Hill

I went to see my neighbours to hear what they might say
The old ones were all dead and gone, the young one’s turning grey
I met the tailor Quigley, he’s bold as ever still
Sure he used to mend my britches when I lived at Spancill Hill

I paid a flying visit
To my first and only love
She’s white as any lily
And gentle as a dove
She threw her arms around me
Saying Johnny I love you still
She’s Meg the farmers daughter
And the pride of Spancil Hill

I dreamt I stooped and kissed her
As in the days of yore
She said Johnny you’re only joking
As many the times before
The cock crew in the morning
He crew both loud and shrill
And I woke in California

Many miles from Spancil Hill.

Big thanks to the original poster

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June 27, 2008 Posted by | Christy Moore, Music_Alternative, Music_Folk, Shane MacGowan, The Pogues, _MUSIC, _POETRY, _VIDEO | Leave a comment

The Pogues – Rum, Sodomy And The Lash + ‘Poguetry in Motion’ EP

The Pogues – Rum, Sodomy And The Lash
+ ‘Poguetry in Motion’ EP
mp3@192
Man, I played Rum, Sodomy And The Lash to death when it first came out!

A stone cold classic!

What’s more the CD issue comes replete with the wonderful Poguetry in Motion’ EP!

Get downloading now motherfuckers!

`Rum, Sodomy and the Lash’ was Winston Churchill’s famous description of the British Royal Navy and somehow suits the album down to the ground. The album its self is a masterpiece and certainly The Pogues most perfect and fully realised album, perfectly portraying their fantastic live performances of this period, the height of Shane MacGowan’s songwriting and there most inventive reinterpretation of traditional folk music.

Of the Shane MacGowan originals the singles `Sally MacLennane’ and `A Pair of Brown Eyes’ were obvious choices but `The Sick Bed of Cuchulainn’ `Billy’s Bones’ and `The Old Main Drag’ are equally accomplished songs. Only the instrumental `Wild Cats of Kilkenny’ smack of filler.

The choice and arrangement of the majority of the traditional standard are also inspired. `Dirty Old Town’ was possibly over produced to engineer it into their biggest single up to that point but the rough performances of `Navigator’, `The Gentleman Soldier’ and the Spider Stacey driven `Jesse James’ fit in with the album theme so much more. The one trick `I’m a Man You Don’t Meet Every Day’ is possibly the albums lowest point. The album ends perfectly with a fantastic performance on Eric Bogle’s `The Band Played Waltzing Matilda’.

The CD re-issue also includes the `Poguetry in Motion’ e.p. which is worth the cover price alone. Either of `The Body of an American’, `Rainy Night in Soho’ or `London Girl’ could have been singles in their own right and highlights the strength of MacGowan’s song writing during this period.

– Amazon reviewer

Tracklisting

1. Sick Bed of Cuchulainn
2. Old Main Drag
3. Wild Cats of Kilkenny
4. I’m a Man You Don’t Meet Every Day
5. Pair of Brown Eyes
6. Sally Mac Lennane
7. Pistol for Paddy Garcia
8. Dirty Old Town
9. Jesse James
10. Navigator
11. Billy’s Bones
12. Gentleman Soldier
13. Band Played Waltzing Matilda
14. A Pistol For Paddy Garcia (Bonus Track)
15. London Girl (Bonus Track)
16. Rainy Night In Soho (Bonus Track)
17. Body Of An American (Bonus Track)
18. Planxty Noel Hill (Bonus Track)
19. The Parting Glass (Bonus Track)

pw=gammon (if needed)
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June 27, 2008 Posted by | Music_Alternative, Music_IrishMusic, Shane McGowan, The Pogues, _MUSIC | Leave a comment

The Pogues – Red Roses For Me + Bonus Tracks



The Pogues – Red Roses For Me
+ Bonus Tracks
mp3@192

The magnificent debut from Shane Mac Gowan and his pals!

A real kick in the ass for the music biz at the time … and especially for the rarified world of Irish traditional music!

This astounding debut appeared fully-formed and gloriously unique, preceded only by their single Dark Streets Of London (in a slightly different version to that on the album), its surface shambolics belying a solid musical and lyrical depth and maturity. Red Roses For Me was produced by Stan Brennan, who ran Rocks Off Records in West One, where Shane sometimes served behind the counter. It was his long term mission to get the band off the ground, and he managed to pour the Pogue magic, unspilled and distilled, into the flagon at Wapping’s tiny Elephant Studios.

The Anglo Celtic sound of the Pogues, fermented in London’s glamorous King’s Cross, is a mixture of pub and punk, both Shane and Mancunian Maestro Jimmy Fearnley having been veterans of punk band the Nips (formerly the Nipple Erectors), but played with an exuberance and an excellence that proved impossible to resist, despite the dark rising tide of New Romanticism, except by an old guard who thought the Pogues represented the stereotype of the drunken Irish paddy they were trying to escape. To be fair, it is rumoured that Shane likes a drink.

The album is embellished with six vital bonus tracks. And The Band Played Waltzing Matilda, Eric Bogle’s chilling account of Gallipoli, was revisited on Rum, Sodomy And The Lash, but this is the original flipside of their debut single. You may know the song by Eric Bogle or June Tabor, but not like this. Repeal Of The Licensing Laws was the B-side of the (cleaned-up) Boys From The County Hell. The band returned to Elephant in 1985 to record the B-sides Whiskey You’re The Devil and Muirshin Durkin, both for the single A Pair Of Brown Eyes, and The Wild Rover and The Leaving Of Liverpool backed up Sally MacLennane. Those last two A-sides are from Rum, Sodomy And The Lash, the next essential Pogues acquisition after this one.

Tracklisting

1. Transmetropolitan
2. Battle of Brisbane
3. Auld Triangle
4. Waxie’s Dargle
5. Boys from the Country Hell
6. Sea Shanty
7. Dark Streets of London
8. Streams of Whiskey
9. Poor Paddy
10. Dingle Regatta
11. Greenland Whale Fisheries
12. Down in the Ground Where the Deadmen Go
13. Kitty
14. The Leaving Of Liverpool (Bonus Track)
15. Muirshin Durkin (Bonus Track)
16. Repeal Of The Licensing Laws (Bonus Track)
17. And The Band Played Waltzing Matilda (Bonus Track)
18. Whiskey You’re The Devil (Bonus Track)
19. The Wild Rover (Bonus Track)

pw=gammon (if needed)
Big thanks to the original poster

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June 27, 2008 Posted by | Music_Alternative, Music_IrishMusic, Shane McGowan, The Pogues, _MUSIC | Leave a comment

The Pogues – Just Look Them In The Eye And Say… POGUEMAHONE (Box Set)

The Pogues – Just Look Them In The Eye And Say… POGUEMAHONE (Box Set)
5 Discs, MP3 @ 320kbs

Fucking hell! Is it Christmas already?

I hate Christmas. But I love this!

The wonderful Shane Mc Gowan – one of the finest songwriters this side of Bob Dylan ever to craft a timeless classic – and troubadours here in a treasure trove of rarities and classics.

Compiled by The Pogues with track by track annotations from Phil Chevron, there are a bountiful 109 tracks traversing the years 1983 – demos pre-dating their first recordings for Stiff Records – through to live recordings from 2001 when The Pogues re-convened for a series of memorable live shows for the first time since they disbanded in 1996.

Just Look Them Straight In The Eye is an absolute treasure trove of unreleased recordings for all Pogues fans, spanning their entire career and featuring rehearsal recordings, B-sides, out-takes, rare mixes, BBC sessions plus recordings with Steve Earle, Joe Strummer and, of course, Kirsty MacColl.

Alongside these are unreleased soundtrack recordings from Sid and Nancy, Garbo and Straight To Hell, alternate versions of Pogues’ classics like “Fairy Tale Of New York” and “Rainy Night In Soho” and a generous selection of live recordings.

These include full-throttle live recordings from Barrowlands, Glasgow in 1987 and The Pogues featuring Joe Strummer from the Forum in London, December 1991 where they perform Clash favourites “London Calling” and “I Fought The Law”. The box set rounds off with live tracks from The Pogues’ triumphant reunion shows at Brixton running up to Christmas 2001.

Including original songs never before released and covers such as the Lovin’ Spoonful’s “Do You Believe In Magic”, Barry McGuire’s “Eve of Destruction”, The Faces’ “Maggie May” plus more traditional fare like Ewan MacColl’s “Hot Ashphalt” and “North Sea Holes”, this collection presents a true alternative picture of The Pogues’ irrepressible career, an extraordinarily rich addendum to their already available recorded works.

Philip Chevron has generously provided these liner notes for those buying the box set through a virtual medium (e.g. MP3) rather than the physical box set:

Philip Chevron emerges from beneath a pile of old tapes and diaries to piece together the Pogues’ hidden legacy.

So what’s all this then? A bunch of dodgy Pogues tracks that did not merit release at the time they were made? Well, that is inevitably true of some of them, though there’s always the hope that time and an apparently finite body of work will have added some lustre or curiosity value to even those hapless orphans. But it doesn’t tell the whole story. Suppose you record a couple of tracks like Ewan MacColl’s “North Sea Holes” and “Hot Asphalt” [Disc One] as demos for an intended Pogues album which never gets made? You never do record the intended “master” version of such songs because the shape of the album you do go on to make has shifted considerably. What does that make your “demos”?

Well, I suppose it renders them no longer demos but Lost Masters, as they appear nowhere else in the Pogues’ catalogue. And we found the Pogues archive, when we finally got around to scrutinising it, turned out to be full of just such items. Before, between and even during the making of our seven studio albums, there was this constant restlessness to try out new things, redevelop older ideas, and generally just try to figure out if there were any round holes which cried out to be plugged with square pegs. Some tracks were more successful, or at least more rewarding, than others. Some found themselves in the position of being helpful to the band’s development without ever seeking exposure on their own account (or in any event, not at the time they were made). Some were, simply, just fun things to do.

There are some tracks on this set about which none of us remembers very much. Nobody is quite sure, for example, why we set up a mixing desk and a Revox at our rehearsal room in North London and recorded a new song by Shane, “The Donegal Express” and another Ewan MacColl classic “The Travelling People” [both Disc One], but we’re glad we did, as the results have a sort of earthy authenticity we are widely supposed to have outgrown by 1990. A 10″ bootleg single of these tracks surely qualifies as the rarest Pogues record ever. We don’t know how many acetate copies were made up, complete with special labels, but I have managed to establish that there is one copy in Germany and another in Japan, and I know this because it is the near-pristine Japanese copy we borrowed to dub from for this collection – it is so obscure that we did not even have a tape ourselves, nor have we been able to discover how it reached the hands of the bootleggers in the first place. Also into this category come such curios as “Maggie May” [Disc One], “The Aria”, “Rince Del Emplacada” [both Disc Two], and “Lust For Vomit” [Disc Four]. “Johnny Was” [Disc Five] comes from a brief episode in which Andrew, Darryl, Jem, James and myself formed our own support band – “Sexy Bongo” – for just one show in Sweden. We wrote all the material at the soundcheck and performed it that evening, never to be repeated. Our long-serving soundman Paul Scully cannot recall why he taped some of the soundcheck. Blackmail, possibly. The majority of the crowd, incidentally, had no idea who we were.

Some of our songs seemed to follow us around without ever quite finding a home. I think we all felt that “NW 3” was one of Shane’s strongest pieces of work and we kept trying to include it in albums but, for reasons that are likely to remain unclear, it was not to be. The version on here [Disc One] is the first recording we have of it, from October 1987, but certainly not the last. By the time we got to working on our fifth album, the Joe Strummer-produced Hell’s Ditch, we even finished a strong new backing track of it for that record, but it never got completed. When Shane came down to Rockfield Studios in Wales, he allocated his time there to other ideas – including the remarkable medley of Culture’s “I’m Alone in the Wilderness” with his own “Pinned Down” [Disc One]. It is perhaps a mark of how fraught with debate the track-listing on that album became (some of the saga is detailed by Carol Clerk in her biography of the band) that when, at the album’s end, I left Rockfield with Joe, a passenger in his old Morris Minor, I was so certain that “Pinned Down / Wilderness” would make the final cut that it never occurred to me it might even need an advocate.

“…………..the house just wants to rock”.

Also from the Hell’s Ditch sessions come “Eve Of Destruction”, “The Last Of McGee” [Disc One], “The Black Dogs Ditch”, the unedited “Maidrín Rua” and the second version of “Murder”, as well as an early version of “Aisling”, later developed by Christy Moore [all Disc Four]. But we cannot represent these sessions fully without mention of the Astro-Physicians. Because Joe Strummer had accepted the job as Producer of the album at the last minute, he found himself having to squeeze a couple of other prior commitments into his time at Rockfield. Among these were the two pieces of music he had promised Aki Kaurismäki for his pitch-black comedy thriller I Hired A Contract Killer. The main song, “Burning Lights” is performed by Joe in the movie but “Afro-Cuban Be-Bop”, which is heard over the closing credits, features the Astro-Physicians, an ad hoc band formed especially for the project and containing only the Pogues. It is heard here in two versions, the original movie mix as featured on the flip side of the rare “Burning Lights” single [Disc Five] and a fuller mix, which Simon Willey made later at Lucinda Strummer’s request. [Disc One].

But the story rightly begins back in the early 1980s, when the then 6-piece Pogues set down the first recordings of what they sounded like, with the usual calling in of favours, the help of friends and some borrowed recording equipment. What is exciting about hearing the 1983 demos of “Repeal Of The Licensing Laws”, “Dark Streets of London”, “Greenland Whale Fisheries” and “Streams of Whiskey” [all Disc Two] again 25 years later – apart from the fact that, as I write, all four numbers are still in the Pogues’ show in 2008 – is how strikingly they call to mind those heady and unpredictable early shows at the Bull and Gate, the Sir George Robey, the Pindar of Wakefield, Dingwalls, the 100 Club and other London venues where the first Pogues fans gathered to celebrate and toast the health of the almost kinetic force of this band, already the leading lights in an alternative London post-punk scene which, as its almost skiffle-like ethic did not provide the soundtrack the world-weary music paper hacks demanded in this early Thatcher era, received scant media coverage.

By 1984, the demos are starting to sound just a little tidier and, with producer/manager Stan Brennan in tow, the Pogues are cutting the tracks which will persuade Stiff Records to give them a record deal. From this session come “The Rocky Road To Dublin” [Disc One], “Sea Shanty”, “Transmetropolitan”, “Kitty” and “Connemara, Let’s Go” [all Disc Two]. By now, too, The Pogues had embarked upon their sporadic live sessions for BBC Radio, a treasure trove from which we have selected “Danny Boy” [Disc One], “The Auld Triangle”, “Poor Paddy On The Railway”, “Boys From The County Hell”, “Billy’s Bones”, “The Old Main Drag”, “Sally Maclennane” [Disc Two] and “The Rake At The Gates Of Hell”, “Turkish Song Of The Damned” and “If I Should Fall From Grace With God” [Disc Three], all recorded at the BBC’s Maida Vale studios between June 1984 and October 1986.

The Stan Brennan-produced Red Roses For Me and the Elvis Costello-helmed Rum, Sodomy and the Lash arrived in 1984 and 1985 (neither album providing any outtakes of any kind) and signaled a period of extensive and exhausting touring, around Britain, then in quick succession to Germany, Scandinavia and the rest of Europe and also, by early 1986, the USA and Canada. By the start of 1987, we had come towards the end of a long period in which our recording opportunities were restricted mainly to soundtrack contributions to the Alex Cox movies Sid and Nancy [Disc Three] and Straight To Hell [see the CD Straight To Hell Returns, Big Beat Records CDWIKD 239] and some song demos – “Driving Through The City” – for Grace Jones, along with “Something Wild” and the instrumental “The Town That Never Sleeps”, both rejected for Jonathan Demme’s Something Wild [all Disc Two]. But although our joint single with the Dubliners, “The Irish Rover” was our first Top Ten hit in the UK, the long deliberations which would see our Stiff Records contract effectively bought out by Warner Music had not yet come to an end. Stiff was a flag of convenience at that point. But we also had to be circumspect about what and where we recorded, as there was always the risk that the tapes could be held hostage by one or other of competing legal factions. Before the Dubliners single, MCA released a single from Sid And Nancy, “Haunted” [Disc One] and a Stiff single from the Straight To Hell soundtrack, The Good, The Bad and the Ugly” [Disc Three], though it was not actually in the movie, was scheduled and cancelled.

And so it was that, in early 1987, we snuck into EMI Studios at Abbey Road in London to record what was being billed as The Terry Woods Solo Album but was in fact demos for the next Pogues album. It was perhaps the worst kept secret in the London music biz at the time, but we kinda dug the subterfuge anyway. The Abbey Road tapes, because of the mythology which surrounds them, are widely supposed to be some sort of Pogues holy grail but actually, they yielded up surprisingly few goodies for this box set. In the main, they are are just not-as-good versions of the recordings we would, within three months, and with Steve Lillywhite in the Producer’s chair, begin to make in RAK Studios just down the road, for what would become If I Should Fall From Grace With God. In all but a couple of cases, Shane is still working out the lyrics, so the guide vocals are, in consequence, quite messy. But we have rescued “The Kerry Polka” [Disc One], a version of which later became part of “South Australia”, and early drafts of “Battle March”, “Streets Of Sorrow”, “Shanne Bradley” and an experimental “Lullaby Of London” [Disc Three], as well as a section of the final demo of “Fairytale Of New York”.

“’twas a wild Christmas Eve…on the West Coast of Clare”

If “NW3” made periodic returns to the recording studio without resolution, “Fairytale Of New York” [Disc Two] had a somewhat happier journey. We worked on earlier versions, with producer Elvis Costello, around the time of, and soon after, our work together on the Poguetry In Motion sessions. Poguetry, an exceptionally strong E.P. by any standards, would also render up the outtake “Do You Believe In Magic?” [Disc One] and the alternative “oboe” mix of “Rainy Night In Soho” [Disc Two], which was replaced on the E.P. by the better-known “flugelhorn” mix everywhere except North America. (The “Rainy Night” saga did not, in itself, conclude there. In 1991, Steve Lillywhite provided a new version combining fresh recording with elements of the earlier two). The Poguetry sessions had been, in the main, happy and successful, but small fissures were beginning to emerge in Shane’s relationship with Elvis. So It’s hard to tell, in the first two demo extracts (Costello plays piano on the first demo and bass on the second) how far the project could reasonably have progressed with that combination of talents. What is clear, however, is that the piece itself still needed work before it would become the most beloved Christmas song of all time. By the time we hear the third demo extract from Abbey Road in 1987, most of the elements seem largely intact, except the as-yet unscheduled Kirsty MacColl factor. By now, just months before the song is recorded in earnest, you sense a fresh confidence in the work that cannot just be caused by the fact that we have kicked it up a tone, from C to D.

The Fall From Grace album did have a couple of outtakes, in the form of “The Ballinalee” and “Nicaragua Libré” and also from those sessions, you get to hear some of “Thousands Are Sailing” with the composer’s original guide vocal, from which Shane learned, or at least adapted, the song [all Disc Three]. “The Mistlethrush” [Disc Four] is from the cutting room floor of album number four, Peace And Love, though long-rumoured lengthy acid-jazz workouts from those sessions do not actually exist. “Call My Name” [Disc Five] is the only outtake from 1995’s Pogue Mahone that has not already surfaced. Also of some interest, we hope, are demos preceding the Peace And Love album – in the form of “Boat Train” and “Night Train To Lorca”, and the Hell’s Ditch album – “Victoria”, “Murder” and “The Wake Of The Medusa” [all Disc Four]. The Waiting For Herb album is represented by demos of “My Baby’s Gone” [Disc One] and “The Girl From The Wadi-Hammamat” and an instrumental, “Moving To Moldova”, a version of which later, with lyrics, became the epic “Drunken Boat” [both Disc Five]. The demos for the final Pogue Mahone album are almost a chapter in themselves, but are marked here by “The Sun And The Moon”, “Living In A World Without Her”, “Who Said Romance Was Dead?”, “Sound Of The City Night”, “Four O’Clock In The Morning” [all Disc Five] and “When The Ship Comes In” [Disc One].

“He was a miserable skinflint, an affliction and a sore”

But in addition to all these curios, we have also found room for some previously released items which resisted, for one reason or another, inclusion on the remastered and expanded versions of our albums which we released in 2004 (UK), 2005 (Japan) and 2006 (USA). The “radio-friendly” version of “Boys From The County Hell” [Disc One] did nothing to propel that particular single into the Top 40, but it did set down the first marker in a long-running squabble between the Pogues and the British broadcasting establishment about lyrical propriety. This reached its nadir in December 2007 when, after 20 years of generous airplay which had helped the single “Fairytale Of New York” into the Top 40 on five separate occasions (all but one of them in the Top 5), the BBC suddenly developed qualms about the words “scumbag” and “faggot”. It was a preposterous and short-lived ban, and one which, we were delighted to discover, caused even more music fans to buy or download the track, but here’s where the whole sorry saga began – a squeamish, though perhaps slightly more substantial objection to the words “he was a miserable bollocks and a bitch’s bastard’s whore”. By the time the band recorded a version of the song for the David Jensen radio show in 1984 [Disc Two], Shane had begun to substitute just a generally disapproving yelp for the offending Anglo-Saxon words. It’s a tough job keeping up with the prevailing morality, not least when you’re in the vanguard of those who don’t like where the goalposts are. Special singles edits or, indeed, extensions, were made for several of our singles and of these numerous items, we have included the single mix of “Fiesta”, the 12″ extensions of “If I Should Fall From Grace With God” and “Yeah Yeah Yeah Yeah” [all Disc Four], not forgetting the “dub” version of “Young Ned Of The Hill” [Disc One]. This seemed like a good moment to gather up “Garbo”, from the Australian film of the same name [Disc One]. Also present are the tracks we recorded for two charity projects, “Got A Lot Of Livin’ To Do” [Disc Four] and, with Kirsty MacColl, “Miss Otis Regrets / Just One Of Those Things” [Disc Five]. La Kirsty also booked us as her band on a session which resulted in “All The Tears That I Cried” and “The One And Only” [both Disc Five]. Two years earlier, Steve Earle had done the same for “Johnny Come Lately” [Disc Four].

There could not, perhaps, be a Pogues Box Set that did not make room for some live recordings, so we have included all six live recordings made at Glasgow in December 1987, which were found dotted around b sides and CD singles for a time [Disc Four]. What a mad week that was at Barrowlands as “Fairytale” climbed tantalisingly to almost the top of the Christmas Top 40! You will also find three selections from the memorable period when Joe Strummer was our lead singer [Disc Five]. Our collection ends with the four selections which, for reasons of space, were omitted from the 2001 live disc on The Pogues: The Ultimate Collection. [Disc Five]. But also, sprinkled around the five discs, are some slightly unusual live recordings not heard before, including a version of Pharaoah Sanders’ “Japan” which we only ever played in that country [Disc Three] and our own live version of Steve Earle’s “Johnny Come Lately”, sung by Spider [Disc Four].

Well, that’s it. There’s no more. Well, there is actually, but even The Pogues reserve the right to keep private some of our less than glorious moments!

Tracklisting

Disc One

The Kerry Polka
(1987, previously unreleased) (d)
[Trad arr Woods, Fearnley, Chevron, Finer, MacGowan, Stacy, Hunt, Ranken]
Produced by The Pogues

The Rocky Road To Dublin
(1984, previously unreleased) (a)
[Trad arr Fearnley, Finer, MacGowan, Stacy, O’Riordan, Ranken]
Produced by Stan Brennan, Engineered by Richard Preston

Boys From The County Hell
(1984, “Radio-friendly” version of Stiff single) (a)
[S. MacGowan]
Produced by Stan Brennan, Engineered by Craig Thompson and Nick Robbins

NW3
(1987, previously unreleased) (d)
[S. MacGowan]
Produced by The Pogues

The Donegal Express/The Hen and the Cock are in Carrickmacross
(d)
(c.1991, rehearsal recording, previously unreleased)
[S. MacGowan] / [Trad arr Finer, MacGowan, Hunt, Woods, Fearnley, Chevron, Stacy, Ranken]
Produced by The Pogues and David Jordan

Do You Believe In Magic?
(1985, outtake from Poguetry In Motion EP sessions, rough mix, previously unreleased) (c)
[Sebastian / Yanovsky]
Produced by Elvis Costello

Hot Asphalt
(1992, previously unreleased) (f)
[E. MacColl]
Produced by The Pogues

Danny Boy
(BBC John Peel Show, December 4, 1984, previously unreleased) (a)
[F. Wetherley / arr. MacGowan, Finer, Fearnley, Stacy, Ranken, O’Riordan]

Maggie May
(1987, previously unreleased) (d)
[R. Stewart / M. Quittenton]
Produced by The Pogues

Haunted
(1986, from the movie and sountrack album Sid And Nancy, also released as a 7″ and 12″ single) (c)
[S. MacGowan]
Produced by Craig Leon, assisted by Cassell Webb

The Travelling People
(c.1991, rehearsal recording, previously unreleased) (d)
[E. MacColl]
Produced by The Pogues and David Jordan

Eve Of Destruction
(1990, outtake from the Hell’s Ditch album sessions, previously unreleased) (d)
[P. F. Sloan]
Produced by Joe Strummer, Engineered by Paul Cobbold

My Baby’s Gone
(1992 Demo, previously unreleased) (f)
[A. Ranken / J. Finer]
Produced by The Pogues

North Sea Holes
(1992, previously unreleased) (f)
[E. MacColl]
Produced by The Pogues

Garbo (aka In And Out)
(1990, from the movie and soundtrack release of Garbo) (d)
[S. MacGowan / J. Finer]
Produced by Jem Finer

The Last Of McGee
(1990, outtake from the Hell’s Ditch album sessions, previously unreleased) (d)
[J. Finer]
Produced by Joe Strummer, Engineered by Paul Cobbold

Afro-Cuban Be-Bop
(Alt. Mix) (from the movie I Hired A Contract Killer, 1990, made during the Hell’s Ditch sessions, this version previously unreleased) (d)
Joe Strummer and the Astro-Physicians
[J. Strummer]
Produced by Joe Strummer, Remixed by Simon Willey

Young Ned Of The Hill (Dub Version)
(1989, from the CD single Misty Morning Albert Bridge) (d)
[T. Woods / R. Kavana]
Produced by Steve Lillywhite, Engineered by Chris Dickee, assisted by Nick Lacey

Pinned Down / I’m Alone In The Wilderness
(1990, outtake from the Hell’s Ditch album sessions, previously unreleased) (d)
[S. MacGowan] / [J. Hill]
Produced by Joe Strummer, Engineered by Paul Cobbold

When The Ship Comes In
(1994 Demo, previously unreleased) (g)
[B. Dylan]
Produced by The Pogues

Waxies Dargle
(1985, Live in Sweden, previously unreleased) (b)
[Trad arr Fearnley, Chevron, Finer, MacGowan, Stacy, Ranken, O’Riordan]
Produced by Paul Scully

Disc Two

Repeal Of The Licensing Laws
(1983 Demo, previously unreleased) (a)
[P. Stacy]
Produced by The Pogues, Recorded by Justin Ward, Remixed (2007) by Nick Robbins and Rob Kyloch

Dark Streets Of London
(1983 Demo, previously unreleased) (a)
[S. MacGowan]
Produced by The Pogues, Recorded by Justin Ward, Remixed (2007) by Nick Robbins and Rob Kyloch

Greenland Whale Fisheries
(1983 Demo, previously unreleased) (a)
[Trad arr MacGowan, Ranken, Finer, Fearnley, Stacy, O’Riordan]
Produced by The Pogues, Recorded by Justin Ward, Remixed (2007) by Nick Robbins and Rob Kyloch

Streams of Whiskey
(1983 Demo, previously released on Poguevision DVD/VHS) (a)
[S. MacGowan]
Produced by The Pogues, Recorded by Justin Ward, Remixed (2007) by Nick Robbins and Rob Kyloch

The Auld Triangle
(BBC John Peel Show, April 10, 1984, previously unreleased) (a)
[B. Behan]

Poor Paddy On The Railway
(BBC David “Kid” Jensen Show, June 21, 1984, previously unreleased) (a)
[Trad arr MacGowan, Ranken, Finer, Fearnley, Stacy, O’Riordan]

Sea Shanty
(1984 Demo, previously unreleased) (a)
[S. MacGowan]
Produced by Stan Brennan, Engineered by Richard Preston

Transmetropolitan
(1984 Demo, previously unreleased) (a)
[S. MacGowan]
Produced by Stan Brennan, Engineered by Richard Preston

Kitty
(1984 Demo, previously unreleased) (a)
[Trad arr MacGowan, Ranken, Finer, Fearnley, Stacy, O’Riordan]
Produced by Stan Brennan, Engineered by Richard Preston

Boys From The County Hell
(BBC David “Kid” Jensen Show, June 21, 1984, previously unreleased) (a)
[S. MacGowan]

Connemara, Let’s Go! (aka Down In The Ground Where The Dead Men Go)
(1984 Demo, previously unreleased) (a)
[S. MacGowan]
Produced by Stan Brennan, Engineered by Richard Preston

Billy’s Bones
(BBC Janice Long Show, July 3, 1985, previously unreleased) (b)
[S. MacGowan]

The Old Main Drag
(BBC Janice Long Show, July 3, 1985, previously unreleased) (b)
[S. MacGowan]

Sally Maclennane
(BBC John Peel Show, December 4, 1984, previously unreleased) (a)
[S. MacGowan]

The Town That Never Sleeps
(c. 1986, previously unreleased) (c)
[J. Finer]
Produced by The Pogues and Nick Robbins

Something Wild
(c. 1986, previously unreleased) (c)
[S. MacGowan]
Produced by The Pogues and Nick Robbins

Driving Through The City
(c. 1986, previously unreleased) (c)
[S. MacGowan]
Produced by The Pogues and Nick Robbins

Rainy Night In Soho
(“Oboe version”, released on the North American editions of the Poguetry In Motion EP, MCA Records, February 1986) (c)
[S. MacGowan]
Produced by Elvis Costello, Mixed by Elvis Costello, Philip Chevron and Nick Robbins

Fairytale Of New York
(extract from 1st Demo, c. 1986, previously unreleased) (c)
[S. MacGowan / J. Finer]
Produced by Elvis Costello and The Pogues, Engineered by Nick Robbins

Fairytale Of New York
(extract from 2nd Demo, c. 1986, previously unreleased) (c)
[S. MacGowan / J. Finer]
Produced by Elvis Costello and The Pogues, Engineered by Nick Robbins

Fairytale Of New York
(extract from 3rd Demo, 1987, previously unreleased) (d)
[S. MacGowan / J. Finer]
Produced by The Pogues

Navigator
(live, Sweden 1985, previously unreleased) (b)
[P. Gaston]
Produced by Paul Scully

Disc Three

The Aria
(c. 1864, previously unreleased) (d)
[J. Finer]
Produced by Jem Finer

The Good, The Bad and the Ugly
(1987, from the original soundtrack LP of the movie Straight To Hell) (c)
[E. Morricone]
Produced by David Jordan

Haunted
(1986 Demo, previously unreleased) (c)
[S. MacGowan]
Produced by The Pogues, Engineered by Nick Robbins

Love Theme from Sid And Nancy
(1986, outtake from the Sid And Nancy soundtrack recordings, unused and previously unreleased) (c)
[J. Finer]
Produced by The Pogues, Engineered by Nick Robbins

Junk Theme
(1986, from the soundtrack album of Sid And Nancy) (c)
[J. Finer]
Produced by David Jordan

Glued Up And Speeding
(1986, from the sountrack of the movie Sid And Nancy, previously unreleased) (c)
[P. Stacy]
Produced by The Pogues, Engineered by Nick Robbins

Paris
(1986, from the soundtrack of the movie Sid And Nancy, previously unreleased) (c)
[J. Finer]
Produced by The Pogues, Engineered by Nick Robbins

A Needle For Paddy Garcia
(1986, from the soundtrack of the movie Sid And Nancy, previously unreleased) (c)
[J. Finer]
Produced by The Pogues, Engineered by Nick Robbins

JB 57
(1986, outtake from the Sid And Nancy soundtrack recordings, unused and previously unreleased) (c)
[J. Finer]
Produced by The Pogues, Engineered by Nick Robbins

Bowery Snax / Spiked
(1986, from the soundtrack of the movie Sid And Nancy, previously unreleased) (c)
[J. Finer] / [J. Finer/P. Chevron]
Produced by The Pogues, Engineered by Nick Robbins

Hot Dogs With Everything
(1986, from the soundtrack of the movie Sid And Nancy and previously on 12″ of Haunted) (c)
[S. MacGowan]
Produced by David Jordan

Rince Del Emplacada
(c. 1987, previously unreleased) (d)
[S. MacGowan]
Produced by The Pogues

The Rake At The Gates Of Hell
(BBC Janice Long Show, October 10, 1986, previously unreleased) (d)
[S. MacGowan]

Turkish Song Of The Damned
(BBC Janice Long Show, October 10, 1986, previously unreleased) (d)
[S. MacGowan / J. Finer]

If I Should Fall From Grace With God
(BBC Janice Long Show, October 10, 1986, previously unreleased) (d)
[S. MacGowan]

Battle March
(1987 Demo, previously unreleased) (d)
[T. Woods]
Produced by The Pogues

Lullaby Of London
(1987 Demo, previously unreleased) (d)
[S. MacGowan]
Produced by The Pogues

Shanne Bradley
(1987 Demo, previously unreleased) (d)
[S. MacGowan]
Produced by The Pogues

Streets Of Sorrow
(1987 Demo, previously unreleased) (d)
[T. Woods]
Produced by The Pogues

Thousands Are Sailing (Extract)
(1987, backing track with guide vocal, from the If I Should Fall From Grace With God sessions, previously unreleased) (d)
[P. Chevron]
Produced by Steve Lillywhite, Engineered by Chris Dickie, Roy Spong, Nick Lacey

The Balinalee
(1987, outtake from the If I Should Fall From Grace With God recording sessions, previously unreleased) (d)
[S. MacGowan]
Produced by Steve Lillywhite, Engineered by Chris Dickie, Roy Spong, Nick Lacey

Nicaragua Libré
(1987, outtake from the If I Should Fall From Grace With God recording sessions, previously unreleased) (d)
[Lyrics: P. Stacy / Music: Trad. arr Stacy / Chevron]
Produced by Steve Lillywhite, Engineered by Chris Dickie, Roy Spong, Nick Lacey

Japan
(1988, live in Tokyo, previously unreleased) (d)
[P. Sanders]
Produced by Paul Scully

Disc Four

Sally Maclennane
(live at Barrowlands, Glasgow, 17/19 December, 1987) (d)
[S. MacGowan]
Produced by Steve Lillywhite

A Pair Of Brown Eyes
(live at Barrowlands, Glasgow, 17/19 December, 1987) (d)
[S. MacGowan]
Produced by Steve Lillywhite

Kitty
(live at Barrowlands, Glasgow, 17/19 December, 1987) (d)
[Trad arr MacGowan, Fearnley, Hunt, Woods, Ranken, Stacy, Chevron, Finer]
Produced by Steve Lillywhite

Maggie May
(live at Barrowlands, Glasgow, 17/19 December, 1987) (d)
[R. Stewart / M. Quittenton]
Produced by Steve Lillywhite

Dirty Old Town
(live at Barrowlands, Glasgow, 17/19 December, 1987) (d)
[E. MacColl]
Produced by Steve Lillywhite

The Sickbed of Cuchulainn
(live at Barrowlands, Glasgow, 17/19 December, 1987) (d)
[S. MacGowan]
Produced by Steve Lillywhite

Fiesta
(1988, 7″ single remix) (d)
[S. MacGowan / J. Finer]
Produced by Steve Lillywhite, Engineered by Chris Dickie, Roy Spong, Nick Lacey

If I Should Fall From Grace With God
(1988, 12″ single remix) (d)
[S. MacGowan]
Produced by Steve Lillywhite, Engineered by Chris Dickie, Roy Spong, Nick Lacey

Johnny Come Lately
(1988, from the album Copperhead Road) (d)
Steve Earle
[S. Earle]
Produced by Tony Brown

Boat Train
(1987 Demo, previously unreleased) (d)
[S. MacGowan]
Produced by The Pogues

Night Train To Lorca
(1987 Demo, previously unreleased) (d)
[J. Finer]
Produced by The Pogues

The Mistlethrush
(1988, outtake from the Peace And Love album recording sessions, previously unreleased) (d)
[A. Ranken / P. Chevron]
Produced by Steve Lillywhite, Engineered by Chris Dickie, assisted by Nick Lacey

Got A Lot Of Livin’ To Do
(1990, from the NME multi-artist charity compilation, The Last Temptation Of Elvis) (d)
[A. Schroeder / B. Weisman]
Produced by David Jordan

Victoria
(1989, previously unreleased) (d)
[S. MacGowan]
Produced by The Pogues and David Jordan

Murder [Version 1]
(1989, previously unreleased) (d)
[A. Ranken]
Produced by The Pogues, David Jordan and Philip Chevron

Lust For Vomit
(1989, previously unreleased) (d)
[S. MacGowan]
Produced by The Pogues and David Jordan

The Wake Of The Medusa
(1989 Demo, previously unreleased) (d)
[J. Finer]
Produced by The Pogues and David Jordan

The Black Dogs Ditch
(1990, outtake from the Hell’s Ditch album recording sessions, previously unreleased) (d)
[T. Woods]
Produced by Joe Strummer, Engineered by Paul Cobbold

Aisling
(1990, outtake from the Hell’s Ditch album recording sessions, previously unreleased) (d)
[S. MacGowan]
Produced by Joe Strummer, Engineered by Paul Cobbold

Murder [Version 2]
(1990, outtake from the Hell’s Ditch album recording sessions, previously unreleased) (d)
[A. Ranken]
Produced by Joe Strummer, Engineered by Paul Cobbold

Yeah Yeah Yeah Yeah
(1989, 12″ single remix) (d)
[S. MacGowan]
Produced by Steve Lillywhite, Engineered by Chris Dickie, assisted by Nick Lacey

Maidrín Rua
(1990, outtake from the Hell’s Ditch album recording sessions, previously unreleased in full) (d)
[Trad arr Woods, Chevron, Finer, Fearnley, Ranken, Stacy, Hunt, MacGowan]
Produced by Joe Strummer, Engineered by Paul Cobbold

Johnny Come Lately
(live 1989, previously unreleased) (d)
[S. Earle]
Produced by Paul Scully

Disc Five

Johnny Was
(17/11/1989 soundcheck, Gothenburg, Sweden, previously unreleased)
Sexy Bongo
[A. Ranken / P. Chevron / D. Hunt / J. Finer / J. Fearnley]
Produced by Paul Scully

Miss Otis Regrets/Just One Of Those Things
(from the Red Hot And Blue multi-artist album, 1990) (d)
The Pogues and Kirsty MacColl
[C. Porter]
Produced by Steve Lillywhite

All The Tears That I Cried
(from the CD single My Affair, 1991) (d)
Kirsty MacColl
[K. MacColl / M. E. Nevin]
Produced by Steve Lillywhite

The One And Only
(from the album Electric Landlady, 1991) (d)
Kirsty MacColl
[K. MacColl / M. E. Nevin]
Produced by Steve Lillywhite

Afro-Cuban Be-Bop (Single version)
(from the movie I Hired A Contract Killer, released as a 7″ single by Villealfa Film Productions record label, 1990) (d)
Joe Strummer and the Astro-Physicians
[J. Strummer]
Produced by Joe Strummer

Turkish Song Of The Damned
(live at the Forum, London, 12 December 1991) (e)
The Pogues featuring Joe Strummer
[S. MacGowan / J. Finer]
Produced by The Pogues and Paul Scully, Mixed by Chris Dickie and Paul Scully

London Calling
(live at the Forum, London, 12 December 1991) (e)
The Pogues featuring Joe Strummer
[J. Strummer / M. Jones]
Produced by The Pogues and Paul Scully, Mixed by Chris Dickie and Paul Scully

I Fought The Law
(live at the Forum, London, 12 December 1991) (e)
The Pogues featuring Joe Strummer
[S. Curtis]
Produced by The Pogues and Paul Scully, Mixed by Chris Dickie and Paul Scully

The Girl From The Wadi-Hammamat
(1992 Demo, previously unreleased) (f)
[A. Ranken / J. Finer]
Produced by The Pogues

Moving To Moldova
(1992 Demo, previously unreleased) (f)
[J. Fearnley / T. Woods]
Produced by The Pogues

Call My Name
(outtake from Pogue Mahone album, 1995, previously unreleased) (g)
[D. Hunt]
Produced by Steve Brown

The Sun And The Moon
(1994 Demo, previously unreleased) (g)
[P. Stacy / J. Clarke]
Produced by The Pogues

Living In A World Without Her
(1994 Demo, previously unreleased) (g)
[D. Hunt / J. McNally]
Produced by The Pogues

Who Said Romance Is Dead?
(1994 Demo, previously unreleased) (g)
[J. Finer]
Produced by The Pogues

Sound Of The City Night
(1994 Demo, previously unreleased) (g)
[J. Finer]
Produced by The Pogues

Four O’Clock In The Morning
(1994 Demo, previously unreleased) (g)
[A. Ranken]
Produced by The Pogues

The Star Of The County Down
(live at Brixton Academy, London, 21 or 22 December, 2001, previously unreleased) (d)
[Trad arr Ranken, Stacy, Woods, Hunt, Chevron, Fearnley, Finer, MacGowan]
Produced by Nick Robbins and Rob Kyloch

White City
(live at Brixton Academy, London, 21 or 22 December, 2001, previously unreleased) (d)
[S. MacGowan]
Produced by Nick Robbins and Rob Kyloch

Medley: The Recruiting Sergeant / The Rocky Road To Dublin / The Galway Races
(live at Brixton Academy, London, 21 or 22 December, 2001, previously unreleased) (d)
[Trad. arr Fearnley, Woods, Finer, Hunt, Chevron, Stacy, MacGowan, Ranken]
Produced by Nick Robbins and Rob Kyloch

The Parting Glass/Lord Santry’s Fairest Daughter
(live at Brixton Academy, London, 21 or 22 December, 2001, previously unreleased) (d)
[Trad arr MacGowan, Finer, Fearnley, Stacy, Chevron, Ranken, Hunt, Woods]
Produced by Nick Robbins and Rob Kyloch


The Pogues – lineups

  • (a) Shane MacGowan, Spider Stacy, Jem Finer, James Fearnley, Andrew Ranken, Cait O’Riordan
  • (b) Shane MacGowan, Spider Stacy, Jem Finer, James Fearnley, Andrew Ranken, Cait O’Riordan, Philip Chevron
  • (c) Shane MacGowan, Spider Stacy, Jem Finer, James Fearnley, Andrew Ranken, Cait O’Riordan, Philip Chevron, Terry Woods
  • (d) Shane MacGowan, Spider Stacy, Jem Finer, James Fearnley, Andrew Ranken, Philip Chevron, Terry Woods, Darryl Hunt.
  • (e) Joe Strummer, Spider Stacy, Jem Finer, James Fearnley, Andrew Ranken, Philip Chevron, Terry Woods, Darryl Hunt.
  • (f) Spider Stacy, Jem Finer, James Fearnley, Andrew Ranken, Philip Chevron, Terry Woods, Darryl Hunt
  • (g) Spider Stacy, Jem Finer, Andrew Ranken, Darryl Hunt, James McNally, David Coulter, Jamie Clarke

Loadsa Pogues info here – http://www.pogues.com/

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June 4, 2008 Posted by | Music_Alternative, The Pogues, _MUSIC | 4 Comments