STUPID and Contagious

Our holiday home from stupidd.blogspot.com !

Suzanne Vega – Discography


A collection of LPs from New Yawk chick (well, at best, MILF now)

We kinda liked this chick’s music when we were rather young, back in the day! Her stuff is ok but her debut really flattered to deceive! We totally lost interest after the second LP.

However, we do love that great track “In a Lonely Place” she did with the wonderful ! That’s better than anything listed here!

She was married to uber indie producer Mitch Froom for a while there.

Here’s some bio from wiki;

Suzanne Vega is an American songwriter and singer known for her highly literate lyrics and eclectic folk-inspired music. Record companies saw little prospect of commercial success in the beginning; Vega’s demo tape was rejected by every major record company—twice by A&M. In 1984 she was finally signed by A&M, and becamethe first major figure in the bumper crop of female singer/songwriters who rose to prominence during the late ’80s and ’90s.

Vega’s early commercial success helped open doors for a wealth of talent, and even if she couldn’t sustain the level of popularity she reached in 1987 with “Luka” and the platinum Solitude Standing, she maintained a strong and dedicated cult following. Her association with — and marriage to — experimental producer Mitchell Froom during the ’90s resulted in two intriguing but uneven albums; however, following their painful divorce, Vega returned in 2001 with her first album in five years, Songs in Red and Gray, which was greeted with her strongest reviews in a decade.

Suzanne Vega [Self Titled][1985]

01 Cracking
02 Freeze Tag
03 Marlene On The Wall
04 Small Blue Thing
05 Straight Lines
06 Undertow
07 Some Journey
08 The Queen And The Soldier
09 Knight Moves
10 Neighbourhood Girls

mp3@

Pass = crunchiedo


Solitude Standing [1987]

01 Tom’s Diner
02 Luka
03 Ironbound/Fancy Poultry
04 In the Eye
05 Night Vision
06 Solitude Standing
07 Calypso
08 Language
09 Gypsy
10 Wooden Horse [Casper Hauser’s Song]
11 Tom’s Diner [Reprise]

mp3@VBR

Pass = crunchiedo

Days of Open Hand [1990]

01 Tired Of Sleeping
02 Men In A War
03 Rusted Pipe
04 Book Of Dreams
05 Institution Green
06 Those Whole Girls (Run In Grace)
07 Room Off The Street
08 Big Space
09 Predictions
10 Fifty-Fifty Chance
11 Pilgrimage

mp3@320

Pass = crunchiedo

99.9°F [1992]

01 Rock In This Pocket (Song Of David)
02 Blood Makes Noise
03 In Liverpool
04 99.9F°
05 Blood Sings
06 Fat Man & Dancing Girl
07 (If You Were) In My Movie
08 As A Child
09 Bad Wisdom
10 When Heroes Go Down
11 As Girls Go
12 Song Of Sand

mp3@320

Pass = crunchiedo

Nine Objects Of Desire [1996]

01 Birth-Day (Love Made Real)
02 Headshots
03 Caramel
04 Stockings
05 Casual Match
06 Thin Man
07 No Cheap Thrill
08 World Before Columbus
09 Lolita
10 Honeymoon Suite
11 Tombstone
12 My Favorite Plum

mp3@VBR

Pass = crunchiedo

The Best of Suzanne Vega: Tried and True [1999]

01 Luka
02 Tom’s Diner
03 Marlene On The Wall
04 Caramel
05 99.9F°
06 Small Blue Thing
07 Blood Makes Noise
08 Left Of Center
09 In Liverpool
10 Gypsy
11 Book Of Dreams
12 No Cheap Thrill
13 World Before Columbus
14 When Heroes Go Down
15 The Queen And The Soldier
16 Book & Cover
17 Rosemary

mp3@320

Pass = crunchiedo

Songs In Red And Gray [2001]

01 Penitent
02 Widow’s Walk
03 (I’ll Never Be) Your Maggie May
04 It Makes Me Wonder
05 Soap And Water
06 Songs In Red And Gray
07 Last Year’s Troubles
08 Priscilla
09 If I Were A Weapon
10 Harbor Song
11 Machine Ballerina
12 Solitaire
13 St. Clare

mp3@VBR

Pass = crunchiedo

Retrospective – The Best Of Suzanne Vega [UK Limited Edition][2003]

Disk 1

01 Luka
02 Tom’s Diner
03 Marlene On The Wall
04 Caramel
05 99.9F
06 Tired Of Sleeping
07 Small Blue Thing
08 Blood Makes Noise
09 Left Of Center
10 (I’ll Never Be) Your Maggie May
11 In Liverpool
12 Gypsy
13 Book Of Dreams
14 No Cheap Thrill
15 Calypso
16 World Before Columbus
17 Solitude Standing
18 Penitent
19 Rosemary
20 The Queen And The Soldier
21 Woman On The Tier (I’ll See You Through)

Disk 2

1 Caramel
2 Widow’s Walk
3 Solitude Standing
4 Blood Makes Noise
5 In Liverpool (Intro/Narrative)
6 In Liverpool
7 Anniversary
8 Tom’s Diner

mp3@192

Pass = crunchiedo

Beauty & Crime [2007]

01 Zephyr & I
02 Ludlow Street
03 New York Is A Woman
04 Pornographer’s Dream
05 Frank & Ava
06 Edith Wharton’s Figurines
07 Bound
08 Unbound
09 As You Are Now
10 Angel’s Doorway
11 Anniversary

mp3@VBR

Pass = crunchiedo

All thanks to the crunchiedo



We do not host any files here. If this post contains a link to content hosted elsewhere, this is content found by a simple search on the worldwide freedom web. However, if for some valid reason, you object to a said content, or any content here, please let us know and we will remove the content in question.

Any content linked to here is only meant as a taster for the original work itself and is posted on the strict understanding that anyone who downloads the taster, deletes said content within 24 hours. We would assume that these fans will then buy the original work and we greatly encourage them to do so.

Mail us: stupidand@gmail.com

Home Art Babes Cartoons Dylan Editorial Music Videos Other

October 15, 2008 Posted by | Music_Pop, Suzanne Vega, The Smithereens, _MUSIC | Leave a comment

The Smithereens – B-Sides The Beatles (2008)

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41OQtLc1WzL._SL500_AA240_.jpg

The Smithereens – B-Sides The Beatles
September 2, 2008
Mp3 / 27:47 min / 42.8 MB
More great music from the power pop masters, again delving into specific Beatles moments!

Yap, from what is becoming the finest cover group on the planet, here we get all The Beatles B-Sides in the period until 1966 covered by The Smithereens!

Some great tracks in here, very well performed.

KOCH Records is happy to announce the release of “B-Sides The Beatles,” The Smithereens’ highly anticipated follow up to their critically acclaimed 2007 release, “Meet The Smithereens.”

The album will be released on September 2, 2008 and includes some very special surprises for dedicated Beatles fanatics.

For “B-Sides The Beatles,” Andy White, who in 1962 played drums on The Beatles’ original version of “P.S. I Love You,” reprises his role as surrogate stickman for The Smithereens in 2008.

The September 11, 1962 session that produced “Love Me Do” and its B-side “P.S. I Love You” featured session drummer White, with the newly recruited Ringo Starr relegated to tambourine and maracas duties.

Upon release in America, the A-side shot to #1, and the B-side made the top-10 as well. “B-Sides The Beatles” also includes fantastic in-depth liner notes by Beatles author/historian Bruce Spizer, as well as “Beatle” Tommy Frangione (Joe Johnson’s Beatle Brunch), and the Smithereens’ own Dennis Diken.

More info here:

http://www.officialsmithereens.com/
www.myspace.com/thesmithereens

Tracklisting

01 Thank You Girl 02:03
02 There’s A Place 01:57
03 I’ll Get You 02:08
04 You Can’t Do That 02:37
05 Ask Me Why 02:27
06 Cry For A Shadow 02:26
07 P.S. I Love You 02:10
08 I’m Happy Just To Dance With You 01:57
09 If I Fell 02:19
10 Slow Down 03:00
11 I Don’t Want To Spoil The Party 02:39
12 Some Other Guy 02:04

Mail us: stupidand@gmail.com

Home Art Babes Cartoons Dylan Editorial Music Videos Other

September 4, 2008 Posted by | Music_Alternative, Music_Pop, The Beatles, The Smithereens, _MUSIC | Leave a comment

The Smithereens – Live In Concert 2008

https://i0.wp.com/blog.nj.com/entertainment_impact_music/2008/05/medium_smither.jpg

The Smithereens – Live In Concert 2008
Original Release Date: May 27, 2008
Label: Koch Records
ASIN: B0016GLX44
MP3 @ 289 kbps


Original Size 41.18 MB
Length 4 minutes 4 seconds
Channels 2 (stereo)
Sample Rate 44.1 KHz;
Sample Size 16 bit
Bit Rate 289 kbps
Encoder LAME 3.97
Encoder Settings Variable Bit Rate -V 0 (Extreme)
Audio Quality Very High (Lossy)
Contains Album Art, ID Tag [ID3v2.3 (ANSI) & ID3v1.1]
Channel Mapping Left, Right
File 03 – Miles From Nowhere

Since it’s power-pop, pernod and pussy day (aka Friday!) today, here’s one our favourites, the rather wonderful Smithereens, New Jersey’s finest power-pop purveyors, from a recent show in hometown New Brunswick.

They’ve still got it!

Here, we get the Smithereens singing 18 of their greatest songs live at the legendary Court Tavern in New Brunswick, NJ, where the band played for years prior to their first record deal!

The early Court Tavern shows were instrumental in helping the band develop their signature sound, original material, and live act.

This album features and showcases song selections that span the entire 28-year, 15-album career of the group, including extended and absolutely wild live versions of Radio Hits like ‘Blood and Roses’, ‘Only A Memory’, ‘A Girl Like You’, as well as Deep Tracks, Fan Requests, Favorite Covers, and several brand-new, much-anticipated, never-released Smithereens Original Songs, recorded live in concert.

http://kellystern.files.wordpress.com/2007/05/smithereens.jpg


Tracklisting

01 – Behind The Wall Of Sleep.mp3
02 – Drown In My Own Tears.mp3
03 – Miles From Nowhere.mp3
04 – Room Without A View.mp3
05 – Only A Memory.mp3
06 – House We Used To Live In.mp3
07 – Spellbound.mp3
08 – Since You Went Away.mp3
09 – She’s Got A Way.mp3
10 – Yesterday Girl.mp3
11 – Well Alright.mp3
12 – Especially For You.mp3
13 – Any Other Way.mp3
14 – Top Of The Pops.mp3
15 – Time And Time Again.mp3
16 – Blood And Roses.mp3
17 – A Girl Like You.mp3
18 – Batman Theme.mp3

Here she be:


password: HAVEDAT

All thanks to HAVEDAT

Mail us: stupidand@gmail.com

Home Art Babes Cartoons Dylan Editorial Music Videos Other

August 15, 2008 Posted by | Music_Alternative, Music_Pop, The Smithereens, _MUSIC | 1 Comment

The Smithereens – "Only A Memory" live at Tempe Music Festival 2007

The Smithereens put on a wonderful, crowd-pleasing set, including this great song “Only A Memory” at Tempe Music Festival 2007.

Big thanks to fendermusical

Mail us: stupidand@gmail.com

Home Art Babes Cartoons Dylan Editorial Music Videos Other

July 8, 2008 Posted by | Music_Pop, The Smithereens, _MUSIC, _VIDEO | Leave a comment

The Smithereens With Belinda Carlisle – Blue Period

‘Of You’ by roykeanz

Blue period, black comedy
Such a joke I’ve played on me
I let you go
And now I know a world of uncertainty

Now I think about the days
When I let you down in so many ways
That’s the time I want to cry
And the time I wonder why and pray

My apathy is tragedy
I’m content to stay inside
This emptiness is killing me
I can run but I can’t hide

And you loved me all along
When I always did you wrong
That’s the time I can’t forget
And it fills me with regret always

When you think that you have won
Then your heartache’s just begun

Blue period, black comedy
Love’s a clown, now laugh my way
I think of you
Much more than I’d ever be willing to say

Now I don’t want to pretend
I was glad to see us ending this way
That’s the time I want to cry
And the time I wonder why and pray

Blue period, I’m looking for someone who
Is just like you, to help end this blue period

Big thanks to the original poster

Mail us: stupidand@gmail.com

Home Art Babes Cartoons Dylan Editorial Music Videos Other

July 8, 2008 Posted by | Belinda Carlisle, Music_Pop, Roykeanz, The Smithereens, _MUSIC, _PHOTOGRAPHY, _POETRY, _VIDEO | Leave a comment

The Smithereens – A Date with The Smithereens

cover of 'A Date With The Smithereens' by The Smithereens

The Smithereens – A Date with The Smithereens (1994)
CD, RCA Victor, 66391-2

The Smithereens are known for writing and playing catchy 1960s-influenced power pop. ‘A Date with the Smithereens’ is the fifth album by this New Jersey band, released in 1994.

It was seen as a big change by the band, because the previous albums were a lot more “poppy”.

This record came out when the horrid Seattle Grunge exploded and you can hear how it affected the band in the production.

Some say ‘A date With…’ is uninspired – not even essential for fans – compared to the extremely high standards they set on their first few albums. Although this album certainly is not their best work, neither is it a complete waste. A couple of Merseybeat-inspired power pop songs really stand out: ‘Miles From Nowhere’, ‘Point Of No Return’, ‘Love Is Gone’, ‘Long Way Back Again’ and the fabulously Revolver-like ‘Gotti’.

The Smithereens have always worn their inspirations proudly, but the band also influenced other musicians, most notably Kurt Cobain during the period he was writing ‘Nevermind’. Ironically, The Smithereens (like many early 1990s bands) were hurt by the rise of grunge music.

The title is supposed to be ironic in the fact that all the songs are mostly hate-inspired.

Hit record producer Butch Vig gave interest in and then left the band. This may have inspired some of the hate for this album. Butch Vig worked with artists Nirvana and The Smashing Pumpkins. The album was originally planned to be released about a year before it actually was, but Capitol Records was near dropping The Smithereens. The reason for this is that their previous album, Blow up, was not tolerated well by listeners and lost a lot of fans.

The Smithereens planned to start recording on the album in December of 1992, but the recording was postponed to February of 1993, because of The Smashing Pumpkins album Vig was working on. In July, Butch Vig gave up on the Smithereens, and shortly after, Capitol Records got rid of them.

After The Smithereens were dropped by Capitol, they went to RCA records. As revenge at Capitol, they even considered naming the new album after Capitols president, but the idea was never used. In the end, the Smithereens decided to use their old producer, Don Dixon for the album.


Tracklisting

1. “War for my mind” 4:07

2. “Everything I have is blue” 4:27

3. “Miles from Nowhere” 4:18

4. “Afternoon Tea” 3:54

5. “Point of No Return” 4:06*

6. “Sleep the Night away” 4:17

7. “Love is Gone” 3:41*

8. “Long Way Back again” 4:06

9. “Gotti” 4:51

10. “Sick of Seattle” 3:03

11. “Can’t go home anymore” 4:11

12. “Life is so beautiful” 3:27


All song written By Pat DiNizio except *Jim Babjak

Here she be;

The Smithereens ‘A Date With The Smithereens’

Big thanks to eternally-yours.blogspot.com

Mail us: stupidand@gmail.com

Home Art Babes Cartoons Dylan Editorial Music Videos Other

July 4, 2008 Posted by | Music_Alternative, Music_Pop, The Smithereens, _MUSIC | Leave a comment

The Smithereens – A Date with The Smithereens

cover of 'A Date With The Smithereens' by The Smithereens

The Smithereens – A Date with The Smithereens (1994)
CD, RCA Victor, 66391-2

The Smithereens are known for writing and playing catchy 1960s-influenced power pop. ‘A Date with the Smithereens’ is the fifth album by this New Jersey band, released in 1994.

It was seen as a big change by the band, because the previous albums were a lot more “poppy”.

This record came out when the horrid Seattle Grunge exploded and you can hear how it affected the band in the production.

Some say ‘A date With…’ is uninspired – not even essential for fans – compared to the extremely high standards they set on their first few albums. Although this album certainly is not their best work, neither is it a complete waste. A couple of Merseybeat-inspired power pop songs really stand out: ‘Miles From Nowhere’, ‘Point Of No Return’, ‘Love Is Gone’, ‘Long Way Back Again’ and the fabulously Revolver-like ‘Gotti’.

The Smithereens have always worn their inspirations proudly, but the band also influenced other musicians, most notably Kurt Cobain during the period he was writing ‘Nevermind’. Ironically, The Smithereens (like many early 1990s bands) were hurt by the rise of grunge music.

The title is supposed to be ironic in the fact that all the songs are mostly hate-inspired.

Hit record producer Butch Vig gave interest in and then left the band. This may have inspired some of the hate for this album. Butch Vig worked with artists Nirvana and The Smashing Pumpkins. The album was originally planned to be released about a year before it actually was, but Capitol Records was near dropping The Smithereens. The reason for this is that their previous album, Blow up, was not tolerated well by listeners and lost a lot of fans.

The Smithereens planned to start recording on the album in December of 1992, but the recording was postponed to February of 1993, because of The Smashing Pumpkins album Vig was working on. In July, Butch Vig gave up on the Smithereens, and shortly after, Capitol Records got rid of them.

After The Smithereens were dropped by Capitol, they went to RCA records. As revenge at Capitol, they even considered naming the new album after Capitols president, but the idea was never used. In the end, the Smithereens decided to use their old producer, Don Dixon for the album.


Tracklisting

1. “War for my mind” 4:07

2. “Everything I have is blue” 4:27

3. “Miles from Nowhere” 4:18

4. “Afternoon Tea” 3:54

5. “Point of No Return” 4:06*

6. “Sleep the Night away” 4:17

7. “Love is Gone” 3:41*

8. “Long Way Back again” 4:06

9. “Gotti” 4:51

10. “Sick of Seattle” 3:03

11. “Can’t go home anymore” 4:11

12. “Life is so beautiful” 3:27


All song written By Pat DiNizio except *Jim Babjak

Here she be;

The Smithereens ‘A Date With The Smithereens’

Big thanks to eternally-yours.blogspot.com

Mail us: stupidand@gmail.com

Home Art Babes Cartoons Dylan Editorial Music Videos Other

July 4, 2008 Posted by | Music_Alternative, Music_Pop, The Smithereens, _MUSIC | Leave a comment

The Smithereens – Live At The Roxy (1992)

The Smithereens – Live At The Roxy (1992)


The Smithereens recorded at the Roxy Theater, Los Angeles, CA. 12-17-91. It was first released as a radio promo CD (coupled with a Pearl Jam concert). “Live At The Roxy” is the unauthorized release of the promo CD “Westwood One In Concert“.

Tracklisting

Indigo Blues
Time And Time Again
Cigarette
Evening Dress
Yesterday Girl
Blues Before And After
Blood And Roses
A Girl Like You
Top Of The Pops

Here she be;

THE SMITHEREENS – LIVE AT THE ROXY


pwd: password
Big thanks topowerpopcriminals.blogspot.com

Mail us: stupidand@gmail.com

Home Art Babes Cartoons Dylan Editorial Music Videos Other

July 4, 2008 Posted by | Music_Alternative, Music_Pop, The Smithereens, _MUSIC | Leave a comment

Meet the Smithereens

Nice piece from thecliffordmethod.blogspot.com

As the weather warms, The Smithereens will be playing a number of shows on both coasts. Visit their website–mark your calender… To help buzz the launch of their last CD, Meet the Smithreens, I penned a feature on the band last year for The Aquarian, New Jersey’s rock paper. Here’s the unedited long-form of that interview with my pal, lead singer/writer Pat DiNizio:

Meth: Tell me about playing with Paul McCartney.

DiNizio: Gary Talent of the E Street band, who was a friend of ours, gave me a call and said he was the music director for the annual Buddy Holly Celebration that McCartney puts together every year. This time it was going to be held in NY City at The Lonestar Roadhouse to herald the debut of The Buddy Holly Story on Broadway. I remember the date vividly—this was Sept. 4 of 1990 and I was getting married on Sept. 1 in Chicago. I asked Gary if there was any chance that Paul would be there and he said most likely; that whenever he does one of these annual Buddy Holly events he’s usually there. I thought, well, if he’s ever going to be there, he’ll be there for this event because he owns the Buddy Holly song catalogue and he’s obviously going to push the musical. So we changed our honeymoon plans—we delayed our honeymoon by a week and eventually we went to Japan. I just had the feeling that Paul was going to be there so I went. And for me, as one of millions of kids who saw the Beatles the first time on The Ed Sullivan Show, and who dreamed of nothing else but being in a band like The Beatles, it was a dream come true. I actually found myself later in the evening on stage with him and the rest of the musicians who played that evening—it was sort of an All-Star band that was thrown together. I played bass and Paul sand “Lucille” by Little Richard, a great, old rocker. It was one of those moments when you wished that someone had snuck in a video camera because there were no cameras allowed for the event and very few people had video cams that were portable back in 1990. About a year later, I went to pick up the mail and I opened the mail up and there was a videocassette with a little note that said, “I thought you might like this.” And it was whole event on video.

Meth: Did the rest of the Smithereens play that night, too?

DiNizio: No, just me. I played because I had written a song on Smithereens 11, an homage to Buddy Holly, a tribute to his early relationship and his widow Maria Elena. The song is called “Maria Elena”. I had sent her a copy and met her and her daughter and we all became friends. She was there, as well, and they asked me specifically to come and sing that song because it was obviously part of an album that was doing very well for us at the time.

Meth: I’m just feeling your place here, Pat.

DiNizio: It’s a good feeling, Clifford. It’s quiet.

Meth: It reminds me of my old Fraternity House. We had a big, old house in Dover, New Jersey.

DiNizio: So you used to go hang out at The Showplace.

Meth: Yeah. My band played there several times. It was a big deal for us because the Ramones had just played there that weekend.

DiNizio: We couldn’t really secure a gig there. It was too far from where we were based and we didn’t have a fan base in that area. But we’d go up there and pay them a fee to do some recording. We’d get up there on a Monday night when nobody was around. We’d hook up a reel-to-reel tape recorder and get a live board mix. It was a very live-sounding room, which I liked about it. We used it to record early demos—we’d do live backing tracks without vocals at The Showplace and we’d come home and transfer that tape in a recording studio and we’d add vocals. It really gave it a dynamic sound because we hadn’t figured out yet how to bridge the gap between the live sound of the band and what would become the studio sound of the band. They are two distinctly different things. Other bands make the mistake of trying to sound exactly like they sound live, but smart bands don’t make that mistake. There was a studio Beatles and there was a live Beatles.

Meth: What do you prefer?

DiNizio: I enjoy the immediacy of a live performance—I enjoy the immediate feedback that you get from an audience; you know whether you are on your game or not, whether people are enjoying it. It’s thrilling to play live and we still put 200% into everything that we do. But the studio is also fulfilling on another level. It’s more difficult to get to the point where you can say I enjoy listening to it because it’s a building stage. You’re starting with your basic tracks and you’re adding guitars and you’re layering and you’re putting your vocals on and you’re mixing. You don’t know really, until the eleventh hour of the project whether what you’ve done has any merit at all. In other words, it’s a longer process. The only real moment of enjoyment is when you’re listening to the final product and you know you’ve done a good job. And hopefully other folks might find enjoyment in the recordings you’ve created. But for me, going in the studio is very difficult. I don’t necessarily enjoy the process. I appreciate it. I’m happy to still have the ability to make records. But it’s not fun.

It was fun in the early days, when we hadn’t yet made records, but it was always pressure. It was thrilling. It’s still thrilling. I still get that tingling, that sense of excitement whenever we go in the studio, but there’s nothing about it I take for granted. It’s extremely challenging and stressful because I really work at it and I want everything to be the best that I can get.

Meth: How involved are you in the production?

DiNizio: I would say that on all The Smithereens albums, although we’re not credited, we certainly co-produced those records. There’s so much input of ours on everything.

Meth: You don’t get on the board?

DiNizio: I sit behind the producer but I don’t operate the board. I think my energy is best spent on thinking of good, creative melodic ideas and arrangement parts, not worrying about the technical aspects of the recordings. I leave that in the hands of the professionals. It’s a blessing when you find yourself in the studio with someone who really does get it, who really understands what the band is all about. That was a process of elimination in the early days. Our first demos were done with individuals who, while well-meaning, didn’t really understand the band, you know? They didn’t really know how to capture the sound of the band in a recording studio.

Meth: Who did you want to sound like, other than The Beatles?

DiNizio: I don’t know that we were really going for a sound. I think it just happened. In fact, the band today stills sounds very much the way we sounded when we first sat down and played together in my dad’s basement right here in Scotch Plains in March of 1980. It hasn’t changed that much except, perhaps, the songs have grown and matured. Some of the first songs I wrote, while charming, are not great compositions. It’s someone learning how to write songs. Yet some of the songs—in fact my first composition, “I Don’t Want to Lose You” wound up on Especially For You and a lot of folks like that song. “Elaine” was song number two and it wound up on “Green Thoughts.” So you never know. It just took a long time to get to that point—to actually sit down and attempt to wrestle with that beast. Understanding how songs work, the mechanics of songs, having to dig deep inside and come up with melodies that are memorable… The hurdle that I had to get over in terms of my live performances—it dawned on my on stage one evening at Kenny’s Castaways, that I was singing original material that contained lyrics that revealed a lot of my inner life and my personal life, to complete strangers.

Meth: Standing naked in front of strangers.

DiNizio: Exactly. And I felt uptight for a little bit but I eventually figured out that this is the job, this is what I do, this is the situation that I’ve put myself in. So I have to deal with it. After I came to terms with it, I started feeling comfortable because I realized that if the song lyrics were well written, then other folks would live through them as well.

Meth: Did you know you had a hit when you wrote certain songs? Songs like “Blood and Roses” for instance?

DiNizio: The only time that I had the feeling I had a hit was when I wrote “Girl Like You,” which was written for Cameron Crowe for his film “Say Anything.” And after a minor argument with the producer James L. Brooks, we decided to take the song back and save it for ourselves. And that being said, obviously I had a feeling at the time that it was a hit or we would have given it to them. We decided to save it for ourselves because it might have been released on a soundtrack album and got lost and then it would have had no meaning later on, on one of our records. But my feeling with that was based in part on the fact that the first album was a hit, the second album had a #1 rock radio single…we were on a roll and it was likely that radio would receive a song like this from us. I had that feeling. I didn’t know if it was a hit but I remember my wife at the time saying, “It’s a good song, but it’s not your best song.”

Meth: What did she think your best song was?

DiNizio: She never spoke of that.

Meth: How about your daughter?

DiNizio: She doesn’t have a favorite but she’s finally gotten a chance to come to some of the live shows, which is a big thrill for me, that she’s old enough now to attend the concerts and actually see what her dad has done for a living for the past 27 years. I remember while writing Smithereens 11 playing a demo of “Blue Period” and my wife Mary saying to me, “Did you really write this song?” Not saying how good it was but inferring that it baffled her that I was able to come up with it.

Meth: “Blue Period” might be my favorite.

DiNizio: Mary was also of the opinion that songs like “Blue Period” should have been hits. They weren’t. They were handled improperly or perhaps they were out of time. They might have hit in 1966 or 67. There were always problems on every level, with management, with distribution.

Meth: It’s been a long time since you’ve had a record contract. How did you end up with Koch?

DiNizio: It’s not really a contract. We’ve licensed this new recording—we own it and we’ve licensed it to Koch. It’s sort of the new model for 2007.

Meth: Let’s talk about this album, “Meet the Smithereens.” Without knowing anything, my guess was the seed for this disc was planted when The Smithereens did “I Want to Tell You” for Songs From The Material World (A Tribute to George Harrison).

DiNizio: No. Not at all. In fact, I was very much against recording that because the arrangement for “I Want to Tell You” was absolutely perfect as it is on Revolver and I couldn’t imagine any way that we could improve it. In fact, in terms of our history, for many years we were asked to do cover songs for movies. We did a version of “Time Won’t Let Me” for “Time Cop,” the Jean-Claude Van Damm film, and it was an okay version. Mr. King, who wrote the song for the original Outsiders, who recorded it in 1966, said that it was the best version of the song that he ever heard. So we got the vote of approval from the guy who wrote it, which meant a lot to us. But there’s not too much you can do with it. So I was very anti doing cover songs unless we could absolutely make them our own. Somehow, we did achieve that with “I Want to Tell You”—it’s a little different.

Meth: I’m not saying this because we’re friends or because I’m sitting in your kitchen drinking your bad coffee—

DiNizio: You don’t like the coffee?

Meth: —but it’s the best track on that album, by far. Most of those tracks weren’t repeatable—not Bill Wyman’s, not John Entwhistle’s.

DiNizio: The track works well because it’s kind of like The Who meets The Beatles meets The Smithereens. And it sounds like us. So I was pleased. I came and I did my vocals and split. But we have a lot of covers—some are good and some are not so good. I remember when they were making this Christian Slater movie when he was a big star in the early ‘90s called “Kuffs”—they wanted The Smithereens to record a version of The Who’s “Shaking All Over” from “Live at Leeds”—but they wanted it to sound like The Talking Heads. And it’s like, “What are you, dreaming? We’re The Smithereens, not The Talking Heads.” So we did a version of it and it’s okay. We did “Wooly Bully” for “Encino Man” and a version of Ringo’s hit “It Don’t Come Easy” and then I didn’t want to do anything that we couldn’t improve on. But that being said, when it came time to record our most recent studio album, which was also for Koch, “God Save the Smithereens” (1999) I felt strongly that based on the theme of the record, which was originally about Apocalypse 2000. There was a tremendous amount of concern and fear and loathing surrounding the millennium, as you recall, Clifford. And I had been listening to a lot of short-wave radio, picking up a lot of weird signs and signals from all over the place, and the album was really for me, initially, about the end of the world. So “Gloomy Sunday” was one of my favorite songs, which Billie Holliday originally recorded. The song was infamous for having inspired people to kill themselves. Whether what was true or not, I don’t know, but they pulled it off the market at a certain point and stopped playing it on the radio because it had this terrible effect—it was just so depressing. We did a version of it that ranks with anything, I believe, that anybody ever did in terms of covering that song. We did it Smithreens-Beatles style; we took the beat from “While My Guitar Gently Weeps” and we really did make it our own. I’m very proud of that particular recording. That’s when I realized that we could take a cover and do something totally different with it and turn it into something that sounded like we wrote it… In the case of “Meet the Smithereens,” which is our song-for-song recreation and interpretation of the first American release by The Beatles on Capital, we follow very closely the structure of the songs while maintaining our own identity as The Smithereens.

Meth: Often when I’ve seen you play, even in your solo performances, you’ve often thrown in a Beatles song.

DiNizio: When we first started playing…we all learned from the masters, from The Beatles, The Byrds, The Beau Brummels. We learned from newer groups like The Jam about live performance. The Stranglers. These were contemporaries of ours at the time, but you take different things for different sources. What we were trying to achieve with Meet the Smithereens was to capture the subtle background sounds of The Beatles and not lose our identity. Come on—let’s play a couple tracks.

© 2007, Clifford Meth

July 4, 2008 Posted by | OTHER_ARTICLE, The Smithereens, _MUSIC | 2 Comments

The Smithereens – Meet The Smithereens (2007)

The Smithereens – Meet The Smithereens (2007)
Genre: Pop | MP3 192 kbps | 38 MB | 28 min.

Welcome to the the Beatlereens!!

Meet The Smithereens is an rather odd, interesting and bold concept by The Smithereens whereby they recorded a complete album cover of the Beatles’ US debut record, Meet The Beatles!

Yap, strange days indeed. Most peculiar, momma!

The band doesn’t make any drastic re-arrangements to the songs, they pretty much cover each song in the way the originals were performed. Despite that, the band plays with such enthusiasm and energy that the pure joy of recordings shine through.

Sometimes recording even a single Beatles cover can be a perilous undertaking. So for the Smithereens to have the impudence to rerecord Meet the Beatles in its entirety (even though some purists don’t recognize it as canonical) is like taking the studio to edge of the cliff. But wait!

While reaching the Fab Four stratosphere is impossible, this New Jersey pop combo, whose last record was released in 1999, comes about as close as any band could in celebrating the 43rd anniversary of this groundbreaking record. Sure, the lead-vocal fury that Lennon and McCartney created in 1964 can’t be restored, and the three-part harmonies are less than hair-raising. But from the opening three chords of “I Want to Hold Your Hand,” the Smithereens are respectful to the album’s legacy, and let virtually no element slip past them. There’s that “1-2-3-4!” countdown to “I Saw Her Standing There,” the same virile harmonica in “Little Child,” and a doo-wop tang to the ever-underappreciated “This Boy.”

And when “Not a Second Time” fades out the last of the album’s 28 minutes, it leaves you wondering if the boys are bold enough to take a crack at Abbey Road in September 2009.

-Scott Holter

The Smithereens show “all their loving” for the “Meet The Beatles” album with this wonderful tribute to the fab four’s 1964 U. S. release. And what an excellent labor of love it is! The Smithereens affectionately invoke the original spirit of the Beatles’ landmark album while still managing to sound unmistakably like the Smithereens in the process. Pat DiNizio’s distinctive vocals make the band’s version of “This Boy” both poignantly wistful and beautiful at the same time.

His feverish harmonica playing on “Little Child” is a bluesy-rock jam that builds on the original John Lennon mouth organ blueprint. Jim Babjak prods his guitar to power pop and crunch on rockers like “Hold Me Tight” and he even takes a rare lead vocal turn on “Don’t Bother Me”. Severo “the Thrilla” Jornacion thrills on pulsating bass. Dennis Diken masterfully switches gears from propulsive drumming on “I Saw Her Standing There” to a rhumba beat on “Till There Was You”. He trades vocals with Pat on “Little Child” and follows Ringo’s example by doing the lead vocal duties on “I Wanna Be Your Man”.

The sum of the parts equals a whole lot of fun for Smithereens and Beatles fans alike as The Smithereens joyously celebrate an album that has obviously inspired them and pretty much everyone else who loves rock `n’ roll. The Smithereens have taken on a daunting task here but it all works remarkably well from infectious beginning to triumphant end.

– Amazon Customer Comment

https://i0.wp.com/blog.pennlive.com/entertainment_impact_music/2008/04/large_smithereens.jpg

Biography by Stephen Thomas Erlewine

Dressed in leather, brandishing heavy guitars, and an unabashed fetish for British Invasion pop, the Smithereens were an anomaly in the American college rock scene of the late ’80s. Lead singer/songwriter Pat DiNizio stood out not only with his strange beatnik goatee, but also because his catchy hooks were haunting, not punchy, and because his lyrics were morose. As time wore on, the group became more straightforward, turning into an excellent bar band, one that attacked pop songs with the weight of AC/DC. A few hits followed, but the Smithereens seemed hopelessly out of date in the alternative rock explosion of the early ’90s, and they quietly faded into a working cult band.

Of course, the Smithereens essentially started out as a working band. After playing in several cover bands, including a handful of prog rock and metal groups, Pat DiNizio (vocals, guitar) was inspired to form his own band after listening to Buddy Holly. Placing an advertisement in a New York paper for musicians influenced by Holly, Nick Lowe, Elvis Costello, and the Clash, DiNizio eventually came into contact with New Jersey high school students Dennis Diken (drums), Jim Babjak (guitar), and Mike Mesaros (bass), who had all played together in school. By the end of 1980, they had independently released Girls About Town, an EP featuring four songs with “girl” in the title that was a moderate local success. For the next three years, the group played around New Jersey and New York, not releasing another record until 1983’s Beauty and Sadness. While the EP earned some play on college radio and received a positive review in Rolling Stone, they still had trouble gaining an audience, so they began supporting traveling oldies groups like Otis Blackwell, with whom they recorded an album’s worth of material, and the Beau Brummels.

By 1985, the Smithereens were growing frustrated by their lack of progress, as most of the demos they sent to labels were ignored. They did send a demo to Enigma, where Scott Vanderbilt, a former college DJ who was a fan of the band several years earlier, signed the group. In 1986, the band released its debut album, the Don Dixon-produced Especially for You, to positive reviews. On the strength of college airplay, as well as MTV’s airing of “Blood and Roses” — a video financed by a film studio that included the song in the B-movie Dangerously Close — the album became a moderate hit, climbing to number 51 on the charts and leading to a major-label contract with Capitol.

The Smithereens supported the album with an extensive tour, and they recorded their second record weeks after they left the road.

Green Thoughts appeared early in 1988, and the first single, “Only a Memory,” not only became a college and modern rock hit, but it crossed over to album rock stations as well. The Smithereens made their attempt for big-time album rock success with their third album, 11. Hiring producer Ed Stasium brought a heavier guitar sound, which made “A Girl Like You” — a song rejected as the theme for the comedy Say Anything — a Top 40 hit, sending 11 to gold status. “Too Much Passion,” the first single from their fourth album, Blow Up, indicated that the new record was more adventurous and produced, and the single did become a Top 40 hit, yet the album itself failed to replicate the success of its predecessor.

Blow Up was their last album for Capitol, and they moved to RCA for 1994’s A Date with the Smithereens, their first album since Green Thoughts to be produced by Don Dixon. By that time, the alternative and mainstream rock scenes had been heavily altered by grunge, which essentially left the band without an avenue for their records to be heard. The album bombed, but the group retained a sizable cult following that helped them tour successfully into the late ’90s.

In 1995, they released a pair of compilations, the hits package Blown to Smithereens and the rarities collection Attack of the Smithereens. After a five-year recording hiatus, the group returned to the studio for 1999’s God Save the Smithereens. Another series of compilations and live recordings appeared between 2000 and 2006, with Meet the Smithereens! arriving the following year along with a holiday album, Christmas with the Smithereens.

Tracklisting

01. I Want To Hold Your Hand
0 2. I Saw Her Standing There
03. This Boy
04. It Won’t Be Long
05. All I’ve Got To Do
06. All My Loving
07. Don’t Bother Me
08. Little Child
09. Till There Was You
10. Hold Me Tight
11. I Wanna Be Your Man
12. Not A Second Time

Here be the Beatlereens!

http://rapidshare.com/files/113474920/MeetSmallFragments.zip

Big thanks to blandyob

Mail us: stupidand@gmail.com

Home Art Babes Cartoons Dylan Editorial Music Videos Other

July 4, 2008 Posted by | Music_Alternative, Music_Pop, The Beatles, The Smithereens, _MUSIC | Leave a comment

The Smithereens – Blown To Smithereens, Best Of

Blown to Smithereens: Best of the Smithereens, 1995 (Capitol Records)

The Smithereens were one of our favourite groups back in the day. We loved their catchy, clever, power-pop classics.

We caught the great video for In A Lonely Place, with Suzanne Vega, the other day and suddenly wondered why the fuck have we not played this great group in years!

There is no excuse, my friends!

So let’s start remedying this serious piece of negligence! And let’s start here with a great collection compiled in 1995.

Man, there are so many pop classics in here! This has been playing on the stereo all day today! Welcome back boys!!

https://i1.wp.com/graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2007/08/12/nyregion/beatles600.jpg

For those who don’t know, The Smithereens are a group out of Carteret, New Jersey formed back in 1980.

The core members were Pat DiNizio (lead singer/guitar), Jim Babjak (guitar), Mike Mesaros (bass guitar), and Dennis Diken (drums). In 2006, Mike parted ways with the band and Severo “The Thrilla” Jornacion currently fills his spot.

https://i2.wp.com/www.midwestbeat.com/ezine/june%202003/images/smithereens_web.jpgThe Smithereens are known for writing and playing catchy 1960s-influenced power pop. The group gained some publicity when the marvellous single “Blood and Roses“, (see below), from their debut album, was made the theme song of the 1986 movie, Dangerously Close, and the video got some moderately heavy rotation on MTV.

The group spent some time in its initial semi-celebrity phase defending itself in Rolling Stone against thinly-veiled accusations of sounding too much like The Byrds and The Beatles, pointing out that its Marshall Amplifier-heavy live sound was closer to heavy metal than it was to The Beatles!

The Smithereens have always worn their inspirations proudly, but the band also influenced other musicians, most notably Kurt Cobain during the period he was writing Nevermind. Ironically, some feel the Smithereens (like many early 1990s bands) were hurt by the rise of that horrible grunge music.


The Smithereens – Blood And Roses

It was long ago
Seems like yesterday
Saw you standing in the rain
Then I heard you say

I want to love but it comes out wrong
I want to live but I don’t belong
I close my eyes and I see
Blood and roses

Love flowers in the springtime
October we were wed
In wintertime the roses died
The blood ran cold
And then she said

I want to love but it comes out wrong
I want to live but I don’t belong
I close my eyes and I see
Blood and roses

It was long ago
Seems like yesterday
Saw you standing in the rain
Then I heard you say

I need your love but it comes out wrong
I try to live but I don’t belong
I close my eyes and I see
Blood and roses
thanks mrbriefcaseTV


Tracklisting

<!– if (browserHasRadio()){ document.write(‘

‘);} //–>

<!– if (browserHasRadio()){ document.write(‘

‘);} //–>

<!– if (browserHasRadio()){ document.write(‘

‘);} //–>

<!– if (browserHasRadio()){ document.write(‘

‘);} //–>

<!– if (browserHasRadio()){ document.write(‘

‘);} //–>

<!– if (browserHasRadio()){ document.write(‘

‘); } //–>

<!– if (browserHasRadio()){ document.write(‘

‘); } //–>

<!– if (browserHasRadio()){ document.write(‘

‘); } //–>

<!– if (browserHasRadio()){ document.write(‘

‘); } //–>

<!– if (browserHasRadio()){ document.write(‘

‘); } //–>

<!– if (browserHasRadio()){ document.write(‘

‘); } //–>

<!– if (browserHasRadio()){ document.write(‘

‘); } //–>

<!– if (browserHasRadio()){ document.write(‘

‘); } //–>

<!– if (browserHasRadio()){ document.write(‘

‘); } //–>

<!– if (browserHasRadio()){ document.write(‘

‘); } //–>

<!– if (browserHasRadio()){ document.write(‘

‘); } //–>

1. Beauty & Sadness ‘);var link = krexLink(‘/gp/recsradio/radio/B000002TUJ/ref=pd_krex_dp_001001?ie=UTF8&track=001&disc=001’); document.write(link + ‘Listen Listen Listen
2. Strangers When We Meet ‘);var link = krexLink(‘/gp/recsradio/radio/B000002TUJ/ref=pd_krex_dp_001002?ie=UTF8&track=002&disc=001’); document.write(link + ‘Listen Listen Listen
3. Blood & Roses ‘);var link = krexLink(‘/gp/recsradio/radio/B000002TUJ/ref=pd_krex_dp_001003?ie=UTF8&track=003&disc=001’); document.write(link + ‘Listen Listen Listen
4. In A Lonely Place ‘);var link = krexLink(‘/gp/recsradio/radio/B000002TUJ/ref=pd_krex_dp_001004?ie=UTF8&track=004&disc=001’); document.write(link + ‘Listen Listen Listen
5. Behind The Wall Of Sleep ‘);var link = krexLink(‘/gp/recsradio/radio/B000002TUJ/ref=pd_krex_dp_001005?ie=UTF8&track=005&disc=001’); document.write(link + ‘Listen Listen Listen
6. Only A Memory Listen
7. House We Used To Live in Listen
8. Drown In My Own Tears Listen
9. A Girl Like You Listen
10. Blue Period Listen
11. Blues Before & After Listen
12. Yesterday Girl Listen
13. Top Of The Pops Listen
14. Too Much Passion Listen
15. Miles From Nowhere Listen
16. Time Won’t Let Me Listen
Here be perfect pop;

Blown_To_Smithereens_-_Best_Of_The_Smithereens.rar

Big thanks to the original poster

Mail us: stupidand@gmail.com

Home Art Babes Cartoons Dylan Editorial Music Videos Other

July 4, 2008 Posted by | Music_Alternative, Music_Pop, The Smithereens, _MUSIC, _POETRY, _VIDEO | Leave a comment